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ChiSau
06-14-2000, 08:55 AM
What is the general opinion of Pentjak Silat? It looks like some brutally effective stuff, and it seems to be getting more and more press in various publications lately.

Kyoshu
06-14-2000, 11:56 AM
I have a friend from Indonesia that did Pentjak Silat and he says it's not much different from Karate.

Sihing73
06-14-2000, 07:31 PM
I have done a little Silat, I still like my Wing Chun /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I guess on a very basic level you could say it is like Karate. However, I think Silat is more fluid and also will fight lower to the ground. Silat also uses weapons as an integral part of its curriculum. I also believe there is a mystical or spiritual aspect to the practice of Silat not found in Karate. There is the use of totems or ank can't spell what I am tryign to say. But in essence there is a mental aspect which involves taking on the characteristics of certain animals and also in blessing certain objects to be used for specific purposes.

I found many of the movements to be quite direct with a no nonsense flavour to them. It is definetly a "fighting art". Not much sport to true Silat. The emphasis is on fighitng and being able to utlizie the techniques quickly. As I said a lot of ground level stuyff, from what I've seen.

Peace,

Dave

ChiSau
06-15-2000, 10:21 AM
Thanks for your post, Sihing73. It is actually the more esoteric, mystic side of Silat which you mentioned that I am more interested in. In the (relatively) limited amount of written material on the shelves regarding Silat and Kuntao, particularly Donn Draegger's terrific Weapons and Fighting Arts of Indonesia, there are references to hypnosis of one's opponent, deep trance states that turn the practioners into unbeatable berserkers, and even cursing!

Unfortunately, these are only cursory descriptions without much detail. Now I'm not saying I necessarily buy all of this, but I am interested in exploring outside of the reaches of conventional martial arts (which is not to say I plan on cursing anyone, mind you, even assuming this is for real!).

Sorry if this drifts a bit away from the topic of streetfighting, but if anyone has any info or insight into this stuff it would be appreciated. And please share if you have any other information on more ordinary things like who are good teachers, styles, lineages, and techniques of Silat.

[This message has been edited by ChiSau (edited 06-16-2000).]

Kymus
06-22-2000, 10:48 PM
I have taken a few classes in Silat. Once I get some more money, I am going to continue it. Silat is nothing like karate. It is unlike anything I have ever seen or taken quite frankly. ChiSau: if you are looking for good instuction in silat, my Sifu has 2 video tapes out on Maphilindo Silat which is a system of Silat Dan Inosanto created to honor all his masters. go to http://www.pamausa.com/silat.html for more information about silat.

-Kymus-

------------------
"Crosstraining is the key"
~Sifu Rick Tucci~

Monkey
06-23-2000, 01:19 AM
I once saw Paul de Thouars demo silat techniques and he looked nothing like Karate.
He was very smooth and flowing and circular. The closest thing he looked like is Paqua.

06-23-2000, 02:31 AM
Yo

The problem is this:- Saying "what is Silat like?" is like saying "what is Kung Fu like?"

There are MANY systems of Silat and yes, some DO look like Karate. Many though are much more fluid & VERY effective. As with many arts you have to be selective & get past a certain amount of "fluff" to see the real stuff but it's well worth it!

YODA http://combatedge.cjb.net

mild7
06-25-2000, 10:14 AM
hi all! I'm new to this forum.. a friend just sent me the link.

Just wanted to put in my 2 cents worth on Silat. I've lived in Malaysia for most of my life(in fact, I'm living here right now) so I can only comment on the Silat that I've seen here.
Silat appears to be an effective art(but then again, I believe all arts to be effective when done and applied properly) but it does'nt seem to be very much different from gung fu and karate in a lot of aspects.
Of course, it has it's own unique aspects, such as weapons(kris, cindai jantan etc) and fighting to music.
The thing about Silat is that it seems to be a little overrated in the West, while other arts that can offer just as much are looked down upon.
This is ironic as over here, silat is in turn looked down upon and generally regarded as more of a "dance" than a fighting art(Of course, this is not neccesarily true).
I've always found it amusing that Silat is often labelled as a brutal, to the point type art especially in the States. This is not to say that it isn't, but I've always seen it on the same level as gung fu. Silat has a lot of forms work, a lot of esoteric dance like elements and other things. It is ironic that jkd has been inclined towards Silat as it fits in very well with the "classical mess" Bruce Lee was talking about.
Anyhow, I think Silat is a very worthwhile art to learn, but it is a little overrated.

MonkeySlap
07-23-2000, 08:42 AM
Some Silat is overrated, some does look like Karate. Silat can be a very broad term, and just like here in the US there is a trend towards turning it into a sport.

After 20 years of Chinese, Japanese and Philipino arts I have recently started a study of Pentjak Silat under the VDT Tjabang (School). These guys are very serious, and will test you for a while just like a good Chinese school, don't expect the main course right away. I just made it to the appetizers - and they are delicious. Great stuff. Check it out at WWW.SERAK.NET (http://WWW.SERAK.NET)

JerryLove
07-23-2000, 09:32 AM
There are several hundred styles of both Pentjak Silat and Kuntao. The Pentjak styles are native to Indonesia and vary from extremely brutal to styles designed for ritual performance at weddings. Kuntao is very much a blending of Chineese and Indonesian arts.

They vary from ground arts (Harimau) to Serak which was created by a man with one arm and a club foot.

I have seen Silt under Willem DeThaures (Serak-ish, founder of Bukti Negara), Chiku Madgid (Head of the Seni Gayong system), Guy Savelli (very fond of whips) and Richard Clear (who has two decades of internal Chineese arts influencing his cirriculum).

They are typically (that I have seen) brutal, direct, and well considered.
http://www.kuntaosilatdethouars.com/ http://www.gayong.com/ http://www.worldkungfu.com/ http://www.clearsilat.com/

Minang
08-16-2000, 04:17 PM
Pencak Silat... hundreds of styles are scattered over the many islands of Indonesia. Low, high, soft, hard, hands, legs, grasps, throws, weopens etc. etc. For each field(s) of interest there is a Silat style. The most internationally known styles originate from Java most of the times. I myself train a Sumatran style of the Minangkabau. The Sumatrans call their Silat "Silek". The book of Dreager, mentioned in an above posting is worth wile taking a look at for more Silat-info...

08-31-2000, 11:32 AM
Check out www.Gayong.com (http://www.Gayong.com)
for info on one of the most effective arts around. The teacher is exceptional, the techniques are incredible.

Any info, you can email me at Bluedragon0114@hotmail.com


Looking to carpool to location from NYC weekends.
Peace

phantom
05-07-2001, 01:30 AM
Same as topic. Thank you for any insight that you could give me concerning this.

JerryLove
05-07-2001, 04:57 AM
No. There is a great amount of variation between Silat styles. There are some generalities that can be made the *often* apply (about equivilent to the "norther kicking, southern punching" generilization in CMA) , but nothing that is universal.

Jerry - Clear's Silat (http://www.clearsilat.com)

Chris McKinley
05-09-2001, 10:40 AM
Bet you guys didn't know that Kevin Bacon was a Silat teacher, did you? He's right there on the home page of Jerry's website, puttin the hurt on some guys. :P

Credits to Braden for the discovery.

JerryLove
05-09-2001, 07:46 PM
Down boy. Bad Chris.

It was funny in chat and all, but rather inappropriate in discussion.

FIRE HAWK
06-22-2001, 09:56 AM
GLOSSARY OF KUNTAO SILAT TERMS
copyright Chas Clements, 1992



This glossary is drawn from many sources, including: The DeThouars Family, Maha Guru Maurice, Pendekar Agung Paul, Hai-Deng Sifu Willem, Bapak Victor, Pendekar Willem Ingram,their wives and family friends and relatives, the absolutely sterling work by Donn F. Draeger, and due diligence from other literary sources and interviews.

The mistakes are mine. No great scholarly attempt was made to find a consistant spelling or to identify from what language root a term derives. Specialty idiom is treated as part of the language. Many words have multiple meanings; a literal meaning, an idiomatic meaning in the general populace, a place name, a particular technique, a particular meaning within its context or in conjunction with another word.

This work is in the area of martial art and reflects the cultural aspect, the traditions and history of the teachers.



Pukulan:from'pukul'or'bukul',to strike or to collide, 'an':the study of, the study of striking. A Dutch Indonesian slang usage. It is not the idea of striking with the fist, but the colliding of bodies. Also 'poekoelan' (archaic)



Pentjak: also, pencak, pentcak, pentcha, etc.(pent ju ta:"strike, kick, block' Chinese usage) Choreography, the study and practice of movements that may be useful for fighting, or practiced for their own uses. A means of practicing combative movement with a partner without killing.



Pentjakkers: active fighters who study by seeking competition. A Dutch-Indonesian usage.



Silat: lit.'lightning' Combat usage of pentjak movements, the study of the lore of combat. 'Blade' There is no silat without knives, there is no knife work without silat.

Serak: The fighting style of the Family DeThouars, embodied in the Pendekar Agung Paul DeThouars. Also known as the Decoy Style, taken from the name Bapak (Father) Serak, the founder. Bapak Burung (owl) Serak was one-armed and one foot was clubbed; his insights into distancing, exchange, multipart striking, etc. were codified by his senior student, Mas Djoet into an art for two armed practitioners. Bapak Serak and Mas Djoet lived, practiced and died in the Kramat section of Batavia (Betawi).



KunTao: Originally a Chinese art, it shows great influence from Indonesian sources. Hsingpo, paqua and taikek (tai chi quan) have all been synthesized and influenced by contact with, primarily, Western Javanese (Sumatran) stylings. The Hai-Deng Sifu Willem DeThouars is the KunTao stylist of the DeThouars family,and Bapak (founder) of KunTao Silat KunLun Pai, having gained advanced teaching rank in several representative arts of KunTao and Silat. Implies 'internal' stylings, although the 'hard' concepts are also addressed.



Tongkat: lit. carrier stick. Also, the style of Maha Guru Victor DeThouars, "the carrier of the movements (knowlege-pencak) of Serak, for the American market. Also, the fighting stick of the family style; measured from the ground to the bottom of the groin. The three sizes of stick are Tongkat Keciel (short stick) Tongkat Setengah (half stick) Tongkat Panjang (long stick)





Bukti Negara: lit. 'evidence of a continent' The existence of the art is evidence that the greater continent of Serak exists. The mystical style of Pendekar Paul. It came to him, in a flash of enlightenment in a single night, as a full blown system, unlike anything seen before. Major aspects of the art center on the use of the fighting floor; positioning and angles of incidence, meridians of weakness and of power, the use of levers and fulcrums, mental preparedness-tenacity and ferocity. It is an art of great subtlety and sophistication.



Malabar:(lit."Voice of the Eastern Facing Mountain)

The Kendang Silat Kuntao styling of Westerners; greater size and physicality, modern defense stylings to sophisticated attack, translators and archivers of the Dutch Indonesian culture to Americans. Given in Grace to Senior Lineage Student and First Practitioner, Steve Gartin, by the entire DeThouars Family.



Kilap: also: khilap, kilat,others. lit.: The thunderclap. an aspect of all fighting styles and the center of others. The hand of thunder, displante by percussion, hitting of weak points; implies centered, focussed striking. It is an aspect of Kendang Silat, implying grappling technique as well as percussion technique. Petjut Kilat is the action of the whiplash kilat punch. Pukulan Pentjak KunTao Silat Kilap Betawi is a derivation of the grace of the DeThouars family Petjut Kilap Silat as it is practiced by Chas Clements and gives hormat to that lineage alone.



Tji: lit.: 'flows from a river' The prefix that identifies a styling from Western Java. It is taken to mean 'style' or school, and the 'river' is a river of knowlege - it has nothing whatsoever to do with low river valleys. Tjimande, Tjikalong, Tjimatjan, Tjimonjet and others are examples. It also would imply a 'village' system; restricted to the inhabitants of a particular locale and maybe to the members of a particular family. A great rivalry exists between the various systems with long standing feuds in blood.



Betawi: lit. proper place name. also; 'Batavia' Located on Western Java, Betawi is the place that Sunda speaking Sumatran peoples settled after crossing the Strait of Sunda over the past twenty-five thousand years. These people had brought their fighting styles with them and the word properly discribes Menangkebau tribal stylings. The history is of a particularly brutal place with a lot of commerce between peoples of vastly different heritage.



Bugis: The particular tribe of Orang Menang from which Pak Serak came. They are known as the Invisible People of the Mountain Forest. They cultivate the single hand punch of startling ferocity, kill with poison, distract the mind and have never been conquered. They live in the territory called Gunung Kendang (Drum Mountain) near Bandung, Ngangdong, western Java. Their name for Pak Serak was Bapak Burung (Father Owl) for his mystical, clairvoyant powers. The kebatinan of these people is very strong; personifying power, projections (tujuh), ipoh ('poisonings'), invisibility of intention, training the animal, withstanding discomfort, etc. Village of Tjibeo (Forbes,1885)



Sumatra: Island Northeast of Java, separated by the Strait of Sunda. A very old culture ranging from very sophisticated traders to cannibalistic pirates and bandits. A very combative peoples made up of the Menangkebau, Atjehnese and others. Our lineage is of the Orang Malayu, the Bugis people of the Menangkebau, Sunda speaking transplants to Western Java. A Muslim professing people with Persian cultural overtones (Northern Indian Mohguls) and Bramanistic Hindu roots.



Majapahit: "bitter fruit" Empire of Indonesia which challenged Kublai Khan, controlled much of the available landscape in the 12th through the 14th centuries. Supplanted the Menangkebau Empire of Sumatra.



Kendang: lit. great drum. The fighting floor, challenge floor, of village oriented silat. At festivals, the village champion appears and dances his 'kambangan' and makes his challenge. If the challenge is answered, the contest is to sweep the opponent. The loser of that contest has the option to continue to the death or to retire from the arena. Combatants are required to bring to the contest: sweet herbs, cloth to wrap the body and burial money. Also; the practice floor, the masters house/school. Kendang Silat is combat styling specifically for the challenge floor; a martial art specifically to fight other martial arts



Sunda Silat:also:Bandung Silat, Main-po, po, Silat Betawi,(Betawie is also known as Batavia).Bandung is the birthplace of Uncle Willem (11 Jan 36) and one of the centers for martial art on West Java. A mountainous region remeniscent of the Gandung Kendang of eastern Sumatra, their place of origin.



Djuru: short styling form, short hand form. Styles may be composed of any number of djurus from six to ten to twenty five or more. Tricks, techniques, timing, breath and distancing are all remembered while doing the djuru.



Langka: A series of djurus strung together to teach a particular aspect of silat. A 'platform' or grid to cut the fighting area into usable sections. A form/style of Silat; as in Langka Blekok, the crane style. Langka Tiga Luar (inside triangle langka) Langka Sliwa Luar (crossing interior (square) langka) Langka Sekurum Luar, Langkah Pancar Luar, Langkah Lima, Langkah Djuru Sepak, Langkah Djuru Combinasi. L.Tiga, adoption of torque and proper positioning of your space. Langkah Securum, three hundred and sixty degrees of sight. L. Sliwa, accepting of total elusiveness. L. Pancar, concept of constant change and awareness of your own space and that of your opponent.



Pukul: to collide; a short fighting technique, made up of movements from djurus, taught as fighting combinations for separate practice and also codifying anddemonstrating martial principles that can be studied in greater detail.



Sembut: Short, formal, two-man combination for the understanding of skeletal principles; clearances, meridians and levers, movement on the langkah with martial purpose.



Sat: percussive hit or blow, breath technique (chiku)for explosive internal power. A true meeting of Chinese internal practice with Indonesian explosive intention. A series of sats precedes the pli-tok.



Tangkis: interception (block) strike to stop opponents' hitting power by jamming or pain to the body or strikes to deaden body members.



Sapu: ankle sweep, torqueing throw for repositioning. Inside sweep-sapu luar, outside sweep-sapu dalem; practiced on the tiga, djurus on the top give hand technique options by body positioning.



Beset: rear stepping sweep or tripping obstacle. Inside sweep-beset dalem, outside sweep-beset luar. Beset is the recovery and alternative for sapu as the throwing mechanism of the feet; practiced on the tiga, djurus on the top give hand technique options by body positioning.



Tempiling: Slapping (hard)



Dempe: low posture attitude



Chekeh: Choking



Buka: opening



Buca: interior wipe, trap/throw, nerve punch applications



Displante:"displace" by collision, cut the line, off-balance opponent, take his ground from him. Surprise his spirit, distract his martial intention.



