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Thread: AI Responses to Common Kung Fu questions.

  1. #16
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    Hm, it looks like that OpenAI is pretty intelligent now.




    Regards,

    KC
    Hong Kong

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Ouch.

    Way to pour salt in the wound, bruh.

    We'd discussed doing the final issue as a Kickstarter. However right now, all attention is focused upon TCEC 2023.
    I'm also interested in getting the final issue, though we all understand the attention being on TGEW.

  3. #18
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    AI-written books

    Slighty OT for AI-Responses-to-Common-Kung-Fu-questions because it's not KF related (but relevant for the-magic-of-mushrooms). I may be hijacking this thread for AI-written stuff in general. I'm still getting an AI-written submission nearly every week.

    Mushroom pickers urged to avoid foraging books on Amazon that appear to be written by AI
    Sample of books scored 100% on AI detection test as experts warn they contain dangerous advice

    Dan Milmo Global technology editor
    Fri 1 Sep 2023 12.32 EDT



    Amateur mushroom pickers have been urged to avoid foraging books sold on Amazon that appear to have been written by artificial intelligence chatbots.

    Amazon has become a marketplace for AI-produced tomes that are being passed off as having been written by humans, with travel books among the popular categories for fake work.

    Now a number of books have appeared on the online retailer’s site offering guides to wild mushroom foraging that also seem to be written by chatbots. The titles include “Wild Mushroom Cookbook: form [sic] forest to gourmet plate, a complete guide to wild mushroom cookery” and “The Supreme Mushrooms Books Field Guide of the South-West”.

    Four samples from the books were examined for the Guardian by Originality.ai, a US firm that detects AI content. The company said every sample had a rating of 100% on its AI detection score, meaning that its systems are highly confident that the books were written by a chatbot such as ChatGPT.

    Examples of prose from the books include: “The sweet smell of freshly cooked mushrooms wafted through the air, bringing back fond memories of my mother” and “Foraging for wild mushrooms is a deeply rewarding experience that connects us with nature’s abundance and the rich tapestry of flowers that the Earth provides.”

    The other books tested by Originality.ai were “Wild Mushroom Cookbook: A beginner’s guide to learning the basics of cooking with wild mushrooms for health and flavor, complete with easy-to-follow recipes!” and “Wild Mushroom Cookbook: unlock the delicious secrets of nature’s most flavorful fungi”. The Guardian has attempted to contact the authors named on the books.

    Leon Frey, a foraging guide and field mycologist at Cornwall-based Family Foraging Kitchen, which organises foraging field trips, said the samples he had seen contained serious flaws such as referring to “smell and taste” as an identifying feature. “This seems to encourage tasting as a method of identification. This should absolutely not be the case,” he said.

    Some wild mushrooms, like the highly poisonous death cap, which can be mistaken for edible varieties, are toxic.

    Frey said that one book refers to the lion’s mane fungus, which is edible but a protected species in the UK and should not be picked. “I would recommend choosing books from reputable sources,” he added.

    Prof Myron Smith, a fungi specialist at Carleton University in Canada, said the books were “totally irresponsible”. He said: “Some of the differences between edibles and non-edibles are very subtle and it really takes an experienced eye and knowledge to discriminate between them.”

    The AI mushroom books were first reported by the 404 Media site. The AI-generated works had also been highlighted by the New York Mycological Society, which posted on X, formerly known as Twitter: “@Amazon and other retail outlets have been inundated with AI foraging and identification books. Please only buy books of known authors and foragers, it can literally mean life or death.”

    Amazon said it was reviewing the books brought to its attention by the Guardian.

    An Amazon spokesperson said: “We take matters like this seriously and are committed to providing a safe shopping and reading experience. We’re looking into this.”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  4. #19
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    Cat I ****ed



    Chat GPT = Chat J'ai pété = Cat I ****ed
    Gene Ching
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  5. #20
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    Slightly OT

    Scientists had a 20-minute "conversation" with a humpback whale named Twain
    01-01-2024


    By Eric Ralls
    Earth.com staff writer
    In an unprecedented encounter, a research team successfully engaged in a “conversation” with a humpback whale named Twain.

    The team, known as Whale-SETI, has been conducting research on humpback whale communication systems, aiming to develop intelligence filters for the search for extraterrestrial life.

    Scientists from the SETI Institute, University of California Davis, and the Alaska Whale Foundation made this amazing breakthrough in the field of non-human intelligence.

