Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 90

Thread: Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    Ha. Another Tarantino publicity stunt

    Never mind the post above.

    Cannes Adds Quentin Tarantino's 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood' to Competition Lineup
    3:01 AM PDT 5/2/2019 by Rhonda Richford


    Andrew Cooper
    'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood'

    The addition will bring Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Margot Robbie to the red carpet, while Abdellatif Kechiche and Gael Garcia Bernal also join the lineup.
    Quentin Tarantino's highly anticipated Once Upon a Time in Hollywood will have its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival, the film festival unveiled Thursday.

    The addition means that Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Margot Robbie will be adding a burst of star power to this year's festival.

    The film had been expected in the original lineup, unveiled on April 18, but artistic director Thierry Fremaux told reporters that day that the film wasn't ready.

    In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, he said he was “really, really, really focused” on Tarantino finishing the film in time to make the festival. He compared the director to Orson Welles and Martin Scorsese and said Tarantino was part of the Cannes family.

    While Fremaux had hinted there would be one or two titles named to the lineup, he added a slew of films in the announcement Thursday.

    Alongside Tarantino, Palme d'Or winner Abdellatif Kechiche will also be in competition with the second part of his Mektoub, My Love epic series. The Intermezzo installment of the young love story will unspool at four hours.

    Out of competition, Gaspar Noe's mid-length Lux Aeterna starring Charlotte Gainsbourg and Beatrice Dalle will take a midnight screening berth, apropos for his story about witches.

    Gael Garcia Bernal's Chicuarotes will join the lineup as a special screening, alongside Patricio Guzman's La Cordillera de los Suenos, Leila Conners's Ice on Fire and Dan Krauss's Ward 5B.

    Lorenzo Mattotti's La Famosa Invasione Degli Orsi in Sicilia and Larissa Sadilova's Odnazhdy v Trubchevske will join the Un Certain Regard lineup.

    Festival regular Tarantino, who won the Palme d'Or for Pulp Fiction, screened Death Proof and Inglorious Basterds in competition in Cannes and served as president of the jury last year, will join Pedro Almodovar, Terrence Malick and Ken Loach among the famed directors in this year's lineup.

    RHONDA RICHFORD
    THRnews@thr.com
    @thr

    THREADS
    Cannes
    Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    7 mins

    Once Upon A Time In Hollywood’ Gets 7-Minute Standing Ovation After Cannes Premiere
    By Nancy Tartaglione
    International Editor
    @DeadlineNancy


    Quentin Tarantino Once Upon A Time In Hollywood
    Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP/Shutterstock

    The crowd that was able to get into the Cannes Film Festival’s world premiere of Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood gave the film a seven-minute standing ovation at the end of one of the most anticipated screenings at the prestigious festival in recent years.

    “Thank you for being such a fantastic audience for the first time we’ve ever showed it to an audience,” Tarantino told the crowd after the screening in very brief remarks, thanking the studio, producers, cast and crew.

    It was an enthusiastic response to the film, Tarantino’s ninth and most recent film in Cannes since Inglourious Basterds in 2009. He won the Palme d’Or 25 years ago for Pulp Fiction.

    The plot revolves around TV star Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his longtime stunt double Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt), who make their way around an industry in 1969 Los Angeles they hardly recognize anymore. It is Tarantino’s tribute to the final moments of Hollywood’s golden age. Margot Robbie as Sharon Tate, Al Pacino, Kurt Russell, Timothy Olyphant, Dakota Fanning, Luke Perry and Margaret Qualley lead the loaded ensemble cast.

    Sony dropped the trailer for the pic just before the screening began. The film from Columbia Pictures hits theaters in the U.S. on July 26.


    Leonardo DiCaprio, left, Quentin Tarantino, Daniela Pick, David Heyman, Shannon McIntosh, Margot Robbie and Brad Pitt on Tuesday
    David Fisher/Shutterstock

    It had been foul weather in Cannes for the fest so far, but the sun came out for the Hollywood red carpet Tuesday. Just before 6 PM local time, Tarantino and the cast including DiCaprio, Pitt, Robbie and Dakota Fanning elicited hoots and applause from the crowd inside the Palais who watched as they appeared on the giant screen and, as is custom, signed autographs for the throngs of fans lining the Croisette.

    (At the same time, some ticket holders were held back between security and the red carpet, wondering if they would make it into the cinema — many didn’t get in.)

    On the red carpet, the crew posed for photographers in a scene that felt more subdued than when Inglourious Basterds was here — Tarantino danced his way up the Palais steps with Melanie Laurent on his way to the screening.

    Also mounting the steps on the 25th anniversary of Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction world premiere were Sony’s Tom Rothman and producers David Heyman and Shannon McIntosh.

    Inside ahead of the screening of the 2 hour, 39 minute film, Cannes boss Thierry Fremaux told the audience not to reveal spoilers — an unusual onstage opening here. “It’s a bit exceptional because the production and Quentin Tarantino asked me to ask you not to discuss the film,” Fremaux said. “They would greatly appreciate that you not reveal anything that would prevent audiences worldwide from experiencing what you do today.”

    He then introduced the cast and Tarantino, who had the crowd on its feet as he flashed his trademark peace sign.

    Without giving anything away, Deadline’s Pete Hammond who was in the crowd Tuesday, already was formulating his take:

    Pete Hammond
    @DeadlinePete
    Tarantino’s onceUpon A time In Hollywood Is justendind. A terrific and entertaining and highly satisfying film. Unexpected in one way but absolutely right on. Pitt and DiCaprio are great!

    10
    11:56 AM - May 21, 2019
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    See Pete Hammond's other Tweets
    Pete Hammond
    @DeadlinePete
    Once upon a time In Hollywood is a true love letter to LOS angeles of the 60’s. QT just thanked the audience and studio. “See you on the Crroisette” he said .