Sodok: jabbing as with the tip of a stick or sword.



Bakthi: internal spirit; as in 'chi', but without the Taoist subjectivity/objectivity- useful power as would be 'jing' in Chinese with active animist aspects. The taking of heads, cannibalism, trophy parts, the generation of the spirit animal, express the taking of the internal spirit of the opponent and the expression by the practitioner.



Kebatinan: spiritual study,kerochanian, djasmani (spiritual studies in martial art.) The training of the martial spirit to withstand pain, overcome fear and confusion, intrude upon the opponent, personalize martial power, etc.



Ilmu Sehat: Internal power



Sa-Lu: breathing, stepping, palm waving excersize



Buntut: lit.:'tigers' tail' pommel end of weapon, the end of a technique, the technique of delivering the end of the weapon.



Gubu: handle of a(weapon)



Matjan: lit.:'tiger' , blade end of weapon, long end of stick. 'Tjimatjan' is the Javanese tiger style; standing tiger.



Kumbag: Elephant (as in Pamur silat)



Puter Kepala: lit.: 'turn the head'. The throw series utilizing the arm bar/ head turn.



Kuda Kuda An: Horse styling, kicks, flicking, lead exchanges and repositionings, the prancing and reversing method of cutting the fighting floor taught in Langkha Tiga Lima,



Sidongkak: 'He kicks' as a horse (after the Pajakumbuk area of Sumatra, horse-breeders)



Sembah: Bowing posture, starts sicar dalem response to ambush attacks.



Selamat: lit.:'peace' as in Salaam, Shalom, selamat pada tua, peace to you (plural)



Hormat: respect/loyalty/indebtedness. Gift of Hormat is the gift from the student in appreciation and respect for his time, ability and generosity in teaching the art. Ma'afghan Hormat is the deepest gesture of respect for the head of the system. The gifts of Hormat for the entering student are: a sharp knife, a chicken, tea, tobacco, a length of cloth and 'the gift of gold'. The gift of Hormat for the continuing student and for the practitioner is to show his respect and appreciation for the gift of the guru to him. If a job needs doing, do it.



Adat: laws of conduct; In the village system, it is expected that people will comport themselves with regard for certain basic laws. It governs the seniority system in an art, the political hierarchy of the village and surrounding land, the respect due age and special talent, the gift of madness and power.



Menangkebau: lit.:'people of the ox-horn' . Originally identified with Sumatra and specifically the SouthEastern end near the Straits of Sunda. They have, for centuries, provided a culture from which were drawn artists, craftsmen, holymen and councelors, fighting men and strategists, dancers and musicians, poets and explorers. They are identified with the mountains, Gunung, and are known for supple, strong leg tactics and deep postures. The kris is the knife of the adult male.



Orang: man, member of a group,Kita Orang (we Men together.)



Orang Menang: man of the Menangkebau



Orang Melayu: other Maylaysians



Orang Utan: old man of the jungle, the orangutan is revered as a sentient being whom it is wrong to murder, he provides the model for the ape style (kalong) along with the rock ape. He teaches the techniques of invisibility, great strategic and intuitive awareness, deep strength, 'long arm, short leg'.





Pendekar:also 'pandekar', Champion; implies spirituality and self mastery to the level of a holy man. The word may be a corruption of the Menangkebau words 'pandai akal' (clever mind). The self discipline and willingness to submit (as a fighting man) to the requirements of a holy pusaka are awesome and command the deepest respect imaginable. 'Agung' is a modifier meaning 'great'.



Ahli: Expert



Pendetar: Non-fighting priest



Agung: Great-as in Pendekar Agung, 'Great Champion'

Guru Tuan: 'prince' teacher, uncle

Maha Guru: Senior Teacher,Professor

Guru: Leader of Practice Guru Muda (young instructor) Guru Satu (student instructor) Guru Dua (assistant teacher) Guru Tiga (teacher leader) Guru Empat (Master of Fist)



Bapak: Father. Used to convey affection to a mentor, or founder of a style. Comes from the Bugis (Sunda) usage.



Chan Man Ran: Man Who Opens the Door of Knowlege, a very close teacher relationship discribed by a student, an honorific to the teacher.



Tangan: hand



Tobrok: colliding technique for displante, a major study in all Pukulan styles.



Sepah: kick



Buong: underhand strike with a long arm.



Sang-sat: palm up strike from underneath with the short hand.



Sang-Sat Tinge: High Sang Sat



Ten Dung Kakhi: Fighting Cocks' kick, a spurring kick of movement around a defense or from an unexpected angle of incidence.



Te: kick



teratai: Shaolin "lotus flower" kick





Gedjelig: downthrusting kick (stomp), may be delivered from any height to any target, intrusivley climbing opponent steps.



selosor: front snap groin kick scoops up to move sarong.



sabit: frontal instep kick (side to side kick)



Puntiar: to jump



Pintuh: door



Pau: explosive breathing expansion block with shoulder, a reply from sicar dalem to ambush.



Sabit Tumit: heel thrust kicks



Susulan: reverse sickle heel kick (the hackysack kick)



Tji Monjet: Monkey styling (Hanuman sized monkey)



Dit Da Jao: Iron Hitting Wine medication for healing bruises.



Majapahit: Hindu-Buddhist empire of Southeastern Asia from about 1250 to 1389.



Atjeh: Formidably combative people of Sumatra, never conquered.



Batak: a cannibalistic people of Sumatra. They were in subservience to the Menangkebau and paid them tribute. Their recipe is Chili, Peanuts and a little lemon juice.



Combinase:Combinato,Combinate, others. A combining of the stylings of several martial styles; Serak, Tjimande, Okinawate, KunTao, etc.





Hilot: Healing art for martial arts injuries, similar to Kappo. An expression of the ChiKu; massage, stroking of the spirit, infusion of spirit, Known as healing in the bloodstream.



Pak Serak: Founder of Serak system (1790-1860(?) A member of the Badui tribe of the Menangkebau of Sumatran Sundanese extraction. He was a practitioner of nine martial styles, offering proficiency in three; five Indonesian, two Indian and two Chinese. Challenged at birth by having only one arm and a clubbed foot, he was able to see strengths and weaknesses in martial arts and to formulate his own. Known as Bapak (Father) Burung (Owl) for his clairvoyance and discernment, he killed tigers and wild water buffalo with his hand.

Pak Serak was a widely employed martial trainer, bodyguard to Sultans, political activitist and martial consultant to nobility. Died in Kramat, Batavia, Djakarta.



Mas Djut: (also,Djoet)d.1930(?).(Kramat, Betawi) Senior Student of Pak Serak and the man responsible for organizing the system from the teachings of Pak Serak. As Djoet had two arms, two legs, he saw the utility of the one armed mans' style as practiced by himself. Passed the art to Johan DeVries and to his nephews, John and Ernest DeVries. The present Pendekar (Paul DeThouars) was the student of John DeVries, his Great Uncle by marriage. Mas Djut was bodyguard to the Sultan of Ponti Anak on Borneo.



Pisau: A short, single edged utility knife. The basic fighting knife of all cultures. Other small knives; sewar, sakin, pisau belati



Kris: A double edged dagger of various sizes and shapes. The main weapon of the Menangkebau people.



Golok: A broad single edged cleaver, very heavy.





Parang: A cutlass style, single edged sword.



Kelewang: A broadsword type. Other swords; pedang, rudus, pamandap



Arit: a sickle; often used in pairs or with another weapon.



Tombak: A spear with a removable blade. The blade is used as a separate weapon when the spear is inconvenient to carry. Other spears;lambing, kujur, kunjur



Tjaluk: a sickle bladed short knife .



Rante: rante ber gangedug, rante delima, rante kembok, others, Long chain weapons with weights (6 to 9 ft.)



Pajung: umbrella (used as fighting weapon)both folding and full umbrella styles are practiced.



Rantjau: Punji Stick, rolled bamboo sliver covered with poisons, bamboo stake buried at one end.



Pusaka: Heirloom, holy legacy- The Serak is a pusaka to be conserved and passed on intact to the next generation.



Beladiri: A personal protection art that emphasizes practicality, it is updated and refined at every opportunity. It has no 'sparring' applications and the principles can be very simple.



Tjimande: Brother art to Serak,founded by Mas Kair (perhaps Mas Djoet) passed to Pa Atma of Tjimahi near Bogor, West Java, to Carl van Deerns,the father in law of Guru Tuan Willem and so to Joyce and Willem DeThouars.





Tjikalong: Brother art to Serak. Known as Bat Style but only from the fact that it comes from the village of bats, involves no hanging upside down. Actually a style drawn from the large primate actions; Rock Apes, OrangUtan, etc.



Longar: long arm movements



Tjimatchan: Javanese Tiger style, fights upright with long sweeping movements; skin attacks, long bone traps, precision striking, ferocity.



Harimau: Sumatran Tiger Style, low to the ground, creeping movement to upset opponent.



TjiOeler: Snake Style, nerve center attacks, muscle splitters, organ attacks, bone displacements, evasion.



Tjiwaringen: brother art to Tjimande, emphasizes long-arm techniques and exquisite balancing as a martial technique.



TjiPadang: A horse style emphasizing a multitude of kicks, stomps, rakes, toekicks, heeling, etc.



Raja Naga: King Snake Dragon, highest expression and most advanced animal form, combines aspects from all forms; animal, human, spirit and immortal.



Oelar Sendok: King Cobra



Setria: patriot (a martial attitude)



Setria Hutan: patriot forest ( a martial attitude)



Putri: lit.a lady: Styles derived from the actions or attitudes of women. putri bersedia, ladies in preparation Putri Sembhyang, ladies worshipping Putri berhias, ladies dressing Putri sepasang pair of flowers





Siku-Siku: also, Tjabang, Trisula, Sai (Okinawan) Three Branch Iron truncheon, main weapon of Serak (Alexander the Great) Originally a treebranch used to picket animals, later a weapon of the privileged classes, associated with animal ownership and metal.



KunLun Pai: lit. 'focused animal hand of Kun Lun Brotherhood'- Kun Lun is a region of the mountains of Hukien, one of the centres of Shaolin temple boxing.

Lineage of KunLun Pai is as follows: Li Po Chang, scholar of the Neijia Chang, Po Qua Zen- his student, Liem Ping Wan of Doasim, founder of Chuan Chu Ie Shing-I, his students; Tan Tong Liong, Wim Chen, Buk Chin of the arts, Que Moi Shantung Kung Fu Chuan Fa, Kwantung Po Kwa Zen and TaiKek and Pa-kua Zen Kun Tao, the art of Fuekchin Kun Tao and Hukien KunTao. The Silat is drawn from the Family Styles, Kendang Silat of Sardjono Guru and Raden Djuaggan, Ganjung System of Mahil Atmo, the Pamur of Madura and Pecut Silat, the Silat of Bondo Waso of Guru Besar Tai Ing. The influence of European Boxing and European Fencing are also very stongly represented. These arts are embodied in the person of Hai-Deng Sifu Willem DeThouars, God Grace him. The KunLun Pai also discribes the cigar dalem group (a Pai) ' a group of men going about doing honourable work' The fingers of the animal hand are separate but joined in the doing of honorable work.



Tulen: lit.purity- close to the source, the old Tulen Styles are: Silat Serak, Tjimande, Silat Kemango of Edgar van der Groen , TjiKalong, Tenje'kan and Silat Betawie.



Pamur Silat: Silat from the Island of Madura. Characterized by bladework, no sparring application, minimal foot shifting, good old mans' style. Emphasis the "harimau" tiger.see also Pamor.



Isi: lit. 'feeling'

Tangkapan: to catch the enemy

Bantingang: th throw the enemy

Sambut Pukui: to evade, parry, and strike

Pombas Mian: to kill as a final decision



Dasar: fundamentals (12 of each)

Djurus: step by step elements

alis plarian: to dodge & escape

kamasukan: the successful entry into the enemies defense



To Count:



Satu - one



Dua - two



Tiga - Three



Empat - four



Lima - five



Enam - six



Tujuh - seven



Delapan - Eight



Sembilan - nine



Sepuluh - ten



Sebelas - eleven



duabelas,tigabelas,empatbelas,limabelas, enambelas,tujuhbelas,

seratus - one hundred



seribu- one thousand



Setengah: one-half, as in Tongkhat Setengah.



Murid: Student



Pandai: skilled craftsman (martial arts rank-practitioner)



Gilap: lit.:'brightening' The training and action of instant response to attack. An aspect of the training of the intention.





Tiga: lit.:'three' Basic platform for fighting one person, angle of attack and defense utilizing meridian theory. The concept of 'three' runs through the art constantly, breathing, meditation, structures of concepts, etc.



Ma'aaf: prefix word of respect



Sudah: "Yes, I understand."



Kinjit: squatting elbow directed throw



Siloh: Cross-legged offensive/defensive seated position for warriors. Also the means for going to the ground while supporting the weight of the opponent to control his body, or to seat next to the opponent as he is thrown to the ground so as to continue in groundfighting. A very strong part of Harimau tiger styling. Sempok is front seated siloh, Depok is back seated siloh. Siloh satu (warriors seat) Siloh Dua (tailor style) Siloh Tiga (kneeling seat)



Tangkis Garis: Blocking cut, a jam to the thrust or punch.



Tendangan: to kick (or knee) and the displante resulting.



Totok: foreknuckle punch to sternum that attacks throat without withdrawing (slides upward, presents elbow).



Tepisan: to parry (not a block, more finesse).



Meliwis: Swallow (a bird), a style that accepts PoKwa readily, very evasive with intercepting strikes, locks and throws.



Lingsang: Otter; an agile grappling presentation style



Kuda ayer: Hippopotamus (water horse)a rushing, overwhelming presentation style.



Garuda: mythical bird, the mount of Agni (bringer of fire), eagle, associated with the aspect of the phoenix. Very scholarly study.



Tekken: walking cane, hooked staff, as weapon. The hook points forward.



Tangkapan: to catch the enemy while positioned to throw.



Bantingang: to throw the enemy (mid-throw actions)



Kamasukan: the entry into the enemies defenses.



Tangkapan: control the wrist of striking arm to use as a handle



Pombas Mian: the decision to kill as a last resort of defense. This is the previous decision as well as the effecting of the action.



Sambut(s): practice techniques for evasion, parry/counterstrike. A method of practicing specific technical responses in a string. A form of sparring against one or more opponents.



Kambangan: lit.:'Flower Dance'. The movement of the dance is a non-threatening means of practice, a way of meeting girls and a form of challenge to observers to see the techniques of a rival. The 'palm waving' movements train footwork, breathing, attack positions, skeletal interception, body torquing, positional changes to various directions, etc. It is performed with a scarf, a candle, a saucer of water with a floating flower, etc. The music is provided by the Gamelan orchestra which also accompanies the fighting contests. Also, 'randai' saucer dance



Tjio Bakh: lit.:'try it', a challenge



Shiapa Brani: lit.:,'Who has the guts to fight?', a challenge



Kita Brani: lit.:'I(we, my group) have the guts to fight', challengers response



Amas Adrai: DeThouars family motto: With God, We Prevail (We shall survive)

Pukul Turush: lit. straight in punch, to fight until the end



MahdJiu: lit.:'Go Ahead' a challenge



Nje-brang: crossing sang-sat, to cross-over (a platform direction from Langka Sliwa), a kuda exchange. Training the ankle positions to effect major torso repositionings. ankles/angles.



Tiga Lima: Langkha Lima- walking the tiga in djurus, sapus, besets-eighteen count, Kuda to reverse.



Pamor Silat: from Madura, sandy beach style- good platform, stepping in, hand traps, minimal jumping to the side, attention to footing-good 'old mans style'. Very direct knife attacks. see also Pamur



Latihan Matchan: Stick (tongkat style) in a tiger modality, presents as a blade.



Dalem Lan Sup:lit.:'Sour fruit' Outside response technique against the knife.



Kraton Guards: guardians of the Kraton (palace,armed enclosure). The central Javanese bodyguards of the Sultan of Jogja who were the standard by which warriors were measured, instructed by Pak Serak. The Visayan (southern Phillipino) styles are derivative.



Kerojok: the fighting of one against many, a continuing technical practice



Petjut: The action of a whiplash, a forward punch, Silat Kilap Petjut is a beladiri style of the DeThouars family.



Guntung: scissor blow with stick.



