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Thread: The Academy Awards

  1. #16
    From the site Philbert linked:

    His fight scenes are so intense that he won't film them in the U.S. for fear of being sued.
    LOL.

    I'd sue the pr!ck if he pulled one of the crazy splits things while fighting me.
    "i can barely click the link. but i way why stop drinking .... i got ... moe .. fcke me ..im out of it" - GDA on Traditional vs Modern Wushu
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    but what if the man of steel hasta fight another man of steel only that man of steel knows kung fu? - Kristoffer
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    How do you think monks/strippers got started before the internet? - Gene Ching
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    Find your peace in practice. - Gene Ching

  2. #17

    The Academy Awards

    I like to the movie. I dun like the ending.

    A 30 year old waitress turned boxer.

    It landed best actress, best director, actor in supporting role and best film.

    Ziyi Zhang was shining or stunning as usual.

    Christ as the host was quite tame with his humors.

    --


  3. #18
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    The Academy Awards

    Finally! So deserved. Congrats to Jackie!



    1 SEP 2016 5:46 pm
    ACADEMY ANNOUNCES JACKIE CHAN, ANNE COATES, LYNN STALMASTER, AND FREDERICK WISEMAN WILL RECEIVE 2016 GOVERNORS AWARDS

    BY. MICHELINE GOLDSTEIN

    The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted on August 30th to present Honorary Awards to actor Jackie Chan, film editor Anne V. Coates, casting director Lynn Stalmaster and documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman. The four Oscar® statuettes will be presented at the Academy's 8th Annual Governors Awards on Saturday, November 12, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center®.

    "The Honorary Award was created for artists like Jackie Chan, Anne Coates, Lynn Stalmaster and Frederick Wiseman – true pioneers and legends in their crafts," said Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs. "The Board is proud to honor their extraordinary achievements, and we look forward to celebrating with them at the Governors Awards in November."

    After making his motion picture debut at the age of eight, Chan brought his childhood training with the Peking Opera to a distinctive international career. He starred in – and sometimes wrote, directed and produced – more than 30 martial arts features in his native Hong Kong, charming audiences with his dazzling athleticism, inventive stunt work and boundless charisma. Since Rumble in the Bronx in 1996, he has gone on to enormous worldwide success with the Rush Hour movies, Shanghai Noon, Shanghai Knights, Around the World in 80 Days, The Karate Kid and the Kung Fu Panda series of animated films.

    A native of Reigate, England, Coates worked her way up to lead editor on a handful of features before collaborating with David Lean on Lawrence of Arabia and winning her first Oscar. In her more than 60 years as a film editor, she has worked side by side with many leading directors on an impressive range of films, including Sidney Lumet (Murder on the Orient Express), Richard Attenborough (Chaplin) and Steven Soderbergh (Erin Brockovich). She also earned four additional Oscar nominations, for Becket, The Elephant Man, In the Line of Fire and Out of Sight.

    Stalmaster, a one-time stage and screen actor from Omaha, Nebraska, began working in casting in the mid-1950s. Over the next five decades, he applied his talents to more than 200 feature films, including such classics as Inherit the Wind, In the Heat of the Night, The Graduate, Fiddler on the Roof, Harold and Maude, Deliverance, Coming Home, Tootsie and The Right Stuff. He has enjoyed multiple collaborations with directors Stanley Kramer, Robert Wise, Hal Ashby, Norman Jewison and Sydney Pollack, and has been instrumental in the careers of such celebrated actors as Jon Voight, Richard Dreyfuss, Scott Wilson, Jill Clayburgh, Christopher Reeve and John Travolta.

    From his home base in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Wiseman has made one film almost every year since 1967, illuminating lives in the context of social, cultural and government institutions. He created a sensation with his first documentary feature, Titicut Follies, which went behind the scenes at Bridgewater State Hospital for the criminally insane. The film established an unobtrusive, observational storytelling style that has strongly identified his work, from the gritty (Law and Order, Public Housing, Domestic Violence) to the uplifting (La Danse – The Paris Opera Ballet, National Gallery, In Jackson Heights).

