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Thread: Karate

  1. #511
    justt paint it white again

    im a genius

    25th generation inner door disciple of Chen Style Practical Wombat Method
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  2. #512
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    If you wear a karate gi for judo grappling, it's not going to last very long. Karate gi are not reinforced in the way that judo gi are.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 03-02-2015 at 03:59 PM.

  3. #513
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    I don't know - afraid bleach may chew it by the time it gets much dye out.
    "The perfect way to do, is to be" ~ Lao Tzu

  4. #514
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    Thanks guys

    The amount of grappling I do is not huge and not that intensive - just a little bit too much for a normal T shirt to withstand.

    Maybe I'll just leave it as is. Any ideas, other than wearing it, to make it softer? I swear it's standing up by itself.

  5. #515
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbob View Post
    Thanks guys

    The amount of grappling I do is not huge and not that intensive - just a little bit too much for a normal T shirt to withstand.

    Maybe I'll just leave it as is. Any ideas, other than wearing it, to make it softer? I swear it's standing up by itself.
    wash it, use fabric softener. hang to dry.

    if you bleach it, you might stress the canvas too much.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  6. #516
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    Stop-Motion Karate

    Gene Ching
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  7. #517
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    Lol, that stop-motion karate is awesome!

  8. #518
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    Olympic Karate

    I trust Japan will do Karate right. Who here remembers the scandal when Korea launched TKD?

    Karate Olympic debut shines light on martial art
    SPORTS OCT. 25, 2016 - 02:30PM JST


    A karate competition takes place in Tokyo on August 22, 2016, to select Japanese representatives for the world championships in Linz, Austria
    AFP

    NAHA — Hollywood may have kicked karate onto the world stage, but its first-ever Olympic inclusion at the Tokyo 2020 Games promises to shine a light on the rich history of the discipline.

    At 78, sensei Masahiro Nakamoto has been waiting decades for this decision, insisting there is far more to the martial art than the caricature depicted in films such as “The Karate Kid” and by action stars Chuck Norris and Jean-Claude Van Damme.

    “This is the art of defence,” the karate master told AFP at his dojo in Naha, Okinawa—an island chain some 600 kilometers (375 miles) from the southern tip of mainland Japan.

    “You don’t go just kicking and punching, you receive your opponent’s blow. Defending yourself translates into offence,” he added.

    At the Tokyo Games, 80 competitors will take part in the Karate event. It joins surfing, skateboarding, climbing and baseball-softball as new sports included for the 2020 edition.

    “The dreams of the world’s karate athletes came true when the (International Olympic Committee) made its decision,” said Japan Karate do Federation vice president Shigeo Kurihara.

    “It’s an historic event—it was a day of joy for all of us.”

    A blend of indigenous fighting styles, karate was born in Okinawa in the 15th century when the area was ruled by the independent Ryukyu Kingdom. Strong trading links meant the sport was also influenced by Chinese martial arts.

    It is far older than the modern Olympics and today has at least 10 million registered practitioners worldwide, and yet it has struggled to make the case for inclusion in the Games.

    By contrast, judo, a Japanese martial art, and Korea’s taekwondo are already permanent fixtures on the roster. Judo made its Olympic debut when Tokyo hosted the 1964 Games while taekwondo made its first appearance at the global event in 1988.

    Integrating karate into the Olympics has been delayed by divisions in the movement around the world, with stalwarts long preferring to adhere to their interpretation rather than to work together to create an global art form.

    “The variety of styles – more than 20 – complicated efforts to unify karate,” said Francis Didier, vice president of the World Karate Federation.

    “It took a bit too long to modernise the rules of competition,” he admitted.

    Sport karate, for example, calls for competition rules where opponents have to control their blows, while traditional karate allows for harder shots but requires significant protective gear, such as boxing gloves and helmets.

    The martial art was only brought to Tokyo in the early 20th century when Gichin Funakoshi, regarded as the father of modern karate, moved from Naha.

    “Okinawa was the place where karate’s spirituality developed,” explains Kurihara.

    Frustrations remain however, that Okinawa’s role in the development of karate has been airbrushed out of history. For Nakamoto, the Olympic Games in four years time, is a chance to redress that.

