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Thread: Fencing

  1. #1
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    Fencing

    What do you guys think of fencing? Do you consider it a martial art or a sport? I have the oppurtunity to train with two national champions and I think I am going to go for it. I tried a little today and it was lots of fun, even if it isn't the most street-fight-realistic thing to train.
    "That is because you are stupid"
    -Zorro

  2. #2
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    Yea I like fencing, I'd classify it definitely as a Martial Art with a sports side. Even though Samurai get all the attention those Europeans could handle themselves. I respect them equally. I'd go for it too if i could train with a couple of national champs. Good luck
    "If I'm gonna get my balls blown off for a word, my word is p00ntang."-Animal Mother

  3. #3
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    Hey lowsweep,

    I'm like you, I found a good fencing instructor in my area and decided to give it a try---I've been to 5 classes so far, and I'm lovin' it!

    I'm just starting out with foil, and from what I gather the rules for foil fencing are a little more restrictive, and then if you move on to the other weapons like epee and saber there are more legal targets and it's more realistic. But even with the foil, you have to figure it's based on a point/stabbing weapon, and you're doing it at full speed against a resisting opponent---I think it's relatively realistic. I sure as heck would be dead pretty quick if my instructor used his foil skill on me with a real needle-point rapier. I've mostly trained Taiji saber and a little sword, and it's really interesting to compare and contrast the training----there's a number of differences in the weapons and the theory, but there's a heck of a lot of similarities, too.

    I would definitely recommend giving it a try--I know I'm enjoying it!

  4. #4
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    I started class last week. I will be learning epee because the man teaching epee looks better than the man teaching foil. Also, the man teaching foil teaches the newer style of foil, which is VERY whippy and I don't like it as much. I have done a little fencing with a foil before, but what I learned was "old style" german and french foil fencing. That was wonderful, very direct, very little whippiness, and it looked really good too. I think the new whippy style of foil that has been adopted by the fencing world is less realistic and, to be honest, kinda cheap. There was a move I saw the foil instructor doing where he would flick his wrist and his foil would bend all the way around behind the other man and hit him in the back. To me at least, that seems like a cheapshot. The epee seems to be much less whippy. If you do learn the whippy style of foil, I'm sure you can still use what you know with a not-so-whippy weapon. Personally though, I'd rather learn with a stiff sword first. Fencing is so much fun though! It's amazing how much fun it is to get in a funny looking tight white suit and stab away at each other.
    "That is because you are stupid"
    -Zorro

  5. #5
    I fenced sabre for almost twelve years. It's a wonderful sport and I've found the speedy footwork to be very helpful in my taekwon do sparring.

  6. #6
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    I've been a European Fencer for the last 6 years (it was my first martial art).

    I've trained with an ex-pro boxer (turned Saberist) and two olymipc competitors. I love fencing, and I'd never trade away!
    I also used it as physical theraphy aftr I shattered my leg (put me in a wheelchair for about a year).
    "We are not the first/
    who, with best meaning/
    have incurr'd the worst"

    King Lear

  7. #7
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    I trained for about 5 years. and finally quit right about the same time my knees gave out. Personally I think the classic or traditional Foil is not only a very effective martial art but also if done properly a wonderul sight to behold. You can really get alot out of Fencing, but you really should try to put everything that you know from other martial arts aside (except for the mind set). During my time as Captain of my college team I met a lot of people who just could not let go of what they had learned from chinese broadsword (etc) and thought that they might reinvent the wheel, by adding a little asain sword tactics to a complete european form.

    Did anyone else train with an old school ex olympian/olympic coach who smacks you with his foil everytime you do something wrong or was it just me and my coach? I still remember the sting on my elbow everytime i would sick it out to much.

    anyway best of luck some of my best memories are of amazing bouts against amazing opponents, even when you lose you learn.

  8. #8
    I still have a scar behind my ear from the times my maestro didn't like my "attitude."

  9. #9
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    Fencing is done with an opponent, like Muay Thai and the Gentleman's Art, both of which are sports.

    Looking to answer your question, sport or martial art? It seems as though whatever requires an opponent is Sport. This do9es not detract from lethalness. These supposed martial arts which are by their nature sports are social events that seem to deal with Respect or Honor.

    Fencing, Boxing, Muay Thai, Shuia Chiao, BrazillianJuijitsu and if these, then perhaps Kendo, Jujitsu, Judo, Karatedo, the Philipino martial arts, Greco-Roman wrestling, Wrestling, Sumo, Grecian combative arts. Capoiera, Sambo.

