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Thread: Orangetheory

  1. #1
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    Orangetheory

    How to get the most out of your exercise time, according to science
    A simple guide to high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, the fitness trend du jour.
    By Julia Belluz@juliaoftorontojulia.belluz@voxmedia.com Updated Jan 13, 2019, 9:13am EST


    The single most well-established benefit of interval training has to do with heart health. Shutterstock

    Modern life has a way of making us feel time-crunched and under pressure to find the most efficient ways of using the precious hours when we’re not working or sleeping. The trendy fitness regimen called high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, is the embodiment of this feeling.

    HIIT promises the best workout in the least amount of time. Runners have used interval training for more than 100 years, alternating between sprints and jogging to improve their endurance. But HIIT didn’t really go mainstream until about a decade ago, when exercise physiologists started to come out with study after study demonstrating that intervals could deliver the biggest health improvement for your exercise time. In 2013, the seven-minute workout, popularized by the New York Times, appeared on the scene, and by 2016, the one-minute workout.

    Recently, fitness professionals voted HIIT the third top fitness trend for 2019 in a survey by the American College of Sports Medicine. And interval-based workouts are now popping up seemingly everywhere: at chains like Shred415 and Orangetheory (the fastest-growing franchise in the US), in group classes at YMCAs, on apps and YouTube, even in the routines outlined in Oprah’s O magazine. Often they promise to burn fat and “metabolically charge the body,” as Orangetheory puts it, in a short time period.

    But there are some important nuances scientists have learned about HIIT that have gotten lost in the hype. The proven benefits of these workouts relate to a very particular type of interval training, and they’ve got nothing to do with weight loss. Here are six basic questions about HIIT, answered.

    1) First things first: what is HIIT?

    HIIT workouts generally combine short bursts of intense exercise with periods of rest or lower-intensity exercise. At fitness studios and online, these workouts often mix aerobic and resistance training.

    To be clear, most of the interval workouts researchers have studied focus solely on aerobic exercise. Which means the scientific understanding of interval training is based on a more specific routine than what’s appearing in most gyms, videos, and magazines. And the researchers’ definition matters because when we’re talking about the evidence of benefits, we need to be specific about the kinds of workouts that science was based on.

    When researchers talk about HIIT, they’re referring to workouts that alternate hard-charging intervals, during which a person’s heart rate reaches at least 80 percent of its maximum capacity usually for one to five minutes, with periods of rest or less intense exercise. (It’s not easy to know that you’re working at 80 percent, but a Fitbit or heart rate monitor can help.)

    “There’s a strict definition of HIIT in terms of heart rate,” explained Todd Astorino, a professor in the department of kinesiology at California State University San Marcos.

    There are also SIT studies, which include all-out bouts of intensity (working at 100 percent of your heart’s capacity). The SIT research, also focused on intervals, reveals similar benefits, so I’ll draw on it too.

    2) What does a HIIT routine look like?

    What differentiates HIIT (or SIT) from the steady-state, continuous types of exercise — jogging at an even pace or walking, for example — is the intervals, those periods of heart-pounding intensity. If you want to try it, you can simply take a HIIT class, or run or even walk in a way that involves higher-speed and higher-incline bursts.

    If you want a routine that’s been lab-tested, there’s the 4-by-4 from Norway. It involves a warmup, followed by four four-minute intervals (again, where your heart rate reaches past 80 percent of its maximum capacity), each interspersed with a three-minute recovery period, and finished off with a cool-down.

    So, for example, you’d jog for 10 minutes to warm up, then do four four-minute intervals of faster running, with three three-minute intervals of moderate jogging or brisk walking in between, and a five-minute cool down at the end. And you can substitute jogging with other aerobic exercises, such as biking or swimming. The whole routine should take 40 minutes.

    A shorter, and also heavily studied, example of an interval routine is the 10-by-1, which involves 10 one-minute bursts of exercise each followed by one minute of recovery.

    Again, these routines look pretty different from what’s on offer at chains like Orangetheory, CrossFit, or even the seven-minute workout. Even though they’re often referred to as HIIT, they combine cardiovascular exercise with strength training.

    3) What are the benefits of interval training?