    “This is a great chance to show the world where karate has its roots. The world may be surprised to know that it was developed here,” he said, adding that it was inexorably linked to the island chain’s politics.

    When the Ryukyu Kingdom ruled Okinawa for more than 400 years starting in the 15th century, brewers hired karate masters to protect shipments of indigenous rice-based liquor called Awamori, Nakamoto explained.

    A vital tool of diplomacy at the time—keeping leaders on good terms with China and Japan.

    “Brewers could sell their surplus so it was the jobs of karate masters to protect convoys from robbery,” Nakamoto said.

    “In summer, they would rest outside and drink the spirits—so it became part of the skill, to defend ourselves from attack while drunk, or asleep.”

    Karate expert and author Stephane Fauchard insists inclusion at the Tokyo 2020 Games will bring people to the sport.

    “This is going to boost the sport’s visibility. The Games are a great showcase,” he told AFP.

    Still, Fauchard doesn’t expect one big happy karate family.

    He explained: “Sport karate will continue to develop in national federations while traditional karate will still be taught in schools. They’ll both benefit from the media attention brought by the Olympics and continue to exist side by side.”

    Karate will still have to prove its credentials to retain an Olympic sport beyond 2020 however, the IOC will review whether its inclusion was a success.

    Didier argues it’s clear why karate should remain in the games after 2020.

    “Karate is relatively inexpensive, and athletes compete in the same arena as their judo and wrestling counterparts, and can be run over a few days.”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  9. #519
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    Karate Combat



    My Man at Arms: Art of War co-star, Danny Trejo, was the ring announcer and several friends went. They all had glowing reports of the event.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #520
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    Karate rejected for Paris 2024 Olympics

    Games
    ‘It’s not just doing the worm’: breakdancing could become Olympic sport in 2024
    • IOC to make decision for Paris 2024 by December 2020
    • Karate, squash, billiard sports and chess rejected
    Press Association

    Thu 21 Feb 2019 07.36 EST Last modified on Thu 21 Feb 2019 11.31 EST


    The head of the Paris 2024 organising committee said breakdancing would make the Olympics ‘more urban’ and ‘more artistic’. Photograph: Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images
    Breakdancing pioneer Richard “Crazy Legs” Colon, who as leader of the US hip-hop group Rock Steady Crew is widely credited with turning the craze into a global phenomenon, has hailed its prospective inclusion in the Olympic Games.

    Breakdancing has been confirmed as one of four sports, along with surfing, climbing and skateboarding, which will be put forward to the International Olympic Committee for inclusion in the Paris 2024 Games.

    It follows the successful introduction of breakdancing at the Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires last year, for which Colon, a 53-year-old from The Bronx in New York, was invited to be a part of the judging panel.

    Colon said: “This is about two worlds coming together. They each have their own history and I think that we can carefully do this in a manner that is respectful to the essence of both. The dance represents many people who come from struggle and have nothing, and now that has translated into an opportunity to see the world, to compete and, most importantly, to build bridges between cultures and break down stereotypes.”

    Colon was a founding member of the Rock Steady Crew in 1977 and helped it develop from what was initially a New York sub-culture into a style which was recognised and copied around the world.

    The group’s major UK hit, ‘(Hey You) The Rocksteady Crew’ reached number six in the charts in October 1983.

    “I was brought in as one of the judges in Argentina and as you are watching the kids getting their medals, you kind of start to feel a little bit emotional,” added Colon.

    Paco Boxy, director of the British Breaking League which organises competitions across the UK,added: “I think it’s fantastic news, not only for the young generation but also for the credibility of breakdancing to be classed as a sport.

    “A lot of people will look at breakdancing as just spinning on your head or doing the worm, but the people that I know train like athletes. They go to the gym swimming, train every day. It will always be a dance first and foremost, but it has turned into a sport.

    The selection of the four sports by the Paris organising committee brings bad news for squash and karate, the latter of which will make its Olympic debut in Tokyo next year.

    A statement from World Karate Federation president Antonio Espinos read: “Our sport has grown exponentially over the last years and we still haven’t had the chance to prove our value as an Olympic sport since we will be making our debut as an Olympic discipline in Tokyo 2020.