    5
    12:01 PM - May 21, 2019
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    See Pete Hammond's other Tweets
    THREADS
    Cannes
    Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD - Official Trailer (HD)

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    Reviews are positive so far

    You know Mike Moh is my angle if I get invited to a screener.

    Meet Tarantino's Bruce Lee: From Running a Martial Arts Studio to 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood'
    4:00 PM PDT 5/21/2019 by Mia Galuppo

    Mike Moh — whose credits include roles on Fox's 'Empire' and ABC's Marvel series 'Inhumans' — opens up about working with the director and his once-in-a-lifetime gig: "Ever since, I have had an epic hangover, creatively."
    At a table read last summer for Quentin Tarantino's top secret ninth feature — which would eventually be titled Once Upon a Time in Hollywood — Mike Moh was seated between Dakota Fanning and Luke Perry. Al Pacino made a point of greeting Moh, and Tarantino introduced him to "my friend, Burt [Reynolds]," while Brad Pitt and Margot Robbie chatted nearby.

    "Then Leo [DiCaprio] walked in and we started," recalls Moh. "I just kept thinking, 'Don't look like the outsider about ready to pee your pants. Just stay cool.' "

    At that point, Moh had not been formally offered a part in the movie. He had flown out from his home in Wisconsin for what he was told would be a chemistry read, but was then led into a room with what seemed like half of Hollywood. During a break, he made conversation with his maybe castmates.

    “I said to Dakota, ‘I haven’t even gotten the role yet,’" remembers Moh. "And she said, ‘I think it is looking pretty good.’”

    Months earlier, Moh, whose credits include roles on Fox's Empire and ABC's Marvel series Inhumans, had flown to Los Angeles to audition for the new season of Issa Rae's HBO comedy Insecure. The session was run by Victoria Thomas, who at the time also happened to be casting for Tarantino's 1960s-set film, They were search of a Bruce Lee and asked Moh to audition.

    "This is literally what I had been waiting for," says Moh, who first saw Lee's Enter the Dragon in grade school and started practicing tae kwon do at 12. He moved to L.A. after college to pursue acting, but Moh and his wife, Richelle, chose to raise their children (ages 4, 6 and 8) in the small Madison suburb of Waunakee, where — like Lee — he runs his own martial arts studio: Moh's Martial Arts.

    “As a kid growing up in suburban Minnesota I was one of the only Asian kids, so I was the class clown and a big part of that was me wanting to fit in," says Moh. "Then I saw Bruce Lee and I was like, 'Wow, this guy can kick ass, the girls want him, he is super-strong and -confident.' I hadn’t seen someone like that before.”

    After his audition with Thomas, a one-on-one with Tarantino, the table read and a two-hour stunt test, Moh was cast.


    Andrew Cooper/Sony Pictures
    Moh as Bruce Lee in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.

    Weeks before filming, he came to L.A. for fight rehearsals with stunt coordinator Zoë Bell and fight choreographer Robert Alonzo, perfecting Lee's patented style of Jeet Kune Do and sparring with his scene partner, Pitt. When not in rehearsal, Moh would listen to Lee’s interviews to master the star’s voice.

    Production blocked out an entire day for Moh's fight sequence. On the third or fourth try, they got their take, but Tarantino wasn't through. "He says, 'That is the one that is going in the movie, but we are going to do it again. Why?' " Moh recalls. "And everyone in unison says, 'Because we love making movies!' " The cellphone-free shoot often was filled with music; Moh was surprised one day to be handed a piña colada on set. "After every 100 rolls of film," he explains, "they have a party."

    When the trailer hit the internet, Moh became an instant standout, with comments on YouTube like, "I was very excited when I saw that Brad and Leo... but I lost my ****ing mind and almost dropped my phone when I saw Bruce Lee."

    Moh has action-thriller Killerman, with Liam Hemsworth, lined up, and is looking for more high-concept action projects, citing the Matrix trilogy as a personal holy grail. "I am continuing to get better as an actor and I'm very confident in my martial arts skills," he says. "And, I know that if I can make my mark, I think that I can be the best at putting them together."

    Still, Moh knows that a Tarantino film is a once-in-a-lifetime gig. "Ever since, I have had an epic hangover, creatively," he says. "I don't think I will ever have a moment like that again — where I felt, for the very first time, like I belonged on the A-list."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    Good ol' Quentin

    He knows how to stage a sensation...

    'I reject your hypothesis': Tarantino lashes out at criticism over female actors
    Director reacts angrily to questions about limited screen time for Margot Robbie in Once Upon a Time in … Hollywood, and violence against female characters
    Gwilym Mumford
    Wed 22 May 2019 07.49 EDT Last modified on Thu 23 May 2019 04.58 EDT

    Quentin Tarantino responded sharply to questions about the portrayal of women in his films and disgraced director Roman Polanski at a press conference in Cannes for his new drama Once Upon a Time in … Hollywood.

    The director, whose latest effort premiered to rave reviews at the Cannes film festival on Tuesday evening, was in no mood to discuss difficult topics, at one point snapping “I reject your hypothesis” at a journalist who asked why Margot Robbie had so few lines in the film.

    Robbie plays Sharon Tate, the actor and wife of Polanski who was murdered by followers of Charles Manson, in the film which stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt as a washed-up actor and his stuntman navigating a changing late-60s Hollywood.

    When asked by another journalist whether he had any hesitation over depicting tragic real-life figures such as Tate in his film, Tarantino responded with a single word: “No.” The director also refused to speak about the issue of violence against women in his film, suggesting that to do so would spoil it for viewers. “I can’t really address that,” he said.

