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Thread: Star Wars: The Mandalorian

  1. #1
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    Star Wars: The Mandalorian

    OCTOBER 4, 2018
    THE MANDALORIAN FIRST IMAGE, DIRECTORS REVEALED
    DETAILS EMERGE FOR LUCASFILM'S LIVE-ACTION SERIES HELMED BY JON FAVREAU.
    Production on the first Star Wars live-action streaming series has begun! After the stories of Jango and Boba Fett, another warrior emerges in the Star Wars universe. The Mandalorian is set after the fall of the Empire and before the emergence of the First Order. We follow the travails of a lone gunfighter in the outer reaches of the galaxy far from the authority of the New Republic. The series will be written and executive produced by Emmy-nominated producer and actor Jon Favreau, as previously announced, with Dave Filoni (Star Wars: The Clone Wars, Star Wars Rebels) directing the first episode. Additional episodic directors include Deborah Chow (Jessica Jones), Rick Famuyiwa (Dope), Bryce Dallas Howard (Solemates), and Taika Waititi (Thor: Ragnarok). It will be executive produced by Jon Favreau, Dave Filoni, Kathleen Kennedy, and Colin Wilson. Karen Gilchrist will serve as co-executive producer. Stay tuned to StarWars.com for updates.

    I always found the Boba Fett story arc disappointing but I did get into Mandalorian culture after Star Wars Rebels.
    Gene Ching
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    Pedro Pascal

    No image - there's a vid behind the link. But there's images of Pedro all over the net now if you're that curious.

    Here's one:


    NOVEMBER 13, 2018 10:45AM PT
    ‘Star Wars’: Pedro Pascal to Lead ‘The Mandalorian’ Series
    By JUSTIN KROLL and JOE OTTERSON

    Pedro Pascal has been tapped to star in the “Star Wars” TV series “The Mandalorian,” which is expected to premiere on the Disney streaming service, Disney+.

    Pascal’s name had previously been rumored for the role, but sources say he was one of many actors being considered. Now, insiders tell Variety that he has been offered the role and negotiations are underway.

    Jon Favreau penned the series, which is set after the fall of the Empire and before the emergence of the First Order. It follows the travails of a lone gunfighter in the outer reaches of the galaxy far from the authority of the New Republic.

    Disney recently announced that Dave Filoni, who has worked on “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” and “Star Wars Rebels,” will direct the first episode of the series. “Thor: Ragnarok” director Taika Waititi, Bryce Dallas Howard, “Dope’s” Rick Famuyiwa, and Deborah Chow (“Jessica Jones”) will direct additional episodes.

    Favreau is also executive producing the show, along with Filoni, Kathleen Kennedy, and Colin Wilson. Karen Gilchrist will serve as co-executive producer.

    Disney also announced in an earnings call on Thursday that it would be doing a prequel series on the “Rogue One” character Cassian Andor, played by Diego Luna.

    Pascal is no stranger to the small screen, with star-making roles as Prince Oberyn in “Game of Thrones” and Javier Pena in “Narcos.” He has since been building a strong film resume with performances in “Kingsman: The Golden Circle,” “The Equalizer 2,” and the upcoming “If Beale Street Could Talk.” He recently finished filming the Netflix action pic “Triple Frontier” as well as “Wonder Woman 1984.”

    He is repped by WME and Untitled Entertainment.
    Gene Ching
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    I felt a presence...

    ... I had a feeling this Star Wars: The Mandalorian Live-Action series would be relevant eventually. The FORCE is strong in me. I'm hoping Gina Carano will play a Twi'lek.

    NOVEMBER 14, 2018 12:00pm PT by Borys Kit
    'Star Wars': Gina Carano Joins 'The Mandalorian'


    By Joe Scarnici/FilmMagic/Getty Images
    Gina Carano

    The series is debuting on Disney+, the streaming service that is set for next year.

    Gina Carano has joined Pedro Pascal in the live-action Star Wars series The Mandalorian.

    The series will debut on Disney’s streaming service Disney+, which is set to bow next year.

    Jon Favreau wrote the series and is executive producing along with Kathleen Kennedy, Colin Wilson and Dave Filoni. Filoni will also direct episodes, along with Taika Waititi, Bryce Dallas Howard, Rick Famuyiwa and Deborah Chow.

    Character details are buried deep in the desert wastes of Tatooine, but the company’s synopsis is thus: "After the stories of Jango and Boba Fett, another warrior emerges in the Star Wars universe. The Mandalorian is set after the fall of the Empire and before the emergence of the First Order. We follow the travails of a lone gunfighter in the outer reaches of the galaxy far from the authority of the New Republic."

    Carano is the MMA star turned actress who starred in Steven Soderbergh’s Haywire and appeared in Fast & Furious 6 and Deadpool. She is repped by Gersh, The Syndicate and Ziffren Brittenham.
    Gene Ching
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    The FORCE is with Taika

    Luv Taika Waititi's work. I've been denying of this show but it'll probably be sufficient bait to lure me into investing in Disney+.

    Taika Waititi's Star Wars: The Mandalorian Episode Set Video Reveals Story Details
    BY DAN ZINSKI – ON NOV 16, 2018 IN TV NEWS



    New video from the set of Disney's streaming Star Wars series The Mandalorian shows director Taika Waititi working on a scene from the season finale together with showrunner Jon Favreau, and the clip appears to reveal some details about the season 1 story. A previous batch of unofficially released photos gave fans a glimpse of a set from the show, and also revealed a pair of Death Troopers like the ones seen in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

    With Disney getting set to launch its new streaming service Disney+, Star Wars fans are getting a whole array of new programming. One of the central Star Wars offerings will be The Mandalorian, which takes place after the destruction of the Empire in Return of the Jedi, and revolves around an armor-clad gunfighter from the same race that spawned the bounty hunter Boba Fett. Showrunner Jon Favreau and Lucasfilm recently offered up the first official image from the series, showing the lead character in his familiar Mandalorian armor. It was also revealed that a weapon wielded by the Mandalorian was inspired by a very unlikely source: the infamous bomb TV movie The Star Wars Holiday Special (which of course was what actually introduced the character of Boba Fett, albeit in animated form).

