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mantis108
08-29-2000, 01:59 AM
This is by no mean representation of all Bak Mei Schools' teachings. These notes are intented to serve as a reference points only. This is not substitution to your study under a qualified Sifu. I do not speak for Bak Mei Pai but I share what little knowledge I have with those who seek my perspective.

Concepts:

Body, Mind and Spirit/breathe as one. There is a heavy Taoist influence in the art. So, a holoistic worldview is adopted.

Adominal Breathing - this allow the rib cage to open more and empowers the diaphram.

Taoist breathing convention is adopted. Inhale - stomache in. Exhale stomache out. Novice level, don't hold your breathe which can cause hyperventilation. Advanced level, your Sifu should guide you.

Tun To are more about breathing. Fao Chum are more about movements. Although, they can be use together. In fact, they should be used together to be effective. For example:

Inhale is Tun (swallow) with Chum (sink). Reconnecting the whole body with Dan Tin (center). Also neuturalize in coming force to the roots. Toes grapping the floor. recton muscle tighten (don't tense up). Whole body is charge with energy but not tense like a log of wood but rather like a bonsai tree.

Exhale is To(split) with Fao(float). This follows Tun (they work together). Release the charge in a relaxed manner. Observe proper body mechanics the "Shock" power will come. It is like Vajra (thunderbolt. Relaxation is the key.

Fao Chum also has a submerge and emerge sense.

Tun To Fao Chum are view as Ging (power mode)

Combining Tun To Fau Chum in movement take a lot of practice and guidence of your Sifu.

Any thoughts?

Mantis108

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08-29-2000, 02:08 AM
Hi Mantis108,

From your previous postings, I gathered that you are a practitioner of Bak Mei and Lung Ying Mor Kiu.

With regards to your current post on tun tou fou chum, I have a question, hopefully you don't mind.

You explained the mechanics of tun tou fou chum. In your opinion, are these four elements independent of one another or they are related? If related, in what way are they so? ARe they done in a sequential manner, i.e. tun and then tou and then fou followed by chum?

I am just interested to listen to your perspective, especially when you are a practitioner of the arts that are famous for this four elements.

Thanks!

mantis108
08-29-2000, 03:32 AM
Hi Integraman,

Excellent question, thank you.

IMHO, I think they are correlated. A Taoist Worldview would suggest that nothing is absolutely indepent of everything else. So Tun is accompanied by To (inhale then exhale or vise versa). It is a cycle. Same as Fao Chum. Tun To as in breathing is not visible but it is behind Fao Chum. The esscence of Fao Chum is Tun To but not the other way around. In other words, the energy is "made" submerged or emerged by good practise of breathing technique but not vise versa.

Yet, it is possible to do Tun and fao instead of Tun and Chum (likewise with To,depending on the movement). It is not necessary to do all of them in sequence.

You are correct in that these elements are important to both Bak Mei and Lung Ying. We often talk about "Sai" (disposition/composture) of a stylist. These elements are first sign of mastery.

BTW, may I ask which art(s) do you study? Please feel free to share your thoughts.

Mantis108

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08-29-2000, 04:00 AM
Hi Mantis108,

Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I believe you have no doubt learned your lessons well under your teacher. He must be happy to have a good student like you.

The explanation you gave above are in line with what I understanding about these 4 elements, at least at my current level of understanding.

To further this discussion, IMHO, tun as in swallow can be executed independently, in the sense of swallowing the force using the body mechanics to achieve such means. However, tun without tou is only one part of the story. Hence, in accordance to what you called as Daoist ideologies, tun and tou are complementary, both having the offensive and defensive elements. Tun is usually accompanied by tou. What do you think of this? Please pardon my poor command of english if you don't mind.

On the other hand, I have also came across other perspective on explaining these 4 elements, the most common being the nature of attacks on opponents.

However to my understanding, the four elements are the basic mechanics of generating power and are done within the body, and the visible result falls to the more common explanation mentioned on the prior paragraph.

Integraman

08-29-2000, 04:11 AM
Hi Mantis108,

I forgot to add something.

In Bak Mei, these 4 elements can be found in the most fundamental set, usually "Jik Bo Kuen" while in Lung Ying Mor Kiu, is usually "Sap Luk Tong".

