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Thread: Branches of Dragon style

  1. #16
    Nim Kiu as we call it (ur YJLK) was from Lum A Haap according to the BM tradn.

  2. #17
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    lum ah hap

    wasnt he dragon style or lee gar?

    FT

  3. #18
    Lum a Haap -> Dragon Style.


    Sam Mun Kuen was from Lei Ga

  4. #19

    Meltdawn

    Your Ying jow is your 2nd level form or close to there is it? I studied some dragon before and the 2nd level form was Ying jow which yes is very different to Ying jow lin Q, my mistake earlier

  5. #20
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    Eagle Claw Sets

    Howdy,

    Quite frankly, I don't understand what, if any, similarities there are between Lung Ying Ying Jow, and the Bak Mei Ying Jow form. I also don't see any similiarity between the Bak Mei Ying Jow and LYMK.

    The Dragon Style Ying Jow is a very demanding, long, and complex set compared to the other LY forms. Great for demonstrations and tournaments - a very comprehensive compendium of basic (and some advanced) Lung Ying concepts. People see the Ying Jow and think this is the most advanced LY form, although the higher forms, although simple in appearance, are far more subtle and difficult to understand / execute.

    There are obvious similarities between LYMK and SBMK. I believe CLC took LYMK and modified it with some higher (such as the "absorbing" hand spoken of in a previous thread) LY concepts (and perhaps with other styles, though I would wonder what exactly), and created SBMK to his own preferences.

    Both are beautiful and powerful arts - in the hands of the dedicated practitioner!

  6. #21
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    Ao Qin:
    "The Dragon Style Ying Jow is a very demanding, long, and complex set compared to the other LY forms. Great for demonstrations and tournaments - a very comprehensive compendium of basic (and some advanced) Lung Ying concepts."

    Excellent comments!

    I have been spending a great deal of energy and thought on eagle recently. The sequencing and transitions are indeed where the complexity lies. The challenge for me has definitely been the flow. Now I've finally started to "taste" the form, and those transitions are becoming really cool applications. It's finally becoming fun to play, instead of a head-spinner.

    "People see the Ying Jow and think this is the most advanced LY form, although the higher forms, although simple in appearance, are far more subtle and difficult to understand / execute."

    The hardest thing in the world is to make something look like it' not the hardest thing in the world.


    Yum Cha:
    "FT, I have heard Ying Jau called Lung Ying Mor Que before by Sifu. I was going to say that but didn't want to confuse things. Does that mean anything to you Melty? "

    I have seen so little Pak Mei that I'm sorry to say it doesn't. The PM Ying Jow I've seen had similar sequences to the Lung Ying Mor Kiu, but the overall look of it made it very contrary.
    East River Dragon Style, Lam Family
    東河龍形 - 林家拳, 林志平,師傅

  7. #22
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    Ah MAN!

    ok! The start of the salute follows the dragon form, the i believe the form was made up with some dragon principles etc, no one said it was your eagle claw form!

    relax dragon breaths....lol

  8. #23
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    Garry, keep up man! I get it already, mate!

    Kevin suggested:
    "There are obvious similarities between LYMK and SBMK."

    and Yum Cha sggested:
    "FT, I have heard Ying Jau called Lung Ying Mor Que before by Sifu."

    ... I can only speak of my own Ying Jow, so I did.
    East River Dragon Style, Lam Family
    東河龍形 - 林家拳, 林志平,師傅

  9. #24
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    LYNLEE

    ok MATE!

  10. #25
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    Philadelphia, PA
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    Question On Lung Ying

    There is a Leung Sifu who a few years back moved to Philadelphia from Toi San, China. He does not speak english however, he tries to speak with me through the use of gestures. One of my sidai who speak Fukienese as does Leung Sifu had translated to me that Leung Sifu has learned three different family styles of Lung Ying in China. I myself not knowing much about gung fu if it is not Hung Ga, thought that there was only one style of Lung Ying but several different branches. My question is if there is anyone else who knows of these three family styles of Lung Ying.