    “Over the last months we have worked relentlessly, together with the French Federation, to achieve our goal of being included in Paris 2024. We believed that we had met all the requirements and that we had the perfect conditions to be added to the sports programme. However, we have learned today that our dream will not be coming true.”

    In a joint statement, the World Squash Federation and PSA World Tour said: “The proposed list of four sports only, of which three sports are already confirmed by the IOC on the Tokyo 2020 Olympic programme, leads to a belief that Paris 2024 and the IOC favoured sports already in the Olympic programme, leaving practically no opportunity for other sports.

    “The unity that our sport enjoys globally is exceptional and is getting stronger by the day. WSF and PSA are supported by the entire squash community and, with our athletes at the forefront, have run a strong campaign that respected the timeline and the criteria set by Paris 2024 and the IOC.”
    THREADS
    Karate
    Gung Fu & Breakdancing
    2024 Paris Olympics
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  11. #521
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    Karate rejected for Paris 2024 Olympics

    Games
    ‘It’s not just doing the worm’: breakdancing could become Olympic sport in 2024
    • IOC to make decision for Paris 2024 by December 2020
    • Karate, squash, billiard sports and chess rejected
    Press Association

    Thu 21 Feb 2019 07.36 EST Last modified on Thu 21 Feb 2019 11.31 EST


    The head of the Paris 2024 organising committee said breakdancing would make the Olympics ‘more urban’ and ‘more artistic’. Photograph: Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images

    Breakdancing pioneer Richard “Crazy Legs” Colon, who as leader of the US hip-hop group Rock Steady Crew is widely credited with turning the craze into a global phenomenon, has hailed its prospective inclusion in the Olympic Games.

    Breakdancing has been confirmed as one of four sports, along with surfing, climbing and skateboarding, which will be put forward to the International Olympic Committee for inclusion in the Paris 2024 Games.

    It follows the successful introduction of breakdancing at the Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires last year, for which Colon, a 53-year-old from The Bronx in New York, was invited to be a part of the judging panel.

    Colon said: “This is about two worlds coming together. They each have their own history and I think that we can carefully do this in a manner that is respectful to the essence of both. The dance represents many people who come from struggle and have nothing, and now that has translated into an opportunity to see the world, to compete and, most importantly, to build bridges between cultures and break down stereotypes.”

    Colon was a founding member of the Rock Steady Crew in 1977 and helped it develop from what was initially a New York sub-culture into a style which was recognised and copied around the world.

    The group’s major UK hit, ‘(Hey You) The Rocksteady Crew’ reached number six in the charts in October 1983.

    “I was brought in as one of the judges in Argentina and as you are watching the kids getting their medals, you kind of start to feel a little bit emotional,” added Colon.

    Paco Boxy, director of the British Breaking League which organises competitions across the UK,added: “I think it’s fantastic news, not only for the young generation but also for the credibility of breakdancing to be classed as a sport.

    “A lot of people will look at breakdancing as just spinning on your head or doing the worm, but the people that I know train like athletes. They go to the gym swimming, train every day. It will always be a dance first and foremost, but it has turned into a sport.

    The selection of the four sports by the Paris organising committee brings bad news for squash and karate, the latter of which will make its Olympic debut in Tokyo next year.

    A statement from World Karate Federation president Antonio Espinos read: “Our sport has grown exponentially over the last years and we still haven’t had the chance to prove our value as an Olympic sport since we will be making our debut as an Olympic discipline in Tokyo 2020.

    “Over the last months we have worked relentlessly, together with the French Federation, to achieve our goal of being included in Paris 2024. We believed that we had met all the requirements and that we had the perfect conditions to be added to the sports programme. However, we have learned today that our dream will not be coming true.”

    In a joint statement, the World Squash Federation and PSA World Tour said: “The proposed list of four sports only, of which three sports are already confirmed by the IOC on the Tokyo 2020 Olympic programme, leads to a belief that Paris 2024 and the IOC favoured sports already in the Olympic programme, leaving practically no opportunity for other sports.