    How to have a conversation with a whale
    Using a recorded humpback “contact” call played into the sea through an underwater speaker, the scientists were amazed as Twain approached and circled their boat, responding in a conversational manner to the whale’s “greeting signal.”

    Throughout the 20-minute exchange, Twain consistently matched the interval variations between each playback call.

    The details of this extraordinary encounter can be found in the recent issue of the journal Peer J, titled “Interactive Bioacoustic Playback as a Tool for Detecting and Exploring Nonhuman Intelligence: ‘Conversing’ with an Alaskan Humpback Whale.”

    Lead author Dr. Brenda McCowan of U.C. Davis explains the significance of this whale conversation, stating, “We believe this is the first such communicative exchange between humans and humpback whales in the humpback ‘language.'”

    Dr. Fred Sharpe of the Alaska Whale Foundation further emphasizes the intelligence of humpback whales, highlighting their abilities to engage in complex social systems, create tools such as nets made of bubbles to catch fish, and extensively communicate through songs and social calls.

    Whales and extraterrestrial intelligence

    The behavior observed in humpback whales supports an important assumption in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Dr. Laurance Doyle of the SETI Institute is another coauthor of the paper.

    He explains, “Because of current limitations on technology, an important assumption of the search for extraterrestrial intelligence is that extraterrestrials will be interested in making contact and so target human receivers. This important assumption is certainly supported by the behavior of humpback whales.”

    Drawing parallels to studying Antarctica as a proxy for Mars, the Whale-SETI team is utilizing their findings from the study of intelligent, terrestrial, non-human communication systems to develop filters that can be applied to any potential extraterrestrial signals received.

    Implications and future research

    The team will be employing the mathematics of information theory to quantify the communicative complexity, such as the rule structure embedded in a received message.

    In addition to the lead researchers, Dr. Josie Hubbard, Lisa Walker, and Jodi Frediani, who specialize in animal intelligence, humpback whale song analysis, and photography and behavior of humpback whales, respectively, are also coauthors of the paper.

    The Whale-SETI team is currently preparing a second paper on the non-audio communicative behavior of humpback whales, specifically focusing on bubble rings made in the presence of (and possibly for) humans.

    The authors would like to acknowledge the Templeton Foundation Diverse Intelligences Program for their generous financial support in conducting this groundbreaking research.

    More about Whale-SETI

    As discussed above, Whale-SETI, short for Whale Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, marks a revolutionary stride in understanding marine mammals, particularly whales.

    This project blends the search for extraterrestrial intelligence with marine biology, aiming to decode whale communication. It operates under the hypothesis that whale sounds contain complex, intelligent messages akin to languages used by humans or potentially, extraterrestrial beings.

    Technology and methodology of the whale conversation

    At the core of Whale-SETI is advanced technology. Researchers use sophisticated hydrophones and AI algorithms to record and analyze whale sounds.

    The AI, trained on vast datasets of whale calls and human languages, seeks patterns and structures that could indicate language-like characteristics.

    This method not only helps in deciphering the complexity of whale communication but also enhances our understanding of language development in intelligent species.

    Discoveries and insights

    Whale-SETI has already made significant discoveries. Researchers have identified certain repetitive patterns and variations in whale songs that suggest a level of intentional communication.

    These patterns vary among different whale species, indicating distinct ‘dialects’ or ‘languages.’

    This finding challenges our understanding of non-human intelligence and communication, opening new avenues in both marine biology and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.

    Whale conversation implications for the future

    The implications of Whale-SETI are vast. It not only enriches our understanding of marine life but also provides insights into the evolution of communication and intelligence.

    By studying the complexities of whale communication, scientists hope to develop better strategies for marine conservation.

    Additionally, the project offers a unique perspective in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, suggesting that understanding non-human communication on Earth could be key to recognizing and interpreting signals from other intelligent life forms in the universe.

    In summary, Whale-SETI stands as a beacon of interdisciplinary research, merging marine biology with linguistics and astrobiology. Its approach to understanding whale communication opens up a new frontier in the study of intelligent life, both on Earth and beyond.

    This project not only deepens our connection with the marine world but also expands the horizons of our search for intelligence in the cosmos.

    More about humpback whales

    Humpback whales, known scientifically as Megaptera novaeangliae, stand out due to their impressive size and distinctive physical features. These marine mammals can reach lengths of up to 60 feet and weigh as much as 40 tons.

