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Destrous9
04-18-2001, 09:47 PM
The following are some suggestions and thoughts on an a strength building routine.
It may be a little wordy, but I wanted to make sure I didn't miss anything.
I practiced and studied bodybuilding and powerlifting for about 10 years,
and most of this information is real world stuff, or the methods that work
for non drug-using lifters. I hope it helps.

1) Nutrition
Nutrition is just as important as a proper strength training plan. Without
the proper amount of complex carb and protein intake, your efforts will
often plateau, or creep slowly forward. It is best to get about 3 quality
servings of complex carbs during each day (rice and pasta are my favorites).
Complex carb intake should be spaced out evenly during the day. One serving
early in the day, one serving midday, and one around dinner time. The next
most important issue is protein intake. Your body needs protein to rebuild the
torn muscle tissue from a hard workout. Generally, a body can only assimilate
28-35 grams of protein every 2.5 to 3 hours, so it is best to spread out your
protein 'meals'. I recommend a minimum of 120 grams of protein a day, up to
200 grams if you really want to pack on extra muscle tissue as well. Eat
protein 4-6 times a day, spread apart by 2.5 to 3 hour intervals. The rest
of your caloric intake should depend on your physique and your nutritional needs.
Don't cut your fat intake to 0 grams, as your body needs a marginal amount of
fat to function. Also, drink plenty of water. Water helps the body recover
faster between workouts.

The following are some protein foods I used during my 10 years of training:

Eggs: 7 grams of protein ea. 75 calories ea.
Protein powder in powdered milk, w/20 ounces of water: Mix to 30 grams protein, 200 calories
Can of tuna packed in water: 28 grams of protein, 180-ish calories, no fat
Met-Rx bars: 28-ish grams of protein, 200-ish calories. Good nutritionally.
Chicken breast: 30 grams of ptotein, low calories.
...and when I didn't have access to these foods, I would grab a huge stick of
beef jerky from a quick-mart...alot of them have 25+ grams of protein and are
low calorie.

2) Sleep
Try to get 7-8 hours a night, or an amount that keeps you feeling good when you
wake up. Nuff said.

3) Training frequency.
Do not train each bodypart 2-3 times a week. This seems like the macho approach,
but it does not works for a non drug-using lifter. Look at all the guys in your
gym that have trained with this program for 5-10 years...they make little or
no progress.

Train each bodypart once every 5, 6 or 7 days. Each muscle needs at least 72
hours of proper recuperation to grow stronger, and the most growth in strength
will occur at 72-100 hours after training. For the five years before my
daughter was born, I trained each bodypart once a week. Which is best? Once every
5-6-7 days? Play around and see which pattern yields you with the biggest improvement
in strength from the last workout. Each body is different.

4) Training Intensity
Fewer sets, and far greater intensity.
Push each set to failure. Use strict technique and heavy weight. Nuke your
body. Life heavy and use heavy compound movements. Do not do more than 10 sets
for any bodypart. More than this is a waste, and actually breaks down tissue
negatively, as well as over-taxes joints.

5) My recommended workout: (Go heavy, and keep trying to go heavier each workout)

Monday: Chest/Shoulders/Triceps

Bench Press 4 sets to failure. 10-12 reps, 7-9 reps, 7-9 reps, 4-6 reps
Dumbbell bench press 4 sets to failure. Same rep pattern as above
Overhead dumbbell press or overhead barbell press (alternate each workout) 6 sets. 10-12, 7-9, 7-9, 7-9, 7-9, 4-6
Closegrip Bench press (hands together or close together) 4 sets. 10-12, 7-9, 7-9, 4-6

This workout when used with maximum weight and intensity will nuke your shoulders, chest
and triceps. It includes basic compound movements which are the key to strength training.
Pec decs, flyes, and other movements are not needed. To Get strong you must life big,
no exceptions.

Wednesday: Back/Biceps/Calves

Dumbell Rows, or Low pulley rows (alternate each workout) 4 sets, same rep pattern
Half deadlifts, (or complete deadlifts if no access to a squat rack) Bar should
rest about 4 inches below your knees at the bottom of the movement. 4 sets, same rep pattern.
Dumbell or barbell curls (alternate each woorkout) 4 sets, same rep pattern
Favorite calve movement 4 sets, same rep pattern

This workout pre-exhausts the back muscle with the rows, and frys the back with the deadlifts.
Again, basic compound movements which will work all back muscles, traps, biceps, obliques, and lower back.

Friday: Legs

Squats 6 sets, 10-12, 10-12, 7-9, 7-9, 7-9, 4-6, maximum weight. Use strict form and no bouncing!
Favorite hamstring movement, 4 sets. I like alternating machine hamstring work with good mornings,
(or straight leg deadlifts).

6) Notes
-Heavy compound movements are the best natural anabolic, as they force the body to release
massive amounts of testosterone. Max weight to failure always. Squatting, deadlifting,
and the other heavy weight movements make your entire body stronger, as they put you in an anabolic state.
-never do more sets. If you have the extra energy, use it elsewhere in life. Strength
training is not endurance training. Lift big and get out of the gym.
-once every month and a half to 2 months, shock a bodypart, or do something different.
For example, instead of your normal chest workout, do pushups until your arms fall off, or do
no resting between sets, with a partner peeling weight off of the barbell, etc. Get creative,
but nuke and shock your body every couple of months. This helps break strength plateaus. ANother
good plateau breaker is super slow motion sets. 5 seconds lifting up, 5 seconds coming down for each movement.
-Lifting without proper nutrition and protein intake is useless. They must go hand in hand.
-Once every 6-7 days is plenty. Rest.
-The monsters in the bodybuilding/strength magazines feature insane routines, which can only be
beneficial under the influence of roids, hormones, and more.

At the end of 1999, (my last training log) my lifts were:

Bench Press, 440 by 5 reps
Deep squat, 600 by 6 reps
Dumbell rows, 190 lb DB's by 6 reps
Overhead DB press, 160's by 5 reps.

My upper body was always naturally weaker than my legs.


I hope this helps some. You may know alot of this, so I hope nothing is redundant.
This program is effective and simple, and has pushed my body to life weights I never thought
possible. My body was not genetically built for power. At the age of 18 (when I first started
lifting), I couldn't bench press 100 pounds for 4 reps. Using this program exclusively
from 1997-1999 (I stopped lifting when my daughter was born :( ), I could lift more than anyone in the gym.
Most guys thought I was on steroids. The same guys overworked and underfed their bodies.
Please try it, it really works well...and give it a year. My numbers were after many years of intense training.
But with this simple program, my strength never stopped increasing.

Good luck!

Destrous9

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

Insynergy
04-19-2001, 10:25 AM
Wow someone posting info instead of questions for a change?? :) Very commendable destrous. I may not try it exactly but more notes are good notes :)
One question though - ever have any problems these days with joints?? esp knees??

Destrous9
04-19-2001, 11:28 AM
No, not really. My body seems built for deep squats, and I've always done them slow, with tight form and knee wraps.

My joints are at their worst when I don't train. It seems (appears) that the muscle strength remains, while the tendons become soft, or weaker at a much faster rate. I think this can cause problems.

When the muscle is far stronger then the tendons, and the muscle is used, I can notice it.

I do have horrible tendonitis in my elbows, but only on pulling motions. For the first five years of my training, I used to train pushing motions much harder than pulling. So the tendonitis is my fault, not the lifting.

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

[This message was edited by Destrous9 on 04-20-01 at 02:38 AM.]

Destrous9
04-19-2001, 11:37 AM
...and thanks for the 'pat on the back'. While I do know alot about weightlifting and nutrition, the martial arts are still relatively new to me.

I am constantly skimming the boards absorbing all I can, and rarely posting anything of value to the CMA student.

I thought I might be able to help a few people with my experience.

Thanks again, and good training, whatever your training might be.

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

IronFist
04-19-2001, 07:49 PM
Good nutrition advice, Destrous9 :)

"-Heavy compound movements are the best natural anabolic, as they force the body to release
massive amounts of testosterone."

Yes! To anyone reading this, don't be afraid of squatting, like most people are. And when you do decide to be a man and squat, make sure you go until your thighs parallel to the floor. Don't do wussy frat boy squats (the kind where you load way more weight than you can handle and go down 2 or 3 inches)

"Max weight to failure always."

I think this is good advice, but someone who ALWAYS did it this way would eventually make slow gains. Every 2 months or so change your workout up. Go less weight more reps for a while to keep your body guessing.

"Squatting, deadlifting, and the other heavy weight movements make your entire body stronger, as they put you in an anabolic state."

Again, yup :)

"-never do more sets. If you have the extra energy, use it elsewhere in life. Strength
training is not endurance training. Lift big and get out of the gym."

Powerlifters do fewer sets with more rest inbetween and heavier weights for less reps. Bodybuilders on the other hand will do more sets to use as much muscle fiber as possible. After all, to the bodybuilder, more muscle fiber recruitment = more growth.

"-once every month and a half to 2 months, shock a bodypart, or do something different.
For example, instead of your normal chest workout, do pushups until your arms fall off, or do
no resting between sets, with a partner peeling weight off of the barbell, etc. Get creative,
but nuke and shock your body every couple of months. "

Oops, I guess you did say this, which pertains to my above comment about changing things up.

"This helps break strength plateaus."

But if someone doesn't always do max weight to failure, plateaus will be less common ;)

"-Lifting without proper nutrition and protein intake is useless."

And rest.

"-Once every 6-7 days is plenty. Rest."

Again, good advice.

"-The monsters in the bodybuilding/strength magazines feature insane routines, which can only be beneficial under the influence of roids, hormones, and more."

Not to mention the fact that pro BB'ers also randomly happen to have the genes to enable them to become that big. Besides, I think a pro BB would be a sucky martial artist :)

"Bench Press, 440 by 5 reps
Deep squat, 600 by 6 reps"

Impressive. Better than me :)

Finally, eat more tuna! (or Chicken of the Sea pink salmon if the mercury content in tuna scares you)

ironman

Ford Prefect
04-19-2001, 07:52 PM
Hey Destrous,

You might find it interesting in reading about the weight-training plans for Eastern Block Countries who are pretty dominant in powerlifting comps. Lots of national team coaches never have their lifters go to failure and will typically have them practice the same lifts multiple times per week as well as at various intervals during a single day while going as heavy as possible. In other words, they have them go as heavy as possible as often as possible. I just started following a similar approach about 8 months ago and have never seen better gains in my life. It's just some interesting reading.

"Who's house?"
"I said RUN's house."

Ford Prefect
04-19-2001, 07:57 PM
>>>Powerlifters do fewer sets with more rest inbetween and heavier weights for less reps. Bodybuilders on the other hand will do more sets to use as much muscle fiber as possible. After all, to the bodybuilder, more muscle fiber recruitment = more growth.<<<

Don't you think that the power lifter who's lifting maximal weights will have far greater neurological muscle fiber recruitment than a bodybuilder who uses less weight? After all, I've seen 185 lbs powerlifters that could out squat many a monster bodybuilder.

"Who's house?"
"I said RUN's house."

IronFist
04-19-2001, 08:15 PM
"Don't you think that the power lifter who's lifting maximal weights will have far greater neurological muscle fiber recruitment than a bodybuilder who uses less weight? After all, I've seen 185 lbs powerlifters that could out squat many a monster bodybuilder"

No. Someone who lifts a heavy weight (obviously for fewer reps), ie powerlifters, will NOT recruit as many muscle fibers as someone who lifts for 6-8 reps (moderate range), with more sets and who lifts to failure.

The purpose of bodybuilding is to get big. On stage, no one cares if you can squat 200lbs or 700lbs. The only thing you're judged on is how you look. Dr. Hatfield, the first man to squat over 1000lbs has skinny legs. Why? Because he doesn't train to failure on multiple sets and therefore doesn't use as much TOTAL muscle fiber.

A sample bodybuilding chest routine might involve first bench press for 5 or 6 sets, never exceding 10 reps per set. And no more than 1.5 minutes rest inbetween sets. Then he may move on to dumbell flies to further use MORE muscle fibers that haven't already been "damaged" by bench press, altho he will use less total weight because there are less fibers left, and then he might move on to cable flies with a relatively lighter weight to further use up as many remaining muscle fibers as possible. The reason for this? The most muscle fibers he uses, the more will grow back, bigger, which is the ultimate goal of bodybuilding.

Powerlifters, on the other hand, use far greater weight, but do less reps, fewer sets, and more rest inbetween sets. Why? Because their ultimate goal is to be able to lift as much weight as possible, with no regard to how they look.

You are right when you say powerlifters can squat more than their much larger bodybuilding counterparts. The reason is because they train differently, because they have different goals. A (typical) bodybuilder would get his arse kicked in a powerlifting comp., as would a powerlifter in a physique contest.

Make sense?

And as for the Eastern strength training stuff, have you read any books by Pavel Tsa-something. You can find his stuff at dragondoor.com. He's a russian powerlifter or trainer or something who writes books about their system of training. I haven't read any yet, but I've only heard good stuff about it.

Ironman

Ford Prefect
04-19-2001, 08:52 PM
Ironman,

Still not getting it. :) I figure if somebody has skinny legs like Dr. Hatfield but can squat 1000 lbs, then wouldn't he be accessing a much greater percentage of muscle fibers than somebody twice his size who can't come close to squatting as much? I'm talking about greater neurological recruitment of muscle fibers, not the number of muscle fibers themselves. Obviously the bigger bodybuilder has more muscle fibers, but I consider it just as obvious that the stronger powerlifter is recruiting a greater percentage of his muscle fibers. If you don't agree with that, could you please xplain why you don't. I'd be sincerely interested in hearing.

I've actually read Pavel's books which got me interested in investigating eastern training methods. It's hard to find eastern weight training books in english, but I found a few. It was more-so a waste of time because Pavel had gone over a lot of the things presented in the books in a manner that is much easier on the brain. :) I consider myself pretty well-read in terms of exercise, fitness, powerlifting, and bodybuilding, but some of the stuff in those books was just too technical.

I'd definately recommend Pavel's books if you are looking for fresh approach. I've had nothing but consistent gains since I started following his advice. The books are a good read too because he adds a lot of flavor and humor to the normally boring subject. As he says, "When the space race was on in the beginning of the Cold War, it was discovered that an ordinary pen could not write in space. NASA through millions of dollars into R&D to remedy the problem and voila: the space pen. Russians opted for the pencil. This is the pencil approach to strength training" Like I said. He's a funny guy. ;)

BTW, like I said I'm pretty well read with this stuff, so you don't have to go into elaborate examples. :)

"Who's house?"
"I said RUN's house."

IronFist
04-19-2001, 09:25 PM
"I figure if somebody has skinny legs like Dr. Hatfield but can squat 1000 lbs, then wouldn't he be accessing a much greater percentage of muscle fibers than somebody twice his size who can't come close to squatting as much? I'm talking about greater neurological recruitment of muscle fibers, not the number of muscle fibers themselves. Obviously the bigger bodybuilder has more muscle fibers, but I consider it just as obvious that the stronger powerlifter is recruiting a greater percentage of his muscle fibers. If you don't agree with that, could you please xplain why you don't. I'd be sincerely interested in hearing."

Ford Prefect, I'm not sure I know that much about neurological recruitment. Perhaps this is relevent, but I'm not sure:

"According to the size principle for recruitment of motor neurons, the smaller, or low-threshold (low stimuli level needed for activation), motor units are recruited first. Low-threshold motor units are composed predominately of Type I fibers. After low-threshold motor units, progressivly higher-threshold motor units are recruited based on the icreasing demands of the activity. The higher-threshold motor units are composed predominately of Type II fibers. Heavier resistances (e.g., 3 to 5 RM) require the recruitment of higher-threshold motor units than lighter resistances (e.g., 12 to 15 RM). However, according to the size principle, lifting heavier resistances will start with the recruitment of low-threshold motor units (Type II) needed to produce greater force will be recruited as the force required increases."
...
"Exceptions to the recruitment order by size are thought to be related to very high velocity and high-power outputs using trained movement patterns... [t]his means that the low-threshold motor units are not recruited in the activity. They are skipped over so that the high-threshold motor units are recruited first. In fact, the low-threshold motor units may be inhibited to facilitate pwer production."