    “The unity that our sport enjoys globally is exceptional and is getting stronger by the day. WSF and PSA are supported by the entire squash community and, with our athletes at the forefront, have run a strong campaign that respected the timeline and the criteria set by Paris 2024 and the IOC.”
    THREADS
    Karate
    Gung Fu & Breakdancing
    2024 Paris Olympics
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #522
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    Karate rejected for Paris 2024 Olympics

    Games
    ‘It’s not just doing the worm’: breakdancing could become Olympic sport in 2024
    • IOC to make decision for Paris 2024 by December 2020
    • Karate, squash, billiard sports and chess rejected
    Press Association

    Thu 21 Feb 2019 07.36 EST Last modified on Thu 21 Feb 2019 11.31 EST


    The head of the Paris 2024 organising committee said breakdancing would make the Olympics ‘more urban’ and ‘more artistic’. Photograph: Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images

    Breakdancing pioneer Richard “Crazy Legs” Colon, who as leader of the US hip-hop group Rock Steady Crew is widely credited with turning the craze into a global phenomenon, has hailed its prospective inclusion in the Olympic Games.

    Breakdancing has been confirmed as one of four sports, along with surfing, climbing and skateboarding, which will be put forward to the International Olympic Committee for inclusion in the Paris 2024 Games.

    It follows the successful introduction of breakdancing at the Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires last year, for which Colon, a 53-year-old from The Bronx in New York, was invited to be a part of the judging panel.

    Colon said: “This is about two worlds coming together. They each have their own history and I think that we can carefully do this in a manner that is respectful to the essence of both. The dance represents many people who come from struggle and have nothing, and now that has translated into an opportunity to see the world, to compete and, most importantly, to build bridges between cultures and break down stereotypes.”

    Colon was a founding member of the Rock Steady Crew in 1977 and helped it develop from what was initially a New York sub-culture into a style which was recognised and copied around the world.

    The group’s major UK hit, ‘(Hey You) The Rocksteady Crew’ reached number six in the charts in October 1983.

    “I was brought in as one of the judges in Argentina and as you are watching the kids getting their medals, you kind of start to feel a little bit emotional,” added Colon.

    Paco Boxy, director of the British Breaking League which organises competitions across the UK,added: “I think it’s fantastic news, not only for the young generation but also for the credibility of breakdancing to be classed as a sport.

    “A lot of people will look at breakdancing as just spinning on your head or doing the worm, but the people that I know train like athletes. They go to the gym swimming, train every day. It will always be a dance first and foremost, but it has turned into a sport.

    The selection of the four sports by the Paris organising committee brings bad news for squash and karate, the latter of which will make its Olympic debut in Tokyo next year.

    A statement from World Karate Federation president Antonio Espinos read: “Our sport has grown exponentially over the last years and we still haven’t had the chance to prove our value as an Olympic sport since we will be making our debut as an Olympic discipline in Tokyo 2020.

    “Over the last months we have worked relentlessly, together with the French Federation, to achieve our goal of being included in Paris 2024. We believed that we had met all the requirements and that we had the perfect conditions to be added to the sports programme. However, we have learned today that our dream will not be coming true.”

    In a joint statement, the World Squash Federation and PSA World Tour said: “The proposed list of four sports only, of which three sports are already confirmed by the IOC on the Tokyo 2020 Olympic programme, leads to a belief that Paris 2024 and the IOC favoured sports already in the Olympic programme, leaving practically no opportunity for other sports.

    “The unity that our sport enjoys globally is exceptional and is getting stronger by the day. WSF and PSA are supported by the entire squash community and, with our athletes at the forefront, have run a strong campaign that respected the timeline and the criteria set by Paris 2024 and the IOC.”
    THREADS
    Karate
    Gung Fu & Breakdancing
    2024 Paris Olympics
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #523
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    Karate rejected for Paris 2024 Olympics

    Games
    ‘It’s not just doing the worm’: breakdancing could become Olympic sport in 2024
    • IOC to make decision for Paris 2024 by December 2020
    • Karate, squash, billiard sports and chess rejected
    Press Association

    Thu 21 Feb 2019 07.36 EST Last modified on Thu 21 Feb 2019 11.31 EST


    The head of the Paris 2024 organising committee said breakdancing would make the Olympics ‘more urban’ and ‘more artistic’. Photograph: Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images

    Breakdancing pioneer Richard “Crazy Legs” Colon, who as leader of the US hip-hop group Rock Steady Crew is widely credited with turning the craze into a global phenomenon, has hailed its prospective inclusion in the Olympic Games.