    Their long pectoral fins, which can span up to a third of their body length, and their knobbly head make them easily identifiable.

    Habitat and migration

    Humpback whales inhabit all major oceans, demonstrating a remarkable adaptability to different marine environments.

    They undertake lengthy migrations, possibly the longest of any mammal, traveling up to 5,000 miles between their feeding grounds in polar waters and breeding grounds in tropical or subtropical seas.

    This migratory behavior ensures their survival, linking nutrient-rich feeding areas with safe breeding locations.

    Social behavior and communication

    These whales exhibit complex social behaviors. They often travel in pods, especially during migration. Notably, humpback whales communicate through an array of vocalizations, known as whale songs.

    These songs, intricate and melodious, play a crucial role in social interactions and are particularly prominent during the breeding season. As discussed in depth above, scientists are on the verge of deciphering their language.

    Feeding patterns

    Humpback whales primarily feed on krill and small fish. They employ unique feeding techniques, such as bubble net feeding, where a group of whales will create a circle of bubbles to trap their prey.

    This cooperative hunting strategy highlights their intelligence and social coordination.

    Conservation status

    Once hunted extensively, humpback whales faced significant population declines. However, thanks to international conservation efforts and legal protections, their numbers have been gradually recovering.

    Despite this positive trend, they still face threats from entanglement in fishing gear, ship strikes, and the impacts of climate change on their habitats and food sources.

    In summary, the story of the humpback whale serves as a reminder of both the fragility and resilience of marine life. Continued conservation efforts and research are vital to ensure the survival and health of these magnificent creatures, allowing future generations to witness their awe-inspiring presence in the world’s oceans.
    This is amazing but I'm not quite comfortable with whales & AI chatting - sounds like the start of a sci-fi film that goes badly for us hoomans...
    Gene Ching
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  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    This is amazing but I'm not quite comfortable with whales & AI chatting ...
    I'm not sure that's actually the case from what I'm reading. Seems they are using AI to recognize patterns but the ultimate goal is that we are doing the communicating with whales (as we would with alien life). Using computers to recognize patterns in nothing new, as we all know. The same research team has also been working for years to decipher the language of sperm whales. I haven't kept up with any of that however. I do welcome this type of research as progress. The idea of human exceptionalism has caused us to do horrific things to other beings we share the world and kinship with. The more people are aware of the intelligence, emotions, and culture of other species the less we will abuse them (and hopefully the more we allow them their place in this world). Evidenced by how captive elephants or orcas has fallen out of public favor, causing places like SeaWorld to discontinue their breeding programs, or captivity for these animals altogether, and change their image. I believe Canada has outlawed captive orcas. The social relationships/hierarchy, communication, altruism shown, and codes of conduct (morality) of other species is a fascination for me. It's also amazing how much we learn about humans when we study these in animals. Like the article said, it's give clues and understanding about how such characteristics evolved.

  7. #22
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    Yeah, I know...

    ... I was being a tad sarcastic there. I embrace AI because it has made my job so much easier.

    But it would make a good sci-fi movie, yes?
    Gene Ching
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  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    ... I was being a tad sarcastic there. I embrace AI because it has made my job so much easier.

    But it would make a good sci-fi movie, yes?
    Yes. I think it would. AI makes me wonder/worry about the future of education. It's nothing short of incredible the quality of essay responses that AI can generate. I think about what "learning" is going to mean in the future. I struggle with students Googling quick answers as it is, or attempting to do so when I'm not looking. Makes me think a good premise for such a movie is humans becoming over-reliant on AI to the point they are too ignorant and incapable without it, therefore it gets better while humans get worse. Perhaps an added plot-theme to such a movie is to imply the question, "What is life?, What does it mean to be living, or sentient?" The audience is left to ponder, aren't we just (organic) machines/chemical reactions after all? Matter that became conscious? etc. etc. " Matter of fact, haven't we already given some sort of personhood status to one AI humanoid? What the future holds is hard to imagine.

  9. #24
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    Right?

    I'm getting an AI-written article submission for KungFuMagazine at the rate of about one per week. I can tell them fairly easily - they read like poorly written wikipedia pages. But MightyB demonstrated at the start of this thread, that's usually because the 'authors' are just asking bad questions. Ask the right question and you could get an acceptable article.

