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Thread: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Wuhan Pneumonia

  1. #331
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    Saul Soliz

    Saul Soliz, legendary coach and MMA pioneer, dies of COVID-19 complications
    Aug 19, 2021
    Marc Raimondi
    ESPN Staff Writer

    Saul Soliz, a mixed martial arts pioneer who trained some of the biggest names in the history of MMA and helped get the sport off the ground in Texas, died Tuesday morning due to complications from COVID-19, according to his wife, Toi. He was 55.

    Soliz, whom many have dubbed "The Godfather of Texas MMA," was in the hospital for "several weeks" because of the coronavirus, she said.

    "He had a long battle," Toi told ESPN. "He fought really hard."

    Soliz was most recently the head coach at Houston Metro Fight Club, but his influence on MMA goes back more than 20 years. He coached all-time great UFC champions such as Tito Ortiz, Quinton "Rampage" Jackson, Mark Coleman, Kevin Randleman, Michael Bisping and Ricco Rodriguez, who was one of his closest friends. Soliz coached with Ortiz on The Ultimate Fighter and had also worked with iconic women's MMA fighter Cris Cyborg.

    "The legacy you left will live on through the lives of all the students, family, and friends you have touched along the way," Cyborg wrote on Facebook.

    Added Bisping in a tweet: "A great man and truly one of the best coaches I've worked with."

    In addition, Soliz was instrumental in helping MMA get off the ground more than 20 years ago, working with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation to develop the rules for the sport in the state.

    "The ties between us in Texas MMA are completely intertwined as it is for the entire Texas MMA community," UFC matchmaker Mick Maynard, who once promoted shows in Texas, wrote on Facebook. "No one can say they weren't influenced directly or indirectly by Saul including commission, promoters, fighters and coaches."

    Soliz's Renegades Extreme Fighting promotion in Houston made its debut in 2000, one year before Dana White and the Fertitta brothers bought the UFC. Toi said Soliz was the first person in Texas to put together a show with "that production value that really you're accustomed to seeing today."

    "Mixed martial arts is definitely his legacy," Toi said. "It's kind of the vehicle for pretty much everything else that he did. In that world and through the lives that he touched in that world, he's very loved. He's very respected. And truly missed by so many people. He touched a lot of lives. I know that he touched a lot of lives, but at this point I think it would even surprise him how many lives he touched."

    In recent years, Soliz had been focusing on developing a younger generation of talent in MMA. Adrian Yanez, Soliz's star pupil, is one of the best up-and-coming bantamweight fighters in the UFC. Bantamweight prospect Mana Martinez, another Soliz student, will make his UFC debut Aug. 28.

    Yanez said that Soliz became a father figure to him when Yanez's father died in 2016. Soliz hired him as a coach at Metro Fight Club and took him under his wing. Soliz's death, Yanez said, is not just a blow for his family and students but also the Texas MMA scene and beyond.

    On Aug. 4, Yanez said he was able to have one last conversation with his beloved coach before things took a turn for the worse. A few days earlier, Yanez was charged with cornering his teammates at a Fury FC show with Soliz in the hospital. The results were not what Yanez was hoping for, and he apologized to Soliz on the phone. Soliz told him it wasn't his fault and not to worry about it.

    "Toward the end of the conversation he just started telling me how proud he was of me, how far I've come, how I never gave up and consistently always just stayed true to who I am," Yanez said. "He was just proud of the man I became. He kept giving me my praises. ... I was just super happy to be able to tell him if it wasn't for him, I wouldn't be where I'm at. I've always tried to express that to him at every turn, every corner. Because you just never know."
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  2. #332
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    Coronavirus (COVID-19) Wuhan Pneumonia

    Janice Carisi-Rose, Wayne's sister, posted on Facebook that Wayne died of COVID pneumonia on Aug 25.

    "He had underlying health conditions and refused to get vaccinated. He contracted severe covid a week or so before his death. He was only 61 years young."