    The single most well-established benefit of interval training has to do with heart health. Intervals can boost cardio-respiratory health with a smaller time investment compared to continuous forms of exercise. So we’re not talking about superior fat-burning capacity (more on that later) or bigger muscles. We’re talking about improved VO2 max, a measure of endurance that calculates the maximum volume of oxygen the body can use.

    “Scientists have found that [VO2 max] is one of the best predictors of overall health,” according to the recent interval training book The One Minute Workout, co-authored by Martin Gibala, one of the world’s leading interval training experts, who’s based at McMaster University in Canada. “The more aerobically fit you are, the better your heart can pump blood, the longer it takes you to get out of breath, and the ****her and faster you’re able to bike or run or swim.” And that, in turn, can help prevent heart disease.

    Consider this 2016 SIT study, in which Gibala and his co-authors followed two groups of participants for 12 weeks: One group worked out for 10 minutes (including several intervals that added up to one minute), and the other for 50 minutes (at a continuous pace).


    The most remarkable finding in the study was that the two groups of exercisers saw the same improvement in their oxygen uptake, despite their varying time commitments.

    In a 2014 study, Gibala and his fellow researchers got a group of overweight and obese sedentary adults to do three workouts per week, for a total of 30 minutes of exercise. Each workout included three 20-second intervals of fast pedaling on an exercise bike. Even in that short period of time, the study participants saw improvements in their VO2 max.

    Reviews of the research have come to similar conclusions: Interval routines lead to greater gains in VO2 max compared with other forms of training in a shorter period of time.

    “HIIT is a time-efficient strategy to get the benefits typically associated with longer bouts of traditional cardio,” Gibala told Vox.

    Of course, the more you put into a HIIT workout, the more heart health benefits you get out. In this 2013 meta-analysis, researchers evaluated the effects of high-intensity interval training studies, separating out nine studies that showed the largest improvements in VO2 max and nine studies that reported the smallest gains.

    The findings were telling: Less intense training programs with shorter intervals carried the least health benefits, while interval training studies reporting the greatest increases typically used longer (three- to five-minute) intervals.

    For this reason, athletes have long used the interval technique to up their game, Mayo Clinic exercise researcher Michael Joyner told Vox in 2016. “There’s observational data in athletes going back almost 100 years showing the benefits of a few bouts of really high-intensity exercise in people.” He added: “If you want to get people to their biological maximum, they need to be doing four to five times of three- to five-minute intervals.”
    continued next post
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    Continued from previous post


    Orangetheory encourages the use of a heart rate monitor to track cardio fitness in its workouts. Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images for Orangetheory Fitness

    4) Why does HIIT improve cardio health?

    Researchers still haven’t figured out exactly why HIIT works to improve aerobic fitness more than continuous types of exercise. But one key hypothesis, Gibala explained, has to do with the heart’s ability to pump blood.

    One measure for blood pumping is something called stroke volume, or the volume of blood that comes out when the heart contracts. And a major determinant of VO2 max is stroke volume.

    “The maximum amount of blood that comes out of the heart is improved by exercise training,” said Gibala, “and there’s evidence that when you do interval exercise training, the stroke volume increases even more.”

    5) Is HIIT the best exercise regimen for weight loss?

    There’s no doubt that interval training can be a time-efficient way to burn calories. Researchers have repeatedly shown that people can burn comparable amounts of calories in HIIT routines lasting, say, 20 minutes, compared to longer continuous exercise routines lasting, say, 50 minutes. The reason for that, Gibala said, is that higher-intensity exercise, like intervals, results in a greater disturbance of the body’s homeostasis, “and it literally takes more energy and oxygen to return it to normal basal levels.” (We’ll get to the related “afterburn” effect in a moment.)

    But the question is whether that calorie burn translates into weight loss, and that’s where HIIT falls short. “Many people overstate the potential for interval training to cause you to lose weight,” said Gibala. But that’s a problem with exercise in general, not HIIT specifically. As we’ve explained, it’s much easier to lose weight by cutting calories in your diet than trying to burn excess calories.

    That’s especially true if your workout is only 20 minutes long, said Jeffrey Horowitz, a kinesiology professor at the University of Michigan. To burn a lot of calories, “you need to exercise [for] a more prolonged period of time. HIIT routines, by definition, tend to be shorter. So if your goal is weight loss, you might consider a longer interval routine, and you definitely want to look at your diet.”