If I am not mistaken, these sets are extremely simple in appearance but serve as a critical and strong foundation for future developement of these styles, and the training of the body mechanics using the 4 elements place a very important role in these sets.

Care to share your thought?

By the way, it appears to me that you are a Cantonese?

Integraman

mantis108
08-29-2000, 05:15 AM
Hi Integraman,

Thank you for your compliment. The late Sifu Chow Fok was a wonderful soul and I learned very little from this great master due to my limited ability.

This is very exciting. Our shorthand brothers and sisters have been waiting to have this kind of disscussion for awhile. Thank you for sharing. This is what I would think "Throwing bricks to entice jades". You are right I am a Cantonese from HK (now in Canada). I must say you are very impressive.

I totally agree with your perspective. At the same time, I wish to hear more. So, please enlighten us.

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>To further this discussion, IMHO, tun as in swallow can be executed independently, in the sense of swallowing the force using the body mechanics to achieve such means. However, tun without tou is only one part of the story. Hence, in accordance to what you called as Daoist ideologies, tun and tou are complementary, both having the offensive and defensive elements. Tun is usually accompanied by tou.[/quote]

This statment makes me more curious about your study. I surmise you are at least advanced level CMAist if not a master yourself. Simple yet powerful... (I'm must confess. I am having one of those pensive moment reading your post) Indeed, well put.

Your knowledge in the 2 systems are equally stunning. Not many people understand Jik Bo and Sup Luk Tong can be practice as Chi Gong. Especially Jik Bo. If these 4 elements are mastered, even the most simple movement becomes charged with power.

This is great. Please share more of your thoughts

You are welcome to email me at sifu1@internorth.com

Mantis108




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08-29-2000, 01:51 PM
Hi Mantis108,

Many thanks for your compliment. I think we should do away with those compliment thing and get started on our discussion.

To start with, I have to disappoint you but to say that I am just a mere beginner, in no way possess any advance knowledge on CMA.

With regards to Tun Tou Fou Chum, IN GENERAL, I believe they are the essense of the Southern styles. By no means an authority on any style, but I have came across these words being mentioned in other system, mainly the Fujian White Crane.

To me, Tun Tou Fou Chum is the main concept behind generating the power or ging in Cantonese. The power being generated might look very external from the naked eyes, but in reality it isn't. The mechanics on executing these four elements can be consider as a combination of internal and external, internal being the role of the mind in uniting the hei, shan and ying while there lies a subtle body mechanics to generate this type of power.

To accompany these 4 elements in training and fighting is the usage of body posture, or Shan Ying, sort of like what you labeled as "Ji Sai" if I understand you correctly?
Each and every school has their own characteristics of how do use the body posture and these body postures mark the distinctive trademark on each different style.

To sum up, IMHO, a good Bak Mei and Lung Ying Mor Kiu practitioner will pay tremendous amount of attention in cultivating these four elements and also investigate the characteristics of these styles' body posture with regards to the concepts and principles found in the system. To do this, one of course need a teacher and more importantly, herein lies the importance of thoroughly understanding the forms.

Well, I hope I didn't ramble too much. Care to add, correct or share your thought?

I really enjoy this discussion alot!

Thanks for bringing this whole topic up

MoQ
08-29-2000, 03:42 PM
What about the 8 Powers and 3 Borders?
I can't agree with "swallow/spit" being inhale/exhale. I think "swallow"(-ing the stomach) certainly doesn't connotate taking IN an abdominal breath, but the action can pull in a small high short breath and combined immediately with "spit", or applying "sink" to crush that which was swallowed. Often though, the "swallow" action can be as a complete emptying to create a momentary, tiny "black hole" to steal the power from an aggressive thrust.

Also, shouldn't "sink" be exhale and "float" be inhale? Hard to sink when you're filling with air and hard to float while deflating, right?

All this is merely a "natural" perspective of the effect the actions(that develop the "powers") have on the body. Although many Taoists believe in breathing normally all the time no matter what is happening, in fact the art of Taoist breathing is quite refined and small bursts of inhale or exhale can be trained to internal response by way of Taoist diaphragmatic exercises and breathing formulas.

At any rate, the cultivation of these powers is the #1 priority past simply learning the movements... THIS is why Masters, not only STILL practice the simple seeming forms(like Jik Bo Kuen, Chung Bo Kuen, Som Bo Gin etc...all those 3 steps forward type forms), but they practice them with more of a "slow internal" attitude than they had when they were younger.