Gatok: butterfly blow with stick



Pentjakkers: people who are part of the martial arts community, Dutch Indonesian slang. Also,"brawlers"



KunTaoers: people who practice KunTao, Dutch Indonesian Slang.



Potong Leher: knife defense ending with the reversal of the weapon to the throat.





TjiNgkrik: Brother art, springing, evasion, siloh, monkey hands, started by woman observing monkeys fighting.





Silat Kwitang:Big mans art, chinese influence on indiginous art, vicious. Mustapha Kwitang is one of the expressions (as taught by Pendekar William Ingram).





Arbir: five foot bladed weapon, a groove in the staff orients the blade edge for the user at all times.





Gowakang: Breathing (a study in all martial arts)





Bathin: spirit (internal)







Hantu: "Spirit" (external) an expression of the Animistic heritage of the Sumatrans.





Kailat: Closing on the target





Kilat: Speed of precise execution, not just quickness- celerity. Another spelling of Khilap; connotes thunderous percussion without warning to vulnerable targets.





Panggau: Warrior





Cigar Dalem: Inner Circle, the close guard. The inner area of body defense.



Ratu Duri: lit. to take the intestines of an opponent. King of Thorns, The T***** King, Kingly Power of a Continent. Emphasizing the ChiGung action of making the body hurt the opponent when he hits it. The action of the Indonesian Continent showing its' martial power to the world by a style that includes wisdom from many sources.





Pai Yun: Tiger Descending the Mountain. The first tiger form of KunLun Pai KunTao; a standing tiger form of the Shaolin style with aspects of TjiMatchan.





Ling Sing Toy: a basic form in KunTao





Wu Kung: The 'strong warrior' art of Shaolin and others. It conditions the body to war and privation, the mind to stress and the spirit to the power that war requires of the participant.





Tan Lung: a basic practice in KunTao. The "Trackless Art". An individual expression of the understanding of the Art, its' principles and techniques expressed as solo movement.







Djuru Satu: lit. "First Hand Form". Introduction to basic principles of KunTao Silat.



Guru Besar: lit. "Great Teacher". An honorific to a respected fellow teacher of another style.



Bunga: Ritualized greeting style that includes self defence options.see also, Sembah



Rahasia: The teaching of the vital points, how to attack and defend them.



Bedok: a meat Axe



Buka: the covered fist, "open to all things"



Tarik: Open hand invitation to attack



Lawan: a signal of having experienced combat. cat stance, palm to face, fist to hip.



Andeka: surpassing in quality



Menarik Napas Dalam: deep breathing techinque-chiku



Rasa: intuitive inner feelings



Sujud: self surrender



Batin: within the heart



Ingsun Sejati: true self



Tapa: ascetic practices



Semadi: Meditation



Berok: a monkey styling



TjiKak: a monkey styling



Maccacque: A monkey styling



Sikap Kuda Hormat: Horse stance in attention.



Tongkat Langka Monyet: Tongkat monkey form for footwork.



Kaki Besi Kanan: Turn foot to the right (kick)



Kaki Besi Kirie: Turn foot to the left (kick)



Puter Sembilan Belas: Turn 90 degrees left.



Jalan Puter: Step and turn.



Naga Dimulka: Full Frontal Dragon



Sepak Naga: Low Front Dragon Kick (full)



Kuda Sepak Blekok: Horse up Crane kick



Sepak Dimulka: Snapping Frontal kick



Tukar: exchange (as of hands, or feet) Kuda



Puter Naga Diblakang: turning back dragon stand



Sapu Harimau: Tiger sweep



Sepak Blekok Didalam: inside Crane kick



Beset Diblakang: 90 degree Backsweep




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In the Adat of Hormat
copyright 1993 Chas Clements

As a student of Silat;



Who is your teacher?

Well kids, first --he is a hell of a fighting man, you give him respect because you have no choice - to associate with him is to show respect for the danger of him.

In addition, he is a man that has learned something that you don't know; how to save your life and the life of your loved ones. That knowlege has come at a cost that you don't have to pay, men died to learn the knowlege that is given to you and conserve it for you.

Your loyalty to him extends to his family, his lineage,his home, his reputation, his time and effort with you.

Why do you give him respect?

Because he has taken time out of his life to help you save yours. There is nothing in your life that is as important as what he teaches you, because, without his teaching everything that you have and are is in hazard.

He not only owes you nothing, you may be a thief or a bandit, a coward or a fascist. He owes the rest of us that he screens his student and that he takes responsibility for him.

For compassionate love of his fellowman, your teacher has accepted the hazards of teaching, the responsibility of teaching and a responsibility to history for your actions in the Pai.



What is his gift?

First, it is Trust. He trusts that you will not embarrass he and his associates. This terrible craft that we do is fraught with pitfalls for the practitioner without deep character values. When we teach this intimate moral and philosophical activity, we want the student to act in the best interests of humanity and society.

Secondly he gives you the gifts of knowlege bought with blood. Men have died learning the body of knowlege to which you now have access. Our secrets, bought with blood are not for sale for money or power. It is your character and committment that is required. The money just keeps the lights on.

Thirdly, he entrusts the safety of his family and friends to you by sharing with you the secrets that keep them safe.



What do you owe for that?

The deep gratitude for the gift of life, pain, intimacy and trust, example, history & tradition. You owe the gifts of comfort, security, assistance, support, consideration.

When you see something that needs being done, Do It ! Make it look easy. That is the style of a man and a martial artist. Any man who has progressed enough to have something to teach to you has accumulated injuries, pain, enemies, memories; don't require that he carry you in addition to all the rest of it. Some things are beneath his notice- nothing should be beneath yours. The least student owes the carrying and cleaning; the senior owes the conservation of the masters time and effort with the administration of the group.

In the Family/Village systems, the leading practitioner didn't charge his neighbors for helping them to learn the Silat used for their common defence. The masters' retirement plan was to grow old with his family and friends. In America, no such security exists. As a student in America, it is incumbent upon you to be the good neighbor. If cash is your only commodity, spend some! If you are a carpenter, get to it! If you fix cars, fix one, now. Do not mistake that this knowlege has ever been 'free', it is not free. It calls a feeling of gratitude and a responsibility to discharge that obligation.

You owe the effort to learn and practice what he teaches; you must be on time for class, if he calls you to be somewhere- be there! A teacher is measured by the quality of student that he produces. If you are a man of honor and integrity, of discipline and dignity, you owe your teacher for that example.





Pukulan Pentjak KunTao Silat Kilap Betawi DeThouars
Copyright 1993 Chas Clements

The KunTao Silat of Betawi Kilap is an art of rich history, deep sophistication and an art of change and adaptation. It is an art formulated to fight with other martial styles, not with untrained opponents. The response to the attack from ambush by multiple armed opponents, the strategies of defense and offense in many different situations and responsibility to the neighborhood community are center to the study of Betawi.

Human history on the Indonesian Archipelago dates to one and one-half million years of continous activity, much of it Martial. The indigenous culture has a continuous social history that rivals Egypt, Rome, Byzantium or South China. They built among the largest buildings in the world, and then they carved pictures all over them about the cultural disciplines that they practiced! The Balinese are among the holiest people in the world, along with the Tibetans and the Irish. It is a spiritual center for humanity.

The Sunda speaking peoples of Sumatra and its attendant islands, especially those of the Bugis tribe, have long been leaders in the practice of martial art in Indonesia. They are of the Menangkebau, the men of the ox-horn, keepers of the Kris. Speaking many languages, they travel broadly 'farming the sea' and trading, while defending their own land from encroachment. Their culture cultivates the portable skills of music, literature, medicine, mechanical engineering and so forth. They are a people of great humor and joy, deep spirituality and culture.

The Empires of the Majapahit, the Suravayjan, the Menangkebau, the Kraton Guards of Jogja, the Sultanates of Atjeh and of Ponti-Anak, have benefitted from the protection of the people of our lineage. The Bugis of the Menangkebau have been artists, statesmen, warriors, explorers and magicians since forever; the De Thouars family is the fruit and flower of that lineage.



Pukulan comes from the word 'Pukul', meaning 'to strike' or 'to collide'- the suffix 'an' connoting a field of study. The word, then, means 'the study of the colliding art'. This usage is primarily Dutch Indonesian. It is roughly equivalent to common handfighting or boxing/wrestling. It also doesn't necessarily have an adherantcy to style lineage as in the idea of a Pusaka (holy legacy/heirloom).





Pentjak (pencak, pentcak, other spellings) denotes the "choreography of movements that are useful in combat". Pentjak may be practiced for its own ends; performance, health, yoga physicality, etc. There is a strong thought that the word has Chinese antecedents as in "pun, cha, te- punch, kick, block". A Dutch Indonesian slang word for all martial arts practitioners is "pentjakkers"(also as in 'karatebrains'). Our pentjak is the flower of our art, in that your personal practice keeps alive the combat technique and reflects it to the descerning eye of your practice leader.

Literally, Silat means 'lightning', the further meaning being 'the combat usages', also, 'the blade'. Silat teaches the methodology of combat application of the Pentjak movements; psychology, tactics and strategy, mental discipline and control. Silat teaches the aspects of the Lightning. Silat is the "buah", the fruit of our practice. Silat cannot be practiced, only experienced; it is your combat experience, refined by study.



Kilap (khilap or kilat) is the Thunder. The aspect of the thunder is the product of the lightning. It teaches a hand of power, striking weak points, crashing and overwhelming the enemy, power in spirit and character. Its' scholarly study is the anatomy of distruction; how to 'break that meat house down'. The study is not so much 'train the frame' as it is 'train the brain'. If mind will lead, body will follow. The study of martial art is not restricted to the athletic of body at all, it is the people of lesser physical presence that need martial art the most.



Betawi (Batavia)is an area on Western Java settled by Sundanese Sumatrans in the distant past. It is considered a very dangerous place. In addition to identifying the Sumatran origins of this Silat, it connotes the the study of the techniques of response to attacks from ambush, fighting multiple opponents- armed as they may come, vicious response to attack, and a preoccupation with personal freedom and responsibility to the community, the Family.

The KunTao is reflective of the martial arts practiced by the ethnic Chinese living on Java for more than five hundred years. The Chinese in Indonesia arrived much as the Dutch did; trading, practicing needed professions and crafts, networking into a market for Indonesian products. They were very insular in their culture, they did not marry into the indigineous peoples as the Dutch did, nor teach their professions or crafts. The Indonesians were not permitted to study the Chinese arts (as a general rule).

The original practice in China has been massively modified by the long exposure to the Indonesian concepts of Silat. Honor is given to the Shaolin practices of Honan, Fuchien, Shantung, Kwantung and Fukien, as well as the Three Crowns of TaiChi, PaQua and Hsing-I. The modern,of the last two hundred years, eclectic arts of China combine the 'secrets' of the original arts and add to the knowlege whenever they can, and they had new fields of study in Indonesia.

The Family DeThouars have been nobility in both the West and the East for a long and honourable time. Both of the lineages that meet in the brothers have been prominent and honored in their cultures as educated, artistic, martial in spirit and courageous in action.

The European family of Holland and Northern France have been the nobility of Tours for hundreds of years, constructing the cutlery and armaments factories for which they are so famous. They owned their own farms, mines, factories and craftsmen, ships and crews, traders and businessmen. The DeThouars family were swordsmen and horsemen, colonels of the military and advisers to the King.

The Indonesian forebearers have been nobles, landowners and confidants of Sultans while maintaining a family system of Silat that has made them champions to all comers for over one-hundred fifty years. They were village elders, chiefs and leaders, landowners, merchants and warriors. They met the Dutch as equals; they were never conquered, not to this day.

The Pendekar Agung, Raden Mas Paul DeThouars, is an undefeated champion on the kendang, the formal challenge floor. His guidance and leadership of the holy pusaka legacy of Serak Tulen has always been to the honour of those that entrusted it to him. He is the first and most senior of all Silat in America, having given the U.S. a continuous teaching and guidance for over thirty-five years-unchallenged by any.

The Guru Besar, Hai-Teng Sifu Willem DeThouars has given his life to two things; his family-his Art. In his expression of his love of Him, Uncle Bill has gone into the world- to study, to learn and compare and challenge and sustain. His humble compassion comes from a lifetime of adversity, his teaching from a lifetime of study and practice, and his punch, I understand, from his Grandfather.



Pendekar Bapak Victor DeThouars is the sustenance of Serak, and the Founder of Tongkat. As he proceeds into his life of service to the family, he conserves the body of knowlege. He will, in the fullness of time, be the Pendekar of Serak. His practice and teaching is a gift to be a part of, all of his students are appreciative of that.

Guru Chas Clements has been privileged to study with three of the brothers DeThouars, holding certification in KunTao Silat and Pentjak Silat. Commencing in 1978, his association with the family has been ongoing. Prior to his entry into the Pukulan association, his background in martial art dates to 1953.

Silat Kilap Betawi is practiced under the guidance of the family DeThouars; hormat is given to the family and to the tulen legacy and lineage of Pak Serak and Mas Djoet, and the lineage of the KunTao that results in the art of the Ratu Duri of the KunLunPai. Honour is given for the gifts of all the teachers and practitioners who have contributed to the state of this art.

The Kendang Silat, from which these expressions derive, is a traditional fighting art of Western Java. The Kendang is the great drum of the Gamelan orchestra, the word also applies to the fighting floor, and to the region of the Gunung Kendang ('Drum Mountain') range, from whence come the Bugis people of the Menangkebau Sumatran forebears. This is the arena of the 'drum fighters' style. Aspects of the style derive from the Indian influence, the Muslims, the Chinese, the Europeans and the indigenous arts of the animist magicians. Our art is formulated to defend against other martial arts, including those unknown to us.

The Champion defending comes to the floor and dances with his female partner an intricate demanding dance, joined by the holding of a scarf. The dance shows footwork with a partner, passages of hand and the use of rhythm, then he performs his 'kambangan'. This 'flower dance' is his expression of pencak, free-form, to the music of the gamelan. The 'flower' (kambang)of a style is its' performance form, the 'fruit' (buah) of a style is its' combat expression to an actual enemy- there is no 'sporting' or 'sparring' application. He challenges: "Kitai Brani?"-Who has the guts to fight? The answer comes from the challenger: "Shiapa Brani"- I have the guts to fight!



The challenger; having seen the footwork, practice patterns and physical expression of the Champion, and being Champion of another village and style, feels that his style will prevail. The pair meet on the floor and try to sweep one another with the foot, keeping the hands behind them. This is a very legitimate test of combat capability, testing footwork, timing and intention. The loser of this contest has the option of retiring from the floor or continuing the contest, unfettered, to the major maiming or death. All contestants are required to bring to the contest a packet of sweet herbs, a sheet to wrap his corpse and transportation money back home. Kendang Silat is an art with which to fight other arts, a battlefield art with which to fight for the village.

The Serak is the legacy of Pak Serak. Born in Sumatra in 1790, of the Bugis people, he was a one-armed, club-footed practitioner. Nicknamed Burung Serak,'Owl', for his clairvoyant powers and spiritual being - this in a culture of very spiritual people known as the 'Invisible people of the Mountain Forest'. He studied nine separate martial arts; 4 Indonesian, 3 Chinese and 2 Indian, felt himself proficient in three, utilizing them to lead as the Champion, undefeated in his time. He traveled very widely as a bodyguard and later as a teacher and a political activist. His synthesis of the stylings and diverse technique of nine studies and the unique view of a physically challenged practitioner gave him an art with which to fight other arts. He, and his senior student Mas Djoet, formalized the art Serak and it has been passed down unchanged, given by all the status of Pusaka- a holy legacy.

The Kuntao Silat of Ratu Duri is an expression of the mastery of a number of styles and influences. The western Java arts of Pamor, Kwitang, Tjimande- the Quemoy Kuntao- pakua chang- hsing po- tai kek, western boxing and the art of Legrands' combat fencing, and others, have, in the person of Uncle Bill, built on the early teachings of the family elders. It is an art of change, synthesis and adaptation. It is responsive to the needs of the practitioner; his body, attitude, convenience, spirituality. The Hai-Teng Sifu Willem DeThouars has crystallized the Ratu Duri,"T***** King", techniques out of the crucible of fifty years of concentrated intention and study of the most difficult arts in the most dangerous places in the world.



