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jbmmaster
06-27-2001, 02:11 AM
I would like to know what others think about Brad Allan, the guy who fought Jackie chan in the movie Gorgeous. I think that where going to see more of this guy in the future. What do you guys and gals think?

"Always expect the unexpected"

Design Sifu
06-27-2001, 07:53 PM
he had a small role in The Accedential Spy Too small a role regretably . . .

Lost_Disciple
06-28-2001, 03:21 AM
This is scarey, I just finished watching that movie.
I think the dude's baaaaad (I mean the good way).
Unfortunately though, he's probably not traditional enough for people on this board.
I think his hand and leg speed are amazing, and he's not half bad at physical acting.
Just my 2 cents.

cho
07-02-2001, 11:00 PM
BTW he also doubled for Ron Smoorenbourg in Who Am I? . When 'Ron' did those spinning air kicks and the double kick. Apparently, Chan only likes to get close with his own stunt men.

dezhen2001
10-19-2002, 11:56 AM
if anyone has seen "My Stunts" it's clear why brad Allen was stunt doubling for Ron... the timing and distance was off so they used Brad to do it... 1st time man! :cool:

As for getting close... some of the crazy stuff he does requires a load of trust... like he said himself: if anyone is fighting and hits him or comes close, its natural to be scared and not flow so well... if it's someone he knows so well and trusts, if they hit him wrong it's an accident so no problems... also they really know each others timing and stuff so things just look much better.

just imo :)
dawood

dezhen2001
10-19-2002, 06:43 PM
as far as i can remember from an interview with him i read a while ago he has been doing more choreography and stunt work as a stuntman and coordinator lately... maybe thats the direction he wants to take things? :)

dawood

HuangKaiVun
10-21-2002, 07:55 PM
Brad Allen has fantastic martial arts skills and talent.

However, 2 compressed vertebrae are hard to have a big-time screen star career with - "golden handcuffs" or not.

dezhen2001
10-21-2002, 10:15 PM
stumblefist: sorry, my misunderstanding of the term :o As far as i know, Brad is mor elike Jackies student/understudy, so i'm sure that would have somehting to do with it.

My Stunts is pretty cool, it explains a lot of good stuff and you see them doing a little training :)

dawood

HuangKaiVun
10-24-2002, 02:45 PM
My understanding, stumblefist, is that having 2 fused vertebrae results in limitation of the spinal column (bone).

Depending on where in the spine the vertebrae were fused, the resulting loss of mobility could impede a martial artist's movement greatly. This is because the individual spinal bones have different characteristics based on where they are.

The nervous system is also affected. The spinal column sheathes the spinal cord, and the peripheral nervous system extends outward from the spinal cord. Fusing two vertebrae can possibly result in impingement of the outgoing nerves from the central nervous system (i.e. spinal cord and brain).

Also, there's the autonomic neural plexus that deals with functions like going to the bathroom. If the vertebrae involved deals with that section, incontinence and bladder urine retention are potential problems as well.

Those are but some of the problems that can stem from this very TOUGH disorder.

HuangKaiVun
10-30-2002, 04:59 PM
"Compressed vertebrae" does NOT mean "slipped or herniated disc", stumblefist.

The spinal column is made of vertically arranged bones stacked kabobed on spinal discs. In Western medicine, compression of the vertebrae refers specifically to the bones and NOT the discs.

You were correct in implying vertebral fracture concerning compressed vertebrae, stumblefist. That's exactly what happens in this type of injury. You are also correct in noting that weightlifters and gymnasts/wushu guys are particularly susceptible to this type of injury.

Fusing the vertebrae is a way of providing stability to a fractured spinal bone.