    Fans hungry for any clues about what is set to go down on The Mandalorian have been treated to a few unofficial pieces of info in recent weeks via the website Making Star Wars. In their latest reveal, the site offers video that shows episode director Taika Waititi, showrunner Jon Favreau, and director Dave Filoni appearing to rehearse an action scene with several actors, including two men dressed in Stormtrooper gear (sans helmets), and two others dressed as characters who've reportedly been seen working in other scenes. There's also another actor or double wearing partial Mandalorian armor.





    Though the video is limited in what it's able to capture - and indeed it doesn't actually show any filming, only featuring Waititi, Favreau and company working out some fight moves - it's possible to glean story details from the footage when put together with the prior leaks. Once all the dots are connected, it appears that the season finale concerns the Mandalorian taking on remnants of the Empire, for reasons that obviously remain shrouded in secrecy. Mandalorians of course are bounty hunters, gunfighters and mercenaries, so there's no reason why one of them wouldn't be fighting the Empire. Even Boba Fett, a bad guy in the original Star Wars trilogy, wasn't above getting mouthy with Darth Vader when he feared Vader would kill Han Solo by freezing him in carbonite, thereby robbing Boba of the bounty he looked to collect by delivering Solo up to Jabba the Hutt.

    Like the other recent unofficial Mandalorian material, this new video offers tantalizing hints without really giving away anything concrete. The most recent bit of tangible news was the revelation that Gina Carano is set to take on a role in the show. Pedro Pascal was also recently reported to be negotiating to play the lead in the series. Carl Weathers too has been named in recent casting rumors. While The Mandalorian continues to shoot, Disney also is reportedly ready to launch another Star Wars streaming series, starring Diego Luna as his Rogue One character Cassian Andor. It remains to be seen what other Star Wars goodness Disney has in store for fans as they prepare to launch Disney+.
    Gene Ching
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    Nolte

    NOVEMBER 30, 2018 11:53am PT by Borys Kit
    'Star Wars': Nick Nolte Joins Pedro Pascal in 'The Mandalorian' (Exclusive)


    Michael Tran/FilmMagic
    Nick Nolte

    The 'Thin Red Line' actor joins a cast that also includes Gina Carano.
    Veteran actor Nick Nolte has joined the cast of The Mandalorian, the live-action Star Wars series that will launch on Disney’s streaming service, Disney+.

    The known cast includes Pedro Pascal and Gina Carano. The project, which is already in production, is heavy on visual effects, costumes and makeup, which will allow actors to come and go as well as, in some cases, be cast later in the production process than usual.

    Jon Favreau wrote the series and is executive producing along with Kathleen Kennedy, Colin Wilson and Dave Filoni. Filoni will also direct episodes, as will Taika Waititi, Bryce Dallas Howard, Rick Famuyiwa and Deborah Chow.

    Character details are stuffed deep in the Sarlacc pit, but the company’s synopsis is thus: "After the stories of Jango and Boba Fett, another warrior emerges in the Star Wars universe. The Mandalorian is set after the fall of the Empire and before the emergence of the First Order. We follow the travails of a lone gunfighter in the outer reaches of the galaxy far from the authority of the New Republic."

    Nolte’s many film credits include 48 Hrs., Down and Out in Beverly Hills, Mulholland Falls, The Thin Red Line, Warrior and Gangster Squad, while his TV credits include Rich Man, Poor Man; Luck and Gracepoint. He most recently starred on the short-lived Epix series Graves.

    Nolte is repped by CAA.
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    R5-d4

    Jon Favreau Teases R5-D4 Appearance in The Mandalorian
    BY ANA DUMARAOG – ON JAN 29, 2019 IN TV NEWS



    The brand new Star Wars TV series created by Jon Favreau, The Mandalorian, may feature R5-D4 from A New Hope. Set to debut on Disney's upcoming streaming platform, Disney Plus, the series will take place between Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens possibly allowing fans to learn about what happened to the said droid following its debut.

    Centered on a single-operating Mandalorian gunfighter, who will be played by Pedro Pascal, not much is known regarding the plot specifics for The Mandalorian. But with a staggering budget of $100 million for its first 10 episodes, fans' expectations on the project are very high. Favreau will also co-executive produce the show alongside Dave Filoni, Kathleen Kennedy, and Colin Wilson with Karen Gilchrist. Meanwhile, Taika Waititi, Bryce Dallas Howard, Rick Famuyiwa, and Deborah Chow have all been confirmed to direct succeeding episodes with Filoni helming the pilot. Pascal is joined by an ensemble cast including Gina Carano, Nick Nolte, Giancarlo Esposito, Emily Swallow, Carl Weathers, Omid Abtahi, and Werner Herzog - but their respective roles are yet to be named. While Disney and Lucasfilm continue to be mum about other information regarding the show, Favreau continues to tease fans with various social media posts - the latest one hints at the appearance of R5-D4

    Taking to his official Instagram account, Favreau shared an image of R5-D4 from the set of The Mandalorian. Fans will remember the droid in Episode IV after the Jawas attempted to sell it to Owen Lars, but it intentionally malfunctioned so that R2-D2 could be picked instead. Sadly, the image doesn't reveal anything more about the involvement of the droid in the show. Regardless, the photo sparked a conversation among fans with regard to what can they expect from R5-D4's appearance. Check out the image below:
    jonfavreau
    Verified

    Considering the time period of The Mandalorian, it would've been several years after his initial debut in A New Hope, and his upcoming re-emergence in the Disney Plus series is surely piquing the interest of many fans. What's unclear, though, is whether or not R5-D4 will play a pivotal role in the show, or his involvement will be nothing more than a glorified cameo. That said, given how he played into the events of Episode IV, it's safe to say that he deserves to get the recognition for his sacrifice that led to the destruction of the first Death Star.

