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Thread: Stop Asian Hate

  1. #31
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    Fake News

    Babylon Bee is a conservative satire news site. Nevertheless I saw this on social media being propounded as news

    Biden Welcomes BTS By Pulling Out His Phone And Playing 'Kung Fu Fighting'
    Celebs
    June 1st, 2022 - BabylonBee.com



    WASHINGTON, D.C.—K-Pop music sensation BTS has been invited to the White House to discuss anti-Asian hate and discrimination. When the artists entered the oval office President Biden welcomed them by pulling out his phone and playing ‘Kung Fu Fighting’.

    "Welcome to the White House my fellow Kung Fu fighters!" said the President while holding out his phone and pretending to karate chop the artists. "HOO! HUH! Gotcha there! You're gonna have to be quicker than that if you wanna block old Joe!"

    The BTS members—also known as the Bangtan Boys—shuffled awkwardly and forced a smile as the President of the United States continued to bob his head up and down as he displayed his kung-fu moves.

    “HIYAH!" shouted Biden still trying to get the band to respond. "What's the deal? I thought you people are supposed to love this music? C'mon now show me your moves—how else are you gonna stop people from discriminating against you?"

    At publishing time, Biden tweeted out a selfie with the Bangtan Boys that has already been deleted that was captioned "The White House rejects racism against Asians. That's why I'm proud to stand by and fight back with the Bangkok Boys!"
    Everybody-was-Kung-Fu-Fighting-by-Carl-Douglas
    Stop-Asian-Hate
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  2. #32
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    Jade Chocolates Teahouse and Cafe

    Taking action in Chinatown: Chocolate shop trains employees in kung fu to combat theft and crime
    Photo of Elissa Miolene
    Elissa Miolene
    Aug. 20, 2022

    Scott McTaggert, executive chef at Jade Chocolates, attends the cafe’s first kung fu class at San Francisco WingTsun in May.
    Elissa Miolene/The Chronicle

    Mindy Fong shut the doors of Jade Chocolates Teahouse and Cafe at just past 5 p.m. on a weekday this spring. Fong had spent the day making chocolate, preparing pastries and serving tea. But now, she was leading her employees to a very different type of shift: their first all-staff kung fu class.

    “It’s beneficial for everyone to know some self-defense,” Fong said. “I would hate for something to happen to them here just because they’ve gone to work.”

    Fong decided to hold the classes in late March, after a string of robberies coincided with the cafe’s move from Inner Richmond to Chinatown. Fong was excited to move to the neighborhood, where her cafe’s Asian-inspired chocolates could find a cultural home. But immediately, it was clear to Fong that COVID-19, crime and anti-Asian hate had left their mark on the neighborhood.

    “Every day, there’s something,” Fong said. “I’ve seen people being chased in the street because they’ve stolen something from the jewelry shops or camera shops.”

    Robberies and assaults fell with overall crime rates in San Francisco during the pandemic, but retail break-ins in Union Square and other high-profile crimes may have made people feel less safe. And a series of assaults on Asian Americans has jolted those communities in particular.

    In 2021, anti-Asian hate crimes spiked 567% in San Francisco, according to the city’s police department, with 60 attacks targeting people of Asian descent. Chinatown’s crime rate is below that of many parts of San Francisco. So far this year, the police department recorded fewer incidents in Chinatown than in 21 of the city’s 43 neighborhoods, including the Marina and Bernal Heights. But still, hate crimes against Asian residents loom large in residents’ minds.

    A block from Jade Chocolates, a mural of Vicha Ratanapakdee - a 84-year-old Thai man who was pushed to the ground during his morning walk in January 2021, and died soon after - seems to watch over Grant Street. Justice for Vicha, the mural reads in big, block letters. #StandForAsians.

    Compounded by that history is the day-to-day experience of business owners like Fong, who say they’ve heard of robberies happening in broad daylight, and brazen attacks against storefronts throughout the area. But still, moving back to Chinatown - a neighborhood her family called home for generations - was important to Fong.

    “All of the theft and crime in Chinatown is not an obstacle for me,” Fong said. “It’s just one more thing we have to get over. We should be able to defend ourselves.”

