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PlasticSquirrel
01-17-2001, 05:16 AM
i was just wondering if anyone knew much about sun lu tang's style of tai chi.

it's really hard to find out much about it, other than it uses high postures with narrow steps and round arm movements. also, it uses bagua footwork and xing-yi kicking.

Ma_Xu_Zha
01-17-2001, 04:55 PM
Plastic squirrel wrote:

i was just wondering if anyone knew much about sun lu tang's style of tai chi.
it's really hard to find out much about it, other than it uses high postures with narrow steps and round arm movements. also, it uses bagua footwork and xing-yi kicking.

-I wouldnt say it uses much any bagua or hsingyi but more concepts. there is the san ti posture and some bagua pivot type stepping. the sun taiji is alo called active stepping taiji and has a step up with the pushing. This is seen in another style of taiji from Yongnian (home of Yang and Hao style)called Guang Ping style. It is not part of hao style that sun learned from hao Wei Zhen. I dont think it uses hsingyi kicking, it has jump kick like guang ping style and chen style. I have sen the sun style taiji done really fast, it was quite unusual.

GLW
01-17-2001, 07:14 PM
Been doing it for years... It is very different and interesting.

Also called Kai He Huo Bu Taijiquan (Open Close, Fast step....) due to the quickness of the steping and the use of the Open/Close technique and its unique Single Whip.

So...what was your question idea....?

OldFatBaldGuy
01-17-2001, 07:37 PM
I read someplace (I'm old - I don't remember where!) that to completely understand Sun style TCC, you first needed to have studied Sun's xing yi and bagua.

What are your thoughts on that?

Thanks.

Respectfully,
OldFatBaldGuy

Esteban
01-17-2001, 11:24 PM
Hi,

well, I think someone who's studied Sun's bagua and xingyi will say that it definitely helps to have learned them if you want to use Sun's tjq. If you're primarily interested in health, then it isn't necessary to know the other arts. However, it would still help if you learned from someone who was familiar with all three. BTW, I don't believe in the idea that it's necessary to master each of the arts to be proficient. If you're not willing to invest years of study, without the hope of mastery, then it's unlikely you'll master it anyway. Anyway, I think it does help to understand Xingyi stepping, particularly Sun's system. But, the stepping in Sun's tjq is not like his Xingyi stepping. Oh, there are a few similariites, but not in general. However, the principles are similar. Knowing Sun's bagua would probably help, too. But, imho, it's not about knowing the forms/animals; it's about learning the bagua method of application. That's always going to be complicated to learn. In Sun's book on bagua, the people who wrote the introductions say it took them 20-30 years to begin to understand. If you read the text, you'll see why. However, Sun Lutang always emphasized "practice" as the means to understanding. So, that's where I'm gonna go now.

Respects,
Esteban

PlasticSquirrel
01-18-2001, 01:04 AM
"I have seen the sun style taiji done really fast, it was quite unusual."

why is it unusual? unusual in a bad weird way or unusual in a good weird way? any details you guys can give me would be great.

one thing that i forgot to ask is this: i've heard that bagua has footwork that allows you to move around your opponent very quickly. i've also heard that the sun style uses the principles of bagua footwork. does sun style have the quick and agile footwork that allows you to circle around your opponent?

thanks :)
:) :) :) :) :) :( :) :)

GLW
01-18-2001, 05:53 AM
There are some very subtle places where Sun Style is more like Xing Yi...others where it is more like Bagua and still more where it is like Wu style with more movement and animation.

I can see where a person with no background in any other stye would have trouble with it if they started with Sun and did not know Bagua Xing Yi or any other style.

From my experience, The Xing Yi parts are the hardest to get if you do not do Xing yi. Not impossible but harder. There seems to be more of an affinity between the melding of the Bagua flavorings to the Wu style Taijiquan.

The places where Xing Yi comes out are alos more obvious than those for Bagua. For example, the instances where you do the twisting step forward into a Pi Quan type of strike...or the San Ti stances ...