    The Honorary Award, an Oscar statuette, is given "to honor extraordinary distinction in lifetime achievement, exceptional contributions to the state of motion picture arts and sciences, or for outstanding service to the Academy."
    More than 30 martial arts movies? More like over a 100.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #19
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    Will Xuanzang make the Oscar cut?

    If Hollywood really wants to pander to China it will...I mean, come on. Skiptrace?

    China's Oscar Selection 'Xuanzang' Wins Big at Inaugural Golden Screen Awards
    6:43 PM PDT 11/4/2016 by Valerie Zhou


    John Li
    Rob Schneider

    The ceremony, presented by the U.S.-China Film & TV Industry Expo, honored the period epic in five categories, including best co-production.
    The inaugural Golden Screen Awards, which specifically focuses on co-productions between the U.S. and China, took place Thursday at L.A. Live. Held by the U.S.-China Film & TV Industry Expo in partnership with the Motion Picture Association (MPA), China Film Co-Production Corporation and The Hollywood Reporter, Xuanzang was the biggest winner, receiving best co-production film, director, cinematography, actor and production design honors.

    The film, which depicts the perilous journey of the legendary Chinese monk who brought Buddhism from India to China, is the latter country's official Academy Award foreign-language submission this year. “This is a great opportunity for us," said director Huo Jianqi, "but I don’t think too much about the result, as long as this film can spread the spirit of Xuanzang.”

    Paula Patton, who starred in the U.S.-China co-production film Warcraft, attended the ceremony, which was hosted by Rob Schneider.

    “It’s great to be in Hollywood, the entertainment capital of the world. Hollywood is proud to be an equal-opportunity spender of other people’s money,” joked Schneider in his edgy remarks. “First we took money from Germany, then from France. Then we raped Japan pretty good. Now we are delighted to take China. Bend them over, for as much money as we could steal from them.”

    Other films receiving awards included Three, Mountain Cry, Skiptrace and Kung Fu Panda 3.

    A complete list of winners follows:

    Best Co-Production Film

    Da Tang Xuan Zang

    Best Director

    Huo Jianqi (Da Tang Xuan Zang)

    Best Screenplay

    Yau Nai Hoi / Lau HoLeung / Mark Tinshu (Three)

    Best Cinematography

    Su Ming (Da Tang Xuan Zang)

    Best Actor

    Huang Xiaoming (Da Tang Xuan Zang)

    Best Actress

    Lang Yueting (Mountain Cry)

    Best Supporting Actor

    Eric Tsang (Skiptrace)

    Best Supporting Actress

    Fan Bingbing (Skiptrace)

    Best Production Design

    Wu Ming (Da Tang Xuan Zang)

    Best Animation

    Kung Fu Panda 3
    Gene Ching
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  5. #20
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    Jackie's Oscar is this Saturday

    Really short interview.

    Jackie Chan reflects on 50 year career and honorary Oscar


    FILE - In this Dec. 18, 2013, file photo, Hong Kong actor Jackie Chan smiles during a news conference to promote his new film “Police Story 2013,” in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. On Saturday, Nov. 12, 2016, Chan will accept an honorary Academy Award from the film academy’s Board of Governors. (Lai Seng Sin, File/Associated Press)

    By Sandy Cohen | AP November 8 at 2:10 PM
    LOS ANGELES — As an action star, Jackie Chan never expected to get an Oscar.

    So he considers receiving an honorary Academy Award from the film academy’s Board of Governors his proudest professional achievement.

    Chan will accept his Oscar statuette Saturday at the eighth annual Governors Awards. Film editor Anne Coates, casting director Lynn Stalmaster and documentarian Frederick Wiseman are also receiving honorary Academy Awards, which recognize lifetime achievement and contributions to the film industry.

    “I never imagined that I’d receive such an award,” Chan said. “I still remember my very first proudest moment was when I received an award for stunt choreography. At that time, I didn’t know much about directing, I just knew how to do action and fighting sequences and stunts. Receiving this honorary award has raised my feelings to another level.”