    Jade Chocolates’ executive chef, Scott McTaggert, has been practicing Wing Tsun - a style of Chinese kung fu focused on self defense - for the last six years. Instead of backing down to the crime, McTaggert and Fong thought they could use Wing Tsun to overcome it.

    “Because I’m here in Chinatown with our staff and the crime rate is so high, I thought it would be advantageous to at least mention, hey, if anyone wants to learn some and get some training, this is available to you,” said McTaggert. “I will do everything I can do to make our employees feel safer and more empowered so they can live their lives without being afraid.”

    At the end of May, Fong, McTaggert, and two other Jade employees - along with the daughters of two employees - headed to San Francisco WingTsun, the Chinatown-based studio where McTaggert usually practices. Joseph Mah, the head teacher of the studio, walked the employees through the practice’s foundations, coaching them through the proper movements to defend themselves. It was the first of many classes to come: Jade’s employees now hone their skills on the last Wednesday of every month.

    “Hopefully, the self-defense program we’re going to establish here is just to know - not to use,” said Fong. “But if the day comes, they’ll be prepared.”

    These classes are just the latest in a string of efforts to combat crime in Chinatown. According to Edward Siu, chair of the Chinatown Merchants United Association, business owners in the area are working together to reduce crime in their own ways. A WhatsApp group of 400 merchants, for example, now works as an alert system: If something happens in a shop, Siu said, a chain reaction is set off. That merchant texts the group and Siu contacts the police.

    “We’re really working together, as merchants,” said Siu. “We want to make Chinatown better and get more business coming in.”

    Elissa Miolene is a graduate student at Stanford University’s journalism school and a former intern with The Chronicle’s multimedia team. Twitter: @elissamio
    I almost wish the Tongs would come back and patrol...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #33
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    There's a special place in hell for people who vandalize museums

    Man charged with hate crime after vandalism at Wing Luke Museum
    Sep. 18, 2023 at 3:33 pm

    Adrien Fonseca, with Marpac Construction, works to remove glass from the Wing Luke Museum’s broken windows on Canton Alley South on Sept. 15. (Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times)
    By Alexandra Yoon-Hendricks
    Seattle Times staff reporter

    A man was charged Monday with a hate crime after he smashed the windows of the Wing Luke Museum, King County prosecutors say.

    According to the charges, Craig Milne, 76, used a sledgehammer to break the windows of the museum along Canton Alley South in Seattle on Thursday night, as dozens of patrons inside were touring an exhibit.

    Milne, who is white, also was charged with first-degree malicious mischief for causing more than $100,000 worth of property damage, charging papers say.

    After smashing the windows, Milne remained outside the building, and was heard saying he had come to the Chinatown International District to cause damage and that “the Chinese ruined my life,” according to witnesses.

    Almost an hour later, when Seattle Police Department officers arrived and arrested Milne, he “continued making racially biased statements and expressed no remorse,” the charging documents stated, with Milne telling officers, “The Chinese have tortured and tormented me for 14 years. I don’t regret anything I did here.”

    “The blatant racist motivations behind the defendant’s actions, the extreme nature of this property destruction, the disregard for individuals who were inside the building, and the lack of remorse gives the State significant community safety concerns,” prosecutors wrote.

    Milne first appeared in court Friday, when a judge set his bail at $30,000. He remained in King County Jail on Monday.

    The Wing Luke Museum is a major educational and cultural institution in Seattle and an anchor in the neighborhood. It is the only pan-Asian Pacific American community-based museum in the country.

    “The attack and the damage, beyond the physical, was in part symbolic,” museum Executive Director Joël Barraquiel Tan previously told The Seattle Times. “It was targeted. It was planned.”

    This is not the first time Milne has been accused of a hate crime. In October 2013, Milne was arrested for allegedly attacking and repeatedly punching an Asian man in the locker room at the Spartan Recreation Center in Shoreline.

    King County Sheriff’s Office deputies reported they heard Milne shouting racial slurs against Asian people, saying “they ruined my life.” When he was arrested, Milne fought the deputies and called an Asian officer racial slurs, according to charging documents.

    Milne was charged with fourth-degree assault and resisting arrest, according to court documents. The charges were dismissed in 2015, prosecutors said.

    Community leaders said the attack Thursday ratcheted up already elevated concerns about public safety among some Asian American and Pacific Islander residents in Seattle. Several criticized the police response time, saying the 52 minutes it took for officers to arrive reflected local law enforcement and city leaders’ disregard for their well-being.