    Breakdancing has been confirmed as one of four sports, along with surfing, climbing and skateboarding, which will be put forward to the International Olympic Committee for inclusion in the Paris 2024 Games.

    It follows the successful introduction of breakdancing at the Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires last year, for which Colon, a 53-year-old from The Bronx in New York, was invited to be a part of the judging panel.

    Colon said: “This is about two worlds coming together. They each have their own history and I think that we can carefully do this in a manner that is respectful to the essence of both. The dance represents many people who come from struggle and have nothing, and now that has translated into an opportunity to see the world, to compete and, most importantly, to build bridges between cultures and break down stereotypes.”

    Colon was a founding member of the Rock Steady Crew in 1977 and helped it develop from what was initially a New York sub-culture into a style which was recognised and copied around the world.

    The group’s major UK hit, ‘(Hey You) The Rocksteady Crew’ reached number six in the charts in October 1983.

    “I was brought in as one of the judges in Argentina and as you are watching the kids getting their medals, you kind of start to feel a little bit emotional,” added Colon.

    Paco Boxy, director of the British Breaking League which organises competitions across the UK,added: “I think it’s fantastic news, not only for the young generation but also for the credibility of breakdancing to be classed as a sport.

    “A lot of people will look at breakdancing as just spinning on your head or doing the worm, but the people that I know train like athletes. They go to the gym swimming, train every day. It will always be a dance first and foremost, but it has turned into a sport.

    The selection of the four sports by the Paris organising committee brings bad news for squash and karate, the latter of which will make its Olympic debut in Tokyo next year.

    A statement from World Karate Federation president Antonio Espinos read: “Our sport has grown exponentially over the last years and we still haven’t had the chance to prove our value as an Olympic sport since we will be making our debut as an Olympic discipline in Tokyo 2020.

    “Over the last months we have worked relentlessly, together with the French Federation, to achieve our goal of being included in Paris 2024. We believed that we had met all the requirements and that we had the perfect conditions to be added to the sports programme. However, we have learned today that our dream will not be coming true.”

    In a joint statement, the World Squash Federation and PSA World Tour said: “The proposed list of four sports only, of which three sports are already confirmed by the IOC on the Tokyo 2020 Olympic programme, leads to a belief that Paris 2024 and the IOC favoured sports already in the Olympic programme, leaving practically no opportunity for other sports.

    “The unity that our sport enjoys globally is exceptional and is getting stronger by the day. WSF and PSA are supported by the entire squash community and, with our athletes at the forefront, have run a strong campaign that respected the timeline and the criteria set by Paris 2024 and the IOC.”
    THREADS
    Karate
    Gung Fu & Breakdancing
    2024 Paris Olympics
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #524
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    olympic primer

    Karate at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics: Everything you need to know
    A new fan's guide to watching this ancient martial art.

    BY DANIELLE KOSECKI
    AUGUST 10, 2019 6:00 AM PDT


    Karate's two modalities -- kata and kumite -- make their Olympic debut in 2020.
    Canva

    Karate, a system of unarmed combat that literally means "empty hand," is said to have developed during the 17th century in the Okinawa prefecture, a chain of islands off the southern coast of Japan. Despite being popularized worldwide as a sport after World War II, karate -- along with four other sports -- will be part of the Summer Olympics for the first time in 2020. Fittingly, it makes its Olympic debut in Japan, where the sport, which involves executing arm- and leg-based strikes, first originated.

    It joins judo, taekwondo, and wrestling as the only Olympics-approved martial arts -- for 2020 anyway: Karate failed to make the cut for the Paris Olympics in 2024.

    With that in mind, here's everything you need to know to enjoy karate during the Tokyo Olympics next summer.

    Karate Events at the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics

    In Tokyo, Karate practitioners, or karatekas, will compete at Nippon Budokan, an indoor legacy venue built to host judo events at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. Since then, Nippon Budokan, which is located in Kitanomaru Park in the center of Tokyo, has hosted various sports and music acts -- including the Beatles, Led Zeppelin and Diana Ross -- but it's best known as the home of Japanese martial arts. It was the site of the first Karate World Championships in 1970 and to this day still hosts the national championships for judo, kendo, aikido and more.