    That said, given that Lucasfilm appears to be revisiting some original side characters, giving them the opportunity to shine on their own shows or movies, it won't be surprising if R5-D4 will play a pivotal role in the upcoming show. Perhaps the public will even learn what happened to it. In the canon book A Certain Point of View, the chapter titled "The Red One," written by Rae Carson provided a little bit of insight with regard to the droid's final sighting. But with the short story leaving his narrative with an open ending, fans are hoping that The Mandalorian will fill-in the gaps regarding his previous adventures.

    Source: Jon Favreau
    The backstory of R5-D4 was something I never even considered.
    Gene Ching
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    Waititi!

    Loved his voicework for Korg.

    Taika Waititi to Voice Bounty Hunter IG-88 in The Mandalorian!
    IG-88 STAR WARS TAIKA WAITITI THE MANDALORIAN TV NEWS
    BY MAX EVRY ON MARCH 22, 2019



    All this time, IG-88 was a Kiwi. Back in December executive producer and writer Jon Favreau revealed that the The Empire Strikes Back‘s robot bounty hunter IG-88 would have a role to play in the upcoming Disney+ live-action series The Mandalorian. Now he’s revealed via Instagram that IG-88 will be voiced by none other than Taika Waititi (What We Do in the Shadows), one of the show’s directors who previously lent that unique New Zealander accent to the character Korg in his own film Thor: Ragnarok. Check out the full photo of Waititi in the recording studio in the gallery below!

    Waititi will next be seen portraying Adolf Hitler in the WWII dramedy Jojo Rabbit, which he also wrote and directed. We’re also hoping for a return of Korg in Avengers: Endgame, but that remains to be seen. As for IG-88, it is rumored that several others from that infamous 1980 Empire lineup will be making appearances on the show. You can see them below, including Dengar, Bossk, 4-LOM and Zuckuss, alongside the original Boba Fett.



    After the stories of Jango and Boba Fett, another warrior emerges in the Star Wars universe. The Mandalorian is set after the fall of the Empire and before the emergence of the First Order. We follow the travails of a lone gunfighter in the outer reaches of the galaxy far from the authority of the New Republic.

    Pedro Pascal (Kingsman: The Golden Circle) will star as a lone Mandalorian gunfighter in the outer reaches of the galaxy and will be joined by the previously announced Gina Carano (Deadpool), Giancarlo Esposito (Breaking Bad), Emily Swallow (Supernatural), Carl Weathers (Predator), Omid Abtahi (American Gods), Werner Herzog (Grizzly Man) and Nick Nolte (Affliction).

    Jon Favreau penned the series, and the directors for the show that have been officially announced include Dave Filoni (Star Wars: The Clone Wars, Star Wars Rebels) who will be directing the first episode. Additional episodes will be directed by Deborah Chow (Jessica Jones), Rick Famuyiwa (Dope), Bryce Dallas Howard (Solemates) and Taika Waititi (Thor: Ragnarok). The Mandalorian will be executive produced by Jon Favreau, Dave Filoni, Kathleen Kennedy and Colin Wilson. Karen Gilchrist will serve as co-executive producer. The live-action series will debut exclusively on Disney+.
    Gene Ching
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    She didn't know


    Gina Carano didn’t know she was auditioning for Star Wars series


    Actress Gina Carano had no idea she was entering talks to feature in Star Wars spin-off The Mandalorian until the meeting began.
    Filmmaker Jon Favreau was tapped to write and executive produce the live-action TV series last year (18), and he soon hired former Game of Thrones star Pedro Pascal to lead the cast as the titular bounty hunter character.
    Gina was subsequently added to the line-up, alongside Nick Nolte, but the project was so secretive, she wasn’t even told what the meeting with Favreau was about prior to the chat.
    She told U.S. breakfast show Good Morning America, “I just showed up to a meeting, and all of a sudden – I didn’t even know it was for Star Wars, first of all – and then I got there and was like, ‘That’s a big deal!'”
    The Mandalorian is set between the fall of the Empire from the original Star Wars movie trilogy and the rise of the First Order from the current trilogy that includes Star Wars: The Force Awakens and Star Wars: The Last Jedi.
    The eight-episode series will also feature episodes directed by Deborah Chow, Rick Famuyiwa, Bryce Dallas Howard, and Taika Waititi, and will premiere on Disney’s new Disney+ streaming service on 12 November (19).
    This article needs a pic
    Gene Ching
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    Jon Favreau

    Favreau is on fire.

    JULY 12, 2019 1:48PM PT
    ‘The Mandalorian’: Jon Favreau Says He’s Already Working on Season 2 of ‘Star Wars’ Series
    By BREANNA BELL



    The first season of Disney Plus’ live-action “Star Wars” series “The Mandalorian” hasn’t even debuted yet, but executive producer Jon Favreau is already working on Season 2.

    “The Lion King” director revealed as much in an appearance on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” Thursday night, telling the host, “We’re done with the first season. I’m actually writing part of the second season now. So I’m having a blast.”

    “It’s honestly like turning over your toy chest and playing with all the ‘Star Wars’ toys together. We’re having a great time,” Favreau added.

    “The Mandalorian” begins its story after “Return of the Jedi” and the fall of the Empire and follows the story of a lone Mandalorian warrior (Pedro Pascal) as he travels the galaxy far away from the New Republic and its laws. His character is modeled after bounty hunters from previous trilogies, Jango and Boba Fett. Other cast members include Giancarlo Esposito, Nick Nolte, Gina Carano as Cara Dune, Emily Swallow, Werner Herzog, Omid Abtahi and Carl Weathers as Greef Carga.


    “The Mandalorian” boasts a high-profile slate of directors on various episodes, including Dave Filoni (“Star Wars: The Clone Wars,” “Star Wars Rebels”), who helmed the first episode; Rick Famuyiwa (“Dope”); Bryce Dallas Howard; Deborah Chow (“Jessica Jones”); and Taika Waititi (“Thor: Ragnarok”).

    Watch the full interview above.
    Gene Ching
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    Embedded vid on ET

    MOVIES
    Gina Carano Is Ready to Launch Her Career Into Hyperspace (Exclusive)
    By Meredith B. Kile* 8:01 AM PDT, June 19, 2019

    Gina Carano is ready for her career to make the jump to lightspeed and with an upcoming role in a galaxy far, far away, she just might get the chance.