    Gibala summed up, “In terms of the overall magnitude of calorie burning, it tends to be small relative to what you can achieve by dietary changes.”

    6) What about the “afterburn” effect?

    Many HIIT gyms tout exercise programs that will lead to an “afterburn” or “excess post-exercise oxygen consumption” — a period of elevated calorie burn after you exercise.

    “This revs your metabolism and makes you burn calories long after your workout is over,” Orangetheory claims.

    “The afterburn effect is real — but it’s often overstated,” Gibala said. “When we’ve measured it in a lab, we’ve shown that a 20-minute session of intervals can result in same calorie burn over 24 hours as a 50-minute bout of continuous exercise. So that means the afterburn effect is greater after the intervals — but it peters out after a while.”

    It’s also marginal, he added, not the kind of calorie loss that would lead to lasting weight loss. (I saw the same effect when I entered a metabolic chamber to measure my metabolism. In the periods after I hit the exercise bike, my metabolic rate ramped up — but only by a few more calories each minute, and the effect wore off within half an hour of exercising.)

    Building more muscles, however, can be a little more helpful for the afterburn. Here’s why: One of the variables that affects your resting metabolic rate is the amount of lean muscle you have. At any given weight, the more muscle on your body, and the less fat, the higher your metabolic rate. That’s because muscle uses a lot more energy than fat while at rest.

    So the logic is if you can build up your muscle and reduce your body fat, you’ll have a higher resting metabolism and more quickly burn the fuel in your body. But that takes work — a lot more work than a short aerobic HIIT workout. And even a short HIIT workout may not be for everyone.

    “Intervals can be demanding mentally and physically, so some steady-state continuous is nice once in a while,” Gibala said. “[But] for those who truly are super time-pressed and can tolerate intervals almost exclusively, it’s the most efficient way to train.”
    SCIENCE!
    Gene Ching
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    Continued from previous post

    “IF THE INSTRUCTOR DOESN’T KNOW MY NAME WHEN I WALK IN, I’M NOT GOING TO COME BACK”
    “If I’m spending money at a studio or gym, I want to make sure I’m seeing my results and can track my workout, but if the instructor doesn’t know my name when I walk in, I’m not going to come back,” she says.

    The company is also ruthless about efficiency (Deutsch was an equities trader before launching F45). Scripted-to-the-second workouts, with names such as Brooklyn, Abacus, and Wingman, aim to provide a sense of community to more members with more video guidance, just a handful of trainers per class, and lower expenses (labor is the industry’s biggest recurring expenses, per IBIS). No-frills locations without locker rooms make turnover quick, and the gear is relatively inexpensive, largely consisting of ropes, weights, and mats. The most expensive items are basic stationary bikes and rowing machines. The company’s recurring eight-week group fitness challenges, which combine workouts with diet recommendations, highlights this approach; F45 leverages community without adding much in the way of overhead.

    My experience with the Venice location, at a modest 1,200 square feet, suggested it works; despite crowded classes (and a low ceiling) that forced you to be very aware of whoever was swinging a hammer next to you, every class covered a lot of ground and always left me exhausted.

    Tech and the efficiency scale

    Deutsch believes F45 combines elements of Apple and Amazon: the elevated look and style, merchandise offerings, and engaging interaction and experience of Apple, as well as the tech and efficiency focus of Amazon.

    F45’s embrace of technology isn’t new for the fitness industry. In 2013, Anytime Fitness created Anytime Health, which enables users to track their fitness progress and compare with other community members. Orangetheory, another HIIT franchise with roughly 1,000 US locations, also uses video screens to remind users of routines and exercises.

    What F45 does well is create a seamless experience, says O’Rourke. The best franchises and facilities are the ones that have simplified their technology in a way that makes it very efficient for the user. A club with 2,000 members that offers everything from classes and weights to cardio has a hard time with technological integration.


    F45

    “While there’s nothing new with F45, it’s a great user experience,” he says. “One of the advantages of being a focused offering is that you can incorporate the technology in a meaningful way.”

    Last year, F45 offered nearly 700 new exercises, as well as four new pieces of equipment, all sent to 1,300 studios around the world. O’Rourke says this year, they plan to add stretch-based sessions, as well as a similar number of new moves. He also hinted at a new form of gamification within F45 workouts but wouldn’t provide more details.