However, to get it down, you really need to do Taijiquan as well.

I have a classmate who learned it at the same time I did. I am familiar with Bagua but not too familiar with Xing yi. I also focus a lot on Taijiquan. Now, after several years, when you see us do it together, I have more twisting and coiling in moves, more subtleness and he has more driving linear power and is more direct. This is as I would expect because he does Xing Yi while I do the evasion and twsting types of arts....

An interesting note...Sun style has no hooking hand.

Also... I think one of the hardest things for me to get at first was the spirit. It is more lively and you have to deliberately let that spirit come out when doing it as opposed to showing a calm manner with say Yang style....and still maintain that Taijiquan air.

fun...

Esteban
01-18-2001, 07:51 AM
"one thing that i forgot to ask is this: i've heard that bagua has footwork that allows you to move around your opponent very quickly. i've also heard that the sun style uses the principles of bagua footwork. does sun style have the quick and agile footwork that allows you to circle around your opponent?"

Good question, and I'll go out on a limb and say that Sun tjq uses no more nor less of the evasive strategy than any other form of tjq. So, the answer is yes and no. For example, most tjq styles (I think) have the movement "fair lady threads shuttles." The (4) movements, taken as a whole (at least two 180 degree turns) can be seen as "evasive" and can be used to get behind one opponent or to deal with more than one. But, in general, Sun tjq would use tjq strategy. Though, of course, it's possible to adapt any of the arts to any strategy, in practice.

Respects,
Esteban

unclaimed effort
07-17-2001, 10:39 PM
Are there any thoughts from anybody about the Sun style? What's it like? How's it different from the others?

I don't hear much about it, maybe there is a site you could lead me to that can help me learn about it?

When you win a fight, who do you think feels worse, you or your opponent?

GLW
07-17-2001, 11:52 PM
Nice...but very different....

Where to start...ask away and I will try to share what I can.

Subitai
07-18-2001, 12:56 AM
If you like, you could visit Sifu Lams school in Sunnyvale, CA. About 50 min ride for you, I think.

www.wle.com (http://www.wle.com)

Take a private or just go ask questions.

"Brilliant general"! "When the dirty ******* finds out, he'll return with his men--then we kill the all of them..." www.kwoon.tv (http://www.kwoon.tv)

unclaimed effort
07-18-2001, 01:11 AM
Well basically, the way of fighting... i guess in a way. Like how Chen is more explosive, lower stances, Yang is more linear, and based a lot on holding the ball.

It's not the alphabet that will write your essay, but the applied letters that do. If you aren't satisfied then proofread until it is better.

Ex: It's not the forms that will win your fight, but the applied techniques that do. If you don't like them then change them until you do.

unclaimed effort
07-18-2001, 01:15 AM
Don't mind the bottom I was trying a new signature out.

GLW
07-18-2001, 10:18 PM
UcE,

well it all boils down to the stepping used. Sun Style employs the follow step seen in Xing Yi. It is much more mobile and quick than other styles of Taijiquan.

For example, Chen has power but it is reeling in nature and then explosive. Sun redirects then quickly comes in to strike.

If the stepping is not quick and sure...and coordinated with the hands, Sun style will never work.

The tempo of the form alludes to this. It has a broken rythm but not the obvious breaks you find in Chen.

There are many postures that really have limited martial use...like the signature Kai He (open close) but then the brush knee engages the opponent and then moves to redirect and strike...a totally different rythm than other styles.

Then, just when you are into the linearity of it all, you can switch and use some of the swimming steps and techniques that came from Bagua...OR in the need for splitting or chopping power, there are those elements from Xing Yi.

Even the neutralizing methods of Sun depend heavily upon the stepping. For example, the roll back from Sun uses a step back then a follow step forward to press.... So you would never absorb without moving and never move without attaching and following back in to the opponent.

unclaimed effort
07-19-2001, 03:36 AM
Thanks GLW, that helped me understand Sun style better.