    Tarantino was slightly more forthcoming in discussing Polanski, declaring himself a fan of the Polish director’s films. “I’ve met him a couple of times. I’m a fan of Roman Polanski’s work, particularly Rosemary’s Baby. I like that a lot.” However, the director said that he had not spoken to Polanski before making his film.


    Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio, Tarantino and Margot Robbie at the press conference. Photograph: JOHN PHILLIPS/POOL/EPA

    When asked why there was such fascination around the Manson murders, Tarantino said that he felt it was because they were “unfathomable”. “The more you learn, the more concrete it gets; it doesn’t make it clearer, it makes it more obscure the more you know,” he said.

    Unlike Tarantino, Robbie was more forthcoming in explaining why she had so few lines in the film. “I think the moments on screen show those wonderful sides of [Sharon Tate] could be adequately done without speaking,” she said.

    Robbie added that she agreed to agree to the role because she “felt that I could honour the memory of Sharon Tate”. “Quentin said to me she’s the heartbeat of the story. I saw her as a ray of light,” she said.

    Brad Pitt, meanwhile, described Once Upon a Time in … Hollywood as “a rage against innocence. When the tragic loss of Sharon and others happened, what scared many even so today; it was a sobering dark look at the dark side of human nature. That pivotal moment was a real loss of innocence, and that’s what the film addresses.”

    Despite Tarantino’s terseness, the director was happy to discuss his recent marriage to actor Daniella Pick. “I’ve never done that before,” he said of the marriage. “Now I know why: I was waiting for the perfect girl.”

    Once Upon a Time in … Hollywood has been received warmly by critics, and currently holds a score of 86 on review aggregation site Metacritic. “I just defy anyone with red blood in their veins not to be bounced around the auditorium at the moment-by-moment enjoyment that this movie delivers,” the Guardian’s Peter Bradshaw wrote in his five-star review of the film.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #21
    Quentin Tarantino ... What a pity that the film didn't win any awards. But still, I look forward to watching it.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    Tarantino = Cannes savior

    Variety.com
    Menu MAY 28, 2019 8:37AM PT
    How Quentin Tarantino Saved Cannes, While Abdellatif Kechiche Set It Back a Decade

    By PETER DEBRUGE
    Chief Film Critic
    @AskDebruge


    CREDIT: SONY

    Once upon a time in Cannes, a wild-eyed rebel kicked his foot through the basement window of Hollywood, stealing helter skelter from his favorite B-movies and lowbrow genres, and splicing them into the king of all cult movies. Mind you, that was a quarter-century ago, the year Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” won the Palme d’Or.

    It’s a different world now, and Cannes is a different beast. Unspooling 25 years to the night after “Pulp Fiction,” Tarantino’s latest meta-movie remix, “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood,” may have been the hottest ticket of the event, but the film hardly made the same impact. Ultimately something of a disappointment, the 159-minute fetish exercise — an epic homage to dirty feet, neon-lit classic L.A. dives and showbiz in-jokes, set half a century ago, on the eve of the Manson Family murders — got the customary standing ovation following its red-carpet premiere (that’s standard practice at Cannes), but elicited nary a clap at the press screening two hours earlier (unusual for such a hotly anticipated title, but a clear sign that this is far from Tarantino’s best). On closing night, the Alejandro G. Iñárritu-headed jury, which gave prizes to nine of the 20 films in competition, didn’t so much as mention the movie (instead, their prizes mostly went to worthier films).

    What a curious situation: Tarantino’s film (a last-minute addition to the lineup) — together with the rhinestone-embellished Elton John biopic “Rocketman” — may have saved Cannes’ reputation for another year, but premiering at the festival may not have done it any favors. Set in 1969, Tarantino’s “Hollywood” contends with how television changed the film biz. That’s ironic, considering that worldwide, more people were tuned to the finale of HBO’s “Game of Thrones” than what was happening in Cannes. Had either of those two glitzy pics skipped the Croisette, however, it would have made the festival’s decline undeniable.

    Where Cannes once stood undisputed as the most coveted place to premiere serious works of film art — and by extension, a kind of cinema mecca for filmmakers and critics — it’s been losing ground in recent years to a trio of end-of-summer showcases: Venice, Telluride and Toronto. Cannes has felt less crowded these past couple years, and in terms of sheer auteur wattage (on paper, at least, not to be confused with overall breadth and quality), not a single edition this century can rival last year’s Venice lineup, which boasted not just “Roma,” “A Star Is Born” and “First Man,” but new films from Yorgos Lanthimos, Mike Leigh, Jacques Audiard, Carlos Reygadas, László Nemes and Olivier Assayas — all directors traditionally associated with Cannes. Quality matters, of course, and Cannes is to be applauded for passing over some of these established directors in favor of newer voices, but in terms of perception, Venice’s strategy of inviting the big names (at the expense of women and emerging voices) is having the desired effect: To the American press and industry, Venice now feels more vital. And while it’s still far from rivaling Cannes in terms of either glamour or press coverage, Venice is clearly on the ascent.

    You could blame the shift of power from Cannes to the fall festivals on changes in Hollywood’s awards-season strategy, as well as the rise of a single disruptor — namely, Netflix. A desperate strategy of banning the streaming service’s offerings from competition in Cannes has sent the new-media studio looking elsewhere to launch its choice titles: independent, auteur-driven works that have every right to be shown alongside those destined for theatrical distribution. Don’t be surprised to see Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman” premiere at a fall festival, the way “Roma” did at Venice, or “The Outlaw King” kicked off Toronto last year.