    Carisi wrote 6 articles for our print magazine starting in 2000. He wrote one for our website - Will and Chi, Yin and Yang by Wang Shi-Qing and Wayne Carisi

    Help Wayne's Family Take Care Of Final Wishes

    $2,550 raised of $5,000 goal

    Daniel Vasquez is organizing this fundraiser.
    Created 2 days ago
    Funerals & Memorials
    HI,
    My name is Dan Vasquez and I created this fund so that Wayne's Children can come to California and settle his final business. They're in Hawaii and need to come to Southern California to take care of his belongings and final wishes. We lost Wayne suddenly and his family needs assistance. I set the goal of 5k, but am not sure if it's enough. He was loved by so man and left some big shoes to fill. Thank you for anything you can donate.
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    Gene Ching
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  3. #333
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    oh Joe...

    Joe Rogan Says He Has COVID-19 And Has Taken The Drug Ivermectin

    September 1, 20218:28 PM ET
    VANESSA ROMO
    Twitter


    Joe Rogan has told his Instagram followers he has been taking ivermectin, a deworming veterinary drug formulated for use in cows and horses, to help fight the coronavirus. The Food and Drug Administration has warned against taking the medication, saying animal doses of the drug can cause nausea, vomiting and in some cases severe hepatitis.
    Michael S. Schwartz/Getty Images

    Joe Rogan, the mega-popular podcast host who has suggested that young, fit people don't need to get the COVID-19 vaccine, has announced he tested positive for the virus, but is feeling fine thanks to a cocktail of unproven medical treatments.

    In an Instagram video, the 54-year-old host of The Joe Rogan Experience, said he felt "very weary" on Saturday and got tested for the coronavirus the following day.

    "Throughout the night I got fevers, sweats, and I knew what was going on," Rogan told his 13.1 million followers.

    After the diagnosis, he said he "immediately threw the kitchen sink at it."

    Rogan says he took a drug the FDA urges people not to use
    His methods included taking ivermectin, a deworming veterinary drug that is formulated for use in cows and horses. While a version of the drug is sometimes prescribed to people for head lice or skin conditions, the formula for animal use is much more concentrated. The Food and Drug administration is urging people to stop ingesting the animal version of the drug to fight COVID-19, warning it can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, neurologic disorders and potentially severe hepatitis requiring hospitalization.

    Rogan added that his treatments also included monoclonal antibodies, Z-pack antibiotics and a vitamin drip for "three days in a row."

    "Here we are on Wednesday, and I feel great," he said.

    Rogan has drawn fire for his comments around the vaccine
    Rogan has won legions of dedicated listeners by courting controversy on his show. In October, he came under fire for interviewing far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones on his Spotify show. More recently, he faced criticism after saying that young and otherwise healthy people don't need a COVID-19 vaccine.

    "People say, do you think it's safe to get vaccinated? I've said, yeah, I think for the most part it's safe to get vaccinated. I do. I do," Rogan said in an April 28 episode of the podcast.

    "But if you're like 21 years old, and you say to me, should I get vaccinated? I'll go no. Are you healthy? Are you a healthy person?"

    Rogan continued, "If you're a healthy person, and you're exercising all the time, and you're young, and you're eating well, like, I don't think you need to worry about this."

    He later explained he is not "an anti-vax person" and joked he is not "a respected source of information, even for me."
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  4. #334
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    De La Hoya survives covid

    Oscar De La Hoya released from hospital, says Covid 'hit me really hard'
    Tim Fitzsimons and Minyvonne Burke 4 days ago


    © Provided by NBC News
    "I was in there for 3 days. Covid hit me really hard," De La Hoya, 48, said on Twitter. "I was in the best shape of my life, and I really can't wait to get back in the ring."

    Covid-19 derailed De La Hoya's planned return to the boxing ring on Saturday, when he was scheduled to fight Vitor Belfort in Los Angeles after 13 years away.

    "I mean, what are the chances of me getting Covid?" De La Hoya said in a video from his hospital bed Friday. "I've been taking care of myself, and this really, really kicked my a--."

    Belfort will now fight Evander Holyfield in the main event of the Triller Fight Club, which has been moved from Los Angeles to the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel in Hollywood, Florida. Former President Donald Trump will serve as host and commentator for the matchup, Variety reported.

    De La Hoya, known as "The Golden Boy," won 10 world titles in six weight classes, according to the International Boxing Hall of Fame, which inducted him in 2014. He was one of the most popular boxers in the history of the sport, generating hundreds of millions of dollars from his pay-per-view matches, biography.com reported.