The physical art of Pukulan Pentjak KunTao Silat Kilap Betawi is secondary to the intellectual and spiritual teaching embodied therein. Our first reverence is for God, the only Master. Our lives in the world must reflect the discipline and teachings of the art. Our practice of the art is for its' own sake. The gifts that the art has to give are far past just the fighting aspect. The tactics and strategies taught in the art give power and success in all facets of ones' life.

The symbol of the Kilap Betawi is two lightning flashes of three parts each, arranged as a triangle, the siku-siku in the center, all arranged within a triangle and the words Silat Kilap Betawi on the sides. The repetition of the tiga reflects the grouping of the knowlege and is used as a mnemonic to facilitate remembering difficult material. The siku-siku, center weapon of the style, is indicative of the armed aspect of the art, we are not foolish enough to assault anyone without bringing tools. It is a three weapon- parts, uses, symbolic aspect. It honours the arts Serak, Ratu Duri, Bukti Negara/Tongkat and the three brothers that have given us the honour of practicing in their presence.

Another aspect of the art is the personal loyalty and group identity, 'pai', fostered by the intimacy of the teachings. A 'pai' is translated from the Chinese as 'animal hand' as opposed to 'chuan', a human fist. A pai is idiomatically, ' a group of men going about doing honorable work', the fingers of the pai are individual, they support and form the 'hand'. It also connotes the utilization of the animal ideoform to teach martial precepts, techniques and attitudes. The KunLun Pai is the 'animal hand of the fighters of KunLun' (a mountainous region of Hokkien, well known for political activism and advanced combat practitioners).

Silat Betawi is taught as a 'beladiri' a personal defense art, rather than a 'pusaka' or formal legacy art. As there is no sparring aspect to the art, all techniques are learned by one practitioner submitting to the technique of the training partner. This submission can test the trust of the partner as all techniques are viciously invasive. To deal with the most interior of emotions and philosophies is the nature of the practice of martial art, to let a stranger into that intimacy is another matter.



Many of the techniques and applications of the art come from the morality of another culture not our own, their application is a matter for philosophical exploration in the context of study and intellectual expansion. The questions stem from the focus of the art which is death, pain, ambush, mayhem, subterfuge

The art is presented as a cultural artifact of scholarly interest, and any participant is enjoined to pick and choose those aspects to which his life experience is responsive. The art and its practitioners also choose with whom they will share their lives.





Martial Arts for the Handicapped

copyright 1994 by Chas Clements

Everyone is in danger. Tolerance is at a minimum. No one is safe. It is the responsibility of all people, of whatever physical condition to protect themselves, their loved ones and their own property. Just because you cannot see or walk or run away does not give you a special "pass" from thugs and bandits, they were looking for an easy hit when they first saw you.

Complete martial arts systems have a special tradition for handicapped people. Often it is referred to as "The Old Mans' Style" or is taught as a womans' style. Generally it is an art of finesse and sophisticated, requiring great courage and a dependance on misdirection and evasions. The arts always include weapons training (a good sharp knife will replace track shoes for almost any occasion), anatomical weapons and targets are a deep source for study, as are the arts of mental domination and perception.

The first lesson in any martial art is to reduce your 'target time'. Don't be a target for any longer than can possibly be helped. Good personal awaremess and overcoming your resistance to being inconvenienced will reduce a great percentage of your hazard exposure. In military terms: a good perimeter defence, good patrol discipline and proper equipment will reduce your KIA's. Pay attention to who is around you and where you are, look for places for assailants to hide, prepare your defences and responses to attack. Pay bills and bank by mail or computer, go places in groups and armed, don't do sleazy things with people that you don't know.

More people get seriously hurt because of their mental state than because of their physical condition. Many people in this culture find it hard to believe that they are actually in hazard of being assaulted, and that kindly 'Officer Friendly' is off doing SWAT penetrations on crack houses. In point of fact, the police are not responsible for your safety, only that of 'society'. You cannot depend on anyone but yourself, your family and friends, and they have no one to depend upon but you. The acceptance and reaction to 'threat' is a matter of mental preparation. Work it out in your mind: fantasize your worst fears and figure out a good reaction while you have plenty of time and can fail for free. The more complete your ideation, the more your preparation will work when the chips start to fall.

Another preparation that you are responsible to do is to figure out what your religious or philosophical posture is about conflict. In an assault you have no time to philosophize about the karmic ramifications of defending yourself by doing force on your opponent. You won't make him more angry by fighting back, you will inconvenience him enough to go away. If you rip his tongue out; he was the one that brought it on. A Lakota saying: "A Thief is Shot in the Night, Whose Hand is on the Bow?

The reason that there are so many martial arts styles is that different people have different bodies, clothing/armor, topographical surroundings and so on. We need to choose the type of martial art that suits our physicality. Kicking arts are not suitable for all people, balance arts or 'juggling' arts mightn't be appropriate for others, but there is an art for you somewhere.

In our tradition, when the Sultan prepared to learn his lifesaving martial skills, he would call the advanced practitioner and that man would analyse the Sultan and teach him the useful arts that fitted him.

To acquire a martial skill is not to give ones' life to the art; it is to learn a skill as one would do with any finesse action. There is the body and there is the mind, to understand the action of combat and accomodate ones' body to the event.

The key to any art is practice. You can practice in 'reverie' or meditation- you can get good practice just moving through the world remembering your martial body attitudes.

Most schools will open themselves to you for your consideration. Distrust teachers or schools that will not let you observe their training, you are not going to learn their 'secrets' in one short exposure.



Choose your weapons. Our debilities and challenges are enough to put up with, that meeting a thug in his arena without a weapon is entirely too much. If he had any respect, he wouldn't be bothering people who already have enough to do; he deserves no consideration whatsoever. Your weapon can be as benign as you care for it to be, but it should be effective. Let him be in hazard for offending you for a change. He was happy enough to chance an assault on a stranger, let him carry the consequences.

One of the secrets to the study of any weapon is to live with it for thirty days. Eat, sleep, bathe, carry the weapon with you always. It will share its' secrets with you if you coax it. Own the best weapon that you can afford, show it to no one (o.k., maybe your Mom- but only once and don't show her your best trick!)

Make your martial skill part of your life. Read books in the interest area that you have. Get some tapes and see what the opponents are learning. Talk about it with your friends, practitioners or not, find out what they think about the philosophical questions. Join a group of practitioners, work out with them,(let them work out their defenses against someone doing wheelies on their chest). Choose a tradition that honours people for their mind or art or craft, not for their abilities to divorce themselves from their compassion. Martial art is the true path of peace, we know what the alternatives are.

Having taught handifolk for over twenty-five years, I have identified some consistencies: Hand/arm strength likes Southern Chinese stylings, Kilap Silat, Hsingpo- Balance strength likes TaiKek, Silat Bukti Negara, PaQua- Leg strength likes Northern Chinese stylings, Pentjak Silat Menang- Intuitive response in short body movements like the Silat Betawie, Pamur, Petjut Silat, the Wing Chun and PaQua. Names are mentioned only to give you a place to start looking, offering the wide variety of Martial Arts schools. All styles have attributes that can be modified to serve people of whatever variety, you must learn to trust your own strengths and enhance them.

It doesn't take a long time. Let me repeat that for the gentleman in the last row: It Doesn't Take A Long Time! Martial skills are different from martial art in the same way that one can do a little necessary plumbing without becoming a Water Engineer. When the emphasis in martial arts change to the Do form, a Way of Enlightenment, from the combat practice of the military soldier, an emphasis was lost.

One can become a competent spearman in about six months; a good spearman in three years and a great spearman in some five to seven years. If what you need is fodder for practice, you can give about six months or a year to learning a 'form' that will give you movements to answer most problems. Your own practice is what will make the difference in whather you survive an encounter.





Martial Arts for the Handicapped

copyright 1994 by Chas Clements

Everyone is in danger. Tolerance is at a minimum. No one is safe. It is the responsibility of all people, of whatever physical condition to protect themselves, their loved ones and their own property. Just because you cannot see or walk or run away does not give you a special "pass" from thugs and bandits, they were looking for an easy hit when they first saw you.

Complete martial arts systems have a special tradition for handicapped people. Often it is referred to as "The Old Mans' Style" or is taught as a womans' style. Generally it is an art of finesse and sophisticated, requiring great courage and a dependance on misdirection and evasions. The arts always include weapons training (a good sharp knife will replace track shoes for almost any occasion), anatomical weapons and targets are a deep source for study, as are the arts of mental domination and perception.

The first lesson in any martial art is to reduce your 'target time'. Don't be a target for any longer than can possibly be helped. Good personal awaremess and overcoming your resistance to being inconvenienced will reduce a great percentage of your hazard exposure. In military terms: a good perimeter defence, good patrol discipline and proper equipment will reduce your KIA's. Pay attention to who is around you and where you are, look for places for assailants to hide, prepare your defences and responses to attack. Pay bills and bank by mail or computer, go places in groups and armed, don't do sleazy things with people that you don't know.

More people get seriously hurt because of their mental state than because of their physical condition. Many people in this culture find it hard to believe that they are actually in hazard of being assaulted, and that kindly 'Officer Friendly' is off doing SWAT penetrations on crack houses. In point of fact, the police are not responsible for your safety, only that of 'society'. You cannot depend on anyone but yourself, your family and friends, and they have no one to depend upon but you. The acceptance and reaction to 'threat' is a matter of mental preparation. Work it out in your mind: fantasize your worst fears and figure out a good reaction while you have plenty of time and can fail for free. The more complete your ideation, the more your preparation will work when the chips start to fall.

Another preparation that you are responsible to do is to figure out what your religious or philosophical posture is about conflict. In an assault you have no time to philosophize about the karmic ramifications of defending yourself by doing force on your opponent. You won't make him more angry by fighting back, you will inconvenience him enough to go away. If you rip his tongue out; he was the one that brought it on. A Lakota saying: "A Thief is Shot in the Night, Whose Hand is on the Bow?

The reason that there are so many martial arts styles is that different people have different bodies, clothing/armor, topographical surroundings and so on. We need to choose the type of martial art that suits our physicality. Kicking arts are not suitable for all people, balance arts or 'juggling' arts mightn't be appropriate for others, but there is an art for you somewhere.

In our tradition, when the Sultan prepared to learn his lifesaving martial skills, he would call the advanced practitioner and that man would analyse the Sultan and teach him the useful arts that fitted him.

To acquire a martial skill is not to give ones' life to the art; it is to learn a skill as one would do with any finesse action. There is the body and there is the mind, to understand the action of combat and accomodate ones' body to the event.

The key to any art is practice. You can practice in 'reverie' or meditation- you can get good practice just moving through the world remembering your martial body attitudes.

Most schools will open themselves to you for your consideration. Distrust teachers or schools that will not let you observe their training, you are not going to learn their 'secrets' in one short exposure.



Choose your weapons. Our debilities and challenges are enough to put up with, that meeting a thug in his arena without a weapon is entirely too much. If he had any respect, he wouldn't be bothering people who already have enough to do; he deserves no consideration whatsoever. Your weapon can be as benign as you care for it to be, but it should be effective. Let him be in hazard for offending you for a change. He was happy enough to chance an assault on a stranger, let him carry the consequences.

One of the secrets to the study of any weapon is to live with it for thirty days. Eat, sleep, bathe, carry the weapon with you always. It will share its' secrets with you if you coax it. Own the best weapon that you can afford, show it to no one (o.k., maybe your Mom- but only once and don't show her your best trick!)

Make your martial skill part of your life. Read books in the interest area that you have. Get some tapes and see what the opponents are learning. Talk about it with your friends, practitioners or not, find out what they think about the philosophical questions. Join a group of practitioners, work out with them,(let them work out their defenses against someone doing wheelies on their chest). Choose a tradition that honours people for their mind or art or craft, not for their abilities to divorce themselves from their compassion. Martial art is the true path of peace, we know what the alternatives are.

Having taught handifolk for over twenty-five years, I have identified some consistencies: Hand/arm strength likes Southern Chinese stylings, Kilap Silat, Hsingpo- Balance strength likes TaiKek, Silat Bukti Negara, PaQua- Leg strength likes Northern Chinese stylings, Pentjak Silat Menang- Intuitive response in short body movements like the Silat Betawie, Pamur, Petjut Silat, the Wing Chun and PaQua. Names are mentioned only to give you a place to start looking, offering the wide variety of Martial Arts schools. All styles have attributes that can be modified to serve people of whatever variety, you must learn to trust your own strengths and enhance them.

It doesn't take a long time. Let me repeat that for the gentleman in the last row: It Doesn't Take A Long Time! Martial skills are different from martial art in the same way that one can do a little necessary plumbing without becoming a Water Engineer. When the emphasis in martial arts change to the Do form, a Way of Enlightenment, from the combat practice of the military soldier, an emphasis was lost.

One can become a competent spearman in about six months; a good spearman in three years and a great spearman in some five to seven years. If what you need is fodder for practice, you can give about six months or a year to learning a 'form' that will give you movements to answer most problems. Your own practice is what will make the difference in whather you survive an encounter.











IT'S NOT HOW BIG IT IS, IT'S HOW YOU USE IT!

copyright 1994 Chas Clements

Her finger knives flayed his face open, arteries in his neck spewed blood into his armor. As he stumbled, blinded, he wondered how he had made such an easy kill for her. He died with the question unanswered, his great sword still clutched in his hand.

The little man capered and danced about; now shielding behind the blade, now reaching with a slash that would fell cane by the bunch, now pounding with the butt of the big knife he knows so well- he sees the man before him as just another piece of work in the fields he has toiled in daily for thirty years.

As his opponent reached for the throat, he pulled the little knife from behind his cummerbund and slashed the offending hand, the serrated edge biting through the motorcycle glove before rendering the hand useless. He turned to pop both tires before driving away from the thug who now had something useful to do with the rest of his night.

Each story illustrates that it isn't the knife, but the style that prevails. We tend to think in terms of a 'preferred' size or style of knife for ourselves, each writer or teacher has a knife which is best for his style. But what can happen if that particular knife is not available, or not convenient to the situation or dress styling? Can we accomodate the challenge of fighting for our lives without 'Ol Betsy' riding in her usual place on the web gear? Can we use the battlefield pick-up or reverse the weapon carried by the enemy?

Lest you lose yourselves in pointless anticipation, let me now answer that question with a resounding; Yes !!

The secret with a large knife is to 'ride' the weight. Make gravity work for you by moving the inertia of the knife with the least amount of 'suddenness'. Overcoming the weight of the knife by accepting the force in your wrist will get you killed. Learn to turn the direction of the knife by dropping the weight straight down through the point and rotating the axis of the blade to the new direction. Set the point and move your body around behind it,stay behind the edge, keeping the knife between you and the opponent.

Use two hands, support the blade with your foot or with your torso. Turn the flat of the blade to your opponent as a shield and make your attack with the butt end of the weapon- pound through his defenses with the weight and inertia. By and large, the large knife is best for fighting, all other choices are a compromise.

The knife of seven or eight inches in the blade is a utility knife in whatever dress, and styles are taught in all schools. This is the knife that you most probably have with you; it is your work knife, kitchen tool, tool-box blade. Think of it as your claw, the point of the spear made by your arm, the tip of your sword.

The small knife is a compromise of stealth, fashion or utility. A small knife requires getting close to the opponent and certifies that one cut is not going to end the fight. The secret of the small knife is sharpness and conceptualizing the knife as a fighting spike. The small knife must fit the hand/fist closely (more so than the larger knives) and the weight in the handle.

The styling doesn't change much whether the knife is thin and light or dense and weighty because the combative distance hasn't changed. The ideas of distraction, decoying, multiple cuts and stabs, piercing the bone, precision targeting of weak points. Small attention getting cuts, a plant with the blade and then leaving the knife in the body and moving the body to produce a larger wound channel.

If the blade is your chosen weapon, familiarize yourself with all sizes and styles. Each style of knife has its own secrets and applications but your body styling is what is going to get you home. Trust your training and your teachers. Do your style, it was conserved for you by men who gave their lives to formulate it.





Magic in the Martial Arts

copyright 1993-Chas Clements

All advanced forms of martial art have their magical aspect. The Taoist practitioners are deeply involved with magic, Shinto has its sophisticated magical aspect as does Islam. The Animists practice ritual magical martial arts, the Hindu and the Buddhist cultures have practices and traditions of martial magic. All the European arts have long ties to magical practice, pre and post Christian era.