    The 62-year-old writer, director, producer and actor reflected on his career in an email interview with The Associated Press from his home base in Hong Kong. He plans to be in Los Angeles to accept his award in person.

    ___

    AP: What was your most challenging film to make and why?

    Chan: “Rumble in the Bronx” had a lot of action choreography, fighting sequences, and dangerous stunts. In “Operation Condor” I filmed in extreme temperatures of over 40 degrees Celsius in the desert. I had a near death accident while doing a stunt in “Armor of God.” In “Rush Hour,” I found the English dialogue most challenging.

    AP: How does making movies in Hong Kong differ from Hollywood’s approach to film?

    Chan: I find Hollywood’s approach to film production very systematic and organized. Of course, being organized is a good thing, but sometimes I feel restrained within set rules. Hong Kong filmmaking is more dynamic because things can be changed on the set while we’re still filming. It’s more flexible and encourages creativity, and if we think of something that might work, we try it right away.

    AP: What changes in the industry have been most surprising to you?

    Chan: Because I’ve been in the film industry for over 50 years, the most significant change I’ve noticed is the change from using 35mm film to digital technology, and even 3D filming. The improvement of technology has changed how films are now made. What we used to use back then is now part of history. I’m still fascinated by digital technology and the amount of work that can be done in post-production with CG (computer-generated) effects.

    AP: What has been was your most exciting Hollywood experience?

    Chan: All my experiences in Hollywood have been interesting and exciting. I’ve learned so many new things in Hollywood, made new friends and family, such as my American Chinese brother Brett Ratner. I’ve had many great memorable moments while working in Hollywood. I guess the most fun was making the “Rush Hour” series.

    ___

    Follow AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy .
    Gene Ching
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  6. #21
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    Jackie Chan - last of his kind

    JACKIE CHAN



    WHY CHINA’S RISE MEANS HONG KONG STARS LIKE JACKIE CHAN WILL BE THE LAST OF THEIR KIND
    At a ceremony in Los Angeles on Saturday, Jackie Chan will receive a lifetime achievement Oscar from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Chan, 62, is the most famous living Hong Kong movie star – and easily tops the Internet…

    BY MICHAEL T. GEORGE
    11 NOV 2016


    Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker in Rush Hour 2.

    At a ceremony in Los Angeles on Saturday, Jackie Chan will receive a lifetime achievement Oscar from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

    Chan, 62, is the most famous living Hong Kong movie star – and easily tops the Internet Movie Database (IMDB) star meter rankings for Hong Kong actors. Thanks to Chan’s early kung fu films and the hugely successful “Rush Hour” franchise, he could walk down the main street of Anytown, USA and turn heads.


    Cast member Jackie Chan poses with Paris Hilton at the premiere of Rush Hour 3. Photo: Reuters

    Jet Li and Donnie Yen are No 2 and 3 respectively on the IMDB list. Li broke into Hollywood via the Lethal Weapon franchise and has stayed in the limelight with roles in all three Expendables movies, while Yen has risen to global fame thanks in part to the Ip Man movies.

    Michele Yeoh and Chow Yun Fat (in that order) round out the Hong Kong Top 5 on the IMDB star meter list, which ranks actors based on the interest shown in them. And despite their fine performances, the Hong Kong A-listers Tony Leung, Andy Lau, Louis Koo, Aaron Kwok and Sean Lau are hardly known outside Asia.

    One thing the Top 5 actors have in common: they are all over 50. Which begs the question, what about the next generation of Hong Kong A-list stars with global recognition? Will any of the younger actors appearing in Hong Kong cinema today break out beyond Asia in future?


    Jet Li in Fist of Legend

    Not likely, and here’s why. Mainland China, now the No 2 box office worldwide, has sucked most of the talent (and money) away from Hong Kong. The big Hong Kong film production companies are using their advantaged access to the Chinese film market to make formulaic comedies and dramas specifically aimed at mainland tastes. Who can blame them? The financial rewards are huge.