    Franchises riding economic trends

    Analysts believe F45 and its franchise model have room to grow, in terms of both expanding the workout routines and community engagement and making a bigger impact on the fitness landscape. IBISWorld’s Roth says there’s growing demand for franchise fitness locations, which allow a local owner to invest and open a business, as opposed to starting from scratch, capitalizing on industry growth and low interest rates.

    It’s no accident the Aussie chain, which has recently made big inroads in Canada and the UK, chose red, white, and blue for its logo and gym decor (“We actually made it look Americanized because we always wanted to take it to the US,” Deutsch said in an interview). The company, and franchises, seeks to grab a larger portion of the US gym market. Gyms, fitness clubs, and fitness franchises comprise a $37.1 billion chunk of the United States health and wellness industry, according to IBISWorld research, with nearly 61 million Americans paying for membership.

    McCall compares the growth of these franchises to Howard Schultz’s strategy with Starbucks; spend on new locations, instead of advertising, and explosive growth becomes the story.

    He sees reasons to be hesitant, with recent signals of a wider economic downturn hinting at a recession. But McCall has no doubt that F45, and studios and programs like it, will increasingly shape the fitness landscape.

    “HIIT is going to be here for a while,” says McCall. “It’s effective, and there’s explosive growth. Adam Smith and Charles Darwin would have liked the fitness industry. It really does favor survival of the fittest.”
    THREADS
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  4. #4
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    indie thread

    I poached the posts above off the F45 & HIIT threads. Anyone doing this?

    Test Your Strength and Endurance With Orangetheory, an Hour-Long Full-Body Workout
    June 23, 2019
    by CHRISTINA STIEHL



    If I were left up to my own devices, I don't think I would push myself nearly as hard in the gym on my own. That's why I love Orangetheory Fitness: the workout combines cardio, like running and rowing, with strength training using both weights and bodyweight moves. With different exercises focusing on upper body, lower body, and core, Orangetheory is a solid full-body workout. It pushes me outside of my comfort zone, and I feel accomplished every time I leave the studio.

    If you're curious about trying Orangetheory for the first time, you probably want to know what you're getting yourself into. Luckily, we tapped Orangetheory coach and NASM-certified personal trainer Giana Cambria, Orangetheory Fitness regional manager in Orlando, FL, who gave us the scoop on what kind of workout Orangetheory is and what to expect.

    What Kind of Workout Is Orangetheory Fitness?

    First and foremost, Orangetheory is a 60-minute workout and a mix of cardio and strength training. Yes, there's a treadmill and rowing machine involved, but you won't be spending your entire class on these pieces of equipment. You'll use a variety of equipment, including dumbbells, a TRX, resistance bands, BOSU balls, and other pieces of equipment for the floor portion. The treadmill/cardio portion of the class is about 30 minutes, and the floor/strength-training portion of the class is about 30 minutes.

    Orangetheory aims to spike your heart rate over the hour-long class, where you rack up Splat Points by how often you are in the higher heart rate zones. This helps you achieve EPOC, or excess postexercise oxygen consumption, sometimes called the afterburn effect, where you continue to burn calories after the workout ends. You can read more about the theory behind Orangetheory here.

    "Orangetheory combines strength training with interval training, and you never do the same thing twice," Giana told POPSUGAR. "We're helping you simply become the best physical version of you."

    Is Orangetheory High-Intensity Interval Training?

    There's no denying that high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, can help you lose fat. In HIIT, you alternate periods of activity, ideally going at 90 percent of your all-out max, with periods of rest. You can do HIIT in a cardio session or with weights. Orangetheory involves intervals, especially on the treadmill portion, and that includes sprints. But is it HIIT?

    "You could consider the treadmill/cardio portion HIIT by standard definition," Giana said. "Notice that intensity is going to be different for everyone, so the term 'high intensity' is subjective. That's why we have heart rate monitors and coaches to help you achieve your proper level of intensity for the most effective results."

    As mentioned above, Orangetheory is a mix of cardio and strength training. "We don't focus on one specific area of fitness," Giana added. "Cardio is part of our workouts, about half, but so is strength training and power training. You're going to get a good dose of both on any given day at Orangetheory." She said cardio is important to achieve that higher intensity, but strength training is also important to help build lean muscle and change your body composition.