    Mind you, I'm not at all opposed to AI-written articles for KFM, at least not yet. I'm just looking for good reads.

    When I was in college, the interwebs were just beginning so it was impossible to research like they do now. I remember doing deep dives into archival libraries for my academic papers. Now it's so easy. And I'm the first to admit that the web has made me ignorant. I often find myself consulting it to remember odd facts. Just yesterday I was trying to remember the word onigiri (I knew it wasn't the same as musubi, but that's another topic).

    I thought the Abbot of Shaolin had some interesting thoughts about AI and sentience.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  10. #25
    I found his comment interesting myself, "However, AI cannot possess the awakening and consciousness preached by Zen. In the face of AI, humans should maintain clarity of mind and seek inner enlightenment and transcendental wisdom, as advocated by Zen."

    Here in FL, from time to time, I catch Christian radio in the car and have noticed that AI has become a regular talking point, right up there with abortion and evolution (yeah....they're still on that one). Granted, I don't know much about religions outside of the one I was raised in but it seems that "human exceptionalism" or the placement of the human at the top of any hierarchy of life is a prevalent theme. I believe that in Buddhism (don't know if Zen is the same) there are what are called "levels of being," with the human at or near the top of a sort-of reincarnation steps going from (so-called) lower to higher life forms.

    Therefore it makes sense that if one prescribes to such a faith, the idea of AI may seem vulgar, or it's acceptance as sentient a threat to dogma. Whether the religious leader is proposing, "...advocated by Zen," or "the Christian worldview," or any other, the idea of why AI is a threat remains the same I think. But a religious perspective on AI or any other matter can only be correct or accurate if the religion itself is also true and factual. Proponents of any religion already accept that it is that. I personally question whether the religion is factual first, and if it cannot be proven to be so then the view is rendered faith-based opinion. For example, in the case of morality. It can be argued as being a survival adaptation for animals that live in social groups and as an aspect of social living that emerges when the survival of one individual depends upon the other. Then there are faiths that claim to have originated morality in that it was handed to us by their god. The origin of morality being another fascinating topic. And, then, of course, can AI develop a sense of morality, or right and wrong?
    Last edited by Lucky Bamboo; 01-05-2024 at 06:33 PM.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucky Bamboo View Post
    I found his comment interesting myself, "However, AI cannot possess the awakening and consciousness preached by Zen. In the face of AI, humans should maintain clarity of mind and seek inner enlightenment and transcendental wisdom, as advocated by Zen."

    Here in FL, from time to time, I catch Christian radio in the car and have noticed that AI has become a regular talking point, right up there with abortion and evolution (yeah....they're still on that one). Granted, I don't know much about religions outside of the one I was raised in but it seems that "human exceptionalism" or the placement of the human at the top of any hierarchy of life is a prevalent theme. I believe that in Buddhism (don't know if Zen is the same) there are what are called "levels of being," with the human at or near the top of a sort-of reincarnation steps going from (so-called) lower to higher life forms.

    Therefore it makes sense that if one prescribes to such a faith, the idea of AI may seem vulgar, or it's acceptance as sentient a threat to dogma. Whether the religious leader is proposing, "...advocated by Zen," or "the Christian worldview," or any other, the idea of why AI is a threat remains the same I think. But a religious perspective on AI or any other matter can only be correct or accurate if the religion itself is also true and factual. Proponents of any religion already accept that it is that. I personally question whether the religion is factual first, and if it cannot be proven to be so then the view is rendered faith-based opinion. For example, in the case of morality. It can be argued as being a survival adaptation for animals that live in social groups and as an aspect of social living that emerges when the survival of one individual depends upon the other. Then there are faiths that claim to have originated morality in that it was handed to us by their god. The origin of morality being another fascinating topic. And, then, of course, can AI develop a sense of morality, or right and wrong?

    the pyramid of morality is generally considered to be agreed upon rules of survival -> veil of ignorance -> utilitarianism. Empathy is the mirror neuron activation of social animals to instinctively carry out these rulesets, wheras structured morality exists to bring efficiency and uniformity to these rulesets in agrarian societies.

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  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Chat GPT = Chat J'ai pété = Cat I ****ed
    This literally made my day!