    It's been nearly a decade since the MMA fighter stepped away from the ring -- following her one and only career defeat -- and decided to pursue her acting career full-time. One of her first major offers, she recalled recently while sitting down with ET's Ash Crossan, came from a serious Hollywood name, director Steven Soderbergh, who cast her as the lead in his 2011 action-thriller Haywire.

    "[Soderbergh] said, 'We would like to do a movie, a real-life action movie with [a real-life] fighter, and um, it's gonna happen really quick or it's not gonna happen at all.' And it happened," Carano said of the film, in which she played black ops operative Mallory Kane and performed her own stunts. "I haven't looked back since. I've just been, you know, paying my dues here in this business... To look back and say that I've been doing this now for 10 years... it just now feels like it's starting to click."

    Accustomed to proving herself in the ring, Carano was ready for the skepticism that came with her decision to step in front of the camera as an actress, thanks to years of critiques as a female fighter in the male-dominated MMA world.

    "So many people look at athletes in movies and they, you know, they're always like, 'Oh, it's so cringeworthy,'" she noted. "And I'm just like, give 'em a second. You know, you knew them as this athlete and so you kind of have to let them turn into an artist."

    "I learned that earlier on with fighting, 'cause I had my first professional fight and I felt like, 'Oh my gosh, I did such a good job,'" she continued. "And I went home and I looked at the internet and looked at the forums, and all they could talk about was boobs and butt and, like, pretty face and 'She's not real' and all this stuff. And I was like, ugh, did anyone see the fight? Like there's-- I was punching. And I did well... I feel like what I have to prove is just something to myself. And I believe that its gonna come through. It just takes a little bit longer for some people."

    For Carano, the process so far has been a decade's worth of hard work -- including roles in Deadpool and the Fast & Furious franchise -- which has brought her to some major career milestones this year, with a leading part in the action-thriller Daughter of the Wolf, as well as a main role in the upcoming Star Wars series,The Mandalorian.

    "There's definitely a lot of pressure, I think, when you're the lead of a film," Carano said of Daughter of the Wolf, in which she plays Clair Hamilton, a military veteran on the hunt for the men who have kidnapped her son. "I think you have to set the bar high."

    "You have to stay super positive, and your work ethic has to be high," she noted. "Everybody kind of feeds off that, so I think, you know, first and foremost, you wanna make sure everybody feels like they're a family unit, and we're gonna get to the end of this film, through all the ice and all the snow and all the blood and all the accidents and all the things that happen."

    However, it was a moment on the Mandalorian set, with executive producer Jon Favreau -- whom Carano raves is a "wonderful man" who provided an experience like no other on the secretive Star Wars project -- that was a true eye-opener for the 37-year-old star.

    "He looked at me before my big scene, one of my biggest introductory scenes in Mandalorian, and he was like, 'We're gonna change your trajectory right now,'" she recalled. "I think he's a very honest man, and he's seen the struggle, and he's seen what happens to careers and he's like, 'We're gonna change your path right now'... He's like, 'From here on out, you're gonna choose jobs that are complementing [you]. And you're gonna choose jobs that challenge you. And you're gonna believe in yourself. From this scene forward.'"

    "I was welling up with tears," Carano continued, remembering the emotional moment. "And I went out and I crushed that scene. And it was like, a scene when I first read the script I was like, 'Oh gosh, this is more than I've ever been given -- how am I going to do this?' And then, with him, I really trained for it, and I really was present... He believed in me and it helped me believe in myself."

    "I couldn't thank him enough, because I feel like my whole life since I shot that has been a different world," she added.

    ginajcarano's profile picture
    ginajcarano
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    I can’t describe the energy I felt at the #starwarscelebration2019 event!! It was incredible and I’m so grateful for all of you and the crazy awesome support you showed us. I’m so stoked... that was epic. Thank you! ♥️ this is the first shot of my character #CaraDune Cara Dune. �� #TheMandalorian #STARWARS #ginacarano
    Though most of the details of her Mandalorian character, Cara Dune, a former Rebel Shock Trooper, are a close-kept secret, for now, Carano is already feeling the love from the Star Wars fandom, beginning with an appearance at Star Wars Celebration earlier this year.

    "Literally, as soon as we walked out on stage, it was a rush of, like, this positive energy, which I was not expecting," she recalled. "And I feel like, you know, Twitter is one of the worst places to go, but I refuse to let people chase me away. And I refuse to be one of those negative voices... because a lot of us have been reserved and now we're like, no, come on, like, we're human beings, you know? We're just trying to do the best we can! So that was just positive energy, I love it."

    As for what's next in her career, Carano is open to anything -- "Get me in a rom-com!" -- but has her hopes set on trying even more new things, like a twisted team-up film or a gritty biopic.

    "All my favorite movies are like that, you know? Natural Born Killers, just, like, crazy psychotic love stories where, like, two people just can't have enough of each other and it's them against the world. That would be amazing," she said. "[Or] a genuine, like, real-life story of struggle. I think that I do really well in that space because I am honest. And so I think that I could really portray somebody's real-life story very honestly."

    "It's gonna be really interesting, what happens next -- I'm not sure what it's gonna be," she added thoughtfully. "Like Jon Favreau told me, you know, we're going in a different direction now -- and I believe it. Who knows what's gonna happen?"

    Daughter of the Wolf is in select theaters and on VOD now. The Mandalorian premieres Nov. 12 on Disney+.
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    About Mandalorians...

    What Is a Mandalorian? The Meaning of a Curious, Important Star Wars Word
    The newest installment of the Star Wars saga ,‘The Mandalorian,’ might not star a real Mandalorian. Confused? Here’s what’s going on.