    Hate crimes targeting Asians and Asian Americans increased dramatically during the COVID-19 pandemic, rising more than 73 percent in 2020, according to FBI data. Since 2020, the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office has filed 130 cases involving hate crimes, with 20 filed this year so far.

    Milne’s arraignment is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. Oct. 2 at the King County Courthouse.

    Times researcher Miyoko Wolf contributed to this report.

    Alexandra Yoon-Hendricks: 206-464-2246 or ayoonhendricks@seattletimes.com; on Twitter: @ayoonhendricks. Staff reporter Alexandra Yoon-Hendricks covers race and equity for The Seattle Times.
    Stop-Asian-Hate
    Bruce-Lee-Museums-and-Gallery-Exhibits
    Gene Ching
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  4. #34
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    Craig Milne unrepentant, earns Wing Luke $100K

    Wing Luke Museum gets $100K from city, state for repairs after vandal smashes windows

    By KIRO 7 News Staff
    September 29, 2023 at 5:01 pm PDT



    SEATTLE — Seattle’s Wing Luke Museum will be getting $100,000 in funds to help in its recovery efforts after several of its windows were smashed by a vandal in early-September.

    Seventy-six-year-old Craig Milne was charged in the incident, after smashing the museum’s windows with a sledgehammer while saying that “the Chinese have ruined my life.”

    When officers arrived, he allegedly told them that “the Chinese have tortured and tormented me for 14 years.”

    “I don’t regret anything I did here,” he added.

    On Friday, the City of Seattle and the Washington State Department of Commerce announced that they would be giving the Wing Luke Museum $100,000 for repairs.

    “I’m proud our state could step in alongside the City of Seattle to help the Wing Luke Museum recover from the violence of hate,” said Gov. Jay Inslee in a news release. “The museum is a local treasure honoring Washington’s global diversity. I encourage folks to visit and learn more about the history and culture of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders.”

    Milne was charged with two felonies, one for a hate crime and another for first degree malicious mischief.
    Stop-Asian-Hate
    Bruce-Lee-Museums-and-Gallery-Exhibits
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  5. #35
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    Stuff like this happens in small towns all the time for years, forever, the azn there just keep their head in the sand.

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  6. #36
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    Encouraging

    Anti-Asian hate crimes decreased for 1st time since pandemic start: FBI
    Anti-Asian hate crimes decreased for 1st time since pandemic start: FBIvia Kareem Hayes on Unsplash
    The decline is attributed to factors such as decreased use of inflammatory language by leaders
    Michelle De Pacina
    OCTOBER 30, 2023



    ANTI-ASIAN HATE CRIMES decreased by 34% from 2021 to 2022, according to new data released by the FBI.

    Factors in the decline: Experts attributed the recent decline — the first drop in anti-Asian hate crimes since the beginning of the pandemic — to factors like reduced opportunities for COVID-related blaming, decreased use of inflammatory language by leaders and a sense of fatigue in reporting.

    Hate crimes are cyclical: However, the decrease may not be a long-term trend, as experts suggest that anti-Asian hate crimes are cyclical and can be influenced by national and international contexts. The initial spike in hate crimes was linked to economic downturns and the blaming of Asians for the coronavirus.

    “The data is a reminder that hate never goes away, it only hides. Any hate crime is a stain on the soul of America,” President Joe Biden said in a statement, according to American Kahani.

    Data on Sikhs and Muslims: Some groups, like Sikhs and Muslims, did not see a significant decrease in hate crime incidents, most of which may be related to anti-immigrant and Islamophobic rhetoric. The number of bias-motivated incidents against Sikhs decreased from 185 to 181. However, The Sikh Coalition said that anti-Sikh hate crime victimizations were “the highest number ever at 198,” an increase from 195 in 2021.

    Important to note: The FBI’s statistics alone may not fully capture the state of anti-Asian hate in the U.S. since they rely on law enforcement data and Asian Americans are less likely to report being victimized in racial incidents, which may end up not even being classified as hate crimes. The absence of adequate performance metrics hinders the assessment of the federal government’s effectiveness in combating hate crimes against the Asian community, as noted by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.
    It's all about that final note, isn't it?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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