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    This is amazing but I'm not quite comfortable with whales & AI chatting - sounds like the start of a sci-fi film that goes badly for us hoomans...
    Believe it or not, that's actually the plot of "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home"

    WARNING: SPOILERS BELOW

    Released in 1986, The Voyage Home builds directly on the events of the previous two films in its opening, with Spock readjusting to life after being reborn on Genesis and the Enterprise crew preparing for an inglorious return to Starfleet after breaking all the rules to rescue him. Near Earth, the arrival of a mysterious probe of unknown origin wreaks havoc on Starfleet Command and the operations of the planet. On their way home in a jalopy of a Bird of Prey from Star Trek III, Kirk and company quickly piece together that the probe is trying to make contact with life forms on Earth—just not the life forms you’d expect.

    The probe is trying to get in touch with humpback whales, except there are no more humpback whales on Earth in 2286. Recognizing that the giant space log isn’t going to stop until it hears some whale song, Kirk realizes that, naturally, time travel must be attempted.

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Lucky Bamboo View Post
    I found his comment interesting myself, "However, AI cannot possess the awakening and consciousness preached by Zen. In the face of AI, humans should maintain clarity of mind and seek inner enlightenment and transcendental wisdom, as advocated by Zen."

    Here in FL, from time to time, I catch Christian radio in the car and have noticed that AI has become a regular talking point, right up there with abortion and evolution (yeah....they're still on that one). Granted, I don't know much about religions outside of the one I was raised in but it seems that "human exceptionalism" or the placement of the human at the top of any hierarchy of life is a prevalent theme. I believe that in Buddhism (don't know if Zen is the same) there are what are called "levels of being," with the human at or near the top of a sort-of reincarnation steps going from (so-called) lower to higher life forms.

    Therefore it makes sense that if one prescribes to such a faith, the idea of AI may seem vulgar, or it's acceptance as sentient a threat to dogma. Whether the religious leader is proposing, "...advocated by Zen," or "the Christian worldview," or any other, the idea of why AI is a threat remains the same I think. But a religious perspective on AI or any other matter can only be correct or accurate if the religion itself is also true and factual. Proponents of any religion already accept that it is that. I personally question whether the religion is factual first, and if it cannot be proven to be so then the view is rendered faith-based opinion. For example, in the case of morality. It can be argued as being a survival adaptation for animals that live in social groups and as an aspect of social living that emerges when the survival of one individual depends upon the other. Then there are faiths that claim to have originated morality in that it was handed to us by their god. The origin of morality being another fascinating topic. And, then, of course, can AI develop a sense of morality, or right and wrong?
    Considering that there are several unresolved arguments about consciousness in general, I tend to take side of dualism over materialism. Listen to any of Alan Watts's lectures covering the nature of being, and you get the sense of reality being nothing more than an overarching consciousness which interacts with a material world. Both exist and interact with each other, basically symbolized with the Yin Yang. In this regard, your brain is nothing more than a receiver for a little piece of that universal consciousness which you think of as you. Theoretically, a truly self-aware, human-built receiver for consciousness should be possible.

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by MightyB View Post
    Considering that there are several unresolved arguments about consciousness in general, I tend to take side of dualism over materialism. Listen to any of Alan Watts's lectures covering the nature of being, and you get the sense of reality being nothing more than an overarching consciousness which interacts with a material world. Both exist and interact with each other, basically symbolized with the Yin Yang. In this regard, your brain is nothing more than a receiver for a little piece of that universal consciousness which you think of as you. Theoretically, a truly self-aware, human-built receiver for consciousness should be possible.
    I tend to see dualism, or "good and evil" as human constructs. The universe, matter, atoms, etc. doesn't know good or evil (and, there's truly nothing to say we are more than matter/chemistry). For example, we celebrate Columbus, but revile Hitler. Both committed the same atrocities. As far as we know, it is our senses that interact with the world around us. That is a characteristic of life....that it responds to stimuli (sensory input). I don't see any evidence that the brain "receives" consciousness from an external source. Rather, the brain is the seat of consciousness, it constructs consciousness. Just as our brain interprets electromagnetic waves as color. The color only exists in our brains. And when we die and decay the synapses between neurons, and neuro chemical bonds that make up our "self" - memories, emotions, and consciousness - also ends. Like melting down a metal can opener. The metal is still around but the can opener no longer exists. It doesn't go anywhere, just no longer is. Same with us. Our atoms will remain but we are gone. There's nothing to say otherwise.
    Last edited by Lucky Bamboo; 01-12-2024 at 10:05 PM.

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