    I have seen Lung Ying performed in the past as well as demonstrated by Leung Sifu. I can guarantee you that his gung fu is top notch as well as his application of technique. He as few students, but the two that I have seen had only trained with him for aprox 4-6 months. Although they have trained for a short period of time, they demonstrated great speed and power, which is a credit to Leung Sifu teaching skills as well.

    As I have stated previously, if it is not Hung Ga, then I know next to nothing about it. So if someone can please enlighten me on this, I would surely appreciate it.

    Peace

    Je Lei Sifu
    Last edited by Je Lei Sifu; 04-12-2002 at 01:19 AM.
    The Southern Fist Subdues The Fierce Mountain Tiger

  11. #26
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    A ha !

    Originally posted by Je Lei Sifu
    There is a Leung Sifu who a few years back moved to Philadelphia from Toi San, China. One of my sidai who speak Fukienese as does Leung Sifu had translated to me that Leung Sifu has learned three different family styles of Lung Ying in China. I myself not knowing much about gung fu if it is not Hung Ga, thought that there was only one style of Lung Ying but several different branches. My question is if there is anyone else who knows of these three family styles of Lung Ying.
    A ha ! More branches of Dragon, the mystery thickens and will hopefully ultimately lead to the elucidation of the question as to WHICH branch of Dragon is linked to WHICH branch of Pak Mei.

  12. #27
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    Form Name

    I too have heard Ying Jow referred to as Lung Ying Mor Kuw in Bak Mei. (Also in the Bak Fu Pai I used to study). To me, the differences lie within the footwork and "spirit". But then I am just a poor beginner.

    FT
    Did you try to call last night? My stupid MSN is still not working right..... I should be home later tonight if you still want to talk. sorry for the problems.....bad feldor....


    Melty
    You don't love me anymore? You never write........

  13. #28
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    Feldor

    Ive been busy and abit stressed but back on track, i didnt get time to call you. Ill try this weekend if im home!

    eaz,

    good question also what dragon style is the real deal? Did lum yul gwai have training brothers with the monk or was there another dragon?



    melty dont get angry just a question...night nite!

  14. #29
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    Dragon?

    Melty my heart away - If don't mind me asking, is dragon considered an internal system. Such as bagua, tai chi, etc... Does it include chi gung?

    Thanks in advance,
    Buby
    Last edited by Buby; 04-12-2002 at 07:32 AM.

  15. #30
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    Je Lei Sifu:
    "My question is if there is anyone else who knows of these three family styles of Lung Ying. "

    If you could find out this master's masters, it would solve this. My opinion would be that maybe he learned from three different individuals who were students/sons of Lam Yiu Kwai and possibly from Lam Lop Gei. If so, he would know that name. We consider Lung Ying to be one family. Branches are all part of the same tree.


    EAZ:
    "WHICH branch of Dragon is linked to WHICH branch of Pak Mei."

    Students of Cheung Lai Chen who learned both arts, or students of both Cheung and Lam Yiu Kwai are those who have decendants that may or may not exhibit more or less crossover of either art.


    fiercest tiger:
    "Did lum yul gwai have training brothers with the monk or was there another dragon?"

    It is known in China and Hong Kong that Monk Dai Yuk had students before Lam Yiu Kwai. Grandmaster Lam was an excellent fighter and brought the art to the public eye. Otherwise, it would still be a relatively rare art.


    Buby
    "is dragon considered an internal system. Such as bagua, tai chi, etc... Does it include chi gung?"

    It is considered internal. Yes it has chi gung.


    These are my opinions and translations of the very limited knowledge and experience I have so far gained of my system, from the lineages of Dai Yuk and Lam Yiu Kwai's younger son, Lam Chon Gong. There are others on this board with much more ability to anwer with accuracy, namely Ao Qin and mantis108, since they have studied far longer than myself. They have both studied under the lineages of Lam Yiu Kwai's students and older son, Lam Wun Gong. It would be a pleasure to discuss more on this topic so long as it does not degenerate.
    East River Dragon Style, Lam Family
    東河龍形 - 林家拳, 林志平,師傅

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