Everybody does magic to prepare for a fight, assist in the fight, recover from the fight and prepare for the next fight. Who can say what the affect is, but the effect is to make a warrior prepared to offer himself in the best effort he can make. To make his magic is to prepare himself in the eyes of God and his community to take on an honorable aspect and prepare himself to receive 'Luck'.

The individual warrior has his own personal magic. He may 'quest' or seek visions or dreams. He will make sacrifice, perform personal rituals and take on his talismans of power. He will appeal to his personal guardians, familiars, ancestors or such. The private practice of the warrior is the purest preparation for meeting God that there is in any spiritual practice.

His community will offer group prayer and ritual, they will declare a common cause and make him exempt from punishments, they will present him with gifts made in the attitude of prayer. His state religion will offer its prayer and support. The women will make magic for their men. His father will give his blessing and a personal weapon, his mother will give her blessing and lay hands upon him.

A warrior seeks to make his weapons more powerful with magic. He will name his weapons, decorate them with powerful symbols or talismans, imbue them with attitudes and cognitive action. The weapons may be of offensive attitude; swords, airplanes & tanks, the rifle. They may be defensive; the helmet, shield, radar, socks and mufflers from home. They may be actions of invisibility or secret listening .

The warrior uses magic to toughen his body and technique, and by extension his 'body weapons', the airplane, the ship, the horse or tank, the missle. He will resort to secret drinks or potions, special liniments, etc. He receives secret training techniques from divine origins. He will perform his training in the attitude of prayer and dedication.



The spiritual study of the warrior is more important than the physical in many ways. Combat is far past the physical abilities of any man; he acts in exhaustion, deafness, pain and privation. The cultivation of the indomitable intention is done in a posture of effecting magic. He 'calls the tiger' or eats the heart of his enemy or of the Bear, collects the heads of defeated enemy or his weapons and artifacts, in order to subjugate his opponents spirit. He pursues the ritual combat in times of peace; gaming, caravan or expedition, hunting, arts and letters, and imbues them with the same importance as the combat experience.

The warrior will weaken his enemy by magical projections and ritual against him. He will seek to understand the intention of the enemy and confuse it, to break his timing and focus. The warrior seeks to controll the weather and the environment against the enemy, to cause him sickness, foul his supplies and sabotage him. He will seek to dominate the enemy with a cloud of dispair.

The natural ally of any warrior is Righteousness. The warrior will seek Heavenly Allies. He will offer sacrifice, penance or loot. He will maintain his honour and integrity in times of no war.

The inevitable product of the warrior is death. He must deal with the departed enemy, his departed comrades, spirit assistants that are no longer useful, and defend against the spirit assistants of his opponent.

With any victory, including survival, comes the obligation to pay for magical power used.. Sacrifices are due, penances must be performed, ritual celebrations; the toast, the virgins' gift, regarding the trophies and offering them to the powers.

"Science is Magic that everyone can do." says some program for children. Someday, science will explain even more of what is now considered to be magic and people will wonder how we ever thought that projecting the ch'i was impossible and not replicable in a laboratory. At one time, poisons were thought 'magical'; predicting eclipses or weather, introducing sickness into cattle, or killing a man by hitting a 'chi meridian.

All through the ages and in all cultures, people have practiced martial magic; magic in aid of prevailing over enemies, magic of healing, magic of preparation for death of ourselves. How much was pointless and how much was a manipulation of power not yet understood by Science is conjecture, but what is not conjecture is that the field of study may yield something that saves your life some day.

If you choose to fight with only science, you will ignore a body of knowlege garnered over millennia by people whose lives depended on it. If you wait for Science to explain it, you may wait for a long time. How do you measure TaijiQuan, how does PaQua work? Is the Ketchak dancer heavier or lighter during the trance, what's a trance? Does mushin mind cause synapses to fire more quickly, then why isn't cha-no-yu done 'quickly'? Obviously, martial magic has answers for which Science has no questions and questions for which Science has no arbiter.

Religion is the place to look. Most religions seem to be systems of cosmology required to answer basic martial questions: Who am I? Who are You? Why are We Fighting? What will Happen when I Kill You? and Laugh? All systems from 'simple' Animism to Evolved Transgenderspecific Deity Identification in the Individual Expressed as Center of the Universe have answers to those and other questions from the martial practitioner, rituals to appease or consequences to punish, means to protect the warrior and to confound the Enemy.

Magic gives us impenetrable shields, Science gives us high tech shoes or slow video kinetic examination, TaiChi knew about that a thousand years ago. Animism tells us to listen to the spirit of the Tree, science tells us which wood makes good spear shafts by resonance sound produced by percussion. The list is long of magical knowlege later explained in terms of definite science and should indicate to us that there is more field for interested exploration.





THE FORM OF THE MAIDEN BATHING



Copyright 1994 Chas Clements

As in any other Silat, Kilap Betawi de Thouars is presented in the guise of animals, mythical figures, elementals, in order to practice a particular combative attitude. The "form" carries the same movements, the same techniques as with any other practice of the Pentjak- what changes is the intention of concept behind the movement.



A young maiden goes to the pool and disrobes, enters the water and bathes- secure in the knowlege that she is alone. She washes her hair, soaps and rinses her body. She hears a noise and reacts modestly. She exits the pool, towels dry and puts on her clothing.

The form, "Young Maiden Bathing", is a practice of the Sicar Dalem 'Inner Circle' or 'Close Guard' aspect of KunTao Silat Betawi. It is primarily focused at the skeleton of the practitioner. It trains the tight spacial awareness needed to combat an ambush. In an ambush, one reacts to the opponents violent attack already launched; long distance defences are already breached. The first movements receive the attack, redirect or defeat the attack, defeat the opponent.

The muscles protect the body at distance. The muscles deliver the skeleton out away from the body and pull it back. At close ranges, the muscles don't have the contraction distance or the extension range. The skeleton takes over as the delivery system for offence and defence.

The form teaches use of the skeletal shield; the cloture of the abdomen by retracting the pelvis, closing the shoulders and dropping the arms naturally in front of the body. The maiden brushes her hair, protecting the head, raising the elbows. She sweeps the front of the body, pivoting out of targeting direction.



How can you run with the wolves if you don't eat red meat?
copyright 1994 Chas Clements

Living just down the street from Boulder, Aspen and the New Age Centre of the Universe, (Shirley MacLaines' house), I often have had occasion to hear about the New Mens' Movement. I have been assailed by naked, chanting, drum beating, wolf-howling 'seekers of themselves' like you wouldn't believe. They deplore the loss of responsible men; honour, duty, country, the family. They see the decline of the power of men; the internal substance of strength and tenacity, the acceptance of morality and the duty to teach it to our youngsters. Well, search no longer Guys, that New Man you seek is down at the dojo- has been for years. (Dojo: jargon, martial arts study place, orig. Japanese. See: kwoon, dojang, kendang, backyard)

Since forever, the Warrior has been the highest expression of any culture. Great Warriors have been also the great philosophers, great poets, great sculptors and painters, leaders and statesmen. The Warrior has been the saviour of his family; the protector of his religion, culture, treasures and the land. He alone, of any other class, stands ready to present his integrity to his Maker on a moments notice. He alone, of any other class, stands ready to present your integrity to your Maker in defense of his people and to answer for his actions with his life and eternal soul. The Warrior is answerable for all his actions, instantly, with his own death. The sacrifice of life is arguably the supreme gift; whether that life of the enemy or ones' own.

Want to learn self-discipline, humility, dignity & reserve, tenacity, tradition & honour, assertion and self confidence? All schools of martial arts teach honour to the Family, duty to our country, brotherhood of all good people, obeying the law, resisting oppression, the freedom of the individual, personal responsibility, and respect for the Creator of us all. The practice of martial art teaches us to conquer fear, to step forward for unpleasant duty, to honour deep learning and practice, to respect age and character, to constantly expand our learning and to test its' worth.

No one values Life more than the Warrior, no one wants Peace more than the man who practices War. (Remember, if War was fun, they'd call it Fiesta) It is the Warrior that pays the first price of War. We hide the casualties away in hospitals or 'veterans' homes', we hide the hideous price that we pay for our privilege of freedom and safety. Dilletantes, secure in their own decadence, sneer at the concept of duty and 'abhor violence', as if that would make it go away. They value the opportunity to taste new fruit or enjoy sound and light and dance, but not enough to fight for it.

It is constantly amazing to me the perversion of the dogmas of religions, philosophies, 'ways' of being, to exclude the necessity of martial training and expression. Christians, Muslims, the Hindu, Buddhist, Taoist, Shinto, Tibetan all exhalt the Warrior; his training, character, expression in battle, prayers for his success. The Modernist expression of religion; the hope for Peace, the value of Life, the posture of ones' spiritual being, has grown in Europe and America because of their wonderfully protected status. They cling to the idea that their example will change the bandits and barbarians of the world, when all it does is excite contempt. There is no Nerf-World- whatever your spiritual posture, you will be called upon to deal with those that don't share it.

Mr. Clements is a forty year practitioner of martial arts. For the last seventeen years he has studied in the grace of the DeThouars family of champion practitioners.



Heartless Monkey Knife
copyright 1993- Chas Clements

In the KunTao Silat Malabar deThouars, the use of animal stylings derives from the Sumatran Menangkebau Silat of the Bugis tribe, the Three Crowns of China and the Five Houses of Shaolin practiced as KunTao. It practices specific martial skills, attitudes and variations by using the animal model to carry a memory of instruction. The deep training of the martial spirit is the quality of focus and visualizing that the practitioner can discipline his mind to accomplish. The activity of excersizing in the attitude of a particular animal gives us an opportunity to remember intellectual martial knowlege in a physical manner for body memory.

Many animals are taken as models for martial practice, additionally there are variations of attitude and sometimes an implication of spiritual identification. The swallow, otter, Garuda or Raja-Naga, Noble Lady of Patriot Forest, Young Maiden Bathing are some of the types of martial forms practiced in the Indonesian systems on the hundreds of islands, and in the thousands of tribes that live on them. It is not only that the physical attitude is mimicked, but that the attitude and spirit of the model is emulated and studied. Obviously, the techniques of calling the animal spirit is outside the parameters of this article. This discussion is on the very basic level so as to speak to many arts.

The Monkey/Ape attitude in particular provides a sophisticated system of footwork for virtually all other combat practices. Any weapon, body type, purpose of fighting, etc. is well served by monkey footwork. Monkey is our closest relative of the animal group and his knowlege of combat is similar to our own. Monkey's concerned with keeping his head just as we are; Tiger fights Monkey, Snake fights Monkey, RajaNaga fights Monkey, he answers them all. Man has nothing to teach Monkey, we can only learn!

The smaller practitioner of KunTao Silat (Fighting Fist Concept) can utilize the monkey called "Monjet", the smaller monkey and the larger practitioner can use Kalong, the larger ape. Berok, Mandrill, Maccaque, Chimpanzee, Ngkrik, Tjikak, another Baboon type, and the "Old Man of the Jungle", Orang Utan, are some of the other "monkey or ape" stylings. The monkey styles of Honan Shaolin, aspected by both HsingPo (IeHsing Ie) and the PoKwa Zen (Paqua) are melded to the Silat understanding of the immediate combative nature. The monkey types modeled are those indigenous to the Indonesian archipelago and not those of the Chinese mainland. This cultural aspect of the monkey can account for much of the difference in the forma of the art, the Pentjak, as opposed to the more classical and formal Chinese performance. The silat, the combative knowlege, is the fruit of the synthesis of Indonesian and Chinese experiences forged in actual conflict.

The European/American "classical" style knife fighter goes for the big cut; he waits for, or forces, an opening and commits the blade edge deeply in the slash or the point to the stab. He will use the feint to call his opponents position into opening for the major wound. He is concerned in not being touched by the opponent; overiding his armor and smashing his defense in one passado.



The Western fighter has a cultural memory of large knives, armored opponents and fighting with the presentation of a shield. Western fighters stay behind the knife, they have very few decoy moves (besides the feint), and emphasize fully committed strikes to overcome armor or heavy clothing. Ancillary weapons, the rest of the body, are not used aggressively, positional and skeletal decoys are not explored, nor is the live hand aspect. The heavy clothing of the more northern peoples, and the easy availability of metal tools very early in the culture could have had some relativity to that stylistic requirement. Piercing, not immediately fatal, is favored; the major cut to the boney extremity is next, cuts to the body, external organs, attacks to the tendons or blood system are not commonly taught.

Many of the Asian arts wait for the big cut; Japanese/Okinawan/Korean, many of the Chinese wushu practitioners, northern India (the Moghul stylists), and so on. Again, the cultural memory is of strong clothing; large, heavy, broadly made knives- thick backed with a wedge ground edge geometry. Styles depend on broad movements, sweeping cuts utilizing the swing weight of the weapon, heavy pommel strikes and piercing with the inertia of the blade as a major aspect of the thrust. These styles also have to emphasize the recovery from the swing weight of the blade and the withdrawal of the blade from the wound channel. Great endurance is needed for the heavy sword or knife and emphasis is on that training.

It is in Indonesia that we see the expression of art known as 'Heartless Monkey'; an art of small knives, small slashes and stabs, small movement and big results. Heartless Monkey has no 'second thoughts'; no compassion, no regret, no remorse, no reservations. Heartless Monkey has no respect for your Humanity; your unique status as a Human Being deserving of anything, he sees you as a Snake. Think of Monkey- he screams and capers, plucking, pulling and twisting, always in motion. He doesn't react to attack or pain or fright. He attacks heartlessly, pitilessly, without regard for his opponent. He fights to vulnerabilitys; the skin, the blood, the tendons, the eyes, the breath. He immobilizes the skeleton and carves the meat off.

It is usually a small knife; sometimes single edged, sometimes double- always very sharp, very pointed, sometimes carried in sets, sometimes in singles carried around the body. Much of the time, the knife is carried in the front of the body, on either side of the navel. The knife in sheath serves as extra armor, a closed knife can be used as a small hand stick and the hand movements to access the knife are naturally to the center of the body. The common sheathes are wood or horn with no retaining device; they slip forth the blade instantly. It does mean that one must be aware of the knife at all times. The sheath is not attached to the belt or sash, it can be positioned in any way convenient.

With the large knife, its weight does the cutting- with a small knife, your body does the cutting. The leverage of a cut with a small knife is dependant on the rigidity of the wrist and the positioning of the horizontal bones of the shoulders. The large knife seems to require a powerful wrist and the positioning of the waist for the extra leverage needed by the greater weight committment. One learns to "ride" the small edge while on the opponent, maintaining the cutting contact as long as is convenient, repositioning the body to extend the cutting action.



The monkey sylings of Indonesian

matt_fitz
06-23-2001, 08:48 AM
Is this a discussion forum or a publication forum? :confused:

SevenStar
10-27-2001, 03:36 AM
A friend of mine is shipping off to boot camp monday, and I went to training with him today. It was cool - 1.5 mile run, pullups, etc. Anyway, I wore a t shirt that said "chinese kuoshu" and during a break, one of the guys came up to me and asked if I was into MA. I told him that I was and he told me that he had been training in silat (the style starts with a 'B', can't remember what it was) closed door with a guro here for the past 11 months. He invited me to drop by sometime, so I'm going to check it out.

"Just because I joke around sometimes doesn't mean I'm serious about kung-fu.
" - nightair

Johnny Hot Shot
10-27-2001, 03:44 AM
Sounds like fun. Is that Indonesian Knife fighting?

"Who's your Daddy?"
Rowdy McNasty

Stranger
10-27-2001, 03:44 AM
I believe, if the school is any good, you'll walk away very impressed. I've seen some fierce fighting skills in silat and among its practitioners. One of my old sparring partners who trained silat used to inflict heavy pain upon us. It is slick and quick when done right.

I don't get mad.
I get stabby.

Stranger
10-27-2001, 03:47 AM
It is both an armed and unarmed approach to fighting. Silat can be Indonesian, Malaysian, or Filipino and there are thousands of styles (silat is about as broad a term as kung fu).

I don't get mad.
I get stabby.

SevenStar
10-27-2001, 04:12 AM
yeah, that's what I'm hoping. I've heard some good thing about silat and seen some pentjak applications, and it looks like some nasty stuff.

"Just because I joke around sometimes doesn't mean I'm serious about kung-fu.
" - nightair

Water Dragon
10-27-2001, 04:32 AM
Bando???

Most actions of men can be explained by observing a pack of dogs. Not wild dogs, just neighborhood dogs who all scurry under the fence on the same night and set off together to reclaim a glimmer of the glory their species possessed before domestication.