    Many Hong Kong actors find regular work in these types of mainland films – and will continue to do so, provided they remain “patriotic” in the eyes of Beijing by not voicing support for Hong Kong democracy. But the problem is that mainland films don’t travel outside China. Name a Chinese movie that has had critical and commercial success in the West in the past decade? You have to go as far back as Zhang Yimou’s Hero in 2002 (which starred Jet Li). Prior to that was the global hit Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000), which propelled Chow Yun Fat and Michelle Yeoh to global fame.


    A still of Donnie Yen in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny

    So, any opportunity for Hong Kong actors to break into Hollywood – or at least appear in films aimed at non-Asian audiences – may have passed due to the “mainlandisation” of the Hong Kong film industry. A further risk for our local actors is if, over time, mainland Chinese audiences grow to prefer their own A-list and B-list actors, which would mean Hong Kong talent is relegated to minor supporting roles.

    When Jackie Chan and Jet Li first landed their overseas roles, Hong Kong cinema was still strong. Hollywood producers effectively made them global A-list stars by casting them in major films. Now, with Hollywood’s love affair with mainland China, it is more likely these producers would choose mainland actors for these potentially breakout roles. The fact is, Hong Kong is not even on Hollywood’s radar anymore.

    To be sure, local Hong Kong actors are still the staple of the “local” Hong Kong films – those not made as co-productions with the mainland. Alas, these are even less likely to travel abroad. Ten Years achieved global publicity far beyond its micro-budget due to its contentious political content, but the actors in that film are unlikely to be offered roles in bigger movies as a result.

    Hong Kong actress Michelle Yeoh sits beneath a giant poster of James Bond while speaking to reporters during a news conference about the filming of the 18th Bond movie Tomorrow Never Dies. Photo: AP

    Many of these local films are funded or supported by Hong Kong government programmes aimed at keeping alive the indigenous film industry. In this respect, Hong Kong is similar to Austria, Belgium and Canada, which each share a border with a larger country that speaks the same language. Germany, France and the US produce enough screen content to meet the needs of these neighbouring countries without them needing to make any of their own. So, why do Austria, Belgium and Canada invest heavily in their own film industries? Because each rightly believes that they have distinct cultures that should be shared with their own people and internationally as well.

    Only the government and NGOs can provide the support via development capital, subsidies and access to cinemas which will ensure that Cantonese language and culture can survive mainland attempts to absorb and ****genise it. So the future of Hong Kong cinema may increasingly depend on handout and charity. No wonder the road ahead looks so narrow for the new crop of Hong Kong actors.

    Michael T. George is general manager of Hong Kong-based MTG Asia, a film distribution consultancy
    George makes some good points here, but I'd argue that Jackie is the last of his kind because no one is training like he did from childhood. The article we published last September addresses his upbringing: Painted Faces: A tribute to the old "Seven Little Fortunes" by Emilio Alpanseque
    Gene Ching
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  7. #22
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    I can't imagine another one like Jackie Chan. Ever. He is an icon.

    Jackie Chan on Hong Kong Filmmaking’s ‘Unique Style and Orientation’
    Vivienne Chow


    TOP PHOTO CORPORATION/REX SHUTTERSTOCK
    NOVEMBER 11, 2016 | 10:00AM PT

    Hong Kong cinema will continue to live alongside mainland Chinese cinema despite the recent boom of China’s film industry, says Jackie Chan ahead of receiving an Honorary Oscar at the Academy’s Governors Awards.

    “Hong Kong filmmaking has its own unique style and orientation, which I think works side-by-side with the Chinese film industry,” says Chan, who will be presented with the award on Nov. 12. “Our Chinese culture is the same but I don’t think Hong Kong cinema will cease to exist,” the Hong Kong-born action superstar tells Variety.

    Chan is arguably the world’s best known Asian actor since Bruce Lee. Born in 1954, Chan was enrolled in the China Drama Academy for training in the art of Peking opera when he was 7. He made his motion picture debut a year later, but continued his training until he was 17.