Braden
07-19-2001, 04:47 AM
GLW - that's great, thanks! I've been looking for info on Sun Taiji for ages now, but it's not particularly common. Can you recommend any videos/VCDs, or even better, good instructors in Canada?

Do you know any Sun style specific foundational exercises or drills? I assume they practice push hands - an emphasis on moving step?

Thanks again.

GLW
07-20-2001, 01:32 AM
I haven't seen a really good book or video...or even VCD on Sun style.

I have one or two (books, video, and VCD) for reference but if I had not learned it already, they would only produce a person with no understanding.

In many, the postures are hunched over and not lively enough. The connection or understanding of the meaning of the move is not there.

Then you have one camp who hate the Competition routine and others who don't. Having touched both, I can say that while the routines are in a different order, the only real difference between the two is that the competition routine has a higher level of difficulty by adding the juming kick... some say this is not traditional but since when do traditional arts not have the ability to take a jump that all have and a kick that all have and combine them into one move?

As for Canada...possibly Helen Wu in Toronto....I know she does Chen and Yang well...and maybe Wu and she ma know Sun....but everything she does is excellent...

Subitai
07-21-2001, 09:54 AM
As I can say that I've felt Sun Jian Yuns skill personally. I can also comment on her feelings of the competition routine.

As I remember, a female wushu champion demostrated her version of SUN to her. She was not impressed. She did not authorize that version.
Upon testing the champions skills and touching hands with her she said it was not correct.

Also, I agree with almost everything that GLW said. Except one little thing when he ended with this:
"So you would never absorb without moving and never move without attaching and following back in to the opponent."

"NEVER" is too constricting, pending on your skill level and the energy given to you by your opponent, you can never say "never". That is to all MA.

Also, their is NO broken rythm to the form. NONE, that would be contrary to SUNS idealogy when creating the form. He was in his later years, i.e. fighting days long since over when he created this form. I would argue that, one of his aims was too create a form that MORE closely followed the TC principles. For example, you will not find a 50/50 heavy stance in the set. Always Yin/Yang, one foot alive and one more empty than the other and switching.


I am not claiming mastery of this style myself, but my sifu is authorized to be the US Sun Style Reseach Institute by Si-Gung herself. So i am relating things that were translated to me/us.

GLW, is also correct when he refferences bagua and Xing Yi. W/O understanding in these as well, you cannot hope to master SUN TC. Albeit, though SUNs Bagua and Xing Yi can be different to other styles too.

"O"

"Brilliant general"! "When the dirty ******* finds out, he'll return with his men--then we kill the all of them..." www.kwoon.tv (http://www.kwoon.tv)

Sam Wiley
07-21-2001, 02:09 PM
Are there no videos at least of Sun Jian Yun performing her father's form? I have Sun's book on Xingyi, and she seemed very open and willing to share when commenting on him and his style of Xingyi. Surely, there must be at least a demo with her on it.

*********
"I put forth my power and he was broken.
I withdrew my power and he was ground into fine dust."
-Aleister Crowley, The Vision and the Voice

GLW
07-21-2001, 06:31 PM
There is a VCD of Sun Jianyun doing the routine. Due to age, here postures are not what her father's were. The widow's hump that many women get as they age is quite apparent in her. The problem is that the stoop that is a physical problem for her is evident in her senior student who demonstrates in the video with her. (seen this before where the student copies the older teacher too closely and does not know where age or experience has changed the technique)

As for anyone who merely learned the routine, OF COURSE they would not have it....how surprising. You train only form and do tons of them and you don't get the real essence of the style and you can't use it. The video on one routine from China has one of the team members doing it...there are noticeable problems with it but you now see many people in the US copying that way of doing things because "It was on the video and that MUST be the way to do it"

By NEVER I may have overstated...in Taijiquan, the extremes such as NEVER and ALWAYS are rare. Also, all rules get broken from time to time. I was speaking in general principles.