    Is Orangetheory Good for Beginners?

    If you've never done Orangetheory before, it may seem intimidating. But it's important to remember everyone started from square one at one point. "It's the perfect place to start your fitness journey and create good habits from the beginning," Giana said. As someone who has done Orangetheory for three years, I can attest that it's an excellent workout for beginners. Everyone is so nice and welcoming, and first-timers get a complete intro and demo to the workout before class even starts. Plus, there are TVs with GIFs of exercises and reps for the floor portion so you never get lost.

    "The coach ensures form is priority, and the workout itself can be adjusted to fit any level," she explained. "At the end of the hour, you'll leave with an incredible sense of accomplishment."

    Image Source: Orangetheory Fitness
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  5. #5
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    Me and my Training partner do Hiit regularly.

    My personal favourite circuit is repetition from running on treadmill going straight to bag work then shadow box before tready again.
    3 min : 3 min : 3min x whatever, no breaks.

    Other circuits involve free weights, bodywork, plyometrics.

    then there is set work.

    Anyway, can attest to the cardio value in the Hiit method.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  6. #6
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    There should be a challenge match!

    Meet F45 Training, The Global Fitness Craze That Could Be The Next Orangtheory
    It's got 1,300 studios and counting....
    BY KRISTINE THOMASON
    NOV 14, 2019



    Australia has brought a lot of good into this world: incredible coffee, Hugh Jackman, and now, F45 Fitness. If that last one sounds vaguely familiar, it's probably because you've seen one of these studios pop up in your city—there are currently 1,300 studios globally, and counting.

    But what exactly is F45 training? Let me break it down.

    What is F45?

    "F45 is a global fitness community that leverages technology and functional training to create high-intensity group workouts that are efficient, fun, and results-driven," says Cory George, the Athletics Director of F45.

    The "F" in F45 stands for "functional" and consists of a mix of high-intensity interval training (HIIT), circuit training, and functional exercises. And "45" refers to the length of each fitness class, which is "focused on delivering rapid, impactful results in an approachable and encouraging environment," says George.

    What kind of workout can you expect?

    As mentioned, F45 includes a mix of cardio and strength training. Before getting started, the trainer will walk you through each exercise of the workout, and then you kick things off with a warmup.

    During each class, "members rotate through different stations and perform specific exercises under the guidance of F45’s expert trainers," says George. "We design our workouts from a substantial bank of functional training movements, which allows us to vary workout programs by exercise type, number of exercise stations, as well as the work time and rest time, ensuring that our members never do the same routine twice."

    So yeah, you'll definitely never get bored with the routines. The workout focus changes daily: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays are for cardio; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays emphasize resistance training; and Saturdays are a hybrid of both cardio and resistance training. Oh and you can expect some pretty fun workout names (similar to a CrossFit WOD), like Angry Bird and Miami Nights.

    How is F45 different from CrossFit, Orangetheory, or other gyms?

    While CrossFit, Orangetheory, and F45 all focus on functional training methods and high-intensity intervals, CrossFit is a bit more preoccupied with building maximum strength, while F45 and Orangetheory are a more even mix of resistance and cardio workouts.

    As far as how F45 stands out in general, George notes: "Our trainers work hard to foster a positive environment, and our studios are deliberately free of mirrors and microphones, which mitigates any appearance-related pressures and trainer intimidation." Plus, the trainers offer a lot of guidance, from form corrections to exercise modifications.

    What do you need to know for your first class?

    You certainly don't need to be an experienced athlete to try F45: "Classes can be scaled for any age or fitness level," says George. "Take a look at any of our classes and you’ll see members from all walks of life and at all stages of their personal fitness journeys."

    Even if you've never done a squat in your life, don't be intimidated by F45. Each class is led by expert trainers who walk you through every exercise, and correct your form as needed during the workout.

    "In addition, all of our studios are outfitted with F45’s proprietary F45TV technology, which guides members through the workout, previews each exercise, and counts down the remaining time in each station," says George.

    Oh, and as far as what to wear, George recommends sticking to athletic clothes that are comfortable, but don't get in the way of dynamic movement. "Leggings, a form-fitting shirt, and sneakers are always a safe bet."