"Without the power we call "ging", this gungfu would be ineffective"

LION
08-29-2000, 07:22 PM
absorbing information....

[This message has been edited by LION (edited 08-31-2000).]

mantis108
08-29-2000, 11:50 PM
Great response going. We will do away with pleasantry then.

Here are a few dynamics going, I will address them seperately.

On Power:

I'm of the view that Hakka styles categorize power in 4 areas and that they work together. Lik (muscular), Hey (endurance*), Nei Hey (intrinsic energy), Gang Ging (shock power, I would describe this as Vajra) are like the four limbs of a fetus. If the limbs are not developed together, you'll have a very deformed bady (another Taoist convention). Again, they are correlated and codependent of each other. We can further discuss this if anyone is interested.

Addressing MoQ's comment

You are right Tun To Fao Chum are more than simple breathing. You have addressed the power mode of the Tun To Fao Chum while I was addressing the basic mechanics of these elements. As for the Sink/Float, I was addressing a more advanced variation. Think in terms of a balloon when filled with gases that it floats. I guess I should use the term "charged with energy" or "summon energy" instead. The Chinese word "Tye" (lifting) comes into mind.

About understanding

It is important not to intellectually "understand" rather intuitively "experience" your very only energy signature. Thunderbolt means nothing to me when I first starting CMA. Now it is a different story.

About practice

It is important to understand that physical conditioning and meditation are of equal importance because they facilitate a most favourable condition for the body, mind, and spirit to correctly perceive the ultimate reality or the truth whichever way you prefer to label "IT".

More thoughts?

Mantis108

P.S. Lion, I was wondering where you were. Thanks, I am glad that you enjoy this thread.



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Kevin Barkman
08-30-2000, 08:59 AM
Hello - I would like to contribute to this, although I understand very little of what is being said.

In my own limited understanding, Fao and To do not necessarily go together. In my past discussions with my Sifu, he laughed at me for making such absolute distinctions. In his opinion, the two (fao/chum) may be combined with the other two (tun/to), depending on the skill of the practitioner. If one makes such a connection, they are a bit limited in their options. In other words, these four concepts are NB, but should be "combinable" to a high level practioner. Almost like only knowing how to do "mor-cup" on the right side only.

Cheers - kevin

08-30-2000, 07:02 PM
Hi Mantis108,

I have a question for you specifically on the manifestation of these 4 elements.
Is it correct to say that in order to produce such amount of power, the whole body including the arms have to be fully relaxed but not limp?

In another words, to an observer, a Bak Mei or Lung Ying guy might be tensing his arm to generate the power but in reality, the power is being produced using the 4 elements. It just look hard but it is not.

Please correct me if I am wrong. Thanks!

Lau
08-30-2000, 07:24 PM
Hi,

Imo the 4 elements create the power. Relaxedness in the body transports it. But on the end of the punch/movement there must be power in the fist.

So I believe the arm must be tensed, but only at the last moment.

By the way, good to hear that there are a lot of people who share the opinion of the importance of jek bo! I think hard work on this form is the 'secret'

Regards, Lau

Lu Chi-hwa
08-30-2000, 07:29 PM
Hi integraman,
You asked:
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by integraman:

I have a question for you specifically on the manifestation of these 4 elements.
Is it correct to say that in order to produce such amount of power, the whole body including the arms have to be fully relaxed but not limp?

[/quote]

In the Bak Mei I learned: when you produce power (ie punch, claw), your legs are the root. So legs, hip are tensed but your upper body is relaxed.

In my school they teached breathing from the first day on! First natural, later reversed. The reversed breathing was used in seperate qi gung exercises. After a while it begame natural.

Question:
When you do qi gung exercises, you always end with some rubbing/massage. This to let the qi, flow normal again in case you did the exercise wrong. But in walking the set, though breathing/qi gung is involved, you do not do this kind of rubbing. Why is that?

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Lu Chi-hwa

Lau
08-30-2000, 07:45 PM
Hi Lu Chi-hwa,

Can you please tell me why reverse breathing is better for pak mei than natural breathing?

Regards, Lau

Lu Chi-hwa
08-30-2000, 08:10 PM
Hi Lau,

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lau:
Hi Lu Chi-hwa,

Can you please tell me why reverse breathing is better for pak mei than natural breathing?