    To make up for those films getting away, festival director Thierry Frémaux needs to convince Hollywood distributors that it makes sense for them to premiere their prestige films in Cannes. In his favor, there’s Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman,” which became a major contender in the Oscar race after playing Cannes. But that strategy backfired on David Robert Mitchell’s “Under the Silver Lake” for A24, all but destroyed by bad reviews from critics who come with knives sharpened (for whatever reason, the press is kinder in Venice, seldom booing the way they do in Cannes). When films skip Cannes, the standard explanation is that they “weren’t ready,” but it’s still telling that James Gray’s “Ad Astra” (previously dated for a May release), Benh Zeitlin’s “Wendy” and Miranda July’s upcoming feature appear to be eyeing fall festivals instead.

    Frémaux has no control over when films will be ready, and is ultimately limited to the titles available to him in late spring — which presumably explains why films such as Claire Denis’ “High Life” and Mike Leigh’s “Peterloo” skipped Cannes last year. But it’s telling that certain producers are no longer rushing to get their films done in time for the festival’s cutoff: In the past, the prospect of premiering in Cannes has been so important to some that they’d scramble to be considered (in 2004, a work-in-progress print of Wong Kar-Wai’s “2046” arrived still wet from the labs) or turn down invitations from Berlin and other festivals in hopes of debuting in Cannes (with “The Tree of Life,” Terrence Malick held off an entire year for the honor). Now that DCPs have taken the place of 35mm prints, filmmakers can cut it closer than ever, working right up to the last minute, which leads to a different set of problems.

    Afraid of losing an important film (or several) to Venice, Frémaux is often forced to accept movies that aren’t yet done when he screens them. This is normal practice for film festivals, by the way, although I can’t think of a more exasperating example than Abdellatif Kechiche’s “Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo,” a continuation of the “Blue Is the Warmest Color” director’s sprawling, body-ogling 2017 “Canto Uno” (which Frémaux may have regretted letting go to Venice instead) that runs an monotonous 206 minutes, centered around a three-hour nightclub sequence in which his actresses twerk the night away — interrupted for 13 minutes to accommodate a marathon oral-sex scene, in which Kechiche explicitly demonstrates how gluteophiles express their appreciation. Practically any shot from the film might be considered gratuitous, but the sum total is downright punishing. It’s enough to make “Cheeky” director Tinto Brass blush, and in no universe does it deserve the kind of platform Cannes gave it.

    Rumors suggest that Frémaux screened 25 minutes of the unfinished sequel in late April, and on the strength of what he saw — the film is so repetitive that a random core sample taken from any point should have been fairly representative — invited the Palme d’Or winner to screen in competition. It’s hard to imagine a worse decision on the part of Frémaux, who’s been obstinate about his reasons for not including more female directors. As he told Variety in 2018, “Many of these films directed by women are first or second films. They are still young filmmakers, and I wouldn’t be doing them a favor by putting their films in competition.” (Whereas men, he seems to imply, can take the scrutiny of that spotlight.)

    Granted, the press reactions at Cannes can be harsh, and though I’ve never heard boos at a red-carpet premiere, they’re not uncommon in press screenings — which is no doubt one of the reasons why Frémaux canceled the practice of showing competition films in advance to critics, as no director wants to walk the red carpet knowing that his film had been rudely received earlier that day. But putting “Mektoub” in competition is nothing short of scandalous, revealing just how deep the festival’s chauvinist double-standard goes. Publicly, Frémaux says loud and clear that Cannes won’t lower the bar to include works by women, when it’s abundantly clear that they’ll take whatever garbage a more established man tosses their way. (Personally, I loved Malick’s “A Hidden Life” — a woozy, wide-angle meditation on heaven and earth from an artist who’d lost his way — but its detractors found it to be another case where the festival accepts familiar works from male artists, but doesn’t stretch to accommodate innovative forms from avant-garde women.)


    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    Continued from previous post

    Meanwhile, it says something that of the four female-made movies in competition this year, three earned prizes: French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics” (acquired by Netflix), Jessica Hausner’s “Little Joe” and Céline Sciamma’s “Portrait of a Lady on Fire.” There’s no question that juries are now more motivated to celebrate the cinematic achievements of women. So are critics and audiences, who’ve been forced to rely on more inclusive showcases — such as Sundance, SXSW and Toronto — to find the female talents whose work festivals like Cannes and Venice refuse to accept.

    Of these films, Sciamma’s “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” distinguishes itself as the most political, dramatizing via an 18th-century encounter between two women — one a female artist, the other the noblewoman whom she’s been commissioned to paint — the way that so much of the female experience went undocumented. When art, literature and cinema are forbidden from depicting certain forbidden practices — such as an abortion, or erotic love between women — then everyone who dares to engage in such behavior feels as if she is inventing it for the first time. “Portrait” captures the thrill and challenge of that discovery, and beautifully makes the case that every artist perceives things differently, and that female artists in particular have much to add to our understanding of the world, if only because their outlook has been suppressed for so long.

    Contrast the way Sciamma portrays sex and the female form from “Mektoub,” and it’s instantly apparent that Kechiche — with his leering, hot-and-bothered gaze — is literally taking the place from someone more deserving in competition. He’s entitled to his point of view as well, but it repeats and exaggerates the worst tendencies in hyper-sexualized objectification, and carving out a space for such a stunt (for there’s no doubt that Kechiche is baiting and antagonizing his critics, without adding anything meaningful to the conversation) denies other original voices a spot in competition.

    We should be grateful for those others who, offered entrée by their reputations, are doing something new in their latest films. Ken Loach’s “Sorry We Missed You” and the Dardenne brothers’ “Young Ahmed” both feel like the work of young directors, despite the fact the filmmakers each have two Palmes already to their names. I’ve often resisted the work of Bong Joon-ho, but have no complaints about him winning this year’s festival with his latest, “Parasite,” which puts his slick, genre-melding skills in service of a venomous class portrait. And just when I thought queer Spanish auteur Pedro Almodóvar had gotten comfortable in his late career, he caught me completely by surprise with his latest — and best — film, the intimate autofiction “Pain and Glory,” in which Antonio Banderas delivers the performance of his career as a director partly inspired by Almodóvar himself.