Stranger
10-27-2001, 04:39 AM
Waterdragon,

I think bando is only from Burma. It has quite a rep for being combat effective, but I have never met a bando practitioner. I don't know if there is or isn't a link between bando and silat

I don't get mad.
I get stabby.

Sihing73
10-27-2001, 04:55 AM
Hello,

Silat with a B could be a few different things. As already mentioned Silat is about a broad a term as Kung Fu or Karate. Some forms resemble Karate and some are more fluid resembling the vastness of Kung Fu. Thousands of islands to choose from. Silate seems to equate fighting. There are forms of Silat which incorporate animal systems as well as some that resemble some of the Internal Arts such as Pakua/Bagwa and Tai Chi.

Anyhow for a B you might see if it is Bersia Silat although my spelling could be off.

Peace,

Dave

SevenStar
10-27-2001, 05:23 AM
Nah, Bando is Burmese. I have an article about it in an issue of Inside Karate from like 1996, but I don't think it's tied to silat.

I called the guy that I mentioned, and he told me that his teacher knew me. I was like "wtf?" and he said that we had a long talk one night that he was invited to my school, which immediately let me know who it was, and he's definitely legit. He is a friend of my sifu's son, which is how he got invited to our school. Stranger, you're right, he is impressive. He's also proficient in an african MA also. The guy said that as soon as he told his teacher my name, the teacher said to give me his number the next time we talked.

I think it's time to learn some silat :cool: I talked to the guy before I read this post, so I still don't know the name of the style, but I'll post it when I find out.

"Just because I joke around sometimes doesn't mean I'm serious about kung-fu.
" - nightair

Braden
10-27-2001, 07:02 AM
Silat is cool shiznit.

Bukti Negara, perhaps?

SevenStar
10-27-2001, 09:16 AM
you hit the nail on the head. I just got off the phone with him - we talked for **** near 3 hours. it is the bukti negara system. His teacher trained directly under Paul de Thouars. If all goes well, we're going to train together tomorrow afternoon - well, this afternoon since it's after midnight.

"Just because I joke around sometimes doesn't mean I'm serious about kung-fu.
" - nightair

diego
10-27-2001, 09:22 AM
and the best song for traingn is KOOL G RAP/CARS,FROM ROAD TO THE RICHES'91 marley prod.
UNO

"I finish the job with a tiger claw into the throat. Remember guys'INSERT CORNY WHITEBOY VOICE' use extreme violence against your opponents always, that will discourage them from hurting other people" kungfu site technique sec.VS?."...

diego
10-27-2001, 09:24 AM
indope CARS/dunanuna da dunanuna du DOPE cars.dana
who does the original
that 80s glampop!

"I finish the job with a tiger claw into the throat. Remember guys'INSERT CORNY WHITEBOY VOICE' use extreme violence against your opponents always, that will discourage them from hurting other people" kungfu site technique sec.VS?."...

Stranger
10-27-2001, 01:29 PM
DeThours is about as legit as they come. My friend was a student of a DeThours rep and he was real impressive. You are fortunate.

I don't get mad.
I get stabby.

Stranger
10-27-2001, 01:30 PM
diego,

I think Randy Neuman sang the original "In Cars".

I don't get mad.
I get stabby.

Kristoffer
10-27-2001, 03:14 PM
martial arts are cool. `nuff said.
Im hungry :(

~K~
"maybe not in combat..... but think of the chicks man, the chicks!"

Kung Lek
10-27-2001, 03:22 PM
That was Gary Newman Stranger, as in Gary Newman and the Tubeway army :D

yeesh, I'm dating myself here hahahahahaha, and I haven't even taken me to a show! :D

peace

Kung Lek

Martial Arts Links (http://members.home.net/kunglek)

Stranger
10-27-2001, 03:25 PM
check out this web page (http://www.buktinegara.com)

I don't get mad.
I get stabby.

Stranger
10-27-2001, 03:27 PM
Who's Randy? I must have pulled that name out of me arse. :o

I don't get mad.
I get stabby.

Stranger
10-27-2001, 03:30 PM
I think Kung Lek is gonna get some from himself. S L U T! :p

I don't get mad.
I get stabby.

Martial Joe
10-27-2001, 05:49 PM
I like Silat...

http://www.stopstart.fsnet.co.uk/smilie/lolup.gif IXIJoe KaveyIXIhttp://www.stopstart.fsnet.co.uk/smilie/lolup.gif
I am Sharky's main man...

diego
10-27-2001, 09:55 PM
one of the main seniors i think has dethauors lineage so hopefully silat is something i will get into
thats cool thiers thousands of styles so its like a whole new dimension of kunf du opened up like thiers a east and west style to
not just north feet and south hands!!!?? or sumthin
dunanana du dunanana dopecars
the ladies good looking in fly rides they get tooken and you know he gets respect cuz when he pass they break thier necks DOPE CARS

FUQ I CANT FIND MY CD AAAAAAAHHHH.hehe

duna

"I finish the job with a tiger claw into the throat. Remember guys'INSERT CORNY WHITEBOY VOICE' use extreme violence against your opponents always, that will discourage them from hurting other people" kungfu site technique sec.VS?."...

JerryLove
10-28-2001, 07:24 PM
Actually, it's relevnt to say "Paul DeThouars" since there are four DeThouars brothers teaching different systems (I've interavted with Victor and Willem).

http://www.clearsilat.com

SevenStar
10-29-2001, 05:52 AM
you're definitely right about that sine only two are legit... This guy in under Paul's lineage. We trained sunday, and he is excellent. He has the most in depth knowledge of body mechanics that I have ever seen. We went over applications of techniques, basically dissecting my forms and thinking of several applications. He also showed me several silat djuru applications. comparing similarities and differences in what we do. The student I mentioned in the original post was there also. He was more of the practice dummy for the day, so I know he learned alot! We are definitely going to keep training together and studying. He also is very knowledgable of the healing/destruction cycles, and of the body's pressure points and meridians.

"Just because I joke around sometimes doesn't mean I'm serious about kung-fu.
" - nightair

Stranger
10-29-2001, 01:20 PM
Which of the brothers are teaching the real deal and which are not?

I don't get mad.
I get stabby.

JerryLove
10-29-2001, 08:17 PM
I believe that all four teach very legit Silat (though different styles)

http://www.clearsilat.com

templefist
10-29-2001, 09:53 PM
My roomate studies with Guru Steven Plink and he and I spend hours at our house discussing techiniques and theorys (high line/low line, seperation of bases, tool backup, base/angle/leverage, etc.) I've found that I could apply alot of their theorys to my training, and it has done nothing but improve my kungfu. Their knife fighting skills are some of the best that I've seen, as it is ingrained in all their djurus.

Wingman
03-18-2002, 12:29 AM
Check out this link: Pencak Silat (http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/content.php?id=43362)

Wingman
03-18-2002, 12:32 AM
Check out this cool link: Pencak Silat (http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/content.php?id=43362)

rubthebuddha
03-18-2002, 12:53 AM
irritating. you score two knockdowns to their zero and still lose.

wonder if that game is run by don king ...

wushu chik
03-18-2002, 12:56 AM
OMFG...that's a good one RTB...definetly makes you wonder huh??

~Wen~

Wingman
03-18-2002, 01:11 AM
rubthebuddha,
click "options" then set the "score Limit" to 1000. You can also set the "TKO limit" to 1 or 2.

CannonFist
03-18-2002, 02:19 AM
About time pencak silat is represented in computer games :)

Kristoffer
03-18-2002, 03:57 AM
mad annoying.. cant get past the Jagoan Boss-dude.. :mad:

Kristoffer
03-18-2002, 04:05 AM
That's it??
When u defeat the red boss, there's no more. It's the end. :( Stupid game.. :rolleyes:

Yung Apprentice
03-18-2002, 04:47 AM
That was kinda cool.

Kristoffer
03-18-2002, 09:04 AM
should be longer with a online-vs-online function.. Huge tournaments and stuff.. more things to buy and more moves. I liked it

Rolling Elbow
03-18-2002, 11:30 AM
Guys,

Just checking out Silat books for the hell of it and came across one that i thought might interest me. HOWEVER, in the spirit of rip offs and Ashida Kims, one can never know how good the author is or how valid his teachings are. Can anyone tell me about a certain:

Bob Orlando?
"Indonesian Fighting Fundamentals : The Brutal Arts of the Archipelago "?

Contents of the book seem interesting..as for the content, maybe some of you guys can let me know. Thanks.

Link:http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0873648927/5317684/103-2442285-4091032

Leonidas
03-18-2002, 11:54 AM
I wasted 30 minutes of my life for that. Looks more like Karate than Silat to me, and whats up with that red dude you have to fight at the end. One kick knockout? Game is kinda fun(for 10 minutes) but slow and annoying............ending sux. "Impossible" "The End" ?

apoweyn
03-18-2002, 12:05 PM
you might have more luck going to the 'street fighting' forum and posing this question to jerry love.


stuart b.

Rolling Elbow
03-18-2002, 12:09 PM
Fellas,

Have any of you heard of Bob Orlando? There is a Silat book i am interested in but i am not sure of its worth because A. you cvan never tell from a book, B. I don't study Silat (although principles of good movement are always similar)

thanks.

Stranger
03-18-2002, 12:16 PM
He is a long time student under Pendakar Williem DeThours according to the back cover of his book. He is associated with a very well know and respected teacher of silat.

Chris McKinley
03-18-2002, 01:20 PM
Rolling Elbow,

Jerry can certainly give you a more qualified response, but from having seen both the book and video by that name, I would qualify it as good to excellent material, especially for the beginner to intermediate level martial artist. One of Bob's strengths is communicating the "why's" of what he's doing in simple straightforward terms that appeal to common sense. A lot of what I saw was very similar to material I know from Baguazhang and Kali, and I found his teaching style to be very "user friendly", especially to the Western mind.

For my money, the SE Asian arts are some of the most combat-viable and eminently practical systems of combat to be found anywhere. There's not a lot of pretense, irrelevant formality or decorative ceremonial ritual. The learning curves are among the shortest of any martial arts, being designed such that what you learn today, you can use on the way home.

As I said before, Jerry can give you a better take on Bob Orlando specifically, but I would have no reservations in giving my recommendation to someone considering studying Kuntao or Pentjak Silat. Really good stuff.

JerryLove
03-18-2002, 02:54 PM
Hey :)

Yes, I've heard of Bob Orlando. I do not personally have any of his material, and have never interacted with the man. So let me be as helpful as I can manage and point you at some other people's posts on the subject (posts chosen based on describing the book and being from a source of some repute).

Tuan Randall Goodwin (http://groups.google.com/groups?q=bob+orlando+silat+chas&hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&oe=ISO-8859-1&selm=379fb5fe.5605165%40news.videotron.net&rnum=2)
Chas Clemets (http://groups.google.com/groups?q=bob+orlando+silat+book&start=20&hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&oe=ISO-8859-1&selm=6for1d%24aa1%40bgtnsc02.worldnet.att.net&rnum=21)

Sorry, I'm having trouble with something resembeling an actual review. Apparently Bob is (or was) a student of uncle Bill (Williem DeTahures) who I do have personal experiene with and respect as a fighter and martial artist. Apparently there is also some bad-blood between many of the students involved (hardly news). That said...

The information I can find says the book sis definately useful to the novice, or at least someone unfamilar with Silat. Several of the people involved found it overly basic and not focused engouh; the people I refer to hae definate martial and Silat skills, but I make no claims as to their Bias or skill as critics.

Tell me what you think if it if you get it!

MonkeySlap Too
03-18-2002, 03:40 PM
I liked the book more than others I know. Bob Orlando's KunTao definitly carries a strong Kenpo 'flavor' - which makes sense considering his history. The book is an interesting, and well organized look at Dutch-Indo material. It is definitely interpretive -Orlando sees things through his Kenpo background. The straight KunTao players look different - those are the guys I know. I think Orlando tries hard to communicate a difficult subject in an easy to understand format. He does pretty good for a guy offering his own interpretation of KunTao Silat.

In addition to his book, I'd check out www.serak.com and pick up "the tsunami' -- Victor DeThouras text.

I also reccomend the videos by Steven Plinck and Steve Gartin from Paladin Press.

Good luck!

Roy D. Anthony
03-20-2002, 10:03 PM
Seems like a cool game!!!

JerryLove
03-22-2002, 08:14 AM
I was emailed and asked to relay this...


but you can relay to Rolling Elbow my recommendation for Bob Orlando's silat video Paladin Press). It's concept-driven (although it has plenty of techniques) and it's also longer than many MA videos. (Paladin also produced an EXCELLENT silat video by Stevan Plinck. See http://home.att.net/~erik.mann/sppps.htm.) Rolling, if you are looking for a video, I'd probibly recommend ours (suprise there huh?) drop me an email about it if you want information.


I have to say, however, that my real-life exposure to Indonesian arts is limited to only a few months of study from the Wetzel/Niggel lineage (good stuff!) and to a one-day seminar by Victor de Thouars (good stuff!). I thought the witers exposure to the art might be important to you in determining how to weight the review.

xinyiliuhe
06-16-2003, 03:51 PM
Rimah Combat Arts Group

www.mubai.cc/online.htm

Come and see a FREE FULL LENGTH ONLINE KNIFE COMBAT LESSON directly viewed in your home via HIGH QUALITY video instruction. Learn to fight with knives, sticks, unarmed, improvised weapons and more. Our Online School is the BEST place to find video lessons in the Silat Arts. Come and explore the deadly Arts of Silat Mubai and Silat Zulfikari today.

www.mubai.cc/online.htm

chen zhen
08-22-2003, 07:41 AM
Great site on the deadly arts of Muslim Silat.
http://www.mubai.cc/home.htm

Some great videos, showing the brutality & effectiveness of Silat.

Empty-hand fight (http://www.mubai.cc/demo-mubaihand.mpg)
Empty-hand transition to knife (http://www.mubai.cc/demo-ehtoknife.mpg)
Counter knife ambush (http://www.mubai.cc/demo-counterassasin.mpg)
& the best one: owning, lock, choke, badmouthing & biyyach-slappin application:D (http://www.mubai.cc/demo-choke.mpg)

More coming up.:)

Kristoffer
08-22-2003, 05:29 PM
awsome

Kristoffer
08-22-2003, 05:34 PM
vid pusha fo shizzle

chen zhen
08-27-2003, 08:44 AM
I wonder why this one has not got more replies.

Deserves it:cool:

Kristoffer
08-28-2003, 03:52 AM
u should post more vids then

Black Jack
08-28-2003, 07:59 AM
Cool,

I take Silat Seni Gayong which is a Malay style of silat though you can be any religon or nonreligon to practice. Religon is not stressed in my group at all even though it comes from a deep historical Muslim background.

Totally nasty and brutal style to say the least.

Here is a small engilsh website on some info on the system. This website is not from my group but you can find mine in the links under Gayong Amerika.

www.extremesilat.com

chen zhen
08-28-2003, 08:35 AM
Great site, BJ!

thanks:)

Stranger
08-31-2003, 06:47 AM
It looks much different than the DeThouars lineage silat I have seen.

Ming Yue
08-31-2003, 06:45 PM
I trained for a while with a guy who had practiced Silat for some years. Can't remember the exact branch/style. He had crazy strong low round kicks, he would sweep both feet out from underneath someone foolish enough to slip into a narrow stance. :)

Black Jack
09-02-2003, 07:49 AM
Stranger,

Do you mean silat seni gayong or the website up above?

Stranger
09-02-2003, 08:04 PM
The website that started this thread.

NeedsPractice
01-08-2005, 03:40 PM
Any silat guys on this forum?
Any silat guys in NY?

Stranger
01-20-2005, 08:34 AM
Are you looking for training partners? a teacher? discussion of specific techniques/lineages? a general silat conversation?

NeedsPractice
01-20-2005, 05:13 PM
General discussion, also if there was anybody into silat in NYC interested in practice. Its nice to interact with people who do different things than you do. To experience diiferent reactions and actions than the people you train with all the time.

Stranger
01-20-2005, 07:01 PM
I have personally met and worked out with people that trained with Rick Tucci in Princeton. I believe he teaches a blend of Mande Muda, Serak, and Inosanto Maphilindo Silat. I really appreciated what I saw from this experience. He also taught a Sat. afternoon silat class a few years back. . It may be worth the occasional car ride. He has a video series on silat.

There are a few IMA guys on this forum, I'd keep tipping the thread to the top, until somebody sees this.