Regards, Lau [/quote]

Uhhh...good question, I am afraid I can not. Only it is different. (Did I imply its better? did not mend to)
With reversed I ment:inhale - stomache in, and exhale - stomache out. When you exhale your stomache out will let the chi flow deep in the dan tien. That is the thought I learned.
I learned a set of Eh Mei chi gung, and these exercises use reversed breathing. After use this set, very fast it became natural way of breathing.
Its not martial but quite relaxing and does the intestine well as the other organs.

Maybe matis108 can tell us more?


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Lu Chi-hwa

mantis108
08-30-2000, 11:33 PM
Hi Kevin, Integraman, Lau, Lu,

Great to see you all.

Kevin,

You are right about that they can be independent or combined to produce Ging.

Integraman,

Yes, we are on the same page. To a spectator, it is deceptively harmless. That why the old masters always warns of public demonstrations. The higher the set the less spectaculor because the movements are stripped of all the flowery stuff. I remember LU told me a story about Sigung Cheung Lai Chun performed once in front of other Ching Wu masters, who wanted Sigung to join them to teach at CW. They didn't find his performance impressive. But Sigung demonstrated the Guo Bo Tyui the second time his rooting force was so strong that the platform was cracked. Hakka styles in general don't mind about esthetics. The beauty lies in the truth.

Lau,

How have you been? Regarding the Taoist (reversed) breathing, I do think it helps. I will direct your attention to Bui Gim which is Tun (breath in and suck in) instead of To. Bui Gim, being a longer range strike, without the Tun, it can degenerate into a swinging motion instead of a controlled blow. The Pheonix Eye punch (the cross) without the To (breath out and push out) will fall shot of power because of its short ranged nature. Taoist believes in the balance of nature. It would seems that Bak Mei's methodolgy has lots of paradox but such is the Taoist world view.

Lu,

Chi Gung can be categorize into 4 types of exercises. Walking (moving), standing, seatted, and lying down. The Latter 3 are mostly immobile and are believe to cause harm to the internal organs (specificly the Kidney when standing over 30 mins or so). So, the self massage (usually starts with the kindneys, then Dan Tin, etc...)to the sooth the internal organs of the stress. Plus that this will bring the heart rate up, circulation up a notch and refresh the muscles (especially the leg muscles).

BTW, I agree that prior to the strike, we remain relaxed but not limp. At the point of impact we tense for a brief instant. The degree of tensing makes the difference in the out come. The mind though must penetrates throgh the target regardless of the tools's range. Do not "just" deliver a strike physically. The "Emotional Content" has to be present.

Mantis108

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MoQ
08-30-2000, 11:50 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by integraman:

I have a question for you specifically on the manifestation of these 4 elements.
Is it correct to say that in order to produce such amount of power, the whole body including the arms have to be fully relaxed but not limp?
In another words, to an observer, a Bak Mei or Lung Ying guy might be tensing his arm to generate the power but in reality, the power is being produced using the 4 elements. It just look hard but it is not.

[/quote]

The body must be relaxed and supple until the moment of impact and then soft and sensitive immediately. Taoist arts are despised by many because of the devious/strategic lack of emotion. It's simply too clever to be considered
"righteous".

The "tensed arm" is called "3 border force" generated from the shoulder and/or shoulder,elbow,wrist in concert. Position of the body is not a factor with the 3-Border power.

The "8 area force" is 3 joints of leg, 3 of arm, waist and jaw, opening and closing the joints together to generate power.

The powers of Fao Chum Tun Tou represent 4 of the 8 Taoist directions of up,down, inward,outward, twist,turn, advance,retreat. These actions are meant to destroy the oppo's balance from the inside. Of course, in conjuction with fist and claw, they can be quite damaging and add to the frighteningly "unexpected" actions these styles are known for.

08-30-2000, 11:51 PM
Hi Mantis108,

You wrote:

Yes, we are on the same page. To a spectator, it is deceptively harmless. That why the old masters always warns of public demonstrations. The higher the set the less spectaculor because the movements are stripped of all the flowery stuff. I remember LU told me a story about Sigung Cheung Lai Chun performed once in front of other Ching Wu masters, who wanted Sigung to join them to teach at CW. They didn't find his performance impressive. But Sigung demonstrated the Guo Bo Tyui the second time his rooting force was so strong that the platform was cracked. Hakka styles in general don't mind about esthetics. The beauty lies in the truth.