    By Ryan Britt on August 5, 2019
    Filed Under The Mandalorian

    Imagine Boba Fett with horns. I wonder if you can? And that’s because if Boba Fett had Viking horns coming out of his helmet no one would think he was cool. Luckily he doesn’t and is very cool. But why? And is this new helmeted character in the new Star Wars streaming Disney+ TV show The Mandalorian just a Boba Fett copy-cat? What the hell is “a Mandalorian” anyway? Here’s a very brief history to get you prepared for the first live-action Star Wars TV show, coming this fall to a new streaming service you’re about to start paying for.


    'The Mandalorian'

    Where Did the Word “Mandalorian” Even Come From?

    When Boba Fett was first introduced in The Star Wars Holiday Special in 1978, everybody fell in love with the word Mandalorian, because it was all Boba Fett could say. “Mandalorian this. Mandalorian that.” JUST KIDDING. Including the animated segment of the Star Wars Holiday special which marks Boba Fett’s very first appearance, nobody says the word “Mandalorian” in any Star Wars movie, ever. So where does the word come from?

    Well, during the development of The Empire Strikes Back, conceptual artist Ralph McQuarrie and production designer Joe Johnston created an idea for super commandos from the planet Mandalore. Eventually, this morphed into just Boba Fett, and he was turned into a bounty hunter. Though there’s considerable evidence that Lucasfilm was considering expanding Boba Fett’s role significantly in Return of the Jedi, it never really happened and Boba Fett died like a chump in the Sarlacc Pit.

    Why, then, did we all know the word “Mandalorian” or that Boba Fett wore “Mandalorian armor” back in the early eighties? The short answer is tie-in media. Nobody says the word “Ewok” in Return of the Jedi (really!) but you all know what an Ewok is, right? Even before the dawn of the internet and people writing handy explainer articles like this one, information about Star Wars canon seeped into the fandom even if characters never said certain words onscreen. Another fun example of this is the phrase “Dark Lord of the Sith,” an honorarium that accompanied photos of Darth Vader in old Star Wars books, but was never, ever mentioned onscreen in the classic trilogy, not once. Nobody says “Sith” in the original films. It’s a dirty word!

    So, in a sense, the word “Mandalorian” is kind of like the word “Sith” but slightly more pervasive and confusing. Eighties and Nineties Star Wars Legends canon played fast-and-loose with Boba Fett’s origins and his ties to the Mandalorian culture. Still, in nearly all versions, including real-deal canon, the Mandalorians are warrior culture who fought with the Jedi in the days of the Old Republic.


    Boba Fett in Star Wars

    Okay, but What Is a Mandalorian?

    If you were a Star Wars fan in the nineties, this meant that you had a vague belief that maybe the Clone Wars and the wars with the Mandalorians were the same thing. Which, if you squint, is kind of what happened when Attack of the Clones came out and retconned Boba Fett.

    In the 1996 short story “The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett”, author Daniel Keys Moran created the first reference to the planet called Concord Dawn, which was where a bunch of Mandalorians lived and where Boba Fett was supposedly born. The notion that Concord Dawn was a Mandalorian planet (read: overrun with people dressed like Boba Fett) is actually still canon to this day, but obviously, because Boba Fett was retroactively revealed to be a clone of Jango Fett in Attack of the Clones, that means Boba Fett isn’t really a Mandalorian. Also, in current canon, Concord Dawn is a planet that renegade Mandalorians live on, but “real” Mandalorians live on Mandalore.

    Weirder still, Jango Fett isn’t a Mandalorian either, even though he claims he was born on Concord Dawn, a planet run by the Mandalorian Protectors. In Star Wars: Rebels (which is canon) Concord Dawn’s Mandalorians are conservative extremists who work for the Empire, which horrifies the heroic Sabine Wren because she is 100 percent, a real-deal Mandalorian.

    That’s right, the most famous person to wear Mandalorian armor, who actually is from the planet Mandalore is one of the good guys from Rebels. In fact, both The Clone Wars and Rebels did more to establish the history of the Mandalorians than any other aspect of Star Wars canon. In The Clone Wars, it was established that though the Mandalorians were a war-like culture, a huge pacifist movement created a peaceful period on the planet. It was during this time that Obi-Wan Kenobi fell in love with Duchess Satine Kryze, the leader of the Mandalorians, who was tragically killed by Darth Maul, while Maul was briefly the ruler of Mandalore. (Yeah, um, Darth Maul was obviously not from Mandalore, but he was in charge of them for a short period.)


    Sabine Wren in 'Rebels'; one of the only legit Mandalorians who is in a bunch of Star Wars stuff.

    Anyway, in both The Clone Wars and Rebels, wearing Mandalorian armor takes on a somewhat heroic visage, which is decidedly different from the kind of Dirty Harry gunslinger feeling of Jango and Boba Fett. This is something to keep in mind when we think about the description for the upcoming show The Mandalorian, which, according to Lucasfilm is:

    After the stories of Jango and Boba Fett, another warrior emerges in the Star Wars universe. The Mandalorian is set after the fall of the Empire and before the emergence of the First Order. We follow the travails of a lone gunfighter in the outer reaches of the galaxy far from the authority of the New Republic.

    Who Is *The Mandalorian?

    So, right now its unclear if titular Mandalorian of The Mandalorian is a “real” Mandalorian or only wears the Mandalorian armor. It’s also doubly unclear what this person is trying to say by wearing that armor. The show’s synopsis seems to imply that putting on this armor is meant to send the message that: “Hey, I’m a murdering badass gun for hire.” But, if you consider that the Mandolorians were also an honorable culture of warriors — and their fashion sense just kind of got co-opted by Boba Fett and his dad — then wearing the armor could send a different message. And that message could be: “This is the armor of a really strong culture, and one person who used to rule the planet Mandalore was Obi-Wan’s girlfriend and a founding member of the Rebellion, Sabine Wren, was also a Mandalorian, so don’t mess with me!”

    So what does it mean to be a Mandalorian? It sort of depends on who is wearing the armor.

    More confused then ever? Well, welcome to Star Wars lore, but hopefully, The Mandalorian will provide even more information on one of the most perplexing corners of the Star Wars galaxy.