    His last professional fight was a loss to Manny Pacquiao in 2008. He retired the following year.
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  5. #335
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    Scott Richards

    Martial arts expert, 32, who tried to drown his NHS nurse girlfriend after accusing her of having an affair as she worked 12-hour shifts on Covid ward in lockdown is spared jail
    Scott Richards pushed ex-girlfriend Kathryn Rich's head under water last year
    He was found guilty of 'cruel acts of violence' against NHS nurse Ms Rich, 40
    Judge said he had 'brought shame' on all those involved in martial art sports
    By ISABELLA NIKOLIC FOR MAILONLINE

    PUBLISHED: 12:53 EDT, 14 September 2021 | UPDATED: 13:13 EDT, 14 September 2021

    A martial arts expert has been spared jail after he tried to drown his NHS nurse girlfriend when their relationship hit the rocks in lockdown.

    Jealous Scott Richards, 32, pushed his ex-girlfriend Kathryn Rich's head under water as she was about to have a bath.

    Richards, of Treherbert, Rhondda, was found guilty of 'cruel acts of violence' against NHS nurse Ms Rich, 40, his girlfriend for 11 years.

    A judge said he had 'brought shame' on all those involved in martial art sports but let him off with a suspended prison sentence.


    Scott Richards (left), 32, pushed his ex-girlfriend Kathryn Rich's (right) head under water as she was about to have a bath

    The domestic violence started in the first lockdown when Richards had to close his martial arts training school and Ms Rich was working 12-hour shifts on Covid wards.

    Prosecutor Rosamund Rutter said: 'The defendant subjected his partner to frightening and cruel acts of violence, which may be partly due to the lockdown.

    'He pushed her head into the bath water and held it down. She could not breathe and desperately tried to pull her head back but the defendant had a firm grip.'

    Merthyr Tydfil Crown Court heard Ms Rich rang police to say her partner had tried to drown her on April 4 last year.

    She also told them about an incident on March 24, the day after the national lockdown started, when Richards headbutted her after finding a 'personal note' about her feelings towards a work colleague.


    Richards, of Treherbert, Rhondda, was found guilty of 'cruel acts of violence' against NHS nurse Ms Rich (pictured together), 40, his girlfriend for 11 years

    Ms Rich denied she was having an affair with a workmate and said it was 'just flirting'.

    She said the bathroom attack was sparked by her commenting about another man in fancy dress on Facebook.

    Mother-of-four Ms Rich told the court: 'Covid had just hit and we were told to have a bath and wash our uniforms when we got home from work.

    'The bath was run when Scott came upstairs and pushed me backwards with quite a lot of force.

    'The bath was pretty full, he pushed my head and shoulders under water. His hand was on the back of my neck, I couldn't get out of the water, it was probably only seconds but it felt longer.


    The domestic violence started in the first lockdown when Richards had to close his martial arts training school and Ms Rich was working 12-hour shifts on Covid wards

    'When he let go I couldn't see, I couldn't breathe, I couldn't hear. I swallowed water, my clothing was soaked.'

    Richards chose not to give evidence in his defence at the four-day trial.

    He was found guilty of assaulting Ms Rich in the bathroom by a majority verdict of 11-1. He was unanimously found guilty of the headbutt assault.

    In a victim personal statement Ms Rich told Cardiff Crown Court: 'When Scott tried to drown me I didn't know if I was going to come back up again.

    'We had been together for 11 years and I genuinely loved him but I can't believe it's come to this.


    Prosecutor Rosamund Rutter said: 'The defendant subjected his partner to frightening and cruel acts of violence, which may be partly due to the lockdown'

    'I have been working in a hospital environment under the pressure of Covid-19 which has had an impact on me.'

    Richards was given a 30-week prison sentence suspended for 18 months and ordered to carry out 200 hours unpaid work.

    Judge Caroline Rees QC made him the subject of a two-year restraining order preventing him from contacting his former partner.

    She told Richards: 'It must have been absolutely terrifying for Ms Rich - she told the court she thought she was going to die.