    At the 2020 Olympics, both the men and the women will compete in two karate events at Nippon Budokan: kata, a solo form discipline, and kumite, a sparring discipline.


    Karate Day 2: Baku 2015 - 1st European Games
    Minh Dack of France competes in the Men's Karate Kata elimination round during the Baku 2015 European Games.
    Michael Steele

    In the Olympics, there will be one kata event -- and one gold medal -- each for men and women. During the competition, karatekas will perform a series of offensive and defensive movements, known as forms, against a virtual opponent. There are 102 kata approved by the World Karate Federation (WKF) that the athletes can choose from, such as Heian Shodan and Nijushiho.

    Unlike in traditional competitions, which are scored using a flag system, Olympic judges will use a point system to evaluate the athletes' technical performance, taking things like techniques, timing and breathing into consideration, as well as their athletic performance -- i.e. strength, speed and balance.

    According to this new scoring system, an individual's two highest and lowest scores will be thrown out, with the three remaining added together to represent their final score. After a ranking round, top performers will either progress to either the bronze medal or final bout.

    Check out the full schedule of the 2020 Olympic Karate events.


    Karate - Buenos Aires Youth Olympics: Day 12
    Annika Saelid of Norway (red) and Negin Altooni of Iran (blue) compete in the Women's Kumite +59kg Semifinal during the 2018 Buenos Aires Youth Olympic Games 2018.
    Marcelo Endelli / Getty Images

    The WKF recognizes five weight classes in competition. But in the Olympics, men's and women's kumite will be consolidated into three weight classes. For men those classes are up to 67 kilograms, up to 75kg, and over 75kg, and for women it's and up to 55 kg, up to 61kg and over 61kg.

    Within each weight class, pairs of karateka will compete against each other in an 8-by-8-meter area for up to three minutes. Points are awarded when an athlete lands a properly executed strike, kick or punch on various parts of their opponent's body, such as their head, neck, belly or back.

    The first karateka to score eight points more than their competitor, or the karateka with the most points at the end of the match is the winner. In the event of a tie, judges determine the winner.

    Competitors in each weight class will have to progress through three rounds -- an elimination round, the semi-final, and the final -- in pursuit of a gold medal.

    How Karateka qualify for the Olympics
    The WKF has more than 190 members but only 80 competitors will qualify the compete in Tokyo: 10 in each kumite weight class for both the men and the women and 10 men and 10 women in kata.

    There are a few different ways to earn a spot on that list. The first is through qualification.

    Thirty-two athletes (16 men and 16 women) will qualify based on their world ranking as of April 6, 2020. Twelve more men and 12 more women will qualify based on their results at a tournament in Paris, France from May 8 to 10, 2020. And 12 athletes will qualify at two continental events: the European Games which will be held June 14 to 30, 2019 in Minsk, Belarus and the Pan-American Games July 26 to Aug. 11, 2019 in Lima, Peru (details here).

    The second pathway to the Olympics is open to citizens of the host country -- Japan is allowed to appoint eight athletes (four men and four women) to their Olympic team. If any of those athletes qualify via their world ranking or a tournament, those spots will be reallocated to other athletes.

    The four final Olympic slots will be chosen by the Tripartite Commission, which is made up of the National Olympic Committees, the International Olympic Committee and the International Federations.

    On Oct. 14, 2019 the International Olympic Committee will invite all eligible National Olympic Committees to submit their requests for Tripartite Commission Invitation Places by Jan. 15, 2020, according to the rules. The allocation of the last four spots will be confirmed after the end of the qualification period for karate, which has yet to be determined.

    By June 2, 2020, the WKF will publish a list of the qualified athletes on the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 section of its website. The National Olympic Committees will then have two weeks to confirm if they wish to send those athletes to the Games.
    THREADS
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  15. #525
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    Our latest sweepstakes offering. ENTER TO WIN!

    Enter to win KungFuMagazine.com's contest for Karate Kid Autographed by Rosanne L. Kurstedt! Contest ends 5:00 p.m. PST on 9/27/2019.



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