    Which brings us back to Tarantino — the 800-pound gorilla in this year’s competition. Where nearly every one of the director’s previous works has rocked the film world, leaving audiences bristling with excitement for every minute of their deranged running times, this one feels unforgivably self-indulgent. It’s bogged down by long, dull stretches (into which the director crams excerpts, real and imagined, from duly forgotten film and TV episodes of the time) during which we experience none of Tarantino’s usual gift for tension. The auteur’s signature strategy is to manipulate anticipation and suspense on a scene-to-scene level, creating situations of imminent and unpredictable violence — a diabolically polite Nazi officer searching for hidden Jews, two gun-toting hitmen tasked with recovering a stolen briefcase — and stretching them to all-but-unbearable lengths via directorial showmanship and colorfully written dialogue, before letting these risky situations snap back on themselves like the elastic band of a slingshot.

    Here, instead of masterfully playing our nerves at such a micro level, Tarantino attempts — and stumbles — with a different high-wire act. Early on, he indicates that events are pointing to Aug. 8, 1969, the night the Manson family murdered Roman Polanski’s pregnant wife, Sharon Tate: The film’s co-dependent protagonists, faded star Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his trusty stunt double Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt), live on Cielo Drive, where the bloody home invasion took place; Hollywood history buffs may recall that a stuntman was murdered around that time at Spahn’s movie ranch; and Tate, radiantly oblivious to her fate, even appears as a character (played by Margot Robbie). Confident those elements all point to who-knows-what kind of confrontation to come, Tarantino no longer focuses on generating electricity within individual scenes, trying instead to make it span the entire picture.

    Between Tarantino’s indulgence, Malick’s resurgence and Kechiche’s concupiscence, the festival was heavy with men who felt they’d earned the right to fill hours of screen time with their most personal preoccupations. Such is the luxury of the established filmmaker. But where Cannes really ought to be using its power — and the fact that, for what could be a limited time, it has first dibs on new work — is in finding the emerging voices who don’t yet presume to have audiences’ attention, but have the freshest things to say. It’s the paradox of being first: The world expects big names, but relevance depends on bold, outside-the-box choices.

    THREADS
    Cannes
    Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

    Quote Originally Posted by EqualStage View Post
    Quentin Tarantino ... What a pity that the film didn't win any awards. But still, I look forward to watching it.
    I dunno, man. QT got more publicity out of Cannes than anyone. Who needs awards?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    About Bruce...

    How Bruce is represented in this film is the most interesting aspect of it to me.

    Jin Hyun·May 23, 2019·4 min read
    People Aren’t Happy That Brad Pitt Thinks He Can Take On Bruce Lee in Tarantino’s New Film Trailer



    Quentin Tarantino’s new film “Once Upon a Time In Hollywood” is already facing backlash after its debut at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival for its portrayal of Bruce Lee.

    In what some Twitter users have dubbed a “white male power fantasy,” Brad Pitt’s character can be seen taking on martial arts legend Bruce Lee in a short clip from the movie’s trailer.

    Bruce Lee, portrayed by actor and martial arts instructor Mike Moh, tells Pitt’s character, “My hands are registered as lethal weapons. We get into a fight, I accidentally kill you, I go to jail.”

    To which Pitt’s character arrogantly replies, “Anybody accidentally kills anybody in a fight they go to jail, it’s called manslaughter.”

    The two begin to face off as Pitt effortlessly manages to keep up with the martial arts legend — a scene many Asian American audiences found to be cringe-worthy and somewhat disrespectful to the real Bruce Lee.

    View image on Twitter
    View image on Twitter

    Olivia Truffaut-Wong
    @iWatchiAm
    So, we're supposed to believe that Brad Pitt would stand a chance against Bruce Lee in a fight now? #OnceUponATimeInHollywood

    498
    6:14 AM - Mar 20, 2019
    245 people are talking about this
    Twitter Ads info and privacy

    Laura
    @lsirikul
    · Mar 20, 2019
    Replying to @lsirikul
    It's obviously a fight scene, guys. The movie is set on a movie set. It's only annoying to see Brad Pitt's cockiness first & ultimately knowing that the white guy has to win in the fight against this fantasy version of Bruce Lee bc Hollywood back then, and still, was super white.


    Laura
    @lsirikul
    Please note, Bruce Lee walked away from roles that would tarnish his image because he knew he could kick ALL OF THEIR ASSES. #OnceUponATimeInHollywood pic.twitter.com/jutIFXZPpA

    128
    8:43 AM - Mar 20, 2019
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    Embedded video
    28 people are talking about this
    Mallory Yu
    @mallory_yu
    A white male power fantasy, thinking it’s anything other than pure nonsense that Brad could “take on” a master like Bruce Lee

    Fandango

    @Fandango
    Brad Pitt takes on Bruce Lee in...#OnceUponATimeInHollywood

    Embedded video
    155
    6:41 AM - Mar 20, 2019
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    132 people are talking about this
    Brandon David Wilson
    @Genius*******
    Replying to @wtm5012
    My point is Quentin Tarantino has a ****ed up track record with POC and I, a POC, am highly suspicious of his use of Bruce Lee. That is my point.

    8
    2:29 PM - May 21, 2019
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    See Brandon David Wilson's other Tweets

    John Wong
    @JohnIsASound
    What? Really Quentin Tarantino? You gonna do Bruce Lee like that? #OnceUponATimeInHollywood

    2
    10:22 PM - May 21, 2019 · Chicago, IL
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    See John Wong's other Tweets
    Angry Asian Man

    @angryasianman
    **** Quentin Tarantino.