My reply:
Thanks. In one of the Bak Mei's book that contains quite a number of Cheung Lai Chuen's pictures doing Bak Mei set ( forgot the author's name ), he seems relaxed, but his postures were good, well connected and solid but what surprised me most was despite the general misconception of Bak Mei being a hard style, Cheung Lai Chuen looked extremely relaxed but one can sense the "intention" was there.

Same goes for Lam Yiu Kwai's pics in Chow Fook's book. His postures are well ground and the connection is there.

Mantis108 wrote:
How have you been? Regarding the Taoist (reversed) breathing, I do think it helps. I will direct your attention to Bui Gim which is Tun (breath in and suck in) instead of To. Bui Gim, being a longer range strike, without the Tun, it can degenerate into a swinging motion instead of a controlled blow. The Pheonix Eye punch (the cross) without the To (breath out and push out) will fall shot of power because of its short ranged nature. Taoist believes in the balance of nature. It would seems that Bak Mei's methodolgy has lots of paradox but such is the Taoist world view.

My reply:
It seems to me that the whole idea of Bak Mei and Lung Ying power generation method is full of paradox. One must swallow before he can spit and he must float before he can sink. The execution of this seemingly paradoxical in nature's mechanics will produce extremely powerful force.
But then as you mentioned, body mechanics is one thing, the "yi" must come into play too. One need both to progress. I think both can be practiced even in the most basic forms.

Lau,

Are you from Holland? How's the Bak Mei clan over there? I was informed that the school there does produce good fighters and they are powerful, externally and also internally.
Hope to hear more from you.

bean curd
08-31-2000, 04:58 AM
off the four concepts of bai mei, can i add the following for your consideration and expantion, and correction if i am off the mark.

tun to is the yin and the internal, while to a degree fao and chum relaite to the raising and lowering of the hand, being the yang and the external

with this then the intention is focused on the movement of ging through the seven stars and bring, as it is said, "the strength to be exerted on top of the force, which is an intrigal part of bei mei.

on the focus of taoist breathing, one explanation to the usage, is that in the exicution of a technique, the actions of the body follow the movement of the reversal breathing, to this end, then it is logical that the focus should be trained in this manner

since attention to the sensation of the arms and the neutralization of the attacking force of an opponent is central to bei mei, consideration to where the strength is exeterted is imperative, to this end, the exertion of strength is only when the fist has reached the target, by using the four principles this permits the effect to be more effective, and leands the saying, "strenght is exerted on top of the force"

hope you don't mind

regards

mantis108
08-31-2000, 11:29 PM
Hi MoQ,

Great stuff. Just love the sharing spirit here. Would you agree?

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>The body must be relaxed and supple until the moment of impact and then soft and sensitive immediately. Taoist arts are despised by many because of the devious/strategic lack of emotion. It's simply too clever to be considered
"righteous".[/quote]

Taoists are often highly educated people. No government ever like the intellectual because they would not be fool the the spin doctors. Likewise in martial arts.

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>The "tensed arm" is called "3 border force" generated from the shoulder and/or shoulder,elbow,wrist in concert. Position of the body is not a factor with the 3-Border power.[/quote]

My understanding of "Sarm Kwan Ging" (3 border force) is similar to "Sarm Tong" in Lung Ying. Sarm Tong is not restricted to the upper limbs only. The whole body including each joint of the limbs is involved in this "Sarm Tong/Kwan" relationship. Good point, MoQ.

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>The "8 area force" is 3 joints of leg, 3 of arm, waist and jaw, opening and closing the joints together to generate power.[/quote]

Excellent. The jaw "Ngarh Ging" is also a very important feature of both Lung Ying and Bak Mei. Besides helpping to generate power, it also serves the purpose of protecting the out going Ging returning to harm the brain. Thanks for the reminder, MoQ.

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>The powers of Fao Chum Tun Tou represent 4 of the 8 Taoist directions of up,down, inward,outward, twist,turn, advance,retreat. These actions are meant to destroy the oppo's balance from the inside. Of course, in conjuction with fist and claw, they can be quite damaging and add to the frighteningly "unexpected" actions these styles are known for.[/quote]

Gang Ging. Really appreciate what you've shared MoQ, more please?