    Star Wars: The Mandalorian debuts on Disney+ on November 12, 2019.
    As a longtime Star Wars fan, I confess I never realized the Ewok or Holiday Special things. Mandalorians really came into my consciousness with Sabine, who was really the central character for Rebels.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  12. #12
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    oh, to be Jon Favreau...

    Jon Favreau Unveils 'Star Wars' Series 'The Mandalorian,' Marvel Plans and a New Venture
    7:00 AM PDT 8/21/2019 by Matthew Belloni


    Yuri Hasegawa

    "When you no longer have the pressure of proving yourself to yourself or to other people, you can just follow your bliss and be led by your curiosity," says Jon Favreau, photographed Aug. 14 at his studio in Playa Vista.

    With 'The Lion King,' 'Spider-Man: Far From Home,' Netflix's 'Chef Show' and now the Disney+ series about to drop a trailer at D23, the 'Swingers' star turned billion-dollar filmmaker chats about his next endeavor, and how he plans to bridge storytelling and technology (and Hollywood with Silicon Valley).
    The future of filmmaking is unfolding in a drab office park near a Whole Foods in Playa Vista. It's where Jon Favreau assembled this summer's $1.5 billion-grossing The Lion King using a gaming engine and a warehouse of cutting-edge artists and technicians, and it's where the actor-writer-director-producer is sketching out season two of The Mandalorian, a Star Wars TV series set to debut Nov. 12 on the new Disney+ streaming service (and to be teased with a trailer at the D23 conference Aug. 23). Favreau, 52, invited Hollywood Reporter editorial director Matthew Belloni to a conference room lined with pictures of Tatooine's finest to talk about his crazy summer (in addition to Lion King, he co-starred in the $1 billion-grossing Spider-Man: Far From Home and dropped The Chef Show on Netflix) and to unveil his new endeavor, Golem Creations, named for the man-made creature from folklore that represents an artistic creation brought to life by magic. It's a logical next step for a multihyphenate who, since writing and starring in Swingers in 1996, has carved out a unique (and lucrative) niche combining his passions for storytelling and technology, launching the Marvel Cinematic Universe with the tech-heavy Iron Man and developing immersive video walls to use with live actors on Mandalorian.

    A married father of three teens (wife Joya is a physician), Favreau lives on L.A.'s Westside and says he's still interested in acting, but he's plenty busy making an Apple docuseries featuring photo-realistic dinosaurs, the VR experience Gnomes + Goblins as well as a stop-motion animation special for Netflix called Alien Xmas. The conversation below has been edited for length and clarity.

    Let's start with is the focus of the new venture. What's Golem Creations?

    Favreau: My fascination is with where technology and storytelling overlap. Méliès, the Lumière brothers, Walt Disney, Jim Cameron. It comes from the tradition of stage magic. When you have a tech breakthrough like Star Wars, like Avatar, like Jurassic Park, people's minds go into a fugue state where they just accept this illusion as reality. What's also enjoyable about it for me is that you're not being tricked by it, you're complicit in that you are agreeing to suspend your disbelief if the spectacle is sufficiently enjoyable. That's why Star Wars is so enduring and why we're surrounded [here] by artwork for Star Wars, why that's a world I want to play in because it's tech and myth coming together in a perfect way.

    So what are your next steps?

    A lot of it is focusing on the opportunities that new production technologies have to offer, and then also what technology offers in the form of platforms, distribution. It could be anything from The Mandalorian, where we're using game engine technology, virtual camera work and virtual production that we developed on Lion King, applying those learnings to designing a project where you could use virtual sets and virtual set extensions using real-time rendering, which is something that people talk about but we're the first people to actually apply it to a production. Getting that thing on its feet, from an idea through the screaming toddler phase into a place where you can actually have a responsible production that delivers quality is a very interesting part of the learning curve, so that's something that I'm fascinated with.

    There will be people who hear "digital production" on The Mandalorian and think "Great, we saw digital production on the Star Wars prequels and it didn't look very good." How is this different?

    Well, I would argue that the prequels are — and [George] Lucas in general is — the bedrock that all of this is built on. He is the first person that had digital photography, he was the first person to do completely CG characters. The whole notion of not having even a print [version of the film], of having everything be 0's and 1's, was all George. Not to mention EditDroid, which turned into Avid, Pixar was spawned out of their laboratories at LucasFilm, so he is arguably the center of the Big Bang for everything that I'm doing. It's building on the shoulders of what he was able to innovate.


    Yuri Hasegawa
    Character models from the Favreau-produced The Mandalorian, the Star Wars series that premieres on Disney+ in November.

    So the answer is this is 20 years later than the prequels?

    This is 20 years later, and also there's been a democratization of the skill set too. It's no longer a few vendors innovating in ivory towers, that information has been expanded and disseminated and democratized so that effects that would cost you millions of dollars, you can do it on a PC now, with consumer-facing filmmaking tools. When George came to our set and visited The Mandalorian, he said, "Oh, we did this," and what he meant was, “We had green screen and we were building small sets and expanding upon it.” Now, we have video walls, NVIDIA video cards that allow a refresh rate that allows you to do in-camera effects, we're in there taking advantage of the cutting-edge stuff.

    You showed me some of the video wall work, and my first thought was, "Why the hell does J.J. Abrams go to Jordan?"

    Every film is a puzzle, and there's a freedom that you have as a storyteller if you go to the real environment; it affects you and the human element. When you see Lawrence of Arabia, how much of that is informed by really being there and not shooting it in Calabasas — I think you get a different movie. The way I work and the stories I'm telling are geared specifically toward what this technology has to offer, so I could not make Episode IX using these tools. If you notice, there's a certain look that the Mandalorean lead character has, there's a size that the spaceship is, there's a scale that lines up with the original trilogy. I'm trying to evoke the aesthetics of not just the original trilogy but the first film. Not just the first film but the first act of the first film. What was it like on Tatooine? What was going on in that cantina? That has fascinated me since I was a child, and I love the idea of the darker, freakier side of Star Wars, the Mad Max aspect of Star Wars.

    People might assume that Disney asked you to figure out what Star Wars looks like on TV, but the opposite is true: You came to them, right?