    336
    5:20 PM - May 21, 2019
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    74 people are talking about this
    Although Tarantino’s new film has yet to be revealed to the public, it has also drawn criticism over its treatment of female characters and scenes featuring “rage against women.”

    With strong disapproval already coming from both female and Asian audiences long before the film’s premiere date, it appears Tarantino’s new film could be the subject of controversy once it is unveiled to the public in the coming months.

    “Once Upon a Time In Hollywood” is set to be released on July 26, 2019.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    4,887
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    How Bruce is represented in this film is the most interesting aspect of it to me.
    Yeah, I find that interesting, too, but not unexpected. Supposedly, BL is one of the many actors whose movies 'inspired' QT, but the very few Asian characters presented in QT movies have mostly been poor at best. Probably his only decent Asian portrayal was the 'Hattori Hanzo' character played by Sonny Chiba in Kill Bill 1, which is odd, considering that QT is supposedly such a stickler for quality and characterization.

    Maybe QT doesn't actually respect BL at all, but like he seems to view the entire kung fu movie genre, just sees BL as something to spoof or be topped by a 'white savior'. I hope that's not the case. I guess we'll just have to see the movie to see if the complaints are justified or not. If asked about it, I'm sure QT would say, "I reject your hypothesis" again.

    I was hoping the BL character would at least play a semi-decent, if not minor, role in the storyline, since there was a connection between BL, Roman Polanski and Sharon Tate, and the investigation of the Tate murders (BL, along with John Phillips of The Mamas and the Papas, were among the people that Polanski had a private detective investigate after the murders). Polanski had been a private student of BL, and Polanski thought it was possible that BL could have killed the 5 victims by himself.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 05-31-2019 at 12:13 PM.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    Speaking of Polanski

    Roman Polanski’s Wife Blasts Tarantino for Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood
    The upcoming movie, which revolves around Hollywood in 1969 and the grisly Tate–LaBianca murders, features an actor playing Polanski—and Polanski’s wife, actress and singer Emmanuelle Seigner, is not happy about it.
    by YOHANA DESTA
    MAY 29, 2019 9:21 AM


    Emmanuelle Seigner and Roman Polanski attend the Based On A True Story photocall during the 2017 Cannes Film Festival.
    By Mike Marsland/Getty.

    Emmanuelle Seigner, the actress and singer who has been married to filmmaker Roman Polanski since 1989, is taking Quentin Tarantino to task over Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood. The movie, Tarantino’s ode to Hollywood in 1969–the year of the Manson Family murders— features actors playing Sharon Tate (Margot Robbie) and Polanski (Rafał Zawierucha), who were married and expecting their first child together when Tate was gruesomely murdered by followers of Charles Manson. In a recent Instagram post, Seigner wrote that she thought it was in poor taste for Tarantino to feature Polanski in the film without reportedly consulting him.

    “How can you take advantage of someone’s tragic life while trampling on them?” she wrote in French, as translated by The Hollywood Reporter. “Something to think about (I’m talking about the system that tramples Roman).”

    She shared the caption beneath an old photo of Tate and Polanski together. Seigner also explained that she wasn’t criticizing the movie itself.



    2,872 likes
    emmanuelle.seigner's profile picture
    emmanuelle.seigner
    Verified
    Comment peut-on se servir de la vie tragique de quelqu’un tout en le piétinant .... a méditer ( je parle du système qui piétine Roman )
    Petit ajustement car je vois que des gens ne comprennent pas mon propos . Je ne critique pas le film . Je dis juste que cela ne les dérange pas de faire un film qui parle de Roman et de son histoire tragique et donc de faire du business avec ca , alors que de l autre coté , ils en ont fait un paria . Et tout cela sans le consulter bien sûr.
    Que le film soit bien , heureusement , j ‘ai envie de dire . Mais le concept me dérange .
    “A little explanation because I understand that people don’t understand my point-of-view. I am not criticizing the film. I am just saying that it doesn’t bother them [in Hollywood] to make a film about Roman and his tragic story, and make money with it . . . while at the same time they have made him a pariah,” she wrote. “And all without consulting him of course. Let’s judge the film as a good one, but the idea is this is bothersome.”

    Regarding her “pariah” comment: Polanski has mostly been out of Hollywood’s spotlight since 1977, when he pleaded guilty to unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor. He fled the U.S. after serving 42 days, and has stayed out of the country ever since. Before the scandal, Polanski was a widely respected director. He was married to Tate, a rising star, and was helming classics like Rosemary’s Baby and, after Tate’s death, Chinatown. His reputation shifted dramatically after the events of 1977, when he was largely excommunicated from Hollywood.

    However, he wasn’t entirely kicked out of the industry. Polanski continued making films overseas and, in 2003, was awarded a best-director Oscar for The Pianist. In the wake of the #MeToo movement, the tide more recently turned on Polanski again, with the Academy voting to boot him out of its ranks—a decision Polanski is fighting against. In the meantime, his upcoming film An Officer and a Spy was recently shopped at Cannes, where Once Upon a Time also made its splashy debut—a sign that though Polanski may be a pariah in Hollywood, he’s still being backed overseas.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    I guess we'll just have to see the movie to see if the complaints are justified or not.
    Agreed. QT gave BL a major nod with Uma's Kill Bill jumpsuit. We shall see...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    Somebody teach Tarantino how to edit...

    Like he split Kill Bill into two because he couldn't edit it down enough?

    Or like he made the extended version of The Hateful Eight?




    Tarantino's Dilemma: Tinker With 'Once Upon a Time In Hollywood' After Cannes?

