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Thread: On the Trail of Buddha: A Journey to the East

  1. #1
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    On the Trail of Buddha: A Journey to the East

    Back to the old Tamo myth...

    Last Updated: 31st August, 2020 14:38 IST
    The Shaolin Temple And Indian Monks!
    A new book explores the ancient India that is preserved in the traditions, art, and architecture of China, as also in Mongolia, Korea and Japan, including the contribution of two Indian monks to the Shaolin temple and martial arts.
    Written By
    Press Trust Of India



    A new book explores the ancient India that is preserved in the traditions, art, and architecture of China, as also in Mongolia, Korea and Japan, including the contribution of two Indian monks to the Shaolin temple and martial arts.

    From the wandering monks of Asia to the temples and monasteries they visited; from the statues and frescoes in grottoes to those in museums; from the diverse ethnicities of the people to their common gods and goddesses, the book "On the Trail of Buddha: A Journey to the East" attempts to touch upon the ethos of the East Asian culture and its deep-rooted linkages with the Indian civilisation.

    Beginning at Karakhoja, the erstwhile capital of Xinjiang, the book covers ancient cities along the Silk Road in China, the north-south trade axis that connects China with Mongolia, travels from Sichaun in south-western China to Mount Kailash and Lake Mansarovar, thereafter moving from south-eastern coastal China from Hong Kong to Shanghai, and then to Taiwan from Taipei to Kaohsiung.

    From there, it moves to Korea and Japan. Traversing 98 destinations across 37 locations, the journey is a voyage of discovery across East Asia.

    Deepankar Aron, an Indian Revenue Service officer, has put together his passions for photography and travel in this book, published by Niyogi Books.

    'Damo' or 'Tamo', as he is popular in China, came to the Shaolin temple, 22 years after it was founded in 495 AD. Born in a royal family in Tamil Nadu's Kanchipuram, Damo, who is also known as Bodhidharma, meditated for nine years in a cave about four km from the temple, the book says.

    "While it (the temple) was set up by the Chinese emperor of the Northern Wei dynasty in honour of the Indian monk Batuo, it was Damo who has been synonymous with the temple," the author writes.

    Bodhidharma is believed to have brought the South Indian martial art form Kalaripayattu to China, where it was later modified into kung fu or wushu, he says.

    "He created the 'muscle-bone strengthening exercises' widely known as the source of Shaolin kung fu. In an iron box left by Bodhidharma, after he passed away, there were two books on the subject," the book says.

    According to Aron, there are thousands of monks who travelled spreading Buddhism across Asia. From Dafo of Leshan, the world's highest rock-cut Buddha to the Floating Temple of Itsukushima-Jinja in Japan, he writes about many World Heritage Sites and unique destinations.
    Wasn't there another work similar to this recently? I can't quite remember but I feel like I've posted something like this before here.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #2
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    This is going to drive me nuts...

    I know there was another Indian book recently that was similar to this...weird de ja vue...

    The Shaolin temple and Indian monks: A new book chronicles ancient Indian art and architecture in China
    On the Trail of Buddha: A Journey to the East attempts to touch upon the ethos of the East Asian culture and its deep-rooted linkages with the Indian civilisation.
    BOOKS Updated: Aug 31, 2020 18:37 IST
    Press Trust of India | Posted by Saumya Sharma
    New Delhi


    Deepankar Aron, an Indian Revenue Service officer, has put together his passions for photography and travel in this book.(amazon.in)

    A new book explores the ancient India that is preserved in the traditions, art, and architecture of China, as also in Mongolia, Korea and Japan, including the contribution of two Indian monks to the Shaolin temple and martial arts.

    From the wandering monks of Asia to the temples and monasteries they visited; from the statues and frescoes in grottoes to those in museums; from the diverse ethnicities of the people to their common gods and goddesses, the book On the Trail of Buddha: A Journey to the East attempts to touch upon the ethos of the East Asian culture and its deep-rooted linkages with the Indian civilisation.

    Beginning at Karakhoja, the erstwhile capital of Xinjiang, the book covers ancient cities along the Silk Road in China, the north-south trade axis that connects China with Mongolia, travels from Sichaun in south-western China to Mount Kailash and Lake Mansarovar, thereafter moving from south-eastern coastal China from Hong Kong to Shanghai, and then to Taiwan from Taipei to Kaohsiung.

    From there, it moves to Korea and Japan. Traversing 98 destinations across 37 locations, the journey is a voyage of discovery across East Asia.

    Deepankar Aron, an Indian Revenue Service officer, has put together his passions for photography and travel in this book, published by Niyogi Books.

    ‘Damo’ or ‘Tamo’, as he is popular in China, came to the Shaolin temple, 22 years after it was founded in 495 AD. Born in a royal family in Tamil Nadu’s Kanchipuram, Damo, who is also known as Bodhidharma, meditated for nine years in a cave about four km from the temple, the book says.

    “While it (the temple) was set up by the Chinese emperor of the Northern Wei dynasty in honour of the Indian monk Batuo, it was Damo who has been synonymous with the temple,” the author writes.

    Bodhidharma is believed to have brought the South Indian martial art form Kalaripayattu to China, where it was later modified into kung fu or wushu, he says.

    “He created the ‘muscle-bone strengthening exercises’ widely known as the source of Shaolin kung fu. In an iron box left by Bodhidharma, after he passed away, there were two books on the subject,” the book says.

    According to Aron, there are thousands of monks who travelled spreading Buddhism across Asia. From Dafo of Leshan, the world’s highest rock-cut Buddha to the Floating Temple of Itsukushima-Jinja in Japan, he writes about many World Heritage Sites and unique destinations.

    (This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text. Only the headline has been changed.)
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
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    As a someone who has put much study into the topic, and I'm sure has heard every angle of it, what is your perspective on the 'myth' of Bodhidharma?
    also Buddhabhadra, Dhyana and Dharma making its way into China via Shaolin?

    I know theres two ways stories are told and record is kept, one is in academia, the other is folklore. As much as I love academia possibly for the organization of the knowledge, at the core, I align more with folklore. Theres a compass we all have, that can make sense of things naturally, we all inherently "know" , when we allow it.
    With a story like Shaolin, at this point most people say it doesnt matter to be critical of certain points as to are they myth or reality, just practice chan wu and dharma in reality, .....and I totally agree there.

    Still I have a story about the temple that reads like a legend transmitted thru the ages. if you dont mind me inquiring, how about you? from "academic fact" to "folklore fact", how do you see the journey of Dharma and Dhyana in Shaolin and China?

    Amituofo
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Djuan View Post
    As a someone who has put much study into the topic, and I'm sure has heard every angle of it, what is your perspective on the 'myth' of Bodhidharma?
    ...from "academic fact" to "folklore fact", how do you see the journey of Dharma and Dhyana in Shaolin and China?

    Amituofo
    How about the angle that there was some diffusion from India of specific yogic knowledge at the time for which there was nothing similar in China. I am from the academic tradition but never heard that one until this year from a somewhat non-academic source, and it sounds like something that verified to some extent.

    P.S. Somewhere, I have a copy of an ancient picture of your "Avalokitesvara" with quite a few weapon-racks worth of arms in each arm, but I can't remember if it was before or after the manifestion of gender change. I could dig it out of storage if it cannot be found it on the internet...

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