Mantis108

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diego
02-25-2010, 02:29 AM
Great thread working on jek bo until friday when I go back to class for more lessons.

kung fu fighter
02-25-2010, 07:09 AM
Amazing thread!!! I wish us in the wing chun section can have deep detailed and informative and civilized discussions such as this:)

It would be nice also to hear how other Hakka styles such as jook lum SPM, and fujian white crane differ in their use of the 4 powers tun, tao, chum, fao in comparison to bak mei and Lung Ying?

TAO YIN
02-25-2010, 08:11 AM
:eek:

A cool topic!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

FWIW, I think that FCTT is just a different way to talk about good body mechanics. Obviously if you are pulling someone towards you, you are going to use pulling energy. A good way to compare would be to compare how one plays fctt in their forms and how one plays fctt in their fighting.

Breathing relates to both attack and defense, no matter the range a fighter is in. Learning breath control is good. Keeps you from losing your breath when someone hits you; which is hard to do sometimes, especially if you are expending it anyways. Those guys that get shot in the guts with cannons have the chi gung down. But if they didnt take care of their breath, they would be dim maked by that cannon ball.

:confused::o

sanjuro_ronin
02-25-2010, 08:18 AM
Reverse breathing is the most natural breathing when lifting a heavy weight.
Powerlifters and ST athletes are taught it, though to be honest most do it naturally from the beginning.
Boxers are taught it when learning how to "take a shot".
Many so-called "esoteric" concepts and principles exist in modern sports, they just have regular names and are simply "part of the package".

kfson
02-25-2010, 08:23 AM
Agreed, Fantastic thread!

TAO YIN
02-25-2010, 09:00 AM
Boxer Breathing is a little difficult to do out of the nose with the mouth closed, but it's better for jaws.

Taking shots and breathing properly out your nose is difficult to learn, especially after the first round...

Olaf
02-25-2010, 09:24 AM
TTFC is a key characteristic of Pak Mei, yet there are different explanations. I guess the key is to do it the way your Sifu tells yo to do it.

sanjuro_ronin
02-25-2010, 09:59 AM
Boxer Breathing is a little difficult to do out of the nose with the mouth closed, but it's better for jaws.

Taking shots and breathing properly out your nose is difficult to learn, especially after the first round...

It certainly is a tad tricky but getting hit in the jaw with an open mouth is no fun at all, LOL !

TAO YIN
02-25-2010, 10:06 AM
OLAF,

I agree there are many explanations and many kinds of ways to do it, especially in forms. But there are only so many ways to actually make it practical and develop it for fighting. Breathing in while punching out, and actually getting power out of it, is difficult to develop and takes time. It's great to do though. Having FCTT, Power, and Breath all working naturally is what every fighter strives for.

With fighting, FCTT should be a natural occurence that relates to breath and kinematics. But because of the breath factor, it is difficult to keep flowing naturally after taking a few body shots. A lot of times, it just ends up being Chum after beginning to lose breath, becoming winded.

My point is, there is FCTT that has nothing really going on inside of it, no breath no kinematics. And there is FCTT that has everything going on inside of it, but is hardly noticeable.

Do wind sprints for a couple of hundred yards, then merry go round with your eyes closed for about ten times, then try fctt! If you can still connect your breath to the forces and keep bak mei principles, that is a good start.

Yum Cha
02-26-2010, 04:06 PM
Lots of good oil in this thread I agree. Mantis108 always made great contributions.

A few things I like to focus on:

Capturing a breath and using it fully. This also hardens your body in defence.

Not linking your movements with your breathing - hands are faster than lungs.

Being able to do anything on the inhale or the exhale - nobody said it was easy.

Not wasting power, strength or breath until its needed - more a mind than a body thing.

Breathing is where most Pak Mei students are weak, you can tell by listening.

TTFC is beyond breath, and the second and most obvious failing amongst PM students. Everybody talks the talk, but few indeed walk the walk. It is very plain to see, there are no rationalisations.

Those two elements are the difference between internal and external Pak Mei, naturally, they revolve around core body techniques, breathing, and snapping between tense and loose. Pak Mei starts external and becomes internal in time. Great for us old blokes...LOL.

Touching Pak Mei hands is similar to touching smoke, or iron bars, and from a good practitioner you will always get the opposite of what you expect.