    'You have shamed those involved in your sport by showing uncontrolled violence and jealous outbursts.'
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  6. #336
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    The Kung Fu Nuns

    Gene Ching
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  7. #337
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    Supply chain broken

    When will supply chains be back to normal? And how did things get so bad?

    [IMG] [/IMG]
    Experts say it will take a while, maybe more than a year, before the supply chain works its way back to a normal flow that will ease delivery delays and goods shortages. (Charlie Riedel / Associated Press)
    BY JON HEALEY, SAMANTHA MASUNAGA
    OCT. 14, 2021 UPDATED 5:43 PM PT
    Wondering why everything from cars and refrigerators to books and toys is in short supply?

    Blame the fouled-up supply chain that connects manufacturers around the world with the makers and assemblers of their component parts, as well as with the consumers and businesses that buy the finished goods. The problem emerged shortly after the COVID-19 pandemic struck, and it’s seemed to get only worse since then.

    How did we get into this mess? And why isn’t it getting better? The Times reached out to some supply chain experts, and here are their answers.

    What, exactly, is ‘the supply chain’?
    Manufacturers in the U.S. and the rest of the industrialized world have long outsourced the production of common and low-cost products to China and other low-wage countries. But starting in the 1970s, companies outsourced the production of an increasing number of more sophisticated products, often using multiple contractors to produce and then assemble the components.

    Here’s how it typically works: A company based in the U.S. will design and put the finishing touches on a product but will turn to one or more foreign manufacturers for raw materials and components if that will significantly cut the cost to build and deliver it. For example, according to the American University Auto Index, roughly half of each Dodge Ram 1500 truck that rolled out of a U.S. auto plant last year came from outside the U.S. and Canada.

    Some companies forgo having U.S. factories altogether, using contractors to assemble their products from the pieces made by subcontractors. With or without a U.S. plant, a company that relies on a far-flung supply chain requires some combination of planes, ships, trucks and warehouses to pull its products together and store the inventory.

    Global supply chains are especially prevalent in durable goods (such as cars and appliances), tech products (such as cellphones and computers), clothing, footwear, textiles, furniture and plastic goods. And although most U.S. imports come from China, Mexico and Canada are also important links in the supply chain here, as are a number of Asian and European countries.

    What caused the problem?
    In a word, COVID-19. The pandemic whirled up a toxic brew of forces that triggered and then exacerbated the shipping logjam.

    The first blow came when many of the Chinese plants that build parts or assemble goods for global manufacturers were shut down by coronavirus outbreaks. Similar disruptions soon spread across the globe, affecting both manufacturers and the logistics companies that ship, store and deliver their goods.

    After a brief COVID-related recession, however, demand for goods grew quickly, as people shifted to online buying and took up new habits (a surge in home-improvement projects, for example, boosted demand for appliances and construction materials).

    Manufacturers face a “perfect storm” of issues, said Nick Vyas, executive director of the Kendrick Global Supply Chain Institute at the USC Marshall School of Business.

    Labor, transportation and logistics costs are up, there’s reduced capacity because of the problems all along the supply chain, and there’s a finite amount of resources across the board, including the number of containers and amount of manufacturing capacity.

    “We might be able to buffer against one type of risk or two types of risk, but it’s the fact that all these challenges are happening at the same time,” said Nicole DeHoratius, an adjunct professor of operations management at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business.

    The pandemic is not entirely to blame. Robert Handfield, the Bank of America professor of supply chain management at North Carolina State University, said that “warehouse, distribution and truck driver shortages were bad before COVID.”

    The delays caused by the backlog in deliveries have been particularly disruptive to companies that operate with small inventories and rely on “just in time” shipments to fill orders. To avoid that pitfall, some companies are ordering extra supplies and components as a precaution, increasing the strain on the distribution system.

    Another factor: Concerns about the spread of COVID-19 and its variants have made it harder for trucks to cross borders. A report Monday by Moody’s Analytics said the differences among countries’ efforts to control the coronavirus have gummed up the movement of transportation workers at ports and other freight hubs, contributing to a problem that will get worse before it gets better.

    And it’s not easy to restart factories after they’ve been shut down to stem surges in coronavirus cases. Raw materials back up, and it can take weeks to restart production, Vyas said.