    6:45 AM PDT 6/6/2019 by Tatiana Siegel


    Illustration by: The Sporting Press

    Although his latest won praise at the festival, the famously fussy filmmaker could re-cut the Leonardo DiCaprio-Brad Pitt feature amid Sony's high expectations for the $90 million project.
    Once Upon a Time in Hollywood emerged from the Cannes film festival with stellar reviews but no Palme d'Or. Now, the major question for Sony is whether Quentin Tarantino will re-edit the film before its release July 26?

    Sources say the director, who headed out on vacation after the Cannes closing ceremony May 25, hasn't indicated that he will shorten or lengthen the film, which is currently 159 minutes, or make any changes. But Tarantino worked up until the last minute on the film and has nearly two months to make a nip/tuck, so insiders would not be surprised if he tinkered. Even the film's trailer features shots that didn't appear in the Cannes cut. Sony film chief Tom Rothman says he is in the dark about Tarantino's plans. "You'd have to ask the maestro himself," Rothman deflects.

    The R-rated Once Upon a Time marks a gamble for the studio considering that its budget came in at $90 million, sources tell The Hollywood Reporter, after qualifying for the California tax credit and recouping more than $15 million.

    The director's highest-grossing film, 2012's Django Unchained (165 minutes) earned $425 million worldwide, while his last directorial effort, 2015's The Hateful Eight (167 minutes), rounded up just $155 million globally. Other films that have been famously recut after their Cannes debuts include 2004's epic Troy and 2014's drama Grace of Monaco, though not great comparisons given that the former received middling reviews out of the festival and the latter featured a standoff between director Olivier Dahan and Harvey Weinstein.

    Heading into the Cannes festival, the director’s biggest concern was keeping spoilers under wraps for the next two months. After all, there remains a great deal of intrigue about how the auteur deals with the infamous Manson murders of 1969, when the film is set (Sharon Tate, who was murdered by Manson cult members, is a central character played by Margot Robbie).

    But for his first film without Harvey Weinstein running interference (all of his previous films were made by the since-disgraced mogul), Tarantino faltered even at the film’s Cannes press conference. When asked by a female reporter why an accomplished actress like Robbie had so little to say or do in the film, he shot back, “I reject your hypothesis.”

    The PR road will inevitably get bumpier for Tarantino over the ensuing weeks. The film features graphic depictions of violence against women as well as a Robert Wagner-esque reference to Pitt's character having gotten away with murdering his wife. In another choice certain to spark outrage, Tarantino again puts his star (Brad Pitt) behind the wheel of a blue Karmann Ghia convertible while it maneuvers twisty Hollywood hills (despite the fact that Uma Thurman famously suffered neck and knee injuries as a result of a crash in a similar car in his Kill Bill).

    Then there’s the casting of Emile Hirsch —who served 15 days in jail after he plead guilty to beating and choking a female Paramount executive at a Sundance party — in the key role of real-life Manson victim Jay Sehbring. Even Roman Polanski’s wife, actress Emmanuelle Seigner, is calling out the film for making money off of her husband Roman Polanski’s tragedy (he was married to Tate at the time of the murder) without consulting him.

    But the Pulp Fiction director appears to have at least reached a détente with Thurman, if a supporting role is any indication. The actress' daughter Maya Hawke plays a Manson follower in the film. "We can't let originality die," Rothman says of the film, adding, "The truth of the matter is the Quentin Tarantinos of this world are few and far between."

    A version of this story first appears in the June 5 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.


    TATIANA SIEGEL
    tatiana.siegel@thr.com
    @tatianasiegel27
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    Irking Shannon

    Does Shannon realize she just gave OUATIH more publicity? Or maybe she's trying to coattail on the OUATIC buzz machine. Either way, this is all about how Bruce is depicted for me too.

    Bruce Lee’s Daughter Irked That Quentin Tarantino Didn’t Contact Her About Father’s Portrayal In ‘Once Upon A Time In Hollywood’
    By BRENT FURDYK. 7 Jun 2019 5:18 PM


    Sony Pictures Entertainment/YouTube

    Quentin Tarantino has been making a splash with his upcoming ninth film, “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”, which features actors portraying various Tinseltown celebrities in the late 1960s.

    While Tarantino reached out to the families of some of the stars portrayed in the film, in which Leonardo DiCaprio plays a fading movie star and Brad Pitt portrays his stunt double, that hasn’t always been the case.

    One of the most arresting parts of the film’s trailer involves sequences featuring “Enter the Dragon” star Bruce Lee, played by Mike Moh (“Marvel’s The Unhumans”), yet the daughter of the late martial arts legend says she never heard from Tarantino about her father being portrayed in the film.

    Speaking with Deadline, Shannon Lee – who controls her father’s estate – expresses her “annoyance” that Tarantino never bothered to contact her.

    “In these instances, there are a lot of different ways you can go,” Lee explained. “If they contacted me I could be completely unreasonable and a pain in the a** and make all kinds of ridiculous demands, but they don’t know that I’m not going to do that. A lot of times, the best practice is, ‘We’ll just stay away from that so we don’t have to even open that can of worms.’”

    However, Lee admitted that since Tarantino has already gone on record to reveal he contacted the sister of slain actress Sharon Tate (who is a character in the movie), she’s not clear why Tarantino didn’t give her a similar call.

    “With Tarantino’s film, to not have been included in any kind of way, when I know that he reached out to other people but did not reach out to me, there’s a level of annoyance – and there’s part of me that says this is not worth my time and my energy,” she added. “Let’s just see how the universe deals with this one.”

    ET Canada has reached out to a rep for Tarantino for comment.

    “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” comes to theatres on July 26.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    4,887
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Agreed. QT gave BL a major nod with Uma's Kill Bill jumpsuit. We shall see...
    Well, kinda. QT has a tendency to appropriate stuff. Recall that QT originally wanted to play the monk Pai Mei himself, before deciding on bringing in Gordon Liu. Which was the wise thing to do, because QT, although he's one of Hollywood's best directors, would have been totally stupid as Pai Mei. That he was even considering playing Pai Mei himself at all says a lot.