    Here's a few ideas to get you started:



    How much does F45 cost?

    Prices range from studio to studio, so check in with your local studio for pricing. But, F45 operates on a membership model, so on average, you can expect to pay $50 per week or $200 per month.

    Does F45 lead to results?

    As far as their efficacy, George emphasizes that "this combination of interval, cardiovascular, and strength training has been proven to be the most effective workout method for burning fat and building lean muscle."

    Like all HIIT style workouts, it's designed to keep your heart rate up and build strength and endurance. The benefits of HIIT include a bigger afterburn effects (i.e. you'll burn more calories for up to 48 hours after a workout) and a boosted metabolic rate, which happens as you convert body fat to lean muscle mass through consistent exercise.

    Of course, it's important to remember that results vary for every body. But if F45 sounds like your kind of fitness, go forth and try the Aussie-born training studio.

    KRISTINE THOMASON Fitness & Wellness Editor
    Kristine Thomason is the fitness & wellness editor at Women's Health, where she edits, writes, and helps oversee the food and fitness sections of the website and magazine.
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  7. #7
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    Good advice for MA schools in general during flu season

    Tiger Claw HQ has initiated an aggressive program of sterilizing all handles, knobs, phones, keyboards, etc every day. Yesterday Jonny even took my temperature with a new thermometer. srsly.

    FITNESS STUDIOS ARE TAKING PRECAUTIONS AGAINST COVID-19—AND CANCELLATION POLICIES SHOULD REFLECT THAT
    ZOE WEINER, MARCH 4, 2020


    Photo: Getty Images/skynesher

    In the last few days, fitness enthusiasts have seen their inboxes flooded with e-mails about the “medical grade hand disinfectants” and “extra precautions” that their go-to studios are taking to guard against COVID-19. Orangetheory is encouraging people to skip the high fives, Barry’s will add disposable wipes and hand sanitizers at studios, Equinox is sanitizing its gyms multiple times a day, and SLT is asking patrons to wipe down their machines before and after they use them. By and large, boutique fitness studios across the country are requesting that people “stay home if they don’t feel well,” but there’s one catch: Many cancellation policies aren’t reflecting that.

    To their credit, some are. Classpass and Solidcore will both be offering more leniency in waiving late cancellation fees for members who are feeling unwell, and Y7 is encouraging students to contact their studio if they’re too sick to come to class. “If you’re sick, you should have the ability to cancel and not be penalized for it,” says Jason Tetro, microbiologist and author of The Germ Files. “If gyms can provide the assurance that if you’re sick and have to cancel, you won’t be charged for a class, that can increase the confidence that people will only show up when they are healthy.”

    Understandably, studios financially incentivize people to show up to classes, but these hard-and-fast rules are contributing to the problem. As of Tuesday afternoon, 100 cases of COVID-19—and nine virus-related deaths—had been reported in the United States. According to the CDC, the virus is mainly spread from person-to-person, “between people who are in close contact (within about 6 feet) of one another, through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.” These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people nearby, or possibly be inhaled into their lungs. It may also be possible that the disease is spread when someone touches a surface with the virus on it and then touches their mouth or nose.

    While this is a cause for concern in any public place, it becomes even more problematic in the context of a gym or fitness studio. “The gym is up there in places where you would have the highest risk for the spread of the Coronavirus,” says Tetro. “You have a lot of people who are exerting themselves, which means they’re breathing a lot and may be sputtering and coughing. And if these people are starting to get sick or develop the infection, there’s a likelihood that they may be spreading that from their lungs into the environment around them.”

    Doubling down on sanitation efforts—which many studios have committed to doing—can help protect against the virus, to an extent. “Soap, hot water, and detergent can kill it, so if you’re religiously adhering to the effort of using a disinfectant before and after you use a machine, you’re probably increasing the safety for yourself as well as for everyone else,” says Tetro.

    But the best way to keep the virus from spreading at the gym is to keep it from ever getting there. The CDC recommends that anyone who feels sick stays home, and pros echo this sentiment across the board. “The only way to contain the virus is to stay home when you are sick. You aren’t helping the greater good if you spread the illness,” says Erika Schwartz, MD and founder of Evolved Science.” If you get sick stay home—be considerate and don’t infect others.”

    And hey studios, in the meantime, how about some leniency?

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