-- Fleck and Kraemer, "Designing Resistance Training Programs." Human Kinetics. 1987. pp. 61-62.


Like I said, I don't know that much about how neurological recruitment relates to muscle recruitment, but the above passage is the closet thing I could find. Perhaps you can derive more information from it than I could.

Basically, I never thought any more into it than, simply, bodybuilders train to achieve a high level of muscular development, while powerlifters train to achieve a high level of muscle power. At this point I'm not too sure of the neurological differences between the two, if there are any.

Hope this was of some help,

Ironman

Destrous9
04-20-2001, 12:09 AM
While the issue of training to failure can be argued, the bigger issue is training intensity. While I hesitate to get into the deep issues of training intenisty (as I could write a book on the nuances), a begining lifter, or a lifter who can burst plateaus should always train to failure. It is in the last few reps of each set in which the muscle experience the greatest stress, and potential for future growth. This is all part of intensity.

While there are hundreds of ways to boost the intensity without training to failure, I am merely trying to build a good, solid foundation.

An example of one of my intensity tricks that doesn't invole training to failure is as follows:

(Using a spotter)
***this is a no rest set, with a spotter peeling wieght off immediately between sets***
Bench 445x3 reps
Bench 405x5 reps
Bench 315x12
Bench 315x10
Bench 225x12

This set is an example of no-failure training, and blitzes the pecs, delts, and tri's.

Advanced intensity training is good for an advanced lifter, and I used it everyday. For a beginner, I don't recommend it.

There are a thousand ways to lift, and a thousand ideas on the right way. My fundamentals are pretty much agreed upon by the majority in the 'natural' community.

Please remember each body is different, and I encourage lifters to find what works best for them. Tweak with the system, over time.

Always remember that intensity is critical, and a good solid base of training to failure is a key ingredient. The first few reps of ech set do little to the muscle, but it is the end of a set that is the most critical. If you're not killing yourself at the end, failure or not, then it's a wasted set.

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

Destrous9
04-20-2001, 12:21 AM
On the issue of bodybuilders vs. powerlifters, body part size, amount of weight lifted, etc:

Bodybuilders 'tend' to use more intensity in their training, and generally don't use as much weight as powerlifters. My first five years of training was strictly with 'bodybuilding' in mind.

Genetics plays a huge roll in everything. My legs, triceps, calves, delts, and back were always huge compared to my biceps and chest, no matter what my strength or bodybuilding program was. Such is genetics. Hatfields legs were big, just not Tom Platzian. Bodyfat always makes a muscle look smaller, or not as impressive.

Watch the olympic powerlifters, or the strong man competition. They have some of the best physiques, pound for pound. Even the heavyweights have great physiques hidden under the extra lard.

For a long time I thought bodybuilders needed exercises that isolated specific muscle groups. WHile I believe that these exercises are good to 'pre-exhaust' muscle, I no longer believe they are good for muscle building.

Alot of natural bodybuilders don't want to be big monsters, as use less weight, and that is fine. Physique 'beauty' is what bodybuilding is all about. My main post is about increasing brute strength, and supplementing your martial arts training.

I respect everyone's opinion, as there are many ways to build a house. TO build a powerhouse, lift big, and use the fundamentals.

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

Destrous9
04-20-2001, 12:29 AM
One more note on the subtle differences between bodybuilders and powerlifters.

Bodybuilders are more 'bodyfat' aware, and during their 8 to 16 week pre-contest phase, they are trying to refine what they have, and generally use less than max weight. Most bodybuilders train heavy (max) the rest of the year though. Exceptions include bodyparts that are already dis-proportionate. (Like legs for me-I would only train them once every 2 weeks, as mine were TOO huge)

Bodybuilding is a work in progress, with much more tweaking and adjusting. Powerlifting is just that, lifting big. A powerlifter is much less likely to care if his legs are bigger than Tom platz' legs, and therefore less likely to lift with less than max weight.

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

IronFist
04-20-2001, 02:02 AM
I agree with everything you said except

"Most bodybuilders train heavy (max) the rest of the year though"

But, I guess this depends on your definition of "heavy." While there are some pro's who proclaim to train this way or that (ie, HIT, or some other radical method), I don't think most bodybuilders go that "heavy" in the off season.

Maybe that is just because of my opinion that "heavy" doesn't start until 3RM or less. But, I would say 90% of bodybuilders, including pros, usually don't train at 3RM or under. But then again, everyone is different and part of BB is finding what works for you.

It's good to see there are some people competent about weight lifting here :D :) :D

Iron

Destrous9
04-20-2001, 04:49 AM
My definition of heavy is using a weight that challenges a muscle, not just maintains a muscle, if that makes sense. I am not really thinking about reps per se.

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

BIU JI
04-20-2001, 04:52 PM
Excellent post, it has come at a time I am putting more thought towards my diet with training as I'm training quite alot now . Along with my kung fu things for fitness such as swimming to add but I have little indepth knowledge of nutrition with exercise(MA) etc.

Your post you say was towards weight training to enhance your MA(if I read correctly). On 3 days of the week I'm training a minmum of six/half hours kung fu each day and now added swimming in the morning and then what I can fit in at home the rest of the week but am guilty of what you say "over training/under feeding". I wish to add more weight training on those 3 days at school so could you suggest a nutritional intake that's suitable for something like kung fu.

I probably need correction but I see weight training for "Bodybuilding and such" different than the type of training you would do for kung fu. So would then your diet need to vary accordingly as well.I mean kung fu is more arobic so would need a different nutrition intake then you would for purely weight training yes? I hope you can understand my rambling, I know what I want to ask although not quite sure how to word it as it's still sort of new to me.

So I'm looking to start more weights to enhance my kung fu and am curious as to the recommended nutriional intake for that, would those guides you gave still apply "as is" for this type of training.

Anyway hope I haven't just made a mess of the basic question! Pleeease help !!

PEACE!!

Destrous9
04-20-2001, 07:51 PM
If you practice kung fu heavily, and also swim and lift weights, I would recommend something along these guidelines:

1) Protein Get at least 100 grams of protein a day, to assist in restoring/rebuilding any damaged muscle tissue. Eat no more than 30-32 grams of protein every 2.5-3 hours.
2) Complex Carbs With the intense energy expenditure that your training has, make sure you get enough good energy. I would recommend at least 3 servings of rice/pasta a day. If you have a fast metabolism, maybe 4-5 servings. (Note: A serving is the serving size listed on the package/box-not a huge bowl.) Spread these servings out into 2-3 meals a day.
3) Vitamins, Minerals With your rigid workout/training schedule, make sure you get the proper amount of vitamins and minerals in your diet. I would go heavy on vitamin C for recovery, and the B vitamins.

Also:
--Intake a minimal amount of fat. Do not use a no fat diet.
--Intake a minimum amount of sodium, or table salt
--Drink alot of water to flush the kidneys and keep the body healthy. Dehydration is a major stress inducer on the body.
--Vegatables and fruits! Snack on either when you need a boost
--Do not eat at least 1.5 hours before training. The body uses alot of blood during the initial digestive stages, and 'eating-then training' will cause your body to revolt. Either the training will be sacrificed, or the proper digestion of the food.
--No simple sugars during training, or up to one hour after training. i.e. sports drinks. Simple sugars curve testosterone release, and can mess with the bodies natural insulin levels.
--30 grams of Protein within 1.5 hours after heavy swimming/lifting
--Deep fried food? Stay away! Especially before training. No french fries :(
--Fruit, or real fruit juice after training is good.
--Do not eat heavily immediately after training. If you want a big meal, cool down for at least an hour to 1.5 hours. Eat a piece of fruit to hold you over. I would have a protein drink w/skim milk, and a banana 30 minutes after a heavy workout.
--The heavier you work out, the more your body needs protein...weightlifting or not. On heavy workout days, 120-150 grams of protein can only help.

Eat more:
Fruit
Vegatables
Oatmeal
Bran Muffins
Tuna
Fish
Chicken
Rice/Pasta
Orange Juice
Beans

Eat less:
Fried/Deep fried foods
High-fat milk (go powdered or skim)
Processed foods
White bread
Simple Sugar (a big one!!)
Red Meat

Balance is the key. Do not cut everything out always. A good candy bar/desert/pizza may be needed to make the soul happy. If you are going to indulge in 'bad' foods, try to keep it only 1 day a week. I used to call saturdays 'pigout days'. I could escape my strict diet, relax, socialize with friends and eat what I liked. Sometimes insulting some one's cooking by turing down a meal is bad. Do not sacrifice your friendships over a need to keep the strictest possible diet. Life is life, life is not training. Training is part of life, as are friends. Keep all balanced, and you will be the healthiest. Balance the health of the mind, body, and soul, and all will be well.


These suggestions really aren't anything 'earth-shattering', but they will help your body perform better. I hope I've help some.

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

[This message was edited by Destrous9 on 04-21-01 at 11:02 AM.]

Destrous9
04-20-2001, 08:00 PM
BIU JI

I forgot to mention one thing:

My nutritional/diet guidelines are generally used by all top-level atheletes who are involved in intense training. They can be tweaked some for individuals needs (i.e. more protein for bodybuilding, etc.), but they will work well as a guildline for any type of training you do.

Stay away from fad diets. If it appears unnatural, it is.

A runner who eats no protein only harms himself.
A swimmer who eats no complex carbs only harms himself.
A wrestler who lives on french fries and sports drinks only harms himself.

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

Mr. Nemo
04-21-2001, 12:15 AM
Biu Ji:

Just to balance things out...

You may want to at least check out a low-carbohydrate diet. They're not only for bodybuilders, many other types of atheletes use them. They've certainly worked for me.

Read some of the low-carb literature and you can decide for yourself whether or not they're "fad diets". Personally, I don't think they are.

Destrous9
04-21-2001, 01:02 AM
I don't really consider 3 servings of rice/pasta a high carb diet. A true serving is not immense.

Don't forget about muscle glycogen levels, and the negative effects on the body due to diminished glycogen levels.

---------------------------------------------

Stores of readily available glucose to supply the tissues with an oxidizable energy source are found principally in the liver, as glycogen. A second major source of stored glucose is the glycogen of skeletal muscle. However, muscle glycogen is not generally available to other tissues, because muscle lacks the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase.
The major site of daily glucose consumption (75%) is the brain via aerobic pathways. Most of the remainder of is utilized by erythrocytes, skeletal muscle, and heart muscle. The body obtains glucose either directly from the diet or from amino acids and lactate via gluconeogenesis. Glucose obtained from these two primary sources either remains soluble in the body fluids or is stored in a polymeric form, glycogen. Glycogen is considered the principal storage form of glucose and is found mainly in liver and muscle, with kidney and intestines adding minor storage sites. With up to 10% of its weight as glycogen, the liver has the highest specific content of any body tissue. Muscle has a much lower amount of glycogen per unit mass of tissue, but since the total mass of muscle is so much greater than that of liver, total glycogen stored in muscle is about twice that of liver. Stores of glycogen in the liver are considered the main buffer of blood glucose levels.

--------------------------------------------

...and more from Web MD...

How can a diet make you lose pounds but not fat? It's all in the way low carbohydrate diets work, says Karin Kratina, MA, RD, a nutrition therapist who specializes in treating weight and eating problems in her private practice located in Gainesville, Fla. She tells WebMD that carbohydrates are broken down into glucose by the body, which in turn either is used immediately for energy or converted into a storage form called glycogen, primarily in the cells of the liver and muscle. Such glycogen is metabolized easily back to glucose, and provides about half of the body's energy supplies daily. Everything from processing a thought to getting from point A to point B requires energy from glycogen, Kratina says.


"At any [given] time, we have about 1,200 calories of glycogen on board," she says. And for every gram of glycogen stored, so are three grams of water. Therefore, when carbohydrate intake is restricted and the existing stores of glycogen stores are exhausted, the body sheds the stored water, leading to an impressive water "weight loss" within a few weeks.


Once the glycogen is gone, the body does turn to fat as a fuel source. But in reality, fat is an inferior energy source compared to glycogen. It's like trying to run a car on lighter fluid, says John Acquaviva, PhD, assistant professor of physical education at Roanoke College in Salem, Va. "In ketosis, the body does burn a higher percentage of fat, but overall, less calories are burned," he tells WebMD.


System Shutdown

"People need to remember that there are a lot of ways to lose weight, but not all of them are healthy," Acquaviva says. "Starvation is one obvious example." As the body starts to burn stored fat, it creates byproducts called ketones, leading to the state of ketosis.


If the determined dieter sticks to the plan despite the unpleasant side effects of this state -- including foul acidic breath, fuzzy thinking, and fatigue -- additional pounds will come off. But like the water loss, it is an illusion. The majority of the loss is muscle, not fat, leaving the dieter with a higher body fat percentage and less lean muscle tissue, Kratina says.


Then the carbohydrate cravings kick in, she says. The body seeks to replace the missing glycogen and restore balance. Dieter Stacy Smith knows this feeling all too well.


"I'll suddenly crave things like bread, oatmeal, ice cream," she says. "I'll binge, eating three or four bowls of oatmeal at a time." When she does, her body once again stores glycogen and water, leading to a dramatic "weight" gain. The numbers on the scale quickly rise 10 to 15 pounds, reinforcing the idea that carbohydrates are to blame.


Smith accepts the label of carbohydrate "addict" and goes back on the plan. It becomes a vicious circle of starve, binge, starve, binge.

-----------------------------------------

Decide for yourself, but always remember balance is the key. The body requires no miracle diets for proper functioning. The body needs glycogen to function properly. Low carb diets are not a healthy solution for the liver, kidneys, muscles, and brain. While they shed water quickly due to the dehydration resulting from low glycogen levels, as stated above, they are not a long term solution for running a healthy, efficient body.

CMA's are about the body, mind and soul working as they should, in a natural way.

Think long and hard before 'fadding'.

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

[This message was edited by Destrous9 on 04-21-01 at 04:08 PM.]

Destrous9
04-21-2001, 01:15 AM
I hope this helps some. I do not wish to argue with anyone. I merely want to provide information, and let you decide on what's best for your body.

We are all adults, and the final say goes to you and your body.

Health care is my profession, and nutrition has been a personal study long before I undertook this as a profession. I am no expert on everything, but I do see hundreds of people a month for health screenings, and I see disease and decay take over people's lives through improper nutrition.

Most diets consist primarily of caffeine, simple sugars, saturated fats, and heavily processed foods, etc. Anything that is a step away from this direction is a good step. So in that sense, any healthy diet can be better than the average American's. The question to ask yourself is do you want a better diet, or a diet that is best.

Better or best are better than worse.

Good luck.

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

Destrous9
04-21-2001, 01:38 AM
If anyone wants to discuss this further without creating a monster thread, or has further questions or comments, feel free to post on my message board by Clicking Here (http://pub41.ezboard.com/bpencaksilat).

I am not always right, nor perfect, but I will always try to assist.

http://www.destrous9.com/destrous9.jpg

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

fiercest tiger
04-21-2001, 02:43 AM
as bui ji said diet is very important, this has given me motivation to start eating right now!

thanks guys :D

come & visit us!
http://home.iprimus.com.au/ykm
yaukungmun@hotmail.com

IronFist
04-21-2001, 06:17 AM
Biu Ji,

Read what Destrous said, he saved me a lot of typing :)

Eat at least 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight.

Depending of on your body type, you might not have to avoid fat foods that much. If you're an ectomorph you can eat whatever you want and not gain any weight.

The only problem I've seen with weight training plus kung fu is that after a session of weight lifting, people tend to be too sore to effectively train kung fu. Example, one day you train chest and triceps in the gym, the next day you can't punch well at all because your tri's are sore.

Sorry to cut this short, I have to go...

Iron

Destrous9
04-21-2001, 07:47 AM
You are dead on with the soreness issue.