The stepping indicates that the issuing and absorption of power are intimately connected with the legs and steps and work through the waist...no big surprise there since that sort of applies to most Taijiquan...but it is put up front in the form.

As for the rythm...it is NOT the same as Yang style (Yang Chengfu routine) which I would consdier unbroken and steady. There are really no breaks in any Taijiquan routine I have seen...but there are changes in rythm. My first year of Sun practice came after many years of Yang...It did not feel right because I tried to apply the same cadence to Sun. As soon as I realized that the spirit and cadence was different, I began to understand the ideas it held.

It appears to me that much of this cadence comes from Bagua with a littel Xing Yi thrown in and then softened by Wu/Hao style....

unclaimed effort
07-21-2001, 08:29 PM
To my understandings, isn't David Lin one of the higher authorities on the Sun style?

Subitai
07-22-2001, 08:12 AM
Very well said GLW.

You obviously see beyond the exterior.

"Brilliant general"! "When the dirty ******* finds out, he'll return with his men--then we kill the all of them..." www.kwoon.tv (http://www.kwoon.tv)

DMK
09-12-2007, 10:20 AM
I have attended many seminars and surprise to see only one or two people competing in Sun style, anyone know who promotes or teaches this system.
Gene had a wonderful article on Sun style , it would be nice to learn the Traditional Form

Three Harmonies
09-12-2007, 01:56 PM
Not many in the US. Mostly wushu stuff. Tim Cartmell is my teacher and I cannot recommend him highly enough. For whatever reason this wonderful system of Taiji is not very popular here in the west. I think it is the shnizel, but then again it is a biased opinion :D
Cheers
Jake :cool:

Doc Stier
09-12-2007, 03:01 PM
The Sun Lu-Tang Style Tai-Chi Chuan has always been considered in a different light than the other major TCC Styles because of its inclusion of various movement elements of Pa-Kua Chuan and Hsing-Yi Chuan, which gives it a unique stylistic interpretation among TCC styles. Unlike Master Sun, very few students who begin learning and practicing the Sun Style TCC have a previous background of training in any style of Pa-Kua Chuan and/or Hsing-Yi Chuan. Most have varying degrees of previous experience with some other TCC style only, if even that. This is why it has been woefully unappreciated by most martial artists for what it truly is, the culminating creative genius of a rare Master, who devoted more than 60 years of his life to his IMA training. :cool:

As a result, without at least an intermediate skill level in the three styles that were combined in creating this method, the Sun Style TCC Form Set generally proves to be quite challenging for most students to perform properly, especially as originally intended and personally performed by Master Sun himself. It should be remembered that Sifu Sun created his TCC Form Set after several decades of exceptionally high level Pa-Kua Chuan and Hsing-Yi Chuan practice. It is a Master Level expression of his unique knowledge, skill, and expert perspective of the IMA's, much like a Doctorate Degree Thesis, meant to represent a Graduate Level training method, not a starting out point for beginners. :rolleyes:

Thus, the Sun Style Tai-Chi Chuan has never enjoyed great popularity among large numbers of enthusiastic practitioners like the other major TCC styles have. It has been my observation through the years that few people devote themselves to learning and training the Sun Style TCC exclusively, and even fewer yet demonstrate the ability to perform it well. ;)

Doc

jaime
09-20-2007, 09:56 PM
hello, I'm jaime, Wing Lam student and Si Hing Gene's kung fu brother in the old days.

I practice (Ku Yu Cheong) Yang style but lately I've been practicing Sun more. I actually prefer it now. While I understand that Sun Lutang emphasized the health aspect of his style , the martial content is very much present.

BTW I very much like Doc's comments.

GeneChing
09-21-2007, 02:50 PM
I really didn't write that much about Sun Style. It's almost all online:

Radical Taiji: The Rising Sun of Taiji (http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/article.php?article=419) (btw, if you get this issue, you can see Jaime getting tossed about by Sifu Paul Tam :p)

Rising Sun of Tai Chi: The Hot new Internal Style (http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/article.php?article=414)

A Setting Sun: Writing an Obituary for Grandmaster Sun Jianyun (http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/ezine/article.php?article=416)

Hey Jaime, nice to see you finally post on board here!