    I wrote four of the episodes before I even had a deal, because I wanted to do this but only if they wanted to do the version that I wanted to do.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  13. #13
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    Continued from previous post


    Yuri Hasegawa
    This fan art mashes up the helmet worn by two iconic characters shepherded by Favreau: Iron Man and Boba Fett.

    And by that you mean using the technology that you've been developing and doing it on the scale that you're comfortable with?

    I had been thinking about Star Wars since Disney acquired Star Wars. When I was working on Lion King, it was a full-time job for a few of the years, but there was a lot of time when I just had to be available for three very focused hours a day. The TV model allowed me to be an executive producer [on Mandalorian], which allowed me to, on my own time, write everything. It's a lot like being a chef. You write the menu, you staff up with people who are great at what they do, you oversee and help guide the people who are actually cooking the food, working the line, and then at the end, you plate.

    So that's why you didn't direct the episodes?

    That's why it worked well for Disney. Plus, Disney+ is emerging and there's an opportunity to tell a story that's bigger than television, but you don't have the same expectations that a big holiday release has, which to me isn't that type of Star Wars that comes out of me. The type of Star Wars that I'm inspired to tell is a smaller thing with new characters.

    But Bob Iger says Disney+ is the future of the company. So there is some pressure on this anchor show.

    That's why he's good at what he does. But this feels to me like when we made Iron Man. It didn't feel like the future of Marvel was resting on it, [even though] the future of Marvel was resting on it because if we failed they would have lost their characters that were collateral.

    How do you think the current entertainment ecosystem is positioned in a competitive landscape that includes Facebook, Fortnite and all the others battling for attention?

    We have to be very keyed into what people really want. My company is called Golem Creations because the Golem could be used to protect the village or you could lose control and it rampages. Technology is that way. You have to make sure that you know why and how you are engaging technology. Are you using it just to grow or are you using it to engage people in a way that is pleasing to them? Are you giving them agency over how it’s being used? Are you being transparent about how they're engaging with the technology? I think these are the questions of our age.

    The digital footage that you just showed me is so realistic, if I were an actor that would scare the crap out of me. You’re an actor …

    I am. Either you have an animator making choices or you have an actor making choices, but it is a human being; it is not a computer. Lion King is the most handmade film I've ever done. There are thousands of hours of human attention being dedicated to every shot of that film.


    Yuri Hasegawa
    A portrait of Favreau as The Mandalorian by Doug Chiang, executive creative director at Lucasfilm.

    But the stars, Beyoncé and Donald Glover, met each other at the premiere.

    Right. But Billy Eichner and Seth Rogen were in my editing room and on that stage for dozens of hours working on every scene with me. It allows people to engage. It allows Donald Glover to work with Beyoncé in a way where Donald Glover is in London working on Solo and Beyoncé is having twins. They would have not been able to participate in this film had it not been for this technology. However, if you wanted to take this and push people out of the equation, technology can always be used to do that. So when does technology end up enriching the human experience and when does it end up isolating us or replacing us? That's why I want to be in the middle of this conversation.

    Do you think a movie like your 2014 hit Chef would debut in theaters today?

    No, I wouldn't have done it that way.

    But the independent film world launched your career.

    It did change things for me. Getting a check for a few hundred thousand dollars on the backend of the sale of Swingers changed my life in a way that money no longer represented something. Once you relieve people of that debt and preoccupation, it allows you to engage creatively on such a more meaningful level.

    Do you think companies like Disney are getting too big and too powerful?

    Compared to who, Amazon?


    Yuri Hasegawa
    Favreau hands out these "challenge coins" to the cast and crew on all of his projects: "I’ve been making them since Iron Man 2."

    Compared to where it was 10, 15 years ago. There's leverage and a balance of power that impacts creative people.

    I know that I have the ability to work with Disney and I have a great time in that partnership. But also there are new people who are financing things. I couldn't make a documentary with Apple 10 years ago. I couldn't do a cooking show as director and on-camera talent for Netflix. Even talking to [an outlet] like Quibi about doing short-form stop motion, working with Netflix on a stop-motion Christmas special. I've been trying to work with these guys the Chiodo brothers, who did the stop-motion on Elf, it took over 15 years, only because the business model changed. Yes, it's the consolidation — certainly of IP — with Disney, but Disney is finding themselves in a position where they have to be competitive with companies that are playing by a different set of rules in the financial space because they're tech companies and growth companies.

    What in your observation is the view of Hollywood from the Silicon Valley community?

    I think they look at Hollywood as having a tremendous amount of potential because we have developed slowly. It's like a slow-growth forest. There's a relationship that the audience has with it and there's wonderful branding because we associate these great memories and great movies with filmmakers, studios and stories. But I think the technology companies are always looking for ways to build a better mousetrap. It's almost like the intercontinental railroad coming from each coast and meeting in the middle. You have people like Bob Iger and [Disney direct-to-consumer and international chair] Kevin Mayer, who are studying the tech space and trying to pivot a very large company into a direction where it's competitive, relevant and flourishing in this new environment. At the same time, you have companies like Amazon and Apple moving toward what Hollywood's doing. Ted Sarandos and Netflix are interesting because I knew him for a very long time — I think I was involved with the first original production. I think we did an episode of [2000s chat show] Dinner for Five on DVD. It was the first thing they financed. He always had one foot in each community. I think both are wary of each other. As we all come together, that's why there's a lot of uncertainty, because we're establishing a new culture that incorporates aspects of both.

    Do you think Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook are in premium content for the long haul or is this a fad?

    Telling people stories that they love is the best way and the most organic way to engage with an audience and have an attention transaction. If Amazon does a wonderful job building Lord of the Rings, and they make a commitment and build a story in a way that delights their audience, there will be a very genuine transaction where people will willfully rush home, sit, watch it when it first posts, and then chat about it online.

    And buy more products on Amazon.

    That's the way that Amazon monetizes. By the way, it's a very sincere, upfront way to monetize.

    But premium content is really hard. Do you think these companies know that?

    They're learning that. Because there's no guarantee. If there were a formula, the studios would get it right every time.