If you lift, stretching and hot showers :)

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."

Mr. Nemo
04-21-2001, 08:35 AM
Destrous9 posted some good info about the risks of a low-carb diet. But as an advocate of low-carb diets myself, I'm obliged to post this:

Risks and caveats of low-carb diets

#1: "Low-carb diets will only make you lose water weight"

It's true that weight loss from water often creates the illusion that you're losing more weight than you are. In addition to this "false" weight loss, these diets can put at risk for dehydration, which everyone agrees is bad for you.

However, I've never met a low-carb diet that doesn't advise you to drink a whole lot of water. Some of the more hardcore ones even encourage 1-2 -gallons- a day. If you drink enough water, you should not be at any risk for dehydration. When in doubt, drink an extra glass.

#2: "On a low-carb diet, you're only burning muscle, not fat."

While it is possible to put your body in a state where it burns as much muscle as fat for energy, low-carb diets generally avoid this. It is possible to almost entirely eliminate carbs from your diet and lose fat while maintaining all your current muscle. However, it's tricky and requires some supplements.

These supplements are entirely legal and almost universally considered to be safe. However, if you want to avoid having to pop pills, I can completely understand - I'm suspicious of pills myself (they seem too artificial to me). If you don't want to have to take supplements, there are low-carb diets that don't require any and shouldn't cause you to lose muscle.

#3: "After a while on a low-carb diets, you'll start to crave carbs and eat a whole lot of them, which will cause you to balloon back up to your previous weight or even higher."

Any diet requires a certain amount of willpower. When you first start especially you'll probably be craving carbohydrates. However, after about a week you'll adjust to your new eating habits and you won't crave carbs anymore.

In case you're mistaking me for an expert, you should know that the only diet I've ever had extensive experience with myself is the one called "The Zone" developed by a guy called Barry Sears.

The zone is not nearly as "low-carb" as most of these diets - 40% of your calories come from carbohydrates (along with 30 from protein and 30 from fat - if you've heard of a "40-30-30" balance this is probably where you heard it).

Before I started this diet, I weighed ~205 lbs., about 150 of which was lean body mass. I went on the diet for about 5-6 months, and similar to Destrous9, I had days where I'd go off the diet and eat Ice Cream or Wendy's or something (mine were sundays, though, not saturdays. To me dairy queen and the simpsons are the ultimate exercise in decadence).

In those 5-6 months I went from 205 lbs. 150 lbs. lean body mass to about 180 lbs. 160 lbs. lean body mass (my real precise lbm was actually 157, but I like to round up), and the diet wasn't even that hard (You should also know that that increase in lean body mass involved no weights. I did things like push-ups but didn't use any weights other than my own body). Then I went off it for about 3 months (I only recently got back on it again, and am trying a couple other more extreme low-carb diets these past couple of weeks) When I went off the diet, I did not gain back any weight. I took care not to eat too much, but I still didn't gain back any weight.

The purpose of this incredibly long-winded post is to give a few points in favor of low-carb diets. In any case, Destrous9 still gave good advice, just be aware that there are other methods.

BIU JI
04-21-2001, 01:10 PM
Guys this info is great, I need a degree to sift through it, well if that doesn't help me nothing will . Much appreciated , will start me off just fine. Destrous9 you must have been full on into it by what you've written, a mountain of info. Mountain of a man, geez legs like trees.I could do without a kick from you thanks!
Once again thanks , I started with the advise and felt better, already reading the packets for the nutrition value, I can see an obsession developing haha. I used the suppliment powders before and found benefits but intend to use it again with a proper diet, what's your advise with those?
I ought to start paying you a fee soon I'm sure.
PEACE!!!

dumog93
04-21-2001, 07:58 PM
All the above info was very informative.A couple of questions though.I don't powerlift at meets yet,but just to give me a strength advantage(or keep me from having a severe disadvantage)on the ground mainly.#1-why no deadlifts? I think deadlifting is probably the most important lift to a cross-trainer.It has to be the king of compound movements.#2-the lift totals were awesome,but i was wondering what weight class or bodyweight that was done at.I'm currently sitting at a 1200 pound total(305 bench,465 deadlift,435 squat) at 180 pounds of bodyweight and was wondering if i'm lagging bad in strength or if bodyweight was my problem.

-Devildog

Destrous9
04-21-2001, 07:58 PM
Well met, Mr. Nemo :)

I think we have a good thread, filled with information. Hopefully we have answered a few questions. It is far better to train with all the information, than only one side of the story. From 2 varying sides, one has the opportunity to draw a truth for themself.

Good training.

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."
Internal Arts Message Board (http://pub41.ezboard.com/bpencaksilat)

BIU JI
04-22-2001, 02:15 AM
Please briefly explain what a "deadlift " is!If I'm to stay away from them then I need to know what they are.100 grams/day, 30 grams/2.5-3 hours, I'm already counting the proteins and thinking "where can I get more protein/ carbs from?" , interesting though to research diet, seems to be alot of myths out there .

PEACE!!!

Ford Prefect
04-22-2001, 06:01 PM
I'd have to agree that the deadlift is an essential lift, especially for beginners. It builds good all-around strength and forces the body to act as a unit rather than isolating body parts. I actually do clean pulls instead of dl's, but to each their own.

Destrous and Ironfist,

I just found out that T-Mag did a two part interview with Pavel about his concepts. I only scimmed through it, but you can get a good idea about the concepts he employs.

Part 1:

http://www.t-mag.com/articles/151russ.html

Part 2:

http://www.t-mag.com/articles/152russ.html

"Who's house?"
"I said RUN's house."

IronFist
04-22-2001, 08:14 PM
Oh boy...

When I first saw the words "T-mag" I worried, but you happened to find the one of like maybe 2 or 3 articles at T-mag that aren't complete tripe.

I have a huge dislike for the whole T-mag crew, and especially their product line, Biotest.

Let me keep this simple so it doesn't start a flame war (too late).

A) The T-mag crew claims to be huge freaky BB'ers. Along the lines of 240lb 5% bf kind of people. Strange how NONE of them will post a picture, and when meets come up, like Bodybuilding shows, for some reason their rep is always "sick" and can't make it.

B) Their supplements suck. Can I say "suck" here? They market all their stuff as "feels just like deca (a steroid)!" Or "my dog was afraid of me while I was on this due to my increased test levels" you know clearly this stuff will replace steroids, but yet their products not only don't live up to their claims, they don't even come close. I know a lot of people really don't care for their mag or false marketing hype.

However, if that's the article on Pavel where they talk about doing Janda situps and such, then it is actually one of the most useful articles I've ever read.

T-mag, however, is cr*p.

Iron

Ford Prefect
04-22-2001, 08:24 PM
Hey dude,

I agree 100%. I think some of Poliquin's and King's articles are good BB references though. Janda's are mentioned in this article, but they also made a reference to a different article that was about ab training.

"Who's house?"
"I said RUN's house."

Destrous9
04-23-2001, 03:20 AM
Well, just so you know I'm not a 78 pound weakling (and I don't sell supplements)... :D

http://www.destrous9.com/destrous9.jpg

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."
Internal Arts Message Board (http://pub41.ezboard.com/bpencaksilat)

Destrous9
04-23-2001, 03:22 AM
Oops, forgot I posted a pic earlier. Chalk another one up to lack of sleep (work). :o

"Deep down inside of all of us is the power to accomplish what we want to, if we'll just stop looking elsewhere."
Internal Arts Message Board (http://pub41.ezboard.com/bpencaksilat)

qeySuS
04-23-2001, 03:28 AM
Well since everyone has got me hyped up :) I think i'll post what i am thinking about. i HATE to lift weights :) But i still think i could go and do it if i have some agenda to get stronger like i really want to know, however all these excersizes you mention seem to involve a LOT of muscle growth, and wouldnt that make me heavy as hell? I know this may sound weird but i dont want to gain too much muscle, although i can take on at least 10Kgs without worrying. But the reason i ask is because i will be competing in TKD tournements and i have to worry about weightclasses, and the last thing i want is to go into the heavyweight devision. I'd also like to know what a deadlift is :) I recognized most of the other excersizes being mentioned. And also will this all work when i have no lifting partner? I really dont think i can get myself a weight lifting partner cause i'm pretty new both at my gym and at my neighborhood. Replies greatly appreciated :)

Free thinkers are dangerous.

IronFist
04-23-2001, 10:02 AM
"But i still think i could go and do it if i have some agenda to get stronger like i really want to know, however all these excersizes you mention seem to involve a LOT of muscle growth, and wouldnt that make me heavy as hell? "

I'm a personal trainer here at my college, and I like to tell people this story who are afraid of lifting weights for fear that they'll get too big. I'll point to somoene who is lifting weights and I'll say "see that skinny guy over there? He's been coming here every other day for the past 3 years and he hasn't gotten any bigger at all."

The point is, training to be a bodybuilder (ie. adding SIZE as opposed to raw power) is a specific type of training. Not everyone who lifts weights wants to get big, and even fewer people who want to get big actually do :)

Isn't 10kgs like 20 or 30 pounds? Sorry, I'm over here in America and they don't teach us metric conversions, and I'm too lazy to go look it up. Well, 20 or 30 pounds of muscle is a good goal for a bodybuilder to add in a YEAR or so of training, if he trains hard, eats hard, rests hard, and knows exactly what he is doing. If you are training with weights to supplement your martial arts, you should have nothing to worry about. Besides, added mass like a bodybuilder doesn't come unless you eat like a bodybuilder. My point is, you are not eating like a bodybuilder unless you're consuming upwards of 4 to 5,000 calories a day (unless you're on the juice, in which case it's up to 8,000 cal/day).

Bottom line(s):

Unless you are specifically trying to put on muscle mass, it's not going to happen (other than maybe a few pounds, tops).

You will, however, notice extended muscular endurance, and increased strength. Size will come, but slowly.

When you are lifting, especially if you have low bodyfat percentage, you will notice that you get a "pump" in whatever muscle you are training, say, biceps in this example. Your muscle will appear fuller and bigger. This happens because the muscle fills with blood during training. A few hours after the muscle will go back to it's normal size. Remember that growth occurs when you eat and sleep, and NOT in the weight room. Don't think that because your bicep gets big when you train it that it has now become that size.

Hope this helped. If you have any more questions just ask :D :D :D

Iron

qeySuS
04-23-2001, 03:29 PM
Ok this sounds pretty cool and solid :) i'm seriously thinking of upping myself one weight class and get into the really hard one :) The only guy that was really hard at the last competition just moved up to the Advanced devision (there is beginner and advanced devision, after what belt you have). However you did not answer my question on what a deadlift is :) And also what is a Dumbell row? (english is not my 1st language :) aaand one more term, there's calves one day and hamstrings the other, i know what calves are, but i always thought hamstrings were the same thing :) Obviously i'm wrong, so if that could be explained to me i'm golden.

Free thinkers are dangerous.

Ford Prefect
04-23-2001, 04:53 PM
Qes,

Iron is right. Bodybuilding is a very specific way of lifting weights. When I was in college I had to remain very light to compete in boxing. I was 6' 142 lbs for 2 years straight while lifting. I had to be very careful about my training, but I was pretty good about not adding any extra mass. Since then, I've "bulked up" (if you can call 6' 170 lbs bulking up) to compete in Jiu-Jitsu tourney's at a weight that I'm comfortable with. If you know what you're doing, you can make consistent gains in strength with only gaining little if any weight at all. BTW, this is a deadlift:

http://www.biofitness.com/demo03.html

This is a clean pull: (i prefer this over the dl)

http://www.biofitness.com/demo36.html

Since Dest posted his, I'll post my extremely fuzzy pics. The first one, I'm on the right and the second one, I'm the one that's applying the choke.

http://www.thedeepening.com/CyberKwoon/gi_fighting_finals1.jpg

http://www.thedeepening.com/CyberKwoon/lion_killer.jpg

"Who's house?"
"I said RUN's house."

Lost_Disciple
10-01-2001, 11:57 PM
TTT


Ahhhh, here we go... now I just gotta remember where he got that from. :)

Just some thoughts from an ignoramus.

Robinf
10-02-2001, 04:27 PM
First of all, I'd like to thank Destrous for posting this info way back when and Lost D for digging it back up.

Now a question. I understand you posted for powerlifting. For simple strength training, not wanting to get big, but simply to get stronger, does the waiting period of 5-6-7 days before working out a muscle group still stand?

I'm reengineering my workout to help me better. Right now, I think I'm over training a bit. I actually wrote out my workout in excel.

I'm thinking of going this way:

Mon, Thur: legs, glutes

Tues, Fri: arms, shoulders

Wed, Sat: abs, back

That'll provide me with the 72 hour minimum. Not to mention that I train TKD 5 days a week and train kung fu three - five days a week.

I think I'll start this one now.

Any input would be greatly appreciated. My goal, again, is to gain strength for better martial arts, injury healing and prevention, and--pullups.

Thanks,
Robin

Surrender yourself to nature and be all that you are.

Lost_Disciple
10-02-2001, 06:58 PM
Well Powerlifting does not mean bulk; so most of his info is directly applicable. However, there are different levels of strength training. You can build strength on the program you posted, but it would be more for toning I think and not pure power. For power it's better to wait longer than shorter. imho

Just some thoughts from an ignoramus.

IronFist
10-02-2001, 10:19 PM
For simple strength training, not wanting to get big, but simply to get stronger, does the waiting period of 5-6-7 days before working out a muscle group still stand?


It depends. Some programs work a muscle once a week, other 5 days a week (Pavel's Power to the People).

It depends on what your schedule looks like.

The reason for the long rest periods while bulking is becaues the muscle gets more torn up and needs longer to heal. That, and it hurts the days after, too.

Iron

Robinf
10-03-2001, 04:15 PM
Thanks, Ironfist. That's the info I was looking for.

I just started loading more on my legs and boy am I sore. I'm going to try it at 2 days a week for the muscle groups and see how that goes.

Thanks, everyone, for all the help.

Robin

Surrender yourself to nature and be all that you are.

Scarletmantis
10-13-2001, 02:54 AM
If I were to use Destrous's wieght program for mass, would I have to tweak the reps per set (ie. lower the reps)?

"Master, here is a stick. Please beat me for my insolence." - KC Elbows

ged
10-23-2001, 06:43 AM
ttt for my own personal ease of reference :)

Cyborg
10-23-2001, 08:16 PM
I don't know alot about the technical stuff, maybe y'all can tell me what's the best way to increase the "fast twitch" muscle fibers? I don't want to be big, just strong and fast. I'd say I'm of average strength, and am more concerned about speed really.

"Box a fighter and fight a boxer". Bruce Lee

Lost_Disciple
10-23-2001, 09:30 PM
Cyborg
I recommend u search on the internet, maybe buy some books, and look through the other threads here for information on any of these topics: Explosive power Plyometrics Powerlifting Olympic lifting Big movement lifts Periodization Rep Tempo %age of max weight Going to failure Rest between sets Total # of sets Repetitions per set

Or particular threads such as: Lifting for Explosive Power (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=1421989903) The Workout Thread (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=7121911292) Plyometrics Question (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=9421977313) The Quick and Dirty Summary Thread (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=7151966062) The Beginning of the Weights vs Plyos Discussion (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=3311981362) An Intro to Pavel (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=8841983162) A Good Deadlift/power thread (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=9521941652) Pretty good all-around thread (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=3671991642) The Soreness Thread (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=1711966842) Fast-Twitch Discussion (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=3631956242) Comparing weights, dynamic tension, etc (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=8431983202) Good Diet Thread (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=6271977432) Free Weights vs. Machines (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=1371978891) Punching Power Thread (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=9351931702) Good Diet Thread (http://forum.kungfuonline.com/1/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=126197291&f=196199028&m=9851943381)
Some Good websites to search on: Pavel's Site (http://www.dragondoor.com) Anabolic Extreme (http://www.anabolicextreme.com) T-Mag (http://www.t-mag.com) (ignore the advertizements) Netfit (http://www.netfit.co.uk/) Good Matt Furey-Like Routine (http://www.webfects.com/hea/routine.htm) Matt Furey's Site (http://www.mattfurey.com)
In a nutshell:
There are tons of olympic/powerlifters who aren't so big, who put up tons of weight with a lot of speed and explosive power. Their weight workouts will supplement your strength, explosive power, and speed; however you might not want to follow any diet advice they have relating to bulking up. Instead, you should probly opt for a more moderate diet: well balanced with liberal amounts of protein and complex carbs; staying away from simple sugars, overly fatty/greasy foods, and too much red meat.
------------------------------------------------

Figured if at least one of us is using this as a reference, maybe we should help make our searching easier. :)

I don't know about the rest of you, but reading my old posts; it's both interesting and embarassing to see how my opinions, knowledge, and ideas have changed.

http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/ezine/4_3/images/gk1.jpg
Just some thoughts from an ignoramus.