What lineage or style do you study?

FuXnDajenariht
01-20-2005, 08:54 PM
do you still practice Systema Stranger? or do i have the wrong person... :o

Stranger
01-21-2005, 04:12 AM
Yes, I am.

FuXnDajenariht
01-24-2005, 07:59 PM
kewl! sorry i was so forward. i think your the only one on the forum that does though... im planning on going to the fighthouse myself :D. i can finally afford it. 135/month is pretty reasonable relatively. 300/month was a bit much tho...

i thought u trained in new york tho?

Stranger
01-25-2005, 04:05 AM
I am in NoVA.

phantom
01-26-2005, 09:48 AM
I have heard that Nubreed Martial Arts is a good school. It is located on 14-16 150th Street in Whitestone New York. They teach maphilindo silat. I hope this helps. Peace.

Buddy
02-01-2005, 10:46 AM
Although I'm a bagua guy I have studied a little Sera w/Pak Vic DeThouars. Not in NY though.

Stranger
02-01-2005, 02:56 PM
I have studied a little Sera w/Pak Vic DeThouars. Not in NY though.

Are you still teaching silat? Are you still with VDT?

FuXnDajenariht
02-01-2005, 06:49 PM
why not just make this an all you ever wanted to know about silat but were too chickin to ask thread. or something. for us who didn't even know what silat was a few months ago.

to all those knowledgeable types...

what are some of the different styles of silat?

what are some weapons taught unique to silat?

what are the differences between silat training and kung fu?

what are some health/wholistic practices?

dumb questions true.... but its a start.

Buddy
02-04-2005, 05:14 AM
Stranger,
No.

SevenStar
02-04-2005, 10:47 AM
chrisM knows alot about silat, if I'm not mistaken. Maybe someone should PM him about this thread.

Stranger
02-04-2005, 06:21 PM
Stranger,No.


I'm sorry to hear that. Silat is such a cool art, but there are not too many teachers in the US, therefore it is sad to hear whenever an instructor stops teaching.

I thought I read on this forum or Emptyflower that you have also worked with Willem DeThouars. If so, could you humor us with a Serak / Kuntao-Silat comparision post? I'm not looking for a statement of which is better or worse.

Anybody here that practices silat and has also been exposed to X-kan taijutsu? I've read material online that suggest an influence of the former on the latter.

Anybody able to compare Indonesian and Malaysian silat?

Buddy
02-11-2005, 03:51 PM
As you probably know my background is baguazhang. Uncle's looked like a cross between southern gongfu and bagua. Sera is different in that it is all base, angle, leverage. If you get a chance check out Guru Steve Plinck's videos. It's funny, when Pak Victor stayed at my house I showed him a bunch of videos. He hated them all. Then I showed him my bagua teachers vid and the moment Pak saw him just walking the circle he sat up and said "now this guy has something."

Uncle I only saw a few times. I consider Pak Vic to have been my teacher. Although we are no longer associated I have nothing but the highest regard for him.

BTW, one of my senior students used to study ninpo.

Stranger
02-14-2005, 07:14 AM
Thanks for the information.


BTW, one of my senior students used to study ninpo.


Has he ever suggested that his previous training and silat have anything in common?

Stranger
02-24-2005, 06:06 AM
Can anybody explain what "Pukulan" means?

Is it a type of silat?

Is it a region?

Does it mean the silat was developed by the Dutch-Indo community rather than full-blooded Indonesians?

Do you see any connection to this: http://perso.club-internet.fr/jfgilles/escrime/bibliotheque/petter/index.html

bustr
02-26-2005, 06:56 PM
This is gonna ruffle some feathers but pukulan is a mis-pronounciation of pugilism. That's all.

Some of the techniques I've seen in the form I'm familiar with definitely show a European/Kaffir influence. Side kicks, for example are well documented in Europe but non-existant in Asian fighting manuals before the late nineteenth century. The hand techniques are classic bare knuckle pugilism. However there is also a definite Chinese/Buddhist influence as Poekoelan contains animal forms. This is just a description of the form that I'm familiar with. It is entirely possible that Poekoelan/Pukulan is a generic term in Indonesia and could refer to any fighting art.

When Keith Myers had his own website up he had some really good pics of old style pugilism. The link below has some pics that resemble the hand techniques of Poekoelan. The primary kick in Poekoelan is alow side kick that is always followed by hand techniques.

http://ejmas.com/jmanly/articles/2001/jmanlyart_myers_0801.htm




Can anybody explain what "Pukulan" means?

Is it a type of silat?

Is it a region?

Does it mean the silat was developed by the Dutch-Indo community rather than full-blooded Indonesians?

Do you see any connection to this: http://perso.club-internet.fr/jfgilles/escrime/bibliotheque/petter/index.html

Buddy
03-02-2005, 05:59 AM
Pukulan is from the Dutch Indo slang pukul meaning to strike

Stranger
03-06-2005, 09:30 AM
silat thread (http://www.emptyflower.com/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi/YaBB.cgi?board=Xing;action=display;num=1109100519; start=)



Mr. Remrev is one of the pioneers of silat in this country along with Pak Rudy Terlingen, Pak Willem Wetzel, Pak Jim Ingram, and of course, the DeThouars family.

Buddy,

This was in the thread I have linked above. I am familiar with all of the names except "Mr. Remrev". The only thing I have found online regarding this name is that he may be the initial silat instructor of Steven Plinck, before Plinck went to PDT. Does this make Remrev a serak guy? Who were his students?

Buddy
03-10-2005, 05:26 AM
Robert, over at EF would be a better one to ask. I only know he's been a silat guy for a long time. He may have worked with the DeThouars at one time, but I doubt he would consider himself a Sera man.

EULOGY
10-17-2005, 09:23 AM
Hello, I am Ojibwe, the founder of American Silat. I am looking to start a mixed martial arts study group that trains on Tuesdays and Thursdays at Middlesex County College in Edison, NJ. We will cover fighting from various ranges, self defense, ground fighting, weapons disarmament, etc. Please contact me if you are interested or know anyone who would be. Thank you.

Orang_Silat
05-21-2006, 04:54 PM
Selamat Saudara Saudara
Pukul or Pukulan or Poekoelan etc. Is not Dutch-Indo slang but actually Indonesian for To Strike. In the Dutch Indo Silat and Some Indonesian Aliran Aliran Western Boxing is incorporated into the systems.

Hormat dan Salaam
Orang Silat

manofleisure
06-19-2006, 12:11 PM
Hello to all,

I am a practitioner of pencak silat and have studied mande muda,maphilindo,inosanto/lacoste,Sera,and harimau.

I also train regular in FMA/JKD along with a catch wrestling instructor.

I am a co founder of the Texas Combatives Association: http://www.freewebs.com/combativearts/

If anyone is in the Austin,Texas area and would like to train in any of these arts without the school mentality...check us out.

RD'S Alias - 1A
11-20-2007, 06:54 AM
:D

Wow, this a guy is really good! I am not sure what all he is doing, but he is maintaining fantastic body structure, especially lower spine. It's very rare to see anyone do this anymore. I know all the work I put into getting it myself, then I see this guy who is light years ahead of me.

It's a Beautiful thing!! :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vc3t3Pxm9YE&feature=related

bakxierboxer
11-20-2007, 06:43 PM
:D

Wow, this a guy is really good! I am not sure what all he is doing, but he is maintaining fantastic body structure, especially lower spine. It's very rare to see anyone do this anymore. I know all the work I put into getting it myself, then I see this guy who is light years ahead of me.

It's a Beautiful thing!! :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vc3t3Pxm9YE&feature=related

The fellow was impressive.... looked rather good.
That said, if you couldn't tell what he was doing.....
Those arts are NOT "the same" as a stand-up TCMA, northern or southern.

xcakid
11-20-2007, 06:55 PM
Can't really appreciate a form unless I know application. Otherwise its just all fancy hand waving. But that's just me. :p

RD'S Alias - 1A
11-20-2007, 07:08 PM
I just thought it was really impressive that he could maintain his spinal alignment moving so low like that. Most guys arch thier backs because they don't have the ability to keep the integrity when the stances get really deep.

The Xia
11-20-2007, 07:09 PM
The fellow was impressive.... looked rather good.
That said, if you couldn't tell what he was doing.....
Those arts are NOT "the same" as a stand-up TCMA, northern or southern.
Can you enlighten us as to what sort of thing he was doing? :)

street_fighter
11-20-2007, 07:14 PM
Can you enlighten us as to what sort of thing he was doing? :)

it doesn't look there could be any applications in there... maybe. couldn't watch the whole thing, too boring.

RD'S Alias - 1A
11-20-2007, 07:15 PM
it doesn't look there could be any applications in there... maybe. couldn't watch the whole thing, too boring.

Reply]
Well of COURSE not!! It's not being done in the octagon after cross training in BJJ.....:rolleyes:

bakxierboxer
11-20-2007, 09:45 PM
xcakid -

Can't really appreciate a form unless I know application. Otherwise its just all fancy hand waving. But that's just me.

The "typical" pentjak/silat arts attempt to mimic someone's "impression" of an animal... possibly tiger here.
I saw little in the way of direct applications, but as an exercise to develope overall agility, flexibility and mobility.....?

RD -

I just thought it was really impressive that he could maintain his spinal alignment moving so low like that. Most guys arch thier backs because they don't have the ability to keep the integrity when the stances get really deep.

I didn't see any particular "spinal alignment" in anything he did.


The Xia -

Can you enlighten us as to what sort of thing he was doing?

Probably shouldn't do that.... it might require that they come out and kill us all. :eek::eek:


street_fighter -

it doesn't look there could be any applications in there... maybe. couldn't watch the whole thing, too boring.

Probable agreement... seems best as an exercise for attributes that could be of use in some circumstances.

Shaolinlueb
11-20-2007, 10:16 PM
i can see some of the applications and how it would be used. but like most people looking at kung fu forms it looked like a guy wandering around doing things.

there was a nice takedown in there at 14/15 seconds into it. he rotates his arms wide. at least thats what i saw.

street_fighter
11-20-2007, 10:37 PM
it doesn't look there could be any applications in there... maybe. couldn't watch the whole thing, too boring.

Reply]
Well of COURSE not!! It's not being done in the octagon after cross training in BJJ.....:rolleyes:

i didn't say any of that, and im pretty sure ive never said that; in fact i believe i included "maybe". i just don't see any apps in there aside from the very abstract. don't see the point in forms like that. i really only appreciate forms where theres actual power generation and at least some resemblence to how it can be applied in fighting. but thats just me with my little understanding of things thus far...

RD'S Alias - 1A
11-21-2007, 06:39 AM
I didn't see any particular "spinal alignment" in anything he did.

Reply]
Because you are blind.

bakxierboxer
11-21-2007, 05:53 PM
I didn't see any particular "spinal alignment" in anything he did.

Reply]
Because you are blind.

My vision is corrected to 20/25.
OTOH, that has nothing to do with the fact that "alignment" refers to things being placed in or held in a straight line.
There was NO point at which this persons spine was straight.

You could be "legally blind" and STILL see that his spine not straight.

msg
11-24-2007, 02:24 AM
i just want to say this before i never waste my time with this form silat is one of the most effective arts that can realy be used and you have people saying the dont see anything in it .like some one sayed before if they dont see it in the ring its no good .those are the people that live in a dream world .i have the oppertunity to meet and train with silat .hsing.kuntao and bagua teachers and they would put those guys that fight in the ring to shame so realy think what you say

Firehawk4
03-01-2011, 03:31 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNb1AaSefiY&feature=related

Blacktiger
03-01-2011, 05:10 PM
There are a few crazy clips like this floating round youtube like this...very cool..:)

Now here is some body conditioning silat style:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0BQtbW0UIQ

GeneChing
06-16-2015, 09:29 AM
...from the SEA Games (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?49262-The-SEA-Games&p=1284584#post1284584).

There are a lot more silat vids available on this Sport Singapore channel


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRVT95Ne2Ls

GeneChing
08-29-2018, 07:57 AM
Does anyone know if Pencak Silat is represented in any other major international games beyond the Asians?


27 August 2018 - 17H40
Malaysian athlete alleges bias after heated martial arts battle (https://www.france24.com/en/20180827-malaysian-athlete-alleges-bias-after-heated-martial-arts-battle)

https://scd.france24.com/en/files/imagecache/france24_large_652_338/images/afp/6ca12cc417462849dfc7f9010602664740db6a37.jpg
© AFP/File | Malaysia's Mohd Al-Jufferi Jamari, the 2016 world champion, stormed out the arena and punched a hole in the wall of the warm-up area

JAKARTA (AFP) -
A Malaysian athlete accused judges of bias and stormed out of a tumultuous match of the Indonesian martial art pencak silat at the Asian Games in Jakarta on Monday.

Mohd Al-Jufferi Jamari, the 2016 world champion, withdrew in protest seconds before the end of the final and punched a hole in the wall of the warm-up area, as Indonesia's Komang Harik Adi Putra bagged gold in the heated contest.

"I'm not mad at my opponent nor the supporters, but I'm mad because the jury didn't give the point fairly," 26-year-old Al-Jufferi said, according to the Games' official website.

Al-Jufferi dominated the early part of the men's 65-70kg final but 23-year-old Komang came back strongly.

Komang eventually clinched the match 4-1 and Al-Jufferi's coach was left trying to calm down the Malaysian, who pulled out two seconds before the finish.

Harry Warganegara, of Inasgoc, the Games organising committee, told AFP Al-Jufferi was unlikely to be sanctioned.

"We think it was very unfortunate though we try to understand (what the athlete was going through)," he said.

"But I don't think there will be any sanctions."

Nazif Najib, secretary general of Malaysia's National Olympic Committee (NOC), said he was waiting for the report from Inasgoc but agreed it was unlikely he would be punished.

"We think it was an athlete's response, he was emotional so no sanctions," he told AFP.

Komang's medal was one of eight golds for Indonesia in pencak silat at this year's Asiad.

The term pencak silat describes hundreds of indigenous combat styles in Southeast Asia, with fighters wielding an array of weapons such as knives, sickles and machetes.

THREADS
Asian Games (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?58907-Asian-Games)
Silat (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?2737-Silat)

GeneChing
09-23-2019, 08:54 AM
National Olympic Committee registers new type of martial arts Pencak Silat (https://www.inform.kz/en/national-olympic-committee-registers-new-type-of-martial-arts-pencak-silat_a3566723)
18 September 2019 10:43

https://www.inform.kz/radmin/news/2019/09/18/190918104350429a3566723i.jpg

NUR-SULTAN. KAZINFORM – Saken Musaibekov, General Secretary of the National Olympic Committee, has bestowed Gadgy Gadgiyev, President of Pencak Silat Association, a certificate of recongnition, Kazinform correspondent reports. Pencak Silat is a type of martial arts practiced by the native peoples of the Malay Archipelago which includes Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei. It is a full-body fighting form incorporating strikes, grappling and throwing in addition to weaponry. Every part of the body is used and subject to attack. Pencak silat plays important role in the history of the indigenous people of the Malay Archipelago. It should be noted that over the past years Pencak Silat has gone beyond the bounds of the Malay Archipelago. Thus, it is widespread in Holland, Germany, Italy, USA and Japan. Nowadays more than 70 countries across the world practice Sports Silat while traditional Pencak Silat is used by about 140 states as a basis for self-defense. According to Mr. Gadgiyev there are several branches in Kazakhstan including in the cities of Nur-Sultan, Almaty, Shymkent, Aktobe, Pavlodar, Karaganda, Kostanay, Atyrau, Zhambyl and Almaty regions. Additionally it is planned to open branches in 5 more regions of the country. He noted that the Association plans to carry out the first Republican Pencak Silat tournament in November the current year.

https://www.inform.kz/radmin/fotofiles/2019/09/18/1909181138473850f.jpg

I put Iko Uwais on the cover of our FALL 2019 (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/article.php?article=1501) issue for many reasons, one of which is the international rise of Silat.

http://www.kungfumagazine.com/admin/site_images/KungfuMagazine/upload/3686_KFM2019-Fall-Cover.jpg

GeneChing
10-08-2019, 09:00 AM
Speaking of Silat, READ The Silk Road Kung Fu Friendship Tour Part 27: Wushu in Indonesia (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/ezine/article.php?article=1513) by Greg Brundage

http://www.kungfumagazine.com/admin/site_images/KungfuMagazine/upload/9288_20194425-silk27.jpg

THREADS
The Silk Road (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?68861)
Silat (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?2737-Silat)
Fall 2019 (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?71322)

GeneChing
10-22-2019, 08:00 AM
READ Meet the Martial Star of Netflix’s Wu Assassins, Iko Uwais (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/article.php?article=1514) By Gene Ching

http://www.kungfumagazine.com/admin/site_images/KungfuMagazine/upload/3686_KFM2019-Fall-Cover.jpg

THREADS
Fall 2019 (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?71322-Fall-2019)
Wu Assassins (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?70838-Wu-Assassins)
Silat (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?2737-Silat)

GeneChing
11-06-2019, 09:09 AM
Silat revisited - READ The Silk Road Kung Fu Friendship Tour Part 28: Wushu in Indonesia Continued (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/ezine/article.php?article=1517)by Greg Brundage

http://www.kungfumagazine.com/admin/site_images/KungfuMagazine/upload/8702_2019471928-Silk.jpg

THREADS
The Silk Road (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?68861)
Fall 2019 (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?71322)
Silat (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?2737)

GeneChing
12-13-2019, 09:04 AM
I'm posting this on the Silat thread (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?2737-Silat) even though it's a passing reference, and hijacking the Shang wu farms, Taoist health and longevity / Thai massage (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?34940-Shang-wu-farms-Taoist-health-and-longevity-Thai-massage-workshop) workshop thread because it's the only one that we have that mentions Thai Massage and the workshop that was trying to promote was nearly a decade and a half ago. :rolleyes:

Also copying this to our UNESCO thread (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?36571-UNESCO-and-the-politics-of-culture).