    “The supply chain is a system,” he said. “When you create shocks from the supply to the demand side and that continues to happen, the system isn’t getting enough time to reset and recalibrate.”

    Why are cargo ships waiting to be unloaded at the ports?
    West Coast ports were barely keeping up with the growth in freight before the pandemic and had no ability to absorb disruption, said Ayman Omar, an associate professor at American University’s Kogod School of Business. The pandemic has only worsened the situation, including a shortage of trucks to haul cargo containers to their destinations.

    There were 64 ships in a holding pattern near the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach Thursday.

    Some trucking industry executives blame higher federal unemployment benefits, which ended in September, for the driver shortage. Omar said that the benefits might have contributed to the problem in the early months of the pandemic, but the issue now is competition coming from transportation start-ups hungry for market share. Drivers come and go at trucking companies at an alarmingly high rate — turnover was more than 90% at large firms in the last quarter of 2020.

    Without enough trucks to carry them off, containers piled up on docks, and more kept coming — each new ship brings in 10,000 to 21,000 containers. And with the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach unable to handle the growing number of ships, vessels were spending about as much time waiting to anchor and unload — about two weeks — as it would take a ship to cross the Pacific, said Robert Khachatryan, chief executive of Freight Right Global Logistics of La Crescenta.

    Compounding the problem is the lack of transparency and information sharing, which makes it impossible for the manufacturers and importers who rely on the ports to see problems developing in advance and route around them, Omar said.
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  8. #338
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    Continued from previous post

    How is this affecting me?
    Prices are higher for many things. The shortages and the heavy demand for shipping have combined to cause freight costs to skyrocket; the cost to move a container from China to the U.S. West Coast is four times what it was a year ago, and more than 10 times what it was before the pandemic.

    Manufacturers have passed their higher costs on to consumers, though that hasn’t seemed to stem the demand for goods, Vyas said. The increase is hitting not just the teak furniture you bought, imported from Indonesia, but also the running shoes and dress shirts you bought from a local retailer.

    Goods are taking longer to arrive. Handfield said he realized this summer that he needed a new refrigerator, so he ordered one in August. It’s not due until December. Some retailers are urging consumers to buy their holiday gifts now, while there’s still plenty of time for them to be delivered.

    Some items are becoming harder to find. Although we’re not seeing as many empty store shelves as we did in the early days of the pandemic, shortages are cropping up in unexpected places. For example, printers, game consoles and rental cars are harder to come by, all thanks to the semiconductor drought.

    More price inflation is expected. “You have this constant pressure of not having enough resources, strong demand,” Vyas said.

    How long will it last?
    Experts say it will take a while — maybe six months, maybe more than a year — before the supply chain can work its way through the backlog.

    “We have these orders coming in, we can’t work them off because we’re facing these labor shortages,” DeHoratius said. “Unless they stop coming in, it doesn’t allow us the time to get it through.”

    Some companies have even tried to hedge their bets by placing multiple orders for the same products from different factories. But that still requires shipping capacity to get the products to store shelves on time.

    How will this be resolved? Some economists argue that the convulsions in the shipping market will encourage U.S. manufacturers to shift more of their outsourced work from Asia to Mexico. But that’s a long-term fix. In the near term, experts say that repairing the supply chain will require addressing every part of it and not focusing on just one part of the process.

    For example, factory employees who work on manufacturing and raw materials processing need to be vaccinated to stop outbreaks.

    Ports need to expand hours so that more containers can be offloaded. The Biden administration announced a move in that direction Wednesday, saying the Port of Los Angeles would start operating around the clock, similar to moves made at the Port of Long Beach.

    Vyas likened the supply chain to a symphony, in which every piece must play its position for the whole ensemble to be successful.

    “We’re doing this in a silo — one touch point at a time — rather than as a system,” he said. “It needs to balance this out.”


    Jon Healey

    Jon Healey is a senior editor on the Utility Journalism team, which tries to help readers solve problems, answer questions and make big decisions about life in and around Los Angeles. He has been with the Los Angeles Times since 2000, previously reporting on technology news and writing opinion pieces.

    Samantha Masunaga

    Samantha Masunaga is a business reporter for the Los Angeles Times. She’s worked at the paper since 2014.
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    Gene Ching
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