DMK
07-24-2009, 09:26 AM
Hello ,
Anyone know who is promoting Sun Family Taiji? This style is almost lost.

NorthernShaolin
07-24-2009, 09:41 AM
Depends where you are located. There are plenty of Sun Style instructors and Sifus in the west coast area. Do a google on Sun Tai Chi.

GLW
07-24-2009, 10:16 AM
you're kidding, DMK, right?

Come now, there are several people in Houston who learned Sun from Madame Wang Jurong ... the traditional and the competition set.

Three Harmonies
07-27-2009, 10:28 AM
Tim Cartmell (http://www.shenwu.com) and his students are surely keeping it alive. I wrote an article on it last year for the Journal of Asian Martial Arts. Check it out on my articles page at www.threeharmonies.com

It is not as popular here in the west as in China, but it is far from "lost." Unfortunately many whom purport they do "traditional" Sun Taiji, are only doing an empty shell of the "traditional" form. Most are modern wushu derivatives, which I do not get since the Sun form is not that long to begin with. But to each their own.

I am happy to answer any questions you have if you wish to email me.
Cheers
Jake
three_harmonies@hotmail.com
www.threeharmonies.blogspot.com
www.threeharmonies.com

GLW
07-27-2009, 10:49 AM
That is a common statement made - Contemporary form vs. traditional. Many will base there opinion on a statement that Sun Jianyun made about not liking the competition form and how the person that was demonstrating it did not understand Sun Taijiquan.

Taking each comment with the last first : How many of the new generation who demo forms for video actually DO understand Taijiquan or other styles anyway. This is the old thing of having many people who learn a routine but not the underlying concepts. This is an indictment of the person and the way they learned the set and not anything directed at the set. In fact, when the original video was made for the Sun competition set, the person doing it had not been doing it that long. It was one of those things where an athlete is chosen and then told "Learn this routine, you will be doing it for filming next month..." This is simply how many things are done with new routines - if anyone remembers how much craziness there was back when all of the compulsories were redone for IWuF and how the written sets did NOT represent the same thing as the filmed ones...

As for the routine itself :
The competition routine IS shorter. It was designed to fit in a 6 minute competition time frame. However, the main changes were to remove some of the repetitions in sections. There are also some sections that are there but swapped around....meaning in the traditional set, the come in a slightly different order.

Now, there is NO truth to the idea that this or any of the other forms have to be done in a certain order to "build Qi". Bottom line, there are sections and a section may have ideas in it...but aside from that, they are often composed in a certain order because of aesthetics - as in martial ART.

The competition routine is roughly if memory serves - 53% right sided and 47% left. Compared to the traditional which was in the mid 60% area right sided...so the competition set is more balanced...and this was mainly achieved by removing extra repetitions from the right side...so, if something was done 3 times right and one left, it was changed to do one and one. Not a big deal.

The other comment from Sun was that she did not like the jumping kick in the competition routine because it was not that way in her father's set. Hmm...the wording was as close to hers as I can get from memory.

Now, ANY stepping kick CAN be done as a jumping kick in any form to add difficulty. THAT is why it was made that way. The level of competitor in competition is high so they wanted to add difficulty. However, if you simply do NOT jump, it is the same section as the traditional set....with the mixing around that was done.

If you learn BOTH of the sets, the differences between the two become less and less important. The concepts for each are - or are intended to be - the same.

But if you only do the routine and never ask the questions of "What is this for...?" you end up with empty movements - regardless of which set you do.

woliveri
07-27-2009, 11:35 AM
Thanks for that reply GLW, a balanced review of Sun Taiji.

For me and from what I've seen of the Sun Taiji set (and I've only seen stuff on video and from what Paul Lam has done to it), it doesn't attract me. You can definately see the Xingyi influence in the art but for me I'd rather do Yang or Wu. Sun seems just too "choppy" for me.