    Initially Chan was a stuntman. His major breakthrough came when he was cast as the lead in Yuen Woo-ping’s kung fu comedy “Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow” (1978). The instant hit was followed by “Drunken Master” released in the same year, also directed by Yuen. The 1980s saw Chan establish himself as an action hero in his native Hong Kong with his inventive stunt work in a number of successful action thrillers including “Project A” (1983) and “Police Story” (1985).

    Chan then ventured into America and starred in a series of box office hits. After the success of “Rumble in the Bronx” in 1996, his other blockbuster hits include “Rush Hour” (1998), “Shanghai Noon” (2000), and “Shanghai Knights” (2003).

    His dazzling on-screen action choreography and slapstick humor have not only sealed his status as a global cinema icon, but also bring back Hong Kong cinema on the world map. He was the ambassador for Hong Kong tourism for decades.

    Although Chan had his success in Hollywood, he still praises filmmaking in Hong Kong. “The greatest qualities about Hong Kong cinema is the flexibility when it comes to making a film, ” he says. “But I think the Hong Kong movie business still hasn’t developed to its full potential because of budget limitations.”

    Overcoming the language barrier, says Chan, is not the greatest challenge for Asian films breaking into the global market.

    “The greatest challenge is finding the right topic, using brilliant techniques and being creative,” he says.

    The star says he’s working on several projects, including collaborations with some of Hollywood’s biggest players. Although he declines to disclose more details, he promises he will never retire. “The day I stop making films is the day my heart stops beating.”
    Jackie is spot on with these comments.
    Gene Ching
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  8. #23
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    Congrats Jackie!

    Gene Ching
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  9. #24
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    La & Zy at the Oscars

    Why Jackie Chan was carrying two stuffed pandas on the red carpet of the Oscars


    Jackie Chan arrives at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)
    Group photo. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles)

    WRITTEN BY
    Echo Huang
    February 26, 2017

    Martial arts superstar Jackie Chan walked down the red carpet with two cute companions at the Oscars.
    Chan, who was awarded an honorary Oscar last year for his “extraordinary achievements,” attended tonight’s (Feb. 26) 89th Academy Awards ceremony holding two panda toys.
    “I am the ambassador of panda,” the Hong Kong actor told interviewer Ryan Seacrest. The two panda plush toys, dressed in yellow jackets and shiny silver boots, represent the two real pandas that Chan adopted in China. “After earthquake, they get hurt, I raise them,” said Chan, referring to the earthquake that hit Sichuan province, home of the giant panda, in 2008 which killed some 87,000 people.
    62-year-old Chan adopted a female and male panda named Cheng Cheng and Long Long in Sichuan in 2009 through a donation of one million yuan ($145,000). “Cheng” and “Long” are the two Chinese characters in Chan’s name in Mandarin.
    We know about Jackie's stuffed pandas - Jackie Chan's La & Zy
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  10. #25
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    Oscar nominated?

    We'll see how far this gets. I would be impressed if it makes it into the finalists.

    Oscars: 92 Films Submitted in Foreign-Language Category
    10:09 AM PDT 10/5/2017 by Gregg Kilday


    Tim Boyle/Getty

    Nominations will be announced Jan. 23.

    A record 92 countries have submitted films for consideration in the foreign-language film category for the 90th Academy Awards.

    Haiti, Honduras, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mozambique, Senegal and Syria have all submitted films for the first time.

    The 2017 submissions are:
    Afghanistan, A Letter to the President, Roya Sadat, director;
    Albania, Daybreak, Gentian Koçi, director;
    Algeria, Road to Istanbul, Rachid Bouchareb, director;
    Argentina, Zama, Lucrecia Martel, director;
    Armenia, Yeva, Anahit Abad, director;
    Australia, The Space Between, Ruth Borgobello, director;
    Austria, Happy End, Michael Haneke, director;
    Azerbaijan, Pomegranate Orchard, Ilgar Najaf, director;
    Bangladesh, The Cage, Akram Khan, director;
    Belgium, Racer and the Jailbird, Michaël R. Roskam, director