Unesco heritage: Traditional Thai massage added to 'cultural heritage' list (https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-50770641?SThisFB&fbclid=IwAR15J_TreWMj-9TBMiwodLtXTpIYrqLPDZwtu7tp-VjeFUBh6NZUG88AX_Q)
13 December 2019

https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/103B2/production/_110128466_gettyimages-1187332710.jpgGETTY IMAGES
The massages involve a lot of movement and typically see people assuming a series of different positions

The back-cracking traditional Thai massage has been added to a prestigious Unesco heritage list.

Nuad Thai is now part of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, which features traditions and practices passed across the generations.

By being part of the list, Thai massage has been recognised as something to be preserved for future generations.

Unesco is the United Nations' agency for education, culture, and science.

The intangible cultural heritage list is separate from the world heritage list, which recognises buildings and sites of prominence.

There are 550 items on the cultural heritage list - split into three categories - from 127 countries.

Items are added every year, with this year's committee meeting in Bogota, Colombia.

https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/178E2/production/_110128469_gettyimages-1157060665.jpgGETTY IMAGES
People in Moscow receiving a Thai massage

Unlike conventional massages, Thai massages involve a lot of movement and typically sees people assuming a series of different positions.

Therapists use not only their hands but sometimes their forearms and knees to apply pressure. There is also no oil involved in Nuad Thai massage.

According to Unesco, the practice has its "roots in self-care in Thai peasant society of the past, [where] every village had massage healers whom villagers would turn to when they had muscle aches from working the field".

Other practices added to this year's list include:

Irish harping

Celestinian forgiveness in Italy

The Carnival of Podence in Portugal

Silat self-defence in Malaysia

According to Unesco, the intangible culture heritage list seeks to recognise things that are "important to preserve for future generations... [like] songs sung and stories told".

It adds that these things "form part of a heritage and this requires active effort to safeguard it".

GeneChing
12-18-2019, 08:49 AM
'Tears of happiness': Pencak silat communities celebrate UNESCO recognition (https://www.thejakartapost.com/life/2019/12/14/tears-of-happiness-pencak-silat-communities-celebrate-unesco-recognition.html)
JESSICHA VALENTINA
THE JAKARTA POST
Jakarta / Sat, December 14, 2019 / 10:32 am

https://img.jakpost.net/c/2019/12/13/2019_12_13_83583_1576237486._large.jpg
Pencak Silat Betawi warriors enliven the performance of 1,000 Warriors at the Hotel Indonesia traffic circle in Jakarta on June 14, 2015. (Shutterstock/dani daniar)

Traditional Indonesian martial art pencak silat was added to UNESCO’s Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in Bogota, Colombia, on Thursday local time.

The announcement made pencak silat communities shed tears of happiness, as they had been working toward such recognition since 2017, Pencak Silat Indonesia Community founding board member Wahdat MY said in a press conference in Jakarta on Friday.

Indonesian pencak silat practitioner-turned-actor Yayan Ruhian also welcomed the news, telling The Jakarta Post via telephone that he felt happy upon hearing it and hoping that pencak silat could be accepted by a wider audience, not just martial arts lovers.

According to The Fighting Art of Pencak Silat and its Music: From Southeast Asian Village to Global Movement, edited by Uwe U. Paetzold and Paul H. Mason, the term pencak silat is a composite of recent origin (late 1940s), deriving from the Sundanese/Javanese word penca(k) and the Malay and Sumatran word silat. The term was made official by the Indonesian Pencak Silat Association (IPSI) in 1973 during a congress in Tugu near Bogor, West Java, as the conceptual basis for a competition for the native self-defense art, enabling it to be included in the National Games as a regulated sport. Both words have their own etymologies.

Though the government-backed IPSI focuses on pencak silat as a sport, Wahdat said that pencak silat consisted of other aspects, such as spirituality and the arts.

There are more than 40 different pencak silat aliran (teachings). Some of the most popular ones include Cimande from West Java and Silek from West Sumatra. “There are more unexposed teachings, such as those from Sulawesi,” Wahdat said.

In recent years, pencak silat has caught the attention of international filmmakers. Indonesian actors and martial artists Yayan, Iko Uwais and Cecep Arif Rahman have been involved in various action film franchises, such as The Raid and John Wick, showcasing the Indonesian martial art to the world.

LifeLike Pictures film producer Sheila Timothy singled out The Raid as the one film that catapulted pencak silat into global film industry fame.

She said the martial art was one of the strengths of Wiro Sableng: Pendekar Kapak Maut Naga Geni 212, which was produced by LifeLike Pictures in collaboration with Fox International Productions, a division of 20th Century Fox.

“When we approached Fox International Productions, they were interested in our ideas as we shared that we wanted to include original Indonesian martial arts in pencak silat,” Sheila said.

“Pencak silat is really interesting as it also contains philosophies. It can be explored further.”

The Education and Culture Ministry’s director general of culture, Hilmar Farid, said UNESCO considered pencak silat a tradition and contribution to humanity and human civilization.

“Unlike Borobudur temple, which is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, pencak silat is owned by the people, not the country,” Hilmar said.

Hilmar explained following the announcement recognizing pencak silat as a piece of intangible world heritage that silat from Malaysia had also been recognized by UNESCO.

Speaking about the differences, Hilmar stressed that silat was highlighted as martial arts. “Meanwhile, martial arts is among the components of pencak silat. It contains a larger cultural heritage, featuring movement and music."

Hilmar said based on ancient inscriptions, pencak silat also involved self-control and character-building lessons that had been passed down from generation to generation, adding that the recognition opened the door to more opportunities to preserve pencak silat.

Speaking about the future of pencak silat, Wahdat said there was a lot of work to do to continue to support the traditional art, which was largely only taught in small communities – pencak silat practitioners and teachers frequently have to dig into their own pockets to fund their activities.

“The organizational system is weak. Hopefully, after being recognized by UNESCO, it can help to motivate [pencak silat practitioners],” Wahdat said. “I’m afraid about us stopping here." (kes)

I feel so justified in doing a Silat-based cover story now for our FALL 2019 (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/article.php?article=1501) issue. I had a feeling that Silat's time had come. Read Meet the Martial Star of Netflix’s Wu Assassins, Iko Uwais
(http://www.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/article.php?article=1514)

http://www.kungfumagazine.com/admin/site_images/KungfuMagazine/upload/3686_KFM2019-Fall-Cover.jpg

THREADS
Silat (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?2737-Silat) UNESCO (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?36571-UNESCO-and-the-politics-of-culture).

GeneChing
12-26-2019, 12:22 PM
Both Malaysian Silat and Pencak Silat (Indonesian) were inscribed. There are more resources on the site itself.


Silat (https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/silat-01504)
Malaysia
Inscribed in 2019 (14.COM) on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

© The Department of National Heritage, Malaysia, 2018
Silat is a combative art of self-defence and survival rooted in the Malay Archipelago. Traced back to the early days of the Langkasuka Kingdom, Silat has evolved into a fine practice of physical and spiritual training also encompassing traditional Malay attire, Silat musical instruments and customs. There are many styles of Silat, inspired by the movements of human anatomy, nature and animals. For example, Silat Harimau involves an aesthetic rhythmic motion imitating the art of self-defence and attack of the tiger. In Malaysia alone, there are more than 150 known Silat styles whose names derive from natural elements such as animals and plants. Originally, Malay Silat was practised by warriors – as noble enforcers of justice – but nowadays practitioners consist of masters, gurus, teachers and students, who are responsible for maintaining the practice. Training sessions usually take place in the evening or at night in an open space such as a courtyard, led by the Master and ‘Jurukaka’. A large number of practitioners have been trained and nurtured, and an increasing number of training centres have been established in various regions. With this accelerated dissemination, the practice has increasingly transcended its status as a martial art to become a performing art; consequently, it is now a popular sport for health and leisure.

https://ich.unesco.org/img/photo/thumb/12872-BIG.jpg



Traditions of Pencak Silat (https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/traditions-of-pencak-silat-01391)
Indonesia
Inscribed in 2019 (14.COM) on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

In addition to their sporting element, Traditions of Pencak Silat also encompass mental-spiritual, self-defence and artistic aspects. The moves and styles of Pencak Silat are strongly influenced by various elements of art, involving a unity of body and movement fitting the accompanying music. The term ‘pencak’ is better known in Java, while the term ‘silat’ is better known in West Sumatra, describing a group of martial arts with many similarities. In addition to local terms, each region has its own moves, styles, accompaniments, music, and supporting equipment, which includes costumes, musical instruments, and traditional weapons. Pencak Silat practitioners are taught to maintain their relationship with God, human beings, and nature, and are trained in various techniques to deal with attacks or other dangerous situations based on principles to protect themselves as well as others, avoid harming the offender and build comradeship. The practice strengthens comradeship, maintains social order, and provides entertainment for ritual ceremonies. Related knowledge and skills are commonly taught in non-formal schools and include oral traditions and expressions such as greetings, philosophical phrases, rhymed poems, advice, as well as songs and techniques to play the instruments.

https://ich.unesco.org/img/photo/thumb/12439-BIG.jpg

Below is what comes up when 'martial' is searched (https://ich.unesco.org/en/lists?text=martial&multinational=3&display1=inscriptionID#tabs):

2019
Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
Silat Malaysia
Traditions of Pencak Silat Indonesia

2018
Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
Chidaoba, wrestling in Georgia Georgia

2017
List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding
Taskiwin, martial dance of the western High Atlas Morocco

2016
Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
Tahteeb, stick game Egypt

2012
Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
Frevo, performing arts of the Carnival of Recife Brazil

2011
Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
Taekkyeon, a traditional Korean martial art Republic of Korea

2010
Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
Chhau dance India
Pahlevani and Zoorkhanei rituals Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Peking opera China

2009
Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
Yueju opera China

GeneChing
05-27-2021, 10:53 AM
Luxury Resorts Are Using Martial Arts to Highlight Local Cultures (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-05-27/luxury-resorts-are-using-martial-arts-to-highlight-local-cultures)
Plan a trip that's worth fighting for.
By Jennifer Flowers
May 26, 2021, 10:25 PM PDT
https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/iQlGrJ5zKBZk/v1/1800x-1.jpg
Capoeira practice at the UXUA Casa Hotel & Spa in Trancoso, Brazil Source: UXUA

I’d spent three intense years training in jeet kune do—an expression of martial arts Bruce Lee developed—before finally making it to Leung Ting Gym in Hong Kong’s neon-lit Yau Ma Tei neighborhood. Among fruit and jade markets, a narrow staircase leads up to this living piece of history. It’s named for one of the last disciples of Grandmaster Ip Man, one of Lee’s most influential teachers, who helped popularize a 300-year-old kung fu style called wing chun.

Leung Ting Gym doesn’t normally allow visitors or drop-in students, so it’s a treat that my concierge at the Rosewood Hong Kong has brought me this far. Through a small window on a mustard-colored door, he and I watch in awe as three students perform the circular and linear hand motions of chi sau. Cantonese for “sticky hands,” it’s a calm, fluid way to diffuse the energy of an attacking opponent, a centuries-old lesson in grace under pressure.

Peering in, I think about wing chun’s founder, a Buddhist nun named Ng Mui from China’s legendary Shaolin Temple. Her fighting system tailored for smaller people has emboldened me as a 5-foot-2 Asian-American woman.

https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/iReEIa_mhBiU/v1/1400x-1.jpg
Silat at One&Only Desaru Coast,Source: One&Only Resorts

When I started training, I thought it would just be something to practice at home. But as I learned at Leung Ting Gym, martial arts in their original context are a compelling portal into other cultures, each movement intertwined with heritage and philosophy. In France there’s savate, a 19th century kicking art that evolved from Parisian street fighting but has the elegance of ballet. The highly efficient krav maga used by the Israeli military was developed by Jews in 1930s Czechoslovakia to defend themselves against violence. Filipino martial arts is a beautiful but deadly practice that had to masquerade as a cultural dance after Spanish colonists banned it in the Philippines; now it’s recognized as a national treasure.

Several forward-thinking resorts today are harnessing the martial arts industry—which racks up an estimated $4 billion in the U.S. each year—as a way to meet travelers’ demands for authentic adventure experiences. An invitation into a master’s private world can feel like the kind of genuine insider hospitality that many travelers seek; it’s as culturally enriching as museums, theater, or food.

https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/ibAdicR7Hzbw/v1/1400x-1.jpg
UXUASource: UXUA
At the recently opened One&Only Desaru Coast, a resort on the tropical southern tip of Malaysia, guests can privately study the fundamentals of silat, a Southeast Asian fighting style practiced to the beat of single-headed kompang hand drums. The teacher is Muhammad Muiz, who holds the elusive master title with the country’s National Silat Federation. A 45-minute lesson costs $60 per person, the same as a private session with a tennis pro at the resort, but with the added dimension of showcasing Malaysian culture.

https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/iDu0pM1Q7QBc/v1/400x-1.jpg
Kru Toom at Capella Bangkok Source: Capella Bangkok
In Thailand the eight-month-old Capella Bangkok provides a similar service. When the pandemic subsides, the resort will be the only place in the city to take a private lesson with former muay thai champion Parinya Kiatbusaba, better known as Kru Toom. For $145 she’ll teach you the secrets behind using shins, knees, elbows, and fists as “eight limbs” for fluid combat in the resort’s tree-shaded courtyard by the Chao Phraya River. With the help of a translator, she’ll also offer some historical context for muay thai, derived from centuries of tactics used in the ancient Siamese kingdom, and share her personal journey becoming one of the world’s few transgender boxers.

The UXUA Casa Hotel & Spa in Trancoso, Brazil, pays allegiance to capoeira, an acrobatic regional dance created by enslaved West Africans in the 16th century. The resort, co-founded by Bob Shevlin and Wilbert Das, ex-creative director of fashion label Diesel SpA, opened in 2009 with a capoeira program for underprivileged kids at a local school—many of whom now teach at an academy that raises money by offering $60-an-hour private lessons to guests.

https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/ifMEDofftEd0/v1/1400x-1.jpg
While I watch the class at Leung Ting Gym, my concierge improvises in Cantonese, hoping to broker access on my behalf. Eventually the door opens. The space is so minuscule, only I can enter—and just for a few minutes. I take in the elegant Chinese calligraphy on the walls, the soft-spoken direction from the sifu, or teacher, and the shuffling of the students’ feet.

I fixate on the wooden mook jong practice dummy in the corner, a replica of which sits in my own school back in Brooklyn. It’s an emblem of a tradition that’s crossed many generations, and the sight of it here, thousands of miles from New York, reminds me that these students and I share a rare and refined language. I’ve never felt so at home.

threads
Leung-Ting-Wingtsun (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?54844-Leung-Ting-Wingtsun)
Muay-Thai (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?26700-Muay-Thai)
Capoeira (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?5880-Capoeira)
Silat (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?2737-Silat)