The absolute worst though that I've seen is the Paul Lam sets.

GeneChing
07-27-2009, 01:50 PM
It was a decade ago - 1999 July (http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/article.php?article=261) - Rising Sun of Tai Chi: The Hot New Internal Style (http://ezine.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/article.php?article=414)

GLW
07-27-2009, 02:08 PM
Sun definitely requires a bit of familiarity with all 3 of the styles it comes from. However, you do not have to be an expert in each....

Having said that, there is a distinct difference in the flavor and how you "play" Sun Style from other types of Taijiquan.

You not only have to get the Huo Bu - quick stepping aspect (Sun is also called - and excuse the bad pinyin spelling Kai He Huo Bu Taijiquan - Open / Close, fast step Taijiquan).

So, if you come to Sun with no exposure to XingYi or Bagua...only Wu/Hao Taijiquan, the flavor will often escape you.

If you come with a Yang flavor, it WILL feel choppy...but not by itself. It is just that the approach is different. While a bad analogy, the closest I can come is to say that Yang has a "stately" bearing and approach while Sun is more "playful" (Granted - not really playful because the applications are still there and serious).

It is more open than Wu/Hao..and also more lively..and moves more.

Comparing it to Chen, the power is more direct and less emphasis on reeling than on the power similar to XingYi....with some redirection thrown in from Bagua.

woliveri
07-27-2009, 02:28 PM
GLW,

Well, I'm still open minded about it and am trying to get a better understanding, thanks for your reply.

I can definately see what you mean about the differences between Yang and Sun. I'm looking at it from an "energy flow" perspective. Yang, and even Wu (not Wu Hao) seems to have more of a flow. Where Sun changes directions often and I get the feel the energy "stops". Perhaps that's why they keep coming back to center and expand and contract Qi with the palms.

One other thing I have noticed is with Wu, the lao gong is used much more to "open channels". I don't think I've seen this as much in other styles.

mawali
07-28-2009, 06:37 AM
That is a common statement made - Contemporary form vs. traditional. Many will base there opinion on a statement that Sun Jianyun made about not liking the competition form and how the person that was demonstrating it did not understand Sun Taijiquan.

Taking each comment with the last first : How many of the new generation who demo forms for video actually DO understand Taijiquan or other styles anyway. This is the old thing of having many people who learn a routine but not the underlying concepts. This is an indictment of the person and the way they learned the set and not anything directed at the set. In fact, when the original video was made for the Sun competition set, the person doing it had not been doing it that long. It was one of those things where an athlete is chosen and then told "Learn this routine, you will be doing it for filming next month..." This is simply how many things are done with new routines - if anyone remembers how much craziness there was back when all of the compulsories were redone for IWuF and how the written sets did NOT represent the same thing as the filmed ones...

As for the routine itself :
The competition routine IS shorter. It was designed to fit in a 6 minute competition time frame. However, the main changes were to remove some of the repetitions in sections. There are also some sections that are there but swapped around....meaning in the traditional set, the come in a slightly different order.

Now, there is NO truth to the idea that this or any of the other forms have to be done in a certain order to "build Qi". Bottom line, there are sections and a section may have ideas in it...but aside from that, they are often composed in a certain order because of aesthetics - as in martial ART.

The competition routine is roughly if memory serves - 53% right sided and 47% left. Compared to the traditional which was in the mid 60% area right sided...so the competition set is more balanced...and this was mainly achieved by removing extra repetitions from the right side...so, if something was done 3 times right and one left, it was changed to do one and one. Not a big deal.

The other comment from Sun was that she did not like the jumping kick in the competition routine because it was not that way in her father's set. Hmm...the wording was as close to hers as I can get from memory.

Now, ANY stepping kick CAN be done as a jumping kick in any form to add difficulty. THAT is why it was made that way. The level of competitor in competition is high so they wanted to add difficulty. However, if you simply do NOT jump, it is the same section as the traditional set....with the mixing around that was done.