    Explain how the Apple dinosaur documentary Prehistoric Planet will work.

    We've been collaborating with BBC and the people that brought us Planet Earth, working to show documentaries that you would be able to film if you were able to travel in time, but present it as though you were seeing it alongside anything that would be filmed today. Technology is really at the point where you can fool people into believing that they're looking at something that was photographed even though it's generated by computers.

    Will Disney submit Lion King in live action or animation for awards consideration?

    Technically, it qualifies for both, but I don't think the technical aspect is what's interesting here. What's interesting is how people are interpreting what they're looking at. We've hit a level of photorealism. You're a journalist, you're more qualified to say what it is or what it should be.

    The animals sing and dance. I think it’s clearly an animated film.

    My perspective as a filmmaker is that I love that this conversation's even happening because it means people care.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  14. #14
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    Continued from previous post


    Yuri Hasegawa
    This director’s chair was a gift from "Stark Industries" by way of Iron Man himself, Robert Downey Jr.

    Is there a character or project that could lure you back to direct for Marvel?

    I'm talking to them because I'm very close friends with all of them. It’s been a really interesting experience being involved with Lion King and being involved with Endgame. Because with Lion King we were taking this technology that is only available now and applying it to one of the great myths. At the same time, we see Tony Stark, who starts off as a very flawed character — using technology, by the way, from the first Iron Man to the 23rd film with Thanos. Developing a character over 23 films, supported by Robert Downey's performance, Gwyneth Paltrow's relationship to him and performance, from the first moment you see them onscreen to the last moment you see them together, you develop such an emotional connection to that character. Going from selfishness to selflessness — the perfect model myth — and that paying off over how many hours of film? I feel like I've seen that video game solved perfectly. So to jump back into the big screen right now, by being involved with both of those projects, I went through that journey.

    But are you going to continue to appear as an actor?

    Oh sure, I love doing that. And I learn because I get to be on other peoples' sets. When I get to see the Russo brothers direct, it's great. When I get to be on Jon Watts' set for Spider-Man, I had more fun in his last Spider-Man than in any movie role I can remember.

    You and Downey have been in it since the beginning. Have you talked to him about his post-Marvel life? What is he thinking?

    I don't know what he's thinking, but he better direct. Otherwise, I'm not going to be his friend anymore. He's the star of the biggest movie of all time. He did it. So now, you better do stuff you love. Because if you can't do what you love, how are you going to inspire everybody else out there who's climbing that ladder? He has a lot of passion. He's an artist: He understands visual art, he understands music. I think he would be a hell of a director. I hope I get to have a part if he ever decides to direct because I want to show him what it felt like when I was directing him. I want to give him the other side of that equation.

    Tell us something about Elon Musk that we don't know.

    I met him when I was making Iron Man. He's in Iron Man 2. He let us shoot at SpaceX for free, long before any rockets launched, so [Iron Man 2 villain] Justin Hammer's worksite is SpaceX. He understands how much impact he has on the path to the future. He understands storytelling, whether it's in how he makes presentations or what he gravitates toward. When he wants to explain things, it's often by referencing something that has appeared in fiction. Whether you're making movies or whether you're selling an idea of the future, the best way to demonstrate it for the most people to understand it is through a good fable, a good story. That's why Steve Jobs was a great storyteller. He told you the story of the iPhone, he didn't just give you the iPhone. Remember, the iPhone never had an instruction manual. The flip phone would have never existed had it not been for Star Trek. The engineer who developed that saw it in Star Trek and said, "How can I build this?" After Iron Man, I went down to SpaceX, and if you remember when Robert Downey is designing the Iron Man suit, he sticks his arm into a hologram and moves it around. [Musk] had his people build that 3D printing system based on manipulating holograms because he saw that in the movie.

    You're now a food celebrity, so people must approach you to open restaurants all the time.

    I will open a restaurant.

    Why don't you already have a restaurant?

    Because I have to talk Roy Choi into it and he's too pragmatic. But you will see a restaurant at some point from me. Restaurants are great, but even when they're hugely successful, what do the chefs end up doing? They go into either merchandising or they become TV personalities. That's how you monetize being a great chef. You don't make the French Laundry twice as big; that's not how you scale. I draw inspiration from that. I want to have an eight-seat ramen bar where I'm there behind the counter. I don't scale well.

    A version of this story first appeared in the Aug. 21 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine.
    Great interview.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  15. #15
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    That looks like Tatooine

    The Mandalorian reveals an epic poster
    By James Hibberd August 23, 2019 at 12:43 PM EDT

    There’s a new poster for The Mandalorian.

    The romantic-looking image tweeted by Star Wars shows The Mandalorian (Pedro Pascal) against a sunset on a desert planet, his ship in the background:


    DISNEY +

    That two-pronged gun by the way is an “Amban phase-pulse blaster” that was first seen in the infamous Star Wars Holiday Special. Here’s a closer look:
    jonfavreau
    Verified


    Disney is also set to unveil the first trailer for this new series at the D23 Expo on Friday as part of a Disney+ showcase.

    The drama series from Jon Favreau (The Lion King) stars Pascal (Game of Thrones) as a lone gunfighter in the Outer Rim and takes place three years after the events in Return of the Jedi (so after the fall of the Galactic Empire, but before the rise of the First Order).

    Also starring the series is Giancarlo Esposito (Breaking Bad), Gina Carano (Deadpool), Nick Nolte (Cape Fear), Carl Weathers (Rocky) and Emily Swallow (The Mentalist).

    Directors lined up for the first season of The Mandalorian include Dave Filoni (Star Wars: The Clone Wars) tackling the first episode and then Taika Waititi (Thor: Ragnarok), Rick Famuyiwa (Dope), Deborah Chow (Jessica Jones), and Bryce Dallas Howard (Solemates) helming subsequent episodes. The debut season costs a reported $100 million to make and consists of eight episodes.

    The price for the service starts at $6.99 a month (a shot across the bow at streaming leader Netflix). The Mandalorian will be released on Disney+ on Nov. 12.
    Wait...the Holiday Special?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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