[This message was edited by Lost_Disciple on 10-24-01 at 12:40 PM.]

Cyborg
10-24-2001, 12:43 AM
Well. Thanks alot! That will keep me busy for quite some time. :)

"Box a fighter and fight a boxer". Bruce Lee

IronFist
10-24-2001, 05:50 AM
Holy ****e, I forgot about some of those threads. Thanks for the links, Lost :)

Iron

Lost_Disciple
10-24-2001, 06:07 AM
Anytime. :)
My purpose for "The Workout Thread" was to have this sort of info constantly available to those who want a quick reference. Also I intended for veterans of this forum to have some place to point newbies to when they ask questions; instead of answering the same questions hundreds of times (sometimes in a single thread).
This thread is as good as any for that though.

http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/ezine/4_3/images/gk1.jpg
Just some thoughts from an ignoramus.

IronFist
10-24-2001, 07:05 AM
Agreed, we should bump it back up to the top from time to time.

Sometimes when people bump threads, they type "ttt" what does that stand for?

Iron

Lost_Disciple
10-24-2001, 07:17 AM
t= to
t= the
t= top

This is just me being a smartass hehehe
:rolleyes: :p ;) :D :rolleyes: :p ;) :D :rolleyes: :p ;) :D

http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/ezine/4_3/images/gk1.jpg
Just some thoughts from an ignoramus.

IronFist
10-24-2001, 06:23 PM
so that's what it means. at AE we usually just say bump. I guess ttt is shorter and thus requires less effort to type. I like.

Iron

hkphooey
10-25-2001, 04:56 PM
i normally just come in and browse these forums (as a health/exercise/medicine freak i can't seem to get enough) without posting.

i just want to say that this post is the kind of stuff that should be on here more often. thanks to destrous9 for starting it off. and to everyone else for thoughtful (and useful) contributions.

oh, and now that i am making a rare post, good stuff ironfist. i will frequently look for your responses to people's questions. i usually feel that there's little need to chime in because i know you're around (and this isn't to take anything away from everyone else who contributes great info as well! and there are quite a few of you!!).

thanks for enduring this boring post.

Lost_Disciple
11-06-2001, 12:39 AM
TTT


cuz it's that d@mn good

http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/ezine/4_3/images/gk1.jpg
Just some thoughts from an ignoramus.

IronFist
11-06-2001, 07:17 AM
ttt cuz i know what that stands for now :) :) :)

Iron

Lost_Disciple
11-11-2001, 07:42 PM
Sorry to steal from Sevenstar, but i think this article's some pretty good info on different types of strength & power as well as muscles- slow-twitch/fast-twitch.

http://www.kungfuonline.com/features/training/powertrain.html

http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/ezine/4_3/images/gk1.jpg
Just some thoughts from an ignoramus.

Wongsifu
02-09-2002, 03:12 PM
ttt

is destrous9 still around , i still believe this is one of the most informative posts..... ever on kfo

CD Lee
02-11-2002, 10:06 PM
Ironfist:

I thought Paul Anderson was the first to squat 1000 lbs?
I have seen pictures of him with 900+ pounds on his back squating with no belt, and in black dress shoes! What an animal. The guy was 5'9, and weighed 400 lbs at his peak of strenth, and I believe still hold the world record for the strongest man, by holding 2500lbs on his back bent over. He did not use steroids either. He could also militar press a 300 lb dumbbell with one arm for 12 reps!!!! cool.

What do you think? Is Hatfield the first by some official standard? I know the guys promotes steroid use, and has a book on how to take them properly. Hmmm.

Kempo Guy
02-07-2003, 10:02 AM
Since people are always asking about good references for strength training online, I thought I'd start a new thread with some of the links I've found useful:

Dragon Door Article Index (http://www.dragondoor.com/cgi-bin/articles.pl)
Clarence Bass' website (http://www.cbass.com/)
The Parallette Training Guide (it requires you to put together parallettes) (http://www.american-gymnast.com/technically_correct/paralletteguide/index.html)
"Fat to Fire" by Coach John Davies (http://www.t-mag.com/articles/190fat.html)
Combat Conditioning - Five months without weights by Mike Mahler (http://www.testosterone.net/articles/153combat.html)
The stairstep approach to one-legged squats by Mike Mahler (http://www.intensitymagazine.com/02-26-02/mike_mahler.html)
The Dark side - the Turkish 'Get-up' by Coach Davies (http://www.intensitymagazine.com/12-04-01/renegade_thoughts.html)
High Rep Snatches by Mike Mahler (http://www.intensitymagazine.com/05-28-02/mike_mahler.html)
"Scrapper's Bodyweight routines" - Body by Fish (http://www.trainforstrength.com)
Renegade Rope Training by Coach Davies (http://www.t-mag.com/articles/174rope.html)
HIIT Training by Liam Bauer (http://www.straightblastgym.com/endurance.html#endurance)

Not necessarily on strength exercises alone but I've found these pretty interesting:
Eugene Sandow - Golden Age of Ironmen (http://www.sandowplus.co.uk/)
The Wrestler's Body - Identity and Ideology in North India (http://ark.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/ft6n39p104/)
The Maxalding Website (http://www.maxalding.plus.com/)
Martin "Farmer" Burns (http://www.sandowplus.co.uk/Competition/Burns/burnsindex.htm)
Strengthfit.com - Sports Science Department (http://www.strengthfit.com/StrengthFit/SportsScience.asp)

A couple of links on diet as well:
Diet and Timing by Charlie Poole (http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/charlie2.htm)
The T-Dawg Diet: Version 2.0 (http://t-mag.com/nation_articles/243tdawg.jsp)

If you guys know of other sites, please share!

KG

Ford Prefect
02-07-2003, 12:33 PM
Exercise Demonstrations

http://www.biofitness.com/demos.html

http://strengthtraining.asimba.com/fitness_info/index.html (video clips of exercises including power and olympic lifts)

Information

http://www.usa-gymnastics.org/publications/technique/1996/8/strength-training.html (Gymnastics Guide to Strength Training)

http://www.elitefitnesssystems.com/ (Westside Barbell Sister Site: Tons of info)

http://www.westside-barbell.com

http://www.crossfit.com


That's about all I can think of off the top of my head.

premier
02-07-2003, 01:18 PM
This is great.. maybe make this even sticky?

rubthebuddha
02-07-2003, 03:14 PM
nope. :) we have too many stickies already. i've tried combining several stuck threads a while back so i could delete the rambling and keep the links, but that didn't work. i'm not done yet. i now know how, so i'll do it probably this weekend.

then, we can have ONE stuck thread with lots of links. no dialogue about them -- that'll be for other threads.

Mr. Bao
02-11-2003, 07:49 AM
Great sites, i might added www.chekinstitute.com and www.performbetter.com and www.ptonthenet.com (I am in this listings for new york city personal trainers). Shout outs to all my people at new york sports clubs. Btw, bao is my real name.

Ptonthenet has many interesting articles and this shows that some personal trainers arent ignorant fools with "Flex", "Muscle & Fitness", Joe Weidler information knowledge. LoL. Many leading experts on the field of strength conditioning from america to europe such as pavel, mel, tate, and etc have articles here. Enjoy!

Kempo Guy
02-11-2003, 08:12 AM
I was trying to be somewhat specific with the links I gave as it's sometimes difficult to find what you're looking for on the various sites...

But since we're talking links in general I'll add these links (there's a lot of information on these site albeit a lot of them are bodybuilding related):
www.bodybuilding.com
www.testosterone.net
www.t-mag.com

Here are a few other links I've found interesting:
Girevik Magazine (www.girevikmagazine.com)
Intensity Magazine (http://www.intensitymagazine.com)
Runner's World - Training Plans (http://www.runnersworld.com/home/0,1300,1-51-55,00.html)
Targeted Body Systems - Dr. Ellis' website (http://www.targetedbodysystems.com/index.asp)

KG

fa_jing
09-05-2003, 02:00 PM
ttt


:D

Vash
09-06-2003, 08:46 AM
ttt? Nay! TTT!!!

fa_jing
09-08-2003, 10:13 AM
I think this thread was actually prior to my joining the forum - but the funniest thing is that Ironfist used to be "Ironman," and that furthermore, he was actually strong!

;) :D :D :D

Ford Prefect
09-08-2003, 11:31 AM
****. I can tell when I'm in a rush and trying to convey a complex thought. heh.

Jowbacca
09-08-2003, 12:45 PM
Can we stickify this thread?

It's just one of the few threads I can look back on and not want to kick my own ass.


The Artist Formerly Known As Lost_Disciple

rubthebuddha
09-08-2003, 01:07 PM
i'll stickify it, but i hate having too many stickies. wanna suggest which of the other ones should be unstickimafied?

Jowbacca
09-08-2003, 01:56 PM
It's simple, replace the health & fitness links sticky. This thread has like double the # of links anyway. Heck, I'll ADD the rest of 'em:

primer on biomechanics (http://kinesiology.rice.edu/programs.cfm?doc_id=400)

A Guided Tour Of The Visible Human (http://www.madsci.org/~lynn/VH/)

the Voxel Man Gallery (http://www.uke.uni-hamburg.de/institute/imdm/idv/gallery/)

Get Body Smart! (http://www.getbodysmart.com/)

Bodybuilding.com Anatomy (http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/anatomy.htm)

Exercises (http://www.trainforstrength.com/exercises.shtml)

http://www.exrx.net/lists/Directory.html

Muscle Diagrams (http://www.howe.k12.ok.us/~jimaskew/bbones.htm )

http://www.jointhealing.com from PL Crane (http://www.jointhealing.com )

Joke Site 1 (http://www.redvsblue.com)

Joke Site 2 (http://www.homestarrunner.com)


On a side note, if we could get some links up here for Scrappers Workout, the pushup programs, and Taku's Intervals (if they're not already on here); that'd be dope.

rubthebuddha
09-08-2003, 02:32 PM
very nice, jowbocca. thanks, and you can consider the request granted. :)

Jowbacca
09-09-2003, 07:37 AM
Thanx RTB :cool:

And just to be productive, I'ma add more links.


Taku's Intervals (http://trainforstrength.com/Endurance1.shtml)
Scrapper's Workout (http://www.trainforstrength.com/)
Khun Kao's Fight Training Regimen (http://stickgrappler2.tripod.com/kbox/kkregimen.html)
StickGrappler's Dope Ass Kickboxing Archives (http://stickgrappler.tripod.com/kbox/kbox.html)
Stick Grappler's Unofficial UG Archives (http://stickgrappler.tripod.com/ug/ug.html)
The Underground (just for the heck of it) (http://mma.tv)
Zercher Squats (http://www.olympus.net/personal/cablebar/Zlift.htm)
Good thread with tons of exercises (http://martial.best.vwh.net/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=24820)
John Davies' Renegade Training (http://www.renegadetraining.com)
The Robin Quivers Diet (http://www.falconblanco.com/health/cleansing/lemoncleanse.htm)
For some of the Dopest articles on Flexibility - Kurz (http://www.stadion.com/column.html)
Push Up Program (http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/Field/4992/100push.html)
Army Ranger Training (http://www.benning.army.mil/rtb/RANGER/PhysicalTraining.htm)


Sorry if there's any repetition.

Elxen
09-09-2003, 11:59 PM
very nice indeed :-)

A question

I train (powerlifting) my upper body on mondays.
Sometimes, on thursday i'm still sore.
But as I do that workout 2 times a week I still do it.
It's not that I can hardly move or something :-) but it just hurts a little (but it's not pain I dislike :-))

so my question
Is it bad to train that 2nd time. Should I rest more so I grow more? Am I throwing my hard earned muscles away?

tnx

fa_jing
09-10-2003, 09:03 AM
2 times a week should be fine. However, one day should be a heavy day and the other a medium day. Take more rest days after your heavy day.

It's ok to train when you are a little sore, sometimes it makes you feel better.

rubthebuddha
10-02-2003, 03:27 PM
fa_jing is right. as ford has told us many times over, a bit of exercise when we're sore can be just what the doctor ordered, helping blood bring its goodness to our muscles with a bit more enthusiasm.

rubthebuddha
05-13-2004, 08:29 AM
since it always takes me a **** long time to find this link when i want it, here's the intro on how to do pistols mike mahler wrote up:

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/mahler2.htm

morbicid
08-09-2004, 04:13 PM
have any of you ever heard of the "fiber blaster" weight training program ? It's goal is to stimulate as many muscle fibers as possible during a workout - slow twitch and fast twitch fibers. It's basically a mix of both high and low rep lifts. Like you would do one or two heavy sets of 6 reps on the bench, then you would do a couple light weight / high rep sets of the same ... say 40 repetitions. I've been doing it for a couple weeks now and notice a difference in muscl. endurance. I also seem to be making gains just fine. Any thoughts ???

Newb
09-30-2004, 10:06 AM
Originally posted by
If you practice kung fu heavily, and also swim and lift weights,
--Deep fried food? Stay away! Especially before training. No french fries :(


[This message was edited by Destrous9 on 04-21-01 at 11:02 AM.]

There are readily available Aero-Fries. These aren't fried, but cooked by hot air. They taste just as good.

IronFist
11-06-2004, 10:56 AM
Originally posted by morbicid
have any of you ever heard of the "fiber blaster" weight training program ? It's goal is to stimulate as many muscle fibers as possible during a workout - slow twitch and fast twitch fibers. It's basically a mix of both high and low rep lifts. Like you would do one or two heavy sets of 6 reps on the bench, then you would do a couple light weight / high rep sets of the same ... say 40 repetitions. I've been doing it for a couple weeks now and notice a difference in muscl. endurance. I also seem to be making gains just fine. Any thoughts ???

I've heard that's counter productive. How are you still doing? Were you just making n00b gains on it?

rubthebuddha
11-10-2004, 03:32 PM
ttt -- we could all use the refresher :)

Serpent
11-10-2004, 03:37 PM
Sticky, sticky, sticky, dayum you!

:mad:

:)

rubthebuddha
11-10-2004, 10:07 PM
well, back in my earlier mod days, i didn't understand how the merging worked. i do now, so i can either:

merge it with one of the other stickies, or unsticky one of the other two. i'm sticking with two stickies, so you chaps can make up your mind.

Serpent
11-10-2004, 10:14 PM
I vote for un-sticky-ing (<-- great new word!) the progress thread as first choice.

Ford Prefect
11-11-2004, 06:15 AM
I have some more I could add too if this becomes a sticky. ;)

Andy62
11-11-2004, 08:50 AM
http://www.bronzebowpublishing.com/index.cfm

FatherDog
11-11-2004, 09:08 AM
Merge it with the "my strength advice" sticky. The whole point of that sticky is the huge number of useful links in it; having two stickied threads with informative links instead of one seems kind of senseless.

IronFist
01-04-2005, 08:25 AM
Supplements tested against their label claims:

http://labelclaimstesting.com/page.php?pageID=11

fa_jing
03-09-2005, 10:04 AM
http://www.irongarmx.org/gpl.html

Ho Chun
04-20-2005, 09:10 AM
www.noweightsworkout.com

There's a new eBook available.

PezFu
08-13-2005, 01:41 PM
this is all you need:

www.crossfit.com

this program leaves bodybuilders quaking...