If you learn BOTH of the sets, the differences between the two become less and less important. The concepts for each are - or are intended to be - the same.

But if you only do the routine and never ask the questions of "What is this for...?" you end up with empty movements - regardless of which set you do.

Even though I learned both, I prefer the wushutaijiquan version of Sun but I purposely leave out the jumping because it is not part of the routine. I just raise the knee and extend the lower leg.
Playing the form is just playing the form if one has never learnt any martial basics so I think that is a major problem today. The performance stuff is OK, I guess.
There is no need to learn xingyi or baqua but remember that Sun is as it is from xingyi (root art of Sun Lutang) and his baquazhang exposure.

Sanshou/shuaijiao/qinna as a root art can surely serve as jibengong/shenfa elementary practice basic for the performance Sun style! SInce the form itself in 'empty', training the jiebngong/shenfa makes it come alive.

GLW
07-28-2009, 07:28 AM
I tend to do the same. Especially the older I get...jumping kicks in your 50's just don't seem to look that good anyway.... :)

I agree you don't need to 'learn' Bagua or Xingyi...but you do need to be familiar with them... enough to know the basic approaches such as the linearity of Xingyi with its follow step...the stance work, the coiling body that is typical of Bagua...so when you hit those places, you can recognize them. The moves in Sun are similar but not as extreme as the art they came from.

I had a classmate who was into Xingyi...and when he did Sun, it was TOO MUCH Xingyi to the detriment of the other ideas and flavors of the routine.

At the same time, I had another classmate who did Bagua, Xingyi, and a couple of Taijiquan systems as well as Chaquan...and his Sun was very very good and had all of the concepts in abundance.

Bob Ashmore
08-04-2009, 01:07 PM
At the Symposium in Nashville Grand Master Sun Yongtian taught the 16 Posture form of Sun Style to hundreds of people.
He wasn't "lost" at all.
I was in the class, though. To be honest, I could not get a good feel for the Sun style.
Entirely my own fault, there was just something about it that threw me and I could not seem to pick it up.
My training partner LOVED it though and he is practicing the form every day.
I know, it's only the short form, but it's all we down here in KY have of the Sun style.
No, we do not know a lot of apps for this but we can put at least the Tai Chi Chuan principles in place. We may botch up the Xingyi and Bagua principles, but we'll do the best we can.
Fortunately, a Sun stylist from a very good school just moved into our area. He is quite good and his former teacher recommends him highly, so we may just learn some of this form yet! :D


Anyway...
Just wanted to let the original poster of the thread know that the Sun style is alive and well under Grand Master Sun's tutelage.

Bob

Sunyang
08-05-2009, 01:19 AM
Hello ,
Anyone know who is promoting Sun Family Taiji? This style is almost lost.

There's Sifu kwong Wing Lam in Sunnyvalle.

http://www.wle.com

SY

DMK
08-05-2009, 08:31 PM
Thanks Jake and Sunyang .

GeneChing
09-11-2018, 09:35 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DC7-cZO_mXs

Master Zhu Zhihua demonstrates Sun Style Small Frame Taijiquan. To learn more read "The Sun & the Swastika: Sun Style Taijiquan Small Frame" by By Xiao Yijing with Gigi Oh and Gene Ching featured in the Fall 2018 issue.

THREADS
FALL 2018 (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?70867-Fall-2018)
Sun Family Taiji (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?54816-Sun-Family-Taiji)

GeneChing
09-27-2018, 03:01 PM
The Sun and the Swastika: Sun Style Taijiquan Small Frame
By Xiao Yijing with Gigi Oh and Gene Ching

FALL 2018 (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/article.php?article=1436)

http://www.kungfumagazine.com/admin/site_images/KungfuMagazine/upload/1840_KFM2018-Fall-Cover.jpg

GeneChing
08-08-2020, 09:14 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=ehzMlWXfJRs&feature=emb_logo