    I might No_Know the African practices or Te or Kara-te or Savate, enough to distinguish these within the concept of Competition, Sport, a way to settle differences, grudges, way to settle debts~ of Honor.

    Training in any of the above could enable a person to be fight prepared or kill capable.

    Throughout the cultures of Earth; it seems that Death and or or hurt and or or loss IS Sport. ~
    There are four lights... impulse...all donations can be sent at PayPal.com to qumpreyndweth@juno.com; vurecords.com

  10. #10
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    Originally posted by Drone
    I met a lot of people who just could not let go of what they had learned from chinese broadsword (etc) and thought that they might reinvent the wheel, by adding a little asain sword tactics to a complete european form.

    Yep, that's something that my Taiji teacher always stresses: "Empty your cup" when you're learning something new. I'm going into fencing with the attitude that I don't know anything about swordfighting. I do note the similarities or differences between Chinese and European swordsmanship as I understand them, but I agree that the European style is complete, and I always do things the way the fencing instructor says. I'm not necessarily saying I wouldn't mix some apsects eventually, but I'd want a pretty solid knowledge of both before I did that.

    Lowsweep, I know what you mean about the "flicky" style---I've been shown what a move like that looks like. I agree with you, it seems pretty cheap and not too realistic. The drills I"m learning are all pretty traditional, though, and I"m going to approach the art from as much of a traditional standpoint as possible. I also want to stick with my French grip and not go to the anatomical /pistol grip one.

    Man, we did footwork drills tonight where we had to match the instructors advances with our retreats and vice versa, and also match his height----which he often lowered to a REALLY low horse stance-type position while moving. My thighs got as sore as from any CMA training! This art is definitely a good cardio workout, and you can really notice how sloppy your footwork and weapon control gets when you're muscles are aching. A lot of fun, though.

  11. #11
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    I know of a Traditional Non-Sports Martial Arts Oriented Fencing school here in New York. I gonna train eventually when i get a base in Karate. I gotta figure out how to fit it in my schedule.
    "If I'm gonna get my balls blown off for a word, my word is p00ntang."-Animal Mother

  12. #12
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    Lightbulb Fencing

    Has any one here ever taken fencing before?
    Just wondering haven't taken it but, I was considering learning and practicing it. I read recently the Toa of JKD. It was facinating the way he was influenced by the world it self, the style that wasn't a style, and the riddles that freak you out when you come to see that you understand what he's saying.

    Very freaky.

    But my question has anyone taken it before as a course of study and if so would you like to list the benifits of it compared to the foot work of another style of your opionated equal to it.

    Thanx,
    Style is only defined by the limitations of a system of fighting and defending. So when in medatation ask yourself not "what are the weaknesses of thine enemy" but rather so what are your own weaknesses

  13. #13
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    Also has anyone noticed the simularity of kickboxings footwork to that of fencing.
    Style is only defined by the limitations of a system of fighting and defending. So when in medatation ask yourself not "what are the weaknesses of thine enemy" but rather so what are your own weaknesses

  14. #14
    Ask this question on the Main Forum. Gene, Apoweyn and several others fence/have fenced.
    i'm nobody...i'm nobody. i'm a tramp, a bum, a hobo... a boxcar and a jug of wine... but i'm a straight razor if you get to close to me.

    -Charles Manson

    I will punch, kick, choke, throw or joint manipulate any nationality equally without predjudice.

    - Shonie Carter

  15. #15
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    Cheers Sevenstar.

    I'm learning to fence now. And I've studied JKD in the past (among other things).

    In my opinion:

    The footwork in fencing is much more closely related to what's now called 'original JKD' than it is to what you might find in a concepts JKD or kickboxing program. In other words, Bruce Lee was much more influenced by fencing than modern day JKD concepts proponents seem to be.

    With its emphasis on linear movement, fencing footwork doesn't lend itself particularly well to rear leg kicking or rear leg punching. (Though it wouldn't take much adaptation to fix that.) But it's really good for controlling distance and timing, stop hitting (a fave of Lee), controlling rhythm, etc.

    I wouldn't dissuade you from learning to fence, mind you. The specific techniques may or may not be useful to you. But the abilities you'll develop will certainly translate. If you become good at fencing footwork, you're certainly capable of becoming good at other footwork systems as well. But in terms of 'plug and play', I think the FMA (eskrima, arnis, kali) footwork patterns are more immediately applicable to kickboxing.


    Stuart B.
    When you assume, you make an ass out of... pretty much just you, really.

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