_William_
08-13-2005, 07:26 PM
Dan John's page - don't skip this one!
http://danjohn.org/coach.html

Idaho Weightlifting page - has various useful programs
http://eteamz.active.com/idahoweightlifting/handouts/

Homepage of the late J.V Askem
http://jva.ontariostrongman.ca/index.htm

Deepsquatter Strength Archives - Mostly geared towards powerlifting
http://www.deepsquatter.com/strength/archives/index.htm

Bryce Lane's page - Also check out the message board
http://home.comcast.net/~joandbryce/

_William_
09-26-2005, 06:46 PM
Clips of olympic weightlifters

http://benn.vectorx.org/

dougadam
10-28-2005, 04:44 PM
I disagree, I feel high reps are better for building strength.

:)

bodhitree
10-01-2006, 03:56 PM
kind of ot but somewhat related

www.whfoods.com

go to the wh foods from A-Z

its really informative for nutrition (for health and anything else including athletic performance)

Chief Fox
10-01-2006, 06:03 PM
Good stuff. Thanks for the link. :)

bodhitree
12-08-2006, 07:30 AM
I disagree, I feel high reps are better for building strength.

:)
High reps for strength? Muscular endurance maybe? The closer you get to your 1rm the more force you are generating.

bodhitree
01-02-2007, 05:57 AM
http://www.vitacost.com/Healthnotes/Index/Supp.aspx

franco1688
02-15-2007, 05:15 PM
I just wanted to make a quick comment on the no weight work out. There is honestly no need to subscribe to the book come train w/ me and I'll teach you the same trainings as part of my class. I'll actually teach you how to perform them the CORRECT way.

bodhitree
05-10-2007, 07:13 AM
http://www.trickstutorials.com/index.php?page=content/flx3

stretching tutorial

dougadam
05-10-2007, 08:32 AM
http://www.trickstutorials.com/index.php?page=content/flx3

stretching tutorial

A good resource of information, thanks bodhitree.

The only problem is that the page took a long time to load.

bodhitree
06-06-2007, 12:09 PM
HUSKER POWER! (http://huskerpower.com/)


includes 10 principles of athletic training and 1rm calculator (plus loads of other stuff).

bodhitree
08-10-2007, 09:19 AM
www.drsquat.com

really (http://drsquat.com/articles/powerliftingandspeed.html)

good (http://drsquat.com/articles/growthhormone.html)

articles (http://drsquat.com/articles/factors.html)

bodhitree
08-10-2007, 11:42 AM
National Strength and Conditioning Association Resources (http://www.nsca-lift.org/Resources/)

sanjuro_ronin
08-10-2007, 01:10 PM
www.drsquat.com

really (http://drsquat.com/articles/powerliftingandspeed.html)

good (http://drsquat.com/articles/growthhormone.html)

articles (http://drsquat.com/articles/factors.html)

Nice article on speed and strength training.
Don't always agree with Fred on everything, like his issues with HIT and his view on Steroids, but he is right on the money on most stuff, like this one and his "specificty" training for MA.

bodhitree
08-16-2007, 05:25 AM
not exactly a strength training link, but good nonetheless:

www.gssiweb.com

bodhitree
08-23-2007, 07:12 AM
Everything you never wanted to know about stretching (http://www.afn.org/skydive/sta/stretch/)

bodhitree
08-31-2007, 08:45 AM
Weightlifting rules (http://www.iwf.net/doc/technical.pdf) (sport lifting)

International Weightlifting Federation (http://www.iwf.net/main.php)

From the BBC

Guide to Weightlifting (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/other_sports/weightlifting/6261048.stm)

Track and Field info (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/athletics/skills/default.stm)

bodhitree
09-14-2007, 06:48 AM
West Side for Skinny Bastads, part III (http://www.elitefts.com/ws4sb/WS4SB.pdf)

bodhitree
09-17-2007, 12:43 PM
Maximum recruitment part 1 (http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do?id=1722595)
part 2 (http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do;jsessionid=BE0217A476C04B68C667FBCA ABB9D87F.hydra?id=1726736)

sanjuro_ronin
09-17-2007, 12:50 PM
Maximum recruitment part 1 (http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do?id=1722595)
part 2 (http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do;jsessionid=BE0217A476C04B68C667FBCA ABB9D87F.hydra?id=1726736)

Ah, to sleep 8 hours a day.....

bodhitree
09-17-2007, 06:29 PM
Ah, to sleep 8 hours a day.....

yeah, it would be ideal, sometimes compensate with daytime sleep:p

sanjuro_ronin
09-18-2007, 04:14 AM
yeah, it would be ideal, sometimes compensate with daytime sleep:p

You mean sleeping at work?
:D

bodhitree
09-18-2007, 04:35 AM
You mean sleeping at work?
:D


work, in class, on a bus, when the wife is talking to you, I know I take a wink whenever I can:p

sanjuro_ronin
09-18-2007, 05:12 AM
I always liked Chad's stuff, though I don't recall where he came up with his "magic numbers"...

Takuan
09-18-2007, 01:54 PM
Ah, to sleep 8 hours a day.....

I'm not about to argue with a guy that big, I guess I have to do what he says!

Time for a nap! ^_^ lol

Scott Meneely
09-19-2007, 06:28 PM
Power clean instructional (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlFZ-nWXxy0&mode=related&search=)



Power clean more pleasant to look at;) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TlbDQUWs0s&mode=related&search=)

bodhitree
09-25-2007, 07:37 AM
5 x 5 program (http://www.geocities.com/elitemadcow1/table_of_contents_thread.htm#PART%20I:%20The%20Pro gram)

Scott Meneely
09-29-2007, 11:57 AM
another clean demonstration (http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/OlympicLifts/Clean.html)


main menu on that site (http://www.exrx.net/Exercise.html)

Scott Meneely
09-29-2007, 12:20 PM
Does anybody know of any db snatch instructionals?

bodhitree
10-01-2007, 10:59 AM
good article on recovery (http://www.athletes.com/fun/aja3.htm)

bodhitree
10-09-2007, 05:18 AM
IronGladiators Articles (http://www.irongladiators.com/index.cfm?page=articles.cfm)

bodhitree
10-11-2007, 05:57 AM
powerdevelopmentinc (http://www.powerdevelopmentinc.com/)

sanjuro_ronin
10-11-2007, 06:12 AM
powerdevelopmentinc (http://www.powerdevelopmentinc.com/)

Interesting site and article, though I wish they would remember that the eastern bloc was so deeply into performance enhances that their "acheivments' are heavily tainted.

bodhitree
10-17-2007, 05:01 AM
50 ways to increase your squat (http://stronglifts.com/50-ways-to-increase-your-squat/)

bodhitree
10-19-2007, 05:32 AM
deadlift tips (http://stronglifts.com/7-tips-for-a-safer-deadlift/)

bodhitree
11-09-2007, 07:17 AM
Create your own creatine supplement (w/ info on sidebar related to creatine) (http://www.bodybuildingforyou.com/creatine/muscletech-cell-tech-homemade.htm)



Training the hands from Ross (http://www.rosstraining.com/articles/trainingthehands.html)


Beginner's guide to power cleans (I certainly still need this one) (http://stronglifts.com/the-ultimate-beginners-guide-to-power-cleans/)

sanjuro_ronin
11-09-2007, 08:08 AM
Great links here:

http://www.rosstraining.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=157

bodhitree
11-11-2007, 07:04 PM
Common Deadlifting mistakes (http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do;jsessionid=C161997237E25C5C6A587836 BC5E668E.hydra?id=459744)

bodhitree
11-12-2007, 07:22 AM
Pure Strength.com (http://purestrength.com/home.html)


A Beautiful Snatch (http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do;jsessionid=8BD57367630FFF7C341730AD 4BE37F0C.hydra?id=1798268)

sanjuro_ronin
11-12-2007, 08:24 AM
A Beautiful Snatch

Must ...resist...urge...to....post....porn..... ARGH !!

bodhitree
11-12-2007, 09:22 AM
Must ...resist...urge...to....post....porn..... ARGH !!


although it was a very cool article I was bitterly disappointed:o

bodhitree
11-13-2007, 12:35 PM
Grip training questions answered (http://www.gripfaq.com/)

bodhitree
11-20-2007, 07:33 AM
Some moderator needs to go through the old threads and remove the dead links.

bodhitree
11-21-2007, 11:08 AM
Science and Practice of Strength Training (http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=QWSn4iKgNo8C&oi=fnd&pg=PP12&dq=strength+training+athletes&ots=v1f9SjKKwq&sig=z6ybs6fK2O8OXB_z691SdDRRylo#PPA5,M1) from Google Books


a must read for those serious about the science behind training!

sanjuro_ronin
11-21-2007, 12:56 PM
Science and Practice of Strength Training (http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=QWSn4iKgNo8C&oi=fnd&pg=PP12&dq=strength+training+athletes&ots=v1f9SjKKwq&sig=z6ybs6fK2O8OXB_z691SdDRRylo#PPA5,M1) from Google Books


a must read for those serious about the science behind training!

Some of those exercises looked, well, dangerous and injury prone.

Any article that references Eastern Bloc training ( in this case Bulgaria) MUST make note of Steroids, performance enchancing drugs and recovery enhancing drugs too.

bodhitree
12-05-2007, 01:41 PM
Stretching for martial arts (http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/hale39.htm)

sanjuro_ronin
12-06-2007, 04:58 AM
Stretching for martial arts (http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/hale39.htm)

If we repeat it enough, do you think everyone will learn?

bodhitree
12-06-2007, 05:11 AM
If we repeat it enough, do you think everyone will learn?


You mean I shouldn't do a bunch of static stretching before working out???

sanjuro_ronin
12-06-2007, 05:20 AM
You mean I shouldn't do a bunch of static stretching before working out???

That depends on what part of your body your stretching ;)
Or who you are stretching with !:D

bodhitree
12-06-2007, 05:29 AM
www.mikemahler.com

bodhitree
12-12-2007, 03:30 PM
http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/

http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do?id=1354863

sanjuro_ronin
12-13-2007, 04:50 AM
Nice 50 tips article.

bodhitree
12-13-2007, 05:48 AM
Energy systems primer! (http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/training/gettinginshape.htm)

sanjuro_ronin
12-13-2007, 05:56 AM
Energy systems primer! (http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/training/gettinginshape.htm)

I don't understand how someone can still claim this:

Day 1 - 1.5 hours of Resistance Training (Upper Body - Pushing Type Exercises)
Day 2 - *30 minutes of Anaerobic Interval Training (Rowing)
Day 3 - 1.5 hours of Resistance Training (Lower Body)
Day 4 - *30 minutes of Anaerobic Interval Training (Cycling)
Day 5 - 1.5 hours of Resistance Training (Upper Body - Pulling Type Execises)
Day 6 - *30 minutes of Anaerobic Interval Training (Running)
Day 7 - Rest

Look at the "resistence training" part:
1.5 HOURS of training !!
And not even the entire body, no, divied into upper and lower and even more so, divided into pushing and pulling on different days !!

I though we had gone pass this type of training awhile ago. :cool:

bodhitree
12-13-2007, 06:39 AM
I don't understand how someone can still claim this:

Day 1 - 1.5 hours of Resistance Training (Upper Body - Pushing Type Exercises)
Day 2 - *30 minutes of Anaerobic Interval Training (Rowing)
Day 3 - 1.5 hours of Resistance Training (Lower Body)
Day 4 - *30 minutes of Anaerobic Interval Training (Cycling)
Day 5 - 1.5 hours of Resistance Training (Upper Body - Pulling Type Execises)
Day 6 - *30 minutes of Anaerobic Interval Training (Running)
Day 7 - Rest

Look at the "resistence training" part:
1.5 HOURS of training !!
And not even the entire body, no, divied into upper and lower and even more so, divided into pushing and pulling on different days !!

I though we had gone pass this type of training awhile ago. :cool:


I agree, the only reason I posted it was because of the description of the energy systems! That routine sucks big time!

sanjuro_ronin
12-13-2007, 06:56 AM
I agree, the only reason I posted it was because of the description of the energy systems! That routine sucks big time!

The "energy system" thing was cool.

bodhitree
12-13-2007, 07:06 AM
Skill or Strength Debate (http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?t=49108)

Thread with vid link to pistols (http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?t=49101)

Sevenstar's supplement and training poll (http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?t=48809&highlight=supplements)

bootytree's most valuable supplements thread (http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?t=43123&highlight=supplements)

Sevenstar on protein (http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?t=42462&highlight=supplements)

Mr Punch
01-02-2008, 05:00 AM
Haven't looked through the whole thread to see if this has been posted yet: will do later and delete this post if it has, but Alwyn Cosgrove (http://www.alwyncosgrove.com/) is the antichrist of trainers.

I love it.

sanjuro_ronin
03-25-2008, 11:10 AM
http://www.t-nation.com/article/most_recent/cosgroves_five_ahha_moments

read people !!

sanjuro_ronin
03-25-2008, 12:09 PM
Cardiovascular programming is an ass-backward concept.

I don't know when I first thought this, but it was confirmed to me when viewing Lance Armstrong's performance in the New York Marathon.

Throughout my college education, countless training certification programs and seminars, I'd been taught the same thing: that cardiovascular exercise was necessary to improve the cardiovascular system and subsequently aerobic performance. But there seemed to be an inherent flaw in that argument.

Let's say I tested your aerobic fitness through a treadmill test.

Then let's say that for the next sixteen weeks, we developed a five-day per week aerobic training program that involved you running at various heart rates and for various lengths of times. The program would progressively increase in difficulty and duration, and the end result was a very significant improvement in your aerobic fitness.

At the end of this sixteen-week period, how much do you expect your swimming times to have improved? Marginally, if at all, right? It seems almost stupid to ask. But wait a second. If you have one cardiovascular system, why doesn't your cardiovascular system improve across the board regardless of the activity?

More to the point, why didn't Lance Armstrong, with perhaps the highest recorded VO2 max in history, win the New York Marathon? Or beat people with lesser aerobic levels than himself?

The seven-time winner of the Tour de France, the greatest endurance cyclist, quite possibly the greatest endurance athlete in the world, finished the Marathon in 868th place, and described the event as the "hardest physical thing" he'd ever done.
Lance Armstrong

"I'd rather be cycling."

The flaw in this thinking was looking solely at VO2 max: the "engine," as it were. It's fair to say that Lance had a "Formula One" engine, but his wheels and chassis were built for a different kind of race. In other words, he just didn't have the structural development for running.

Lance was a cyclist: his body had adapted to the demands of cycling, but not to the specific demands of running. In fact, the longest distance he'd ever run prior to the Marathon was 16 miles. Lance had developed strength, postural endurance, and flexibility in the correct "cycling muscles," but it didn't transfer to running the way his VO2 max did.

The muscles don't move because of cardiovascular demand. It's the reverse. The cardio system is elevated because of muscular demand. We need to program the body based on the movements it's going to perform, not based on the cardiovascular system.

Basically, if that muscular system can't handle the stress of performing thousands of repetitions (which is what you're doing, after all, when running or cycling), then we have to condition that muscular system first. And by doing so, we automatically improve cardiovascular conditioning.

The only reason there's any demand on the cardiovascular system is because the muscular system places that demand: the muscles require oxygen in order to continue to work. In fact, cardiovascular exercise is impossible without moving the muscle first.

I've seen this across various sports. The cardio conditioning required to run a 10K won't transfer to motocross or jujitsu.

Conclusion: If cardio training doesn't transfer well from one activity to another, and it only 'kicks' in because of muscular demand, we should program muscular activity first in order to create a cardiovascular response.

sanjuro_ronin
03-25-2008, 12:10 PM
Strength is the single greatest equalizer in sport; therefore strength training is the most important physical preparation quality

While in college we were in the midst of the aerobic training and endurance activity focused period. Strength training studies were few and far between, to be honest. And any strength training studies were rarely performed on the more advanced programs we have available today. It was as if strength development was ignored completely, as all "training programs" for sport were based around various cardiovascular improvement programs.

While competing in various martial arts systems it struck me that all combat sports exist in a weight category system. The idea was not to prevent a fighter from facing a heavier fighter; it was based on the idea that the heavier fighter was stronger and therefore more dangerous.

Also, men and women (even of the same weight) didn't face each other in fighting sports. Incidentally, Lucia Rijker, the female boxer and kickboxer, lost only one kickboxing match ever.

By knockout.

In the second round.

In a match against the male world champion at the same weight.
Fight like a girl

She fights like a girl. A really strong girl.

So matching athletes up had nothing to do with weight or sex; it had to do with the idea that males were stronger than females, and heavier athletes were stronger than lighter athletes.

And when I thought about it more, even looking at activities such as marathon running, long distance cycling or figure skating, activities where excess weight may be a disadvantage, males still tended to perform better than females.

Conclusion: Being stronger is the single biggest advantage in most sports. Obviously not the only advantage, but definitely a serious difference maker. It was at this point (when I was still in college) that I started to realize that improving strength had to be a primary objective in any sports training program, despite what my professors were saying.

sanjuro_ronin
03-25-2008, 12:11 PM
Hypertrophy is a systemic response and effect, not a localized one.

All the talk about bodypart training versus full body routines, isolation exercise versus compound exercise, etc. is based upon a fundamentally flawed concept: that hypertrophy is somehow completely regional-specific.

Here's a study that examines this in a bit more detail:

Rogers et al

The Effect of Supplemental Isolated Weight-Training Exercises on Upper-Arm Size and Upper-Body Strength

Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University, Muncie, IN.
NSCA Conference Abstract (2000)

The researchers compared the effects of a weight training program on 5RM strength and arm circumference and divided the subjects into two groups. Group 1 performed four compound upper body exercises, while Group 2 used the same program but included biceps curls and triceps extensions.

The results showed that both groups significantly increased strength and arm size

However, the addition of direct arm training to group two produced no additional effect on strength or arm circumference after 10 weeks of training.

The additional localized training did not result in anything that the bigger compound exercises didn't provide.

Let me present a hypothetical example:

Twin brothers eating the same diet, working at the same job. Three times a week for the next 52 weeks, both brothers undertake a progressive resistance-training program, each adding weight, sets, or reps in a logical manner over the whole year. One difference: the first brother does deadlifts only. The second brother does arm curls only.
Twins

Guess which twin did deadlifts?

After a year, who do you think will have bigger arms? Obviously it will be the first brother, who put more overall stress and load through his system. Even though he didn't bend his elbow at all.

Charles Poliquin is fond of saying in order to gain an inch on your arm, you'd have to gain 10 pounds of muscle mass. If that's true, it'll happen a lot faster with an exercise like the deadlift than it will with the dumbbell curl.

The bottom line is that muscle growth is a systemic issue, not a localized one. If you put a stress on the forearm only, of course it would grow, but that growth would be limited because the systemic load is small. If you did deadlifts, on the other hand, the systemic load would be so big, everything would grow.
Sitting on ball.

He'd be much better off doing deadlifts.

And when we think about anabolics or anything that can enhance muscle growth, they're injected or consumed into the system. You don't inject steroids in equal amounts into every muscle group, just as you don't rub Surge on your arms. Increased protein synthesis is a systemic phenomenon.

Conclusion: If hypertrophy is what you want, develop training strategies that target the entire system at once.

sanjuro_ronin
04-16-2008, 12:02 PM
http://www.t-nation.com/article/most_recent/7_steps_to_a_balanced_fighter

sanjuro_ronin
04-16-2008, 12:05 PM
http://www.t-nation.com/article/performance_training/how_not_to_warm_up&cr=performanceTraining

Vash
04-16-2008, 02:24 PM
T-Mag FTW.

sanjuro_ronin
06-10-2008, 06:17 AM
FYI:

Stretching the Truth: Dr. Michael Bracko

This is the second presentation I attended that left the impression that stretching is basically overrated. Here are some highlights:

• Once again, stretching prior to a power event or high energy performance does not improve performance or reduce the risk of injury.

• After static stretching, the muscles and tendons stay stretched and are weaker for 10 to 15 minutes. This is called the "stretch lag period" or "tendon slack."

• Whether you get injured or not is more related to your overall fitness level, not your flexibility level.

• Super-inflexible people get injuries more often, but so do super-flexible people. It's best to be in the middle.

• Inflexible sprinters and middle-distance runners are more economical. And that's a good thing.

• Dr. Bracko does this for his hockey teams: To psychologically mollify them (because athletes are usually stretch-o-holics), he'll have them stretch, then do their warm-ups on the ice. That way, the 15 minute weakening period caused by the stretching has passed by the time the game starts.

• Like McGill, Bracko likes the idea of a 50 minute moratorium on sitting. If you've been sitting for 50 minutes, stand up and move around!

• Stretching is beneficial in work or industrial settings (like if you're sitting at a desk or standing at a machine all day) and can improve posture and reverse muscle imbalances.

sanjuro_ronin
06-10-2008, 06:18 AM
Is Bottled Best? Cynthia Sass

• Some experts claim that the next war will be over water. This is largely because of world population increases: about 200,000 people per day.

Given the rising obesity stats, I personally think the next war will be over peanut butter cups.

• What's the number one most water-consuming activity in the US? Flushing the toilet. Washing clothes and showering come in second and third.

• The average American drinks two liters of water per day, but most of that comes in colas and beer.

• 27% of bottled water drinkers choose it because of taste issues. However, in taste tests, most couldn't tell the difference between bottled and tap.

• Should we count the water we consume that comes in caffeinated beverages like coffee? Yes. A diuretic effect has been shown, but only in inexperienced caffeine users. Those who drink coffee or other caffeinated beverages every day don't get the diuretic effect. (The body adjusts to the pee-pee effects of caffeine in 3-5 days.)

• Some athletes, even ice hockey players, can lose 10 to 12 pounds of body fluid per game.

• Is tap water safe? While it varies from place to place, it generally is safe. Tap water must meet EPA standards for 90 contaminates (fertilizers, pesticides etc.)

That doesn't mean these things aren't in the water, it just means there's not a dangerous amount in there. Problem is, there are more than 90 known contaminants, and even rocket fuel has been found in tap water.

• So bottled water beats tap water right? Not necessarily. For one thing, 25 to 45% of all bottles water is tap water. If the bottle says only "drinking water" and not "spring" or "artesian" water, then it could be tap.

• Don't reuse water bottles. It's not safe.

• In blind taste tests, the discount brand of bottled water sold at K-Mart beat all the popular brands. Evian came in last, behind New York City tap water.

But here's some psychology for you. If the water taster knew it was Evian, he said it tasted the best. If he didn't, Evian came in dead last.

• Bottles water actually has less regulation than tap water. It's also tested less frequently and can have fewer restrictions depending on the state.

• But bottled water is environmentally friendly, right? Sorry, tree-huggin' Prius drivers, it takes a whole lot of oil to produce all those plastic bottles, and those bottles produce a whole lot of waste compared to just drinking tap water from a reusable glass. But hey, you drive a Prius, so please continue to feel all smug and superior.

• Oxygenated water sucks and has been shown to have no measurable effect on performance. You'll get more oxygen by taking a single deep breath than you will drinking oxygenated water. Also, most oxygenated bottled water doesn't meet label claims for O2 anyway.

• Be careful with vitamin/mineral waters. While getting calcium and other things is good, many people get too much of a good thing when they consume a multivitamin and several vitamin-enriched foods and drinks. It's easy to consume more than the tolerated upper limit.

• So if tap water isn't that great and neither is bottled, what's best? Sass recommends drinking filtered tap water. She suggests a NSF certified filter (a # 53 is best) that's changed frequently.

sanjuro_ronin
06-18-2008, 12:46 PM
Some stuff from Charles Poliquin ( if you have to ask, don't):

Aerobics Sucks

Q: Coach Poliquin, you've said: "... the more lower body aerobic work you do, the more your vertical jump worsens. The more upper body aerobic work you do, the more your medicine ball throws worsen." Also, "Continuous aerobic work plateaus after 8 weeks of training so anything more is counterproductive." So what are your general aerobic-related recommendations?

A: First, for fat loss purposes, I find aerobic training to be worthless. Most people are already stressed enough, and aerobic work only further stresses the adrenals.
kidneys

Second, genetically speaking, we're made to throw a rock at a rabbit, not to run after it. We're not aerobically designed machines; we're designed for short bursts. Slow, continuous aerobic work also interferes with the brain's ability to recruit high-threshold motor units and interferes with power development.

I don't make any of my athletes do aerobic work unless they compete in an aerobic sport. And yet my athletes score really high on aerobic tests. My hockey players always have the highest VO2 max at camp, and all we do is interval training a few weeks out of camp. People can't believe my players don't do aerobic work in the summer.

In the '92 Olympics, the Canadian alpine ski team actually surpassed the cross-country team on aerobic scores using this method as measured by third party university labs.

One of the guys from the Green Bay Packers asked for a copy of my running program. I gave him some blank sheets of paper and said, "Here, you can have it all!"

Listen, the research is very clear: Having a so-called aerobic base doesn't make you handle interval training any better. And most sports are basically interval training: short bursts followed by a rest, then another short burst.
KTFO

American football is just a few seconds of action followed by a longer rest. Hockey is forty-five seconds on, a minute and thirty-five seconds off.

What type of interval training do my athletes do? Usually it goes by the sport. In hockey we do everything on skates, so we'd do skating sprints. As the summer progresses, my athletes do longer work intervals and shorter rest intervals.

sanjuro_ronin
06-18-2008, 12:46 PM
And more:

5 Reasons Soy Sucks

Q: Soy protein is touted as a health food, but Testosterone has always said that people should avoid it. What do you think?

A: Soy is for ****s. That's what I think. But people love lists, so here are five reasons not to eat soy:

Reason 1 — Toxicity: Soy increases your toxic load. It's one of the most sprayed crops. Their high content of pesticides increases your ever-increasing toxic load. In addition, aluminum content skyrockets in processing.
soy just say no

Just say no.

Reason 2 — Potential hypothyroidism: Soy contains goitragens, which are compounds that lead to hypothyroidism. To learn more about fighting hypothyroidism, attend one my Biosignature Modulation seminars.

Reason 3 — Blocking mineral absorption: Soy has a high content of phytates, which are known to inhibit the absorption of both macro-minerals (i.e. calcium) and trace minerals (i.e. zinc). The good news is that meat consumption blocks phytates. If you're going to eat tofu, make sure to eat some meat (ironically) during the same meal.

Reason 4 — Link to Attention Deficit Disorder: Soy-based infant formulas are linked to ADD. They contain 80 times more manganese than breast milk. Too much manganese content is linked to neurotoxicity.

Reason 5 — Increased cardiovascular load: Hemaglutinin is found in soybeans. This compound is known to make red blood cells aggregate, therefore increasing your cardiovascular load.

If you're not convinced, read Dr. Kaayla Daniel's book, The Whole Soy Story, or check out her interview HERE on this site. The information and research provided will blow you away.

In conclusion, soy is for ****s.

sanjuro_ronin
06-18-2008, 12:48 PM
And:

How Much Protein?

Q: Is the old "gram of protein per pound of body weight" rule still good? I hear some coaches say we need less and some recommend 300 grams a day for a 200 pounder.

A: For a 200-pound lean male, 300 grams of protein per day would be the minimum. In fact, I think the rule should be closer to 2 grams of protein per pound of body weight, assuming the person is lean.

For about 70% of the population who isn't carb tolerant, 2 grams per pound is good for mass gains. It can make a huge difference. Personally, I couldn't get above 192 pounds until bodybuilder Milos Sarcev convinced me to get 2 grams of protein per pound of body weight. In no time I was up to 205, lean.

Now, if a person is carb tolerant (he handles carbohydrates very well), that value would drop to 1 to 1.5 grams of protein per pound of body weight.
steak

Someone like Christian Thibaudeau, who's not carb tolerant, should be getting 2 grams of protein per pound, but a guy like Milos Sarcev, who can wake up and drink a gallon mixture of 50% maple syrup and 50% dextrose without it affecting his blood sugar, I'd say 1 to 1.5 grams. Rare guys like Milos need to eat 70% of their calories from carbs.
muscles


It has to be individualized to an extent. Still, most people don't "deserve" the carbs they eat. The rule for most people is this: you have to earn your carbs.

Raipizo
09-23-2008, 03:11 PM
but i still like tofu XD

anyway anyone know any good finger strength exercises??

sanjuro_ronin
10-03-2008, 06:45 AM
http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sex_news_sports_funny/caveman_speaks


Why you ask?
Good question, read that article to help you understand that. if you wanna look and perform like a pro you have to train and "supplement: like a pro.
People with "lives' and work sechedules can't and as such need to realize that and not get discouraged.
This is applicable to MA training as well.

TaichiMantis
10-03-2008, 07:08 AM
http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sex_news_sports_funny/caveman_speaks


People with "lives' and work sechedules can't and as such need to realize that and not get discouraged.
This is applicable to MA training as well.

Can a true martial artist be a well rounded person? Everything I've observed points to no, except maybe later in life when they pursue tai chi ;)

sanjuro_ronin
10-03-2008, 07:16 AM
Can a true martial artist be a well rounded person? Everything I've observed points to no, except maybe later in life when they pursue tai chi ;)

Time is finite, that's for sure.

sanjuro_ronin
02-04-2009, 08:18 AM
http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/how_strong_are_your_abs_really

Some of you will be surprised...

air
04-09-2009, 02:31 PM
I am 33 years old when i was in my younger years, I use to lift heavy and often.

As I started to get older and wiser, I started incorporating more of a cardio routine mixed with a little bit of weight lifting, but lots of push ups, sit ups, crunches, leg drills..

I see weight lifting as a great way to maintain muscle mass, but as far as lifting like a power lifter or someone who lifts to sculpt their body its really a waste of energy for martial arts.

I do believe you have to train your body, but I believe you should train your body for application of technique. Styles like Wing chun, Tai Chi even aikido etc... Don't need to focus heavily on weight training. Shaolin systems like the 5 animals require a great deal of strength but very little weight lifting.

It is also my personal opinion that focusing on strength training more than focusing on martial training is a big mistake. While its true that if you are stronger you can beat someone else up who is weaker. (Unless you are dealing with someone who is a skilled fighter. )

I say become very weak, take your strength away and learn how to use your skill.

Its okay to be strong its even better to be skilled.

For martial art purposes, you can get by without ever lifting a weight and still become a excellent fighter. (if you are learning to defend yourself in real life under real conditions)

If you are competing the *rules* will require you to focus more on strength training.


The only tip I can give on weight lifting is don't over train I made that mistake a few times and ended up hurting myself and not being able to train for a few months.

It has been my personal experience that your body will tell you when it has had enough. Listen to it.

sanjuro_ronin
06-17-2009, 07:44 AM
So, with every passing day it seems that we hear of another athlete that was "caught" using performance enhancing drugs ( Sammy Sosa being the latest).

It is time to consider that perhaps PED ( Performance enhancing drugs) are far more common place than ever suspected and that they seem to be "bread and butter" for high level performance.

Frost
08-27-2009, 04:09 AM
I feel PED’s are so widespread that you almost have to use them to compete at a high level.

The only reason more do not test positive is that the testing protocols are always far behind the various masking agents used, and even when people are found out some are cleared by there governing bodies (Carl Lewis for one), and only comes to light years later

on subject below is a great site for strength training and conditioning for fighters, Joel has worked with many of the top MMA guys in the world, so unlike allot of the guys getting on the bandwagon for training fighters he actually speaks from experience.


http://www.8weeksout.com/

sanjuro_ronin
08-27-2009, 05:36 AM
In the world of professional atheltes, one can hardly be competitive without PED.
The training demands on the body are so great that, even with enough rest ( which we never get) it is slmost impossibel to maintain that level for a consistent time.
Sure they cycle their training intensity, but as any good S&C coach knows and will tell you, its the gains made OUTSIDE the peaking for a match/contest, that will be the edge in said contest.

Frost
08-27-2009, 06:36 AM
No argument from me I would make a bet that we all know athletes who looked into steroids to help them overcome nagging injuries, or enable then to train at the level and with the constancy they need to in order to be competitive. (In fact most of the guys I know who have looked into steroids have done so to aid recovery from injury) In MMA and combat sports where there is on off season, and where the technical demands are so great, I imagine the only thing that might be stopping people taking PEDS is the fact that they can’t afford to get caught by a random test, and they can’t afford the same masking agents and high cost doctors that track and field stars can, yet.

Maybe they should just level the playing field and allow the use of PEDS in all sports, its not like anyone believes any of these guys are 100 natural anymore

sanjuro_ronin
08-27-2009, 07:04 AM
I have often said the samething, just let them do what they need to and hope for the best.
Problem is, sports has zero to do with health, it has to do with success, with winning and with $$$ and for that, atheltes will sell souls.
I know that PED are NOT regulated for the health of the athletes, but I truly think that, if any regulation is used it should be for THAT purpose.

Frost
08-27-2009, 07:24 AM
Yep non of the things elite athletes do is good for them, most of the pro rugby players in the UK can hardly walk by the time they reach there mid 40's, football (sorry soccer) players need new kneecaps and hips, boxing has so many cases of brain damage and death as a direct result of fighting.

Why not level the playing field it will at least stop the snide remarks about who is and who is not natural, and as you said properly regulated and in the mainstream it might be better for the health of those who do chose to use

sanjuro_ronin
11-02-2009, 07:51 AM
An update of sorts:
http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/bigger_better_faster_longer

There is a part here that I wanted to make "stick out' because there is some confusion in regards to Tabata's:


Everybody wants to do everything these days. Everything at once! You have to do HIIT, have to do Tabatas, have to do snatches and clean and jerks, have to do all the powerlifts, have to do a bodybuilding workout, then you have to periodize it. And your nine-year-old kid? He's in a stroller at Disneyland.

• I almost want to call Izumi Tabata, the Japanese researcher, and apologize for all the Internet nonsense I've caused by my Tabata Method article.

• The issue with Tabata is that people think it's part of a workout. The truth is,

if done right, you'd need a gun to make an athlete do another set. Izumi had to practically force his athletes to get back on those bikes.

• If you do push-ups for 20 seconds, then rest for 10 seconds and continue that for 4 minutes, it is not the Tabata protocol. Tabata is 20 seconds on and 10 seconds off for 4 minutes, but the mere fact that you can do sit-ups and "Tabata" jumping jacks afterwards tells me that you're not doing the original plan.

• I made a mistake in the article saying that thrusters were okay. The more I did it and the longer I had athletes do it, the more I realized this was an absolute failure. It's terrible! There's only one weight-lifter exercise that works with Tabata: the front squat.

• If you do 115 pounds in the Tabata front squat, you will not at the end of those 4 minutes look at me and say, "Now what do I do for the next 4 minutes?"

No, you're going to do what I did when I used to do these in my driveway. You're going to lay there on the ground with your dog sniffing at you, worried about your life. You do not repeat a true Tabata workout.

It's an act of will to finish the last two minutes. You should be looking at the clock and thinking, "Only one more minute until I have one more minute!" That's a Tabata workout. And it only works with front squats.

Dan mentions front squats because he is a powerlifter but the crucial factor of Tabata's is that 4 mins is ALL that you can do.

Frost
11-03-2009, 02:17 AM
An update of sorts:
http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/bigger_better_faster_longer

There is a part here that I wanted to make "stick out' because there is some confusion in regards to Tabata's:



Dan mentions front squats because he is a powerlifter but the crucial factor of Tabata's is that 4 mins is ALL that you can do.



He should also mention that the Tabata study is the most overblown study used in exercise, its proof that marketing works much better than science when it comes to selling products. I mean it’s hard as hell to do, but what exactly does it accomplish apart from making you puwk?

the original study he did only had 14 test subjects (how many scientific studies do you know with less than 15 people taking part) all relativity unfit, 7 did the protocol (plus 30 minutes a week of lsd work which is over looked) and the other group did lsd work for 6 weeks, then at the end they found that VO2 Max and anaerobic capacity were better improved by using anaerobic means then aerobic means, hardly ground breaking.

The group that used an anaerobic methods improved anaerobic capacity and the group that used a method that did not stress the anaerobic method did not (and there improvements in VO2 max happened mostly in the first 3 weeks, in the last three weeks they saw almost no improvements) whilst the aerobic groups VO2 max increased at a slower rate, it kept increasing and if the study group had continued for another 4 or 5 weeks would have probably surpassed that of the HIIT group. So HIIT training leads to greater immediate changes but tapers off and these changes are not very stable, no news there

Even using VO2 max as a measure of aerobic fitness is misleading, resting heart rate, heart rate recovery, heart rate at anaerobic threshold, and power output at anaerobic threshold are much better indicators of aerobic power and capacity and overall fitness.

sanjuro_ronin
11-10-2009, 07:38 AM
He should also mention that the Tabata study is the most overblown study used in exercise, its proof that marketing works much better than science when it comes to selling products. I mean it’s hard as hell to do, but what exactly does it accomplish apart from making you puwk?

the original study he did only had 14 test subjects (how many scientific studies do you know with less than 15 people taking part) all relativity unfit, 7 did the protocol (plus 30 minutes a week of lsd work which is over looked) and the other group did lsd work for 6 weeks, then at the end they found that VO2 Max and anaerobic capacity were better improved by using anaerobic means then aerobic means, hardly ground breaking.

The group that used an anaerobic methods improved anaerobic capacity and the group that used a method that did not stress the anaerobic method did not (and there improvements in VO2 max happened mostly in the first 3 weeks, in the last three weeks they saw almost no improvements) whilst the aerobic groups VO2 max increased at a slower rate, it kept increasing and if the study group had continued for another 4 or 5 weeks would have probably surpassed that of the HIIT group. So HIIT training leads to greater immediate changes but tapers off and these changes are not very stable, no news there

Even using VO2 max as a measure of aerobic fitness is misleading, resting heart rate, heart rate recovery, heart rate at anaerobic threshold, and power output at anaerobic threshold are much better indicators of aerobic power and capacity and overall fitness.

I think you need to look further into his study bro...

http://www.cbass.com/SEARCHOF.HTM

http://www.rosstraining.com/articles/tabataintervals.html

Frost
11-11-2009, 01:31 AM
I think you need to look further into his study bro...

http://www.cbass.com/SEARCHOF.HTM

http://www.rosstraining.com/articles/tabataintervals.html

Thanks I have read the first study before so I read the second one now! I just think the study has been blown out of all proportion and it is used by people to bash steady state work and say all you need to do for aerobic and anaerobic training is 4 minutes of hard work, which I think distorts the study.

The first thing people tend to forget is that the HIIT group did one session of 30 minutes LSD work a week in addition to the intervals
Secondly to quote the study:

“Average VO2 max in group one was 52.9 (LSD group) in the second group it was 48.2 (HIIT Group)”

So the LSD group had a larger VO2 at the start, so they had a better aerobic system to begin with and would be less likely to see improvements in the 6 weeks


Also whilst the HIIT group saw good increases in VO2 mas in the first 3 weeks, in the second three weeks as tabata himself said “no significant changes were observed."

Whilst the LSD group saw smaller but steady increases over the whole 6 weeks.

So the study proved that HIIT causes better short term adaptations but they stall after a few weeks whilst LSD leads to slower but more steady progress

Also he only tested VO2 max for aerobic fitness, if Tabata had measured other variables such as changes in cardiac output and stroke volume, resting heart rate, anaerobic threshold, velocity at anaerobic threshold, etc. you would have got a different result

I also don’t like how people use tabata for bodyweight stuff, weights etc, the original study used the bike and subjects were very carefully monitored, once pedal speed dropped below a certain point the training was stopped as it was no longer considered beneficial, this is very different from simply trying to work as hard as you think you can doing burpees or running

Overall I think the study was useful but has been blown out of all proportion and used as an excuse not to do LSD work, threshold training or any other longer term aerobic training etc

sanjuro_ronin
11-11-2009, 08:55 AM
I think that the what was blown out of proportion were the results of the Tabata protocol and how they were used to justify ANY type of HIIT and gave people the impression that what they were doing was the true Tabata protocol.
HIIT is great to compliment regular, moderate paced work, but it is not a subsititute nor is moderate work anything like HIIT.
They birds of a different feather.
The Tabata protocol is something to be cycled into your workout, it can't be your whole workout, at least not for very long, you'd die !
LOL !

Tabata won't get great long term results, nothing over 6 weeks that's for sure, because the PEAK is reached so quickly and because the body just can't handle it.
It is also a far better protocol for those that are already in good shape, it is NOT for the beginner or novice.

Frost
12-01-2009, 02:22 AM
http://www.sherdog.net/forums/f14/new-article-explosive-conditioning-mma-799523/ here is a great program for those looking to increase explosive power

sanjuro_ronin
12-01-2009, 06:02 AM
I have never been a huge fan of TUL ( Time under load) training to be honest.
A little too much "gray" area for my taste.
But the routine looks like a very good and well though our periodization program.

Frost
12-01-2009, 06:20 AM
I have never paid much attention to TUT or TUL training, but increasing alactic power is something I have always been interested in and the science behind this makes sense, if the alactic system can only produce power for 10-12 seconds it makes sense to limit your sets accordingly, and the periodization of the programming, max strength to explosive power to explosive capacity is very clear. I followed this program a few months ago and was impressed with the results so thought I’d share, if nothing else its refreshing to see a program from someone who actually trains fighters for a living, too many of the programs on the net are from people with no back ground in training fighter or training anyone.

sanjuro_ronin
12-01-2009, 06:57 AM
Rooney's stuff is also pretty good, but I think most of this stuff works not only because, well it works, but because it "jolts" people out of a stagnant workout.
Now, there is nothing wrong with consistent training, especialy when you are building a foundation, but that well runs dry real quick at times and in the ST game, periodization is very important, whatever form of it you choose.

Frost
12-01-2009, 07:08 AM
I like Rooney’s stuff, the problem with it I had was that he gets you to get a HR monitor but other than telling you to look at it during training etc to see how you adapt and recovery quicker he doesn’t really tell you how to use it efficiently. One of the reasons I like Jamison’s stuff is that he gives you the science behind his methods, and the data from the guys he has worked with to back up his claims and then tells you how best to use the methods depending on your strengths and weaknesses. He tells you why a HR monitor is useful and tells you how to use it for different goals, (nothing new endurance athletes have been using HR zones for training for years but combat sports are way behind other sports when it comes to S and C) he tells you the methods he uses to test his fighters and then how he builds their strength and endurance according to those tests.

Your point on periodization is spot on, I love the block periodisation methods the soviets came up with but hell even linear periodisation is better than Westside full on max effort work all the time

Fa Xing
12-01-2009, 07:21 AM
Anyone ever use Robert dos Remedios (http://www.coachdos.com)' stuff? It's been the best when coming from a strength training perspective. I don't have much time to talk about it more right now, but will later. It's nice to see these discussions here on this forum; I wasn't expecting that.

Frost
12-02-2009, 12:58 AM
Anyone ever use Robert dos Remedios (http://www.coachdos.com)' stuff? It's been the best when coming from a strength training perspective. I don't have much time to talk about it more right now, but will later. It's nice to see these discussions here on this forum; I wasn't expecting that.

Looks a good site.. Like how he stresses heavy lifting and the Olympic lifts.

But I am always weary of coaches that bash steady stat cardio for fitness and fat loss, also his article on football (sorry soccer) not being an aerobic sport is for me wrong but I like a lot of the stuff I saw

sanjuro_ronin
12-02-2009, 06:12 AM
Looks a good site.. Like how he stresses heavy lifting and the Olympic lifts.

But I am always weary of coaches that bash steady stat cardio for fitness and fat loss, also his article on football (sorry soccer) not being an aerobic sport is for me wrong but I like a lot of the stuff I saw

I think that sometimes coaches tend to either over simplify or over complicate.
Steady cardio IS a good way to burn fat, it is NOt the best way, but for most it is the ideal way.
Very few people can do HIIT to the point where they can get decent fat loss.
At least from what I have seen.
As for football, how aerobic it is depends on the position you play, anyone that has played the game knows that.

The biggest issue I have with most coaches is they tend to be of the either/or position and that is not really needed.

Frost
12-02-2009, 06:35 AM
Coaches who are trying to sell a product always have to stand out, look at mike Boyle’s no need to back squat articles for a classic example of this.

I always look at the real world when in doubt, how does virtually every body builder cut weight, get on the bike for 45 minutes 3 or 4 times a week. What does A boxer or wrestler do when looking to make weight? Hit the road for a long run every morning, there is a reason these things have always been done and it’s not because they wee too dumb to know any better (regardless of what siome coaches say)

As for soccer I take your point about it being position specific, but apart from the goalie I think the demands are roughly the same. A huge study was done at one of the UEFA cups a few years ago 68 matches where studied, that included 58 different teams, and 719 players from 20 different nations. Actual playing time was found to be 54-65 minutes and players average heart rate was between 160-175 bpm

. The longest sprint the players ran was 20-30m and the total volume per match was about 160m at speeds of >25.3Km/h, for high speed runs the total was 680m 19.9-25.2km/h, jogging was 4.97km speed=7.3-14.4km/h and finally walking of 3.67km speed=.02-7.2km/h.. so most of the time the players were jogging, walking and sprinting short distances, sounds aerobic alactic sport to me.

Michael Dasargo
01-14-2010, 07:02 PM
http://www.sandiegofitnessmartialarts.com/blog/entry/441021
just posted some videos...here's one that's not on my site:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqm2M_CIqSA

Shima Wara
11-15-2010, 02:59 PM
For lifting and diet information geared towards powerlifting type training.

www.70sbig.com

and

www.criticalbench.com

are very good sources.

Foiling Fist
03-17-2011, 10:51 PM
The book Axe Hand; Hsing-i & Internal Strength Workout, contains everyday methods for internals, meditations, rooting, exercises, tests and self adjustments. Instruction goes from the individual’s known, to his related unknown. Taught with the common ground of the 'shared lived experience' .

Wrist and fore-arm stretches for energy flow: these can help with tendonitis, typing hands, carp-tunnel, and muscle knots; preventing injury and learning wrist locks as well as teaching grappling seizures and locks, and will help you transfer it more effectively.

Five move Tai Chi form, Hsing I Five Elements detailed with step by step photos, Twelve Animals steps written descriptions.
Standing Pole (Embrace the Moon) moving Qigong: 'shifting the water' and 'rising-expanding/sinking-contracting'.
Hsing-i San Ti: standing and moving for Qi and Fa Jing.

Fore-arm Throw double set, dynamic drill, adjusting moving root, responsive blocking enabling the same move for offense and defense, center of Qi as it moves through oneself and the center between two people.

http://jadedragonalaska.yolasite.com/book-intro.php

bawang
03-18-2011, 03:24 AM
will it make my penus bigger

taai gihk yahn
03-18-2011, 03:40 AM
will it make my penus bigger

yes


.......

Foiling Fist
03-18-2011, 11:11 AM
will it make my penus bigger ?

Just fuller, maybe wider.:)

bawang
03-18-2011, 01:51 PM
i am sorry, my penus always very wide like french bread.
what i need is make penus long. your product cannot help me.

taai gihk yahn
03-18-2011, 03:18 PM
i am sorry, my penus always very wide like french bread.
what i need is make penus long. your product cannot help me.

put it back in the oven for a bit, then when it's warmed up, pull it out longer

Foiling Fist
03-19-2011, 06:53 PM
Not my specialty, but this appears to be the real McCoy here. My teacher would pull trucks with his hair, but I had not seen this done at this level before.

Mantak Chia refers to this method in some of his books.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7x7-gHCLPcA
Impressive!

Used to be at site below, but copyright stopped it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFfhxVmdXZ4

I suppose if you strengthen the weakest, or narrowest passage of circulation, one could improve their overall flow health and power. I prefer fingertip (flat-tip) pushups, sometimes headstand fingertip pushups leaning against a wall.

I have used dear antler, penus and tail; effectively for physical, mental and sexual stamina. These all are at narrow bottlenecks of flow. Pantochrin tincture that was concentrated from antler, is one of the few proven and documented natural stimulants that are not caffeine (adrenalin) based.

See my book or your herbalists for more; and what conditions to take them under. Ginseng is similar.
http://www.lulu.com/product/paperback/axe-hand-hsing-i-internal-strength-workout/15063347

****

"i am sorry, my penus always very wide like french bread.
what i need is make penus long. your product cannot help me. "

bawang
03-19-2011, 07:30 PM
I suppose if you strengthen the weakest, or narrowest passage of circulation, one could improve their overall flow health and power. I prefer fingertip (flat-tip) pushups, sometimes headstand fingertip pushups leaning against a wall.

are you trying to tell me to do pushups with my penus?

sanjuro_ronin
03-21-2011, 06:08 AM
Keep it on the subject guys, this is a thread about STRENGTH training, got it?

gongfupanda
06-07-2012, 09:49 AM
strengthcoach.com has some great articles for strength training - not all kung fu stuff but v good

ryanh
01-16-2013, 06:25 PM
Thank you for your thoughtful post. Really provided some great information.

Raipizo
08-21-2013, 06:03 PM
What do you guys think about using sandbags for exercise, not a striking bag but one you lift or carry for various exercises like those for at sporting goods stores? About to make one as they seem to give a pretty good workout. Though I would contribute seeing as the forum is pretty dead.

Raipizo
08-21-2013, 06:05 PM
Also i took a look at Bill Pearls getting strong book, I forgot who posted about it. It's a pretty good resource and has a lot of material I would recommend it also so thanks to that person who mentioned it :p

Kellen Bassette
08-21-2013, 06:45 PM
What do you guys think about using sandbags for exercise, not a striking bag but one you lift or carry for various exercises like those for at sporting goods stores? About to make one as they seem to give a pretty good workout. Though I would contribute seeing as the forum is pretty dead.

I do similar things all day at work, carrying and throwing 80 pound bags of mortar. It will make you strong, but it just seems like work and it sucks. I'd rather hit pads.

JamesC
08-21-2013, 09:54 PM
What do you guys think about using sandbags for exercise, not a striking bag but one you lift or carry for various exercises like those for at sporting goods stores? About to make one as they seem to give a pretty good workout. Though I would contribute seeing as the forum is pretty dead.

It depends on your goals, really. For general physical preparedness it can be quite good. They're very versatile. Loads of exercises you can do. Getups, cleans, squats, good mornings/deadlifts, heavy carries(wrap arms around carry for distance), possibly overhead pressing, etc.

Another good thing about it is that you can progressively load them. Add weight and get stronger. Unfortunately, it won't be a substitute for barbells for strength training.

If you're jus tryin to "get in shape", I think they're pretty great and versatile pieces of equipment. Especially for someone that does home workouts and likes to do more calisthenics.

GoldenBrain
08-21-2013, 10:21 PM
What do you guys think about using sandbags for exercise, not a striking bag but one you lift or carry for various exercises like those for at sporting goods stores? About to make one as they seem to give a pretty good workout. Though I would contribute seeing as the forum is pretty dead.

Along with my regular strength training routine of using free weights, bow flex, body weight exercises...etc I sometimes use an old 70 pound heavy bag for various exercises. I'll bear hug it and do a single long set of squats for several minutes or until burnout. I also do one legged squats, up and down a hill and walking steps with it on my shoulders. I don't have a spare tractor tire like I've seen the MMA fellas using (mine are actually on a tractor), so another exercise I do is to flip it end over end across the yard for several minutes. This last one is especially entertaining for my dog.

madhusudan
08-22-2013, 08:33 AM
I like low cost DIY stuff and am just about to make a sandbag for home workouts. Most people seem to recommend using wood pellets rather than actual sand. The links are easy to find online. Here is one: http://www.davisdailybootcamp.com/motivation/how-to-make-your-own-sandbag/

Like JamesC said, I'm looking for general fitness and decent strength. People that do real work are usually very functionally strong even when not very bulky at all. I'm an office guy, so I need the workout.

I remember living abroad we used to have 5 gallon jugs of water, or whatever the metric equivalent of that is, delivered. Dude's forearms were developed. I started doing farmers carries of those plastic water jugs to good effect. Plus, you get to handle a lot of jugs.

Raipizo
08-22-2013, 10:24 AM
Yeah I'll be doing weights also, but functional strength is nice :) I will be using my heavy bag also, I just need to get it set back up is all. I got an empty bag from everythingwingchun.com and filled it with beans, I prefer it over a regular bag I think, it's al lot quieter so I can use it in the house while others are sleeping, and it's not too hard to where I have to worry about hurting my wrist on it, but not too light either. Of course filling it was kind of expensive because beans aren't super cheap.

I filled my sandbag with wood pellets, trying to figure out how to use a garbage bag as a liner. I tied it off with the top of the other but then it seemed it wouldn't flow freely entirely but then I had to cut it to untie the bag so I tied it in a knot and this time just put it inside the bag but now the garbage bag is shorter than the sandbag so there is a big spot where the pellets never move to so I'm gonna grab another bag and use the full sized garbage bag tucked inside and see where that puts me, if nothing else maybe I won't use a garbage bag. I just wanted to keep the dust level down was all.

I single handedly revived this thread :D lol

Raipizo
08-22-2013, 10:26 AM
It depends on your goals, really. For general physical preparedness it can be quite good. They're very versatile. Loads of exercises you can do. Getups, cleans, squats, good mornings/deadlifts, heavy carries(wrap arms around carry for distance), possibly overhead pressing, etc.

Another good thing about it is that you can progressively load them. Add weight and get stronger. Unfortunately, it won't be a substitute for barbells for strength training.

If you're jus tryin to "get in shape", I think they're pretty great and versatile pieces of equipment. Especially for someone that does home workouts and likes to do more calisthenics.

I see what you were saying now, yeah you can't really make a 300 lb sandbag, although maybe you can if you shoved weights in or something, but you wouldn't need 300 lbs of sandbag to equal the difficulty of a barbell I wouldn't think. Either way there are some exercises a limp sandbag can't do a stiff barbell can.

Kellen Bassette
08-22-2013, 01:16 PM
I see what you were saying now, yeah you can't really make a 300 lb sandbag, although maybe you can if you shoved weights in or something, but you wouldn't need 300 lbs of sandbag to equal the difficulty of a barbell I wouldn't think. Either way there are some exercises a limp sandbag can't do a stiff barbell can.

You would probably hurt yourself lifting a 300 lb sand bag, that dead, limp weight is a lot harder to carry than something solid...I actually have a 300 pound plus gravel bag made out of an old army duffel bag, not for lifting, just for conditioning leg kicks and sweeps. (Sits on the floor, I couldn't hang it if I wanted to, straps wouldn't hold and if they broke that could be the end of your foot.)

Those 70 pound tubes of sand they sell at Home Depot would be a good workout tool, they're cheap, manageable and half way durable.

GoldenBrain
08-22-2013, 02:59 PM
I actually have a 300 pound plus gravel bag made out of an old army duffel bag, not for lifting, just for conditioning leg kicks and sweeps.

Dude, you're a beast! I have an XXL Wave Master that I kick around but I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around kicking a 300 pound gravel bag, though I'd sure give it a go.

Raipizo
08-22-2013, 03:05 PM
This guy can just hold it up for you :p, nah but yeah I definately could not lift that I have about 40 in now just to try it out and see how that suits me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?nomobile=1&v=nRSgMdmhaA0

Kellen Bassette
08-22-2013, 04:12 PM
Dude, you're a beast! I have an XXL Wave Master that I kick around but I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around kicking a 300 pound gravel bag, though I'd sure give it a go.

I'm a long ways from doing it full force, I should have started with half sand, half gravel, but I wanted all or nothing, lol...I can hit it about half power, maybe someday....

Kellen Bassette
08-22-2013, 04:13 PM
This guy can just hold it up for you :p, nah but yeah I definately could not lift that I have about 40 in now just to try it out and see how that suits me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?nomobile=1&v=nRSgMdmhaA0

That's insane! You know he can toss some dudes around like rag dolls, technique or not!

Raipizo
08-22-2013, 05:31 PM
Hulk smash!

Drake
09-06-2013, 01:15 PM
Just added pullups to my routine, and getting some solid results.

Do about 110 of them on biceps and back day. Split them into sets of 10, with 60 close hand and 50 widearm. Usually need to bring in the chair to finish them all.

Raipizo
03-17-2014, 10:18 PM
So I'm trying to gain some size, and this is a lazy question I could probably answer with Google but I figure I'd ask, which percentage max rep will help you gain size? And with that what size reps? I'm pretty sure with size gain you want small reps and few sets correct? And is there a difference for say pure mass gain and trying to gain size and strength? Thanks.

sanjuro_ronin
03-18-2014, 10:35 AM
So I'm trying to gain some size, and this is a lazy question I could probably answer with Google but I figure I'd ask, which percentage max rep will help you gain size? And with that what size reps? I'm pretty sure with size gain you want small reps and few sets correct? And is there a difference for say pure mass gain and trying to gain size and strength? Thanks.

Increase of muscle mass comes from two MAIN factors:
Increase in weight.
Hypertrophy, which is a fancy name for increase in muscle mass.
Muscle gets bigger when it has to grow bigger because of increased demands.
For that it requires food.
The reps schemes are, typically, as follows:
1-3 range - pure strength and minimal muscle size increase
3-5 - mostly strength and some mass
5-8 mostly mass and some strength
8-12 - mostly mass and some muscular endurance
12+ mostly endurance and little mass.

Sets are a bit more tricky because that depends on the protocol you are following what kind of exercises you will be doing.

Do NOT use the typical bodybuilder routines unless you are a high caliber BB and/or on recovery enhancers ( Steroids, etc).

wenshu
03-18-2014, 12:38 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZ4EraZBB00

Raipizo
03-18-2014, 06:44 PM
Increase of muscle mass comes from two MAIN factors:
Increase in weight.
Hypertrophy, which is a fancy name for increase in muscle mass.
Muscle gets bigger when it has to grow bigger because of increased demands.
For that it requires food.
The reps schemes are, typically, as follows:
1-3 range - pure strength and minimal muscle size increase
3-5 - mostly strength and some mass
5-8 mostly mass and some strength
8-12 - mostly mass and some muscular endurance
12+ mostly endurance and little mass.

Sets are a bit more tricky because that depends on the protocol you are following what kind of exercises you will be doing.

Do NOT use the typical bodybuilder routines unless you are a high caliber BB and/or on recovery enhancers ( Steroids, etc).

I'm okay I don't need to use steroids and shrink my wang. Well that does help some :D

bawang
03-22-2014, 06:40 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1Ge6AjO7kY

Frost
03-24-2014, 01:50 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1Ge6AjO7kY

or you could do what the raw IPF world record holders all do to build strength and their deadlift, just well deadlift :confused:

I like louie but his stuff is for geared lifters (in both senses) no matter what he or dave tate say

Raipizo
03-30-2014, 04:14 PM
or you could do what the raw IPF world record holders all do to build strength and their deadlift, just well deadlift :confused:

I like louie but his stuff is for geared lifters (in both senses) no matter what he or dave tate say

Off the topic of that, but over at truenutrition.com and making a custom protein powder. My question being, say I add whey, casein, and brown rice, would that be a complete protein because I know you often have to add rice and beans together to make a complete protein or would also adding hemp or pea protein be needed? I also suggest taking a look over that site, pretty good stuff for much cheaper than anywhere else.

bawang
03-31-2014, 10:23 AM
or you could do what the raw IPF world record holders all do to build strength and their deadlift, just well deadlift :confused:

I like louie but his stuff is for geared lifters (in both senses) no matter what he or dave tate say

I like louie because the amount of free info he gives.

bawang
03-31-2014, 10:26 AM
Off the topic of that, but over at truenutrition.com and making a custom protein powder. My question being, say I add whey, casein, and brown rice, would that be a complete protein because I know you often have to add rice and beans together to make a complete protein or would also adding hemp or pea protein be needed? I also suggest taking a look over that site, pretty good stuff for much cheaper than anywhere else.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwUYSi3c2Oo

I eat powder when i really cant have food but best food is real food

boxerbilly
01-03-2016, 09:54 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwUYSi3c2Oo





I eat powder when i really cant have food but best food is real food



Raipizo,

Guy in link fails to tell the supplements he uses, LOL. Like Winny and Nandro.

Bodybuilders eat like CRAP most of the time until a few months out. Then they clean up the diet and cut the amount they eat. That is also when they tend to use things like protein powder. Or when cycling- your body will use the excess protein for muscle when you are on. Get the protein without the calories.

Just go to a vegan site about what needs to be combined with what to make a complete protein. It is sort of crap. Because you do not need to eat that combo at the same time but most already do anyway. Like beans and tortillas. Burrito. I like meat so I don't even worry about it.

First guy that I know of to say supplements were a joke- Arthur Jones. He was probably not the first either.

Vash
01-03-2016, 02:37 PM
He goes into great detail about his cycling habits in other videos; also covers the reasons people have for bodybuilding, including body image issues, feelings of inadequacy, etc.

But yes, supplements are nice, but not essential... usually. I universally recommend zinc/magnesium, fat (usually Omega 3, or coconut) and protein. That's to cover the nutrient-deficient lifestyles my clients lead.

boxerbilly
12-14-2016, 05:27 PM
He goes into great detail about his cycling habits in other videos; also covers the reasons people have for bodybuilding, including body image issues, feelings of inadequacy, etc.

But yes, supplements are nice, but not essential... usually. I universally recommend zinc/magnesium, fat (usually Omega 3, or coconut) and protein. That's to cover the nutrient-deficient lifestyles my clients lead.

Yeah on the zin/mag and I also like cal. Ive tried fish oils across the board. I pass . They make my skin dry out always. Fish is fine with my system. I don't think coconut oil is any better than any other oil and in fact the healthiest oil may in fact be canola oil. What do you believe is enough protein ?

SteveLau
05-20-2018, 12:29 AM
Dear Destrous9,

First of all, I largely agree with your training method. My story is that from 2016-17, I have tried to build up more muscles. And two years are more than long enough to reach the conclusion that the training method did not work. In Sept 2017, I was weighing 56 kg. My goal is to reach 60 kg. So starting from that time, the change in my training program was instead of one BB session per week, I added 1/2 BB session. And I also started to take more protein rich food daily, and protein supplement in training day. It has worked slowly, and I am now at 59 kg. The guy in the mirror also looks bigger and more ripped in his muscles.

P.S. Would you mind to tell us why you have quitted BB?



Regards,

KC
Hong Kong

taizukungfu
09-20-2018, 11:49 PM
My joints are at their worst when I don't train. It seems (appears) that the muscle strength remains, while the tendons become soft, or weaker at a much faster rate. I think this can cause problems.

When the muscle is far stronger then the tendons, and the muscle is used, I can notice it.

I do have horrible tendonitis in my elbows, but only on pulling motions. For the first five years of my training, I used to train pushing motions much harder than pulling. So the tendonitis is my fault, not the lifting.

kung fu schools (http://www.learnshaolinkungfu.com/)

taizukungfu
09-21-2018, 12:09 AM
My joints are at their worst when I don't train. It seems (appears) that the muscle strength remains, while the tendons become soft, or weaker at a much faster rate. I think this can cause problems.

When the muscle is far stronger then the tendons, and the muscle is used, I can notice it.

I do have horrible tendonitis in my elbows, but only on pulling motions. For the first five years of my training, I used to train pushing motions much harder than pulling. So the tendonitis is my fault, not the lifting.

kung fu schools (http://www.learnshaolinkungfu.com/)