    If BL is beaten and humiliated by Pitt's character, I'd be curious what Mike Moh thought of it, though I doubt he'd be forthcoming about it.

    If QT did have Brad Pitt's character humiliate Bruce Lee, I'll lose a lot of respect for QT.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,630

    The next Bruce Lee indeed...

    ...we'll see about that.

    There are some nested vids that I couldn't copy&paste easily so follow the link if you don't know what these exercises are, you can see more demos. The more common ones had little .gif files which were easy to transfer here.

    How to Train Like Mike Moh, The Next Bruce Lee
    Moh plays Bruce Lee in Quentin Tarantino's new movie. Here, he explains how to get ripped like the martial arts legend
    BY DANIEL DAVIES
    13/06/2019

    Mike Moh was a teenager when he started practising martial arts. After a misspent youth spent imitating the Power Rangers, the Ninja Turtles and, of course, Bruce Lee, it seemed like the obvious thing to do, but little did Moh know that one day his childhood obsession would lead him to bagging the role of his hero on the big screen.

    No, Moh isn't about to don a turtle suit to play Rafael, he's the actor tasked with playing Bruce Lee in this summer's new Quentin Tarantino flick, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. Being a fifth-degree black belt in Taekwondo, he certainly has the credentials to play the part, but if all it took play Bruce Lee was being good at martial arts almost anyone could do it. “I had to get really deep into not only who Bruce was, but how he ate and how he trained,” says Moh. And he had to do all that in just three months.

    To become Bruce Lee, Moh didn't call a celebrity trainer or just hit the gym and start benching. Instead, he studied Lee's martial arts training techniques and used his own knowledge of fighting to mimic Lee's workouts.

    For starters, Lee was a big fan of boxing, so Moh starts every workout with skipping. "Jumping rope is going to get your nerves and your joints and your muscles warmed up," Moh says. "It’s also going to help with your timing and your footwork.”

    Lee was also famous for his one-finger pushups. Moh doesn't touch those, but he does do standard pushups, archer pushups, and Superman pushups to prep to play the master.

    But, at the end of the day, you can only really play Bruce Lee if you have a set of abs rippling just below the surface. So Moh has incorporated hanging leg raises and windshield wipers into his workout to achieve the correct look.

    Moh finishes his workout by honing his hard-earned martial arts techniques with punches and kicks — and focusing on control. Brad Pitt is also in the movie, and the last thing Moh wanted to do was hurt his co-star. “For filming, we had to make sure that I was not only looking powerful and fast like Bruce himself, but also that my kicks were one-hundred percent controlled," he says. "The last thing I wanted to do was break Mr. Pitt’s ribs.”

    Before he's done, Moh wraps up the workout with some old-school conditioning, in the shape of 3 sets of burpees. However, he throws in backflips after several of his burpees. We did say he was inspired by the Power Rangers too, right?


    MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES GETTY IMAGES


    Mike Moh's Bruce-Lee-Inspired Workout
    by Men's Health UK

    Skipping, 100 reps
    Grab the rope at both ends
    Use your wrists to flick it round your body, jumping to clear the rope as it hits the ground
    Make the move more intense with double unders – letting the rope pass round your twice for every jump


    Standard Pushup, 30 reps
    Set up with your weight supported on your toes and hands beneath your shoulders, body straight.
    Take care to keep your core locked so a straight line forms between your head, glutes and heels.
    Lower your body until your chest is an inch from the ground then explosively drive up by fully extending your arms.
    Isometric press-up wipers

    Archer Pushup, 20 Reps
    Get into a press-up position with your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart.
    Shift your body weight to one side, flexing the elbow on that side to lower your body until your chest almost brushes the floor.
    Push yourself back up to the start position and repeat on the other side.

    Superman Pushup, 10 reps
    Get down into a press-up position with your hands placed shoulder-width apart.
    Lower your body until your chest is an inch from the ground then explosively drive up elevatig your whole body above the floor.
    While in mid-air extand your arms and legs out to your sides before returning to the centre to land softly with flexed elbows.
    Continue the downwards momentum into your next rep.

    Hanging Leg Raise, 20 reps
    Grab a pull-up bar and lower yourself into a dead hang.
    Let your legs straighten and pull your pelvis back slightly.
    Tense your core and raise your legs until your thighs are perpendicular to your torso.
    Hold then lower slowly back to the starting position.


    Windshield Wipers, 10 reps
    Holding a barbell or kettlebell or dumbbell above you, or while gripping a pull-up bar, keep your legs together and as straight as possible
    Raise your legs until they are parallel with the floor; then, maintaining this angle, bring your torso up to parallel with the floor.
    Your legs, still forming a 90-degree angle with your torso, should now be perpendicular to the floor. This is your starting position.
    From this position, keep your core braced and lower your legs with control to one side.
    Pause for a count, then bring them over to the other side. That’s one rep.


    Shadow Boxing, 3 rounds, 3 minutes each
    Adopt a fighting stance and bounce on your toes as you shadow box.
    Dip and weave to your heart's content.
    Cycle between low- and high-intensity punching for a HIIT style cardio workout.


    Burpees, 3 sets, 1 minute each
    From a standing position squat down until your thighs are parallel to the floor and place your palms on the floor.
    From there kick your feet back as far as you can while keeping your arms extended.
    As soon as your feet land jump them back in towards your hands, then jump up into the air.
    Land and immediately squat down to go into the next rep.
    A solid core is key to avoiding sagging hips when you kick your feet back.

    THREADS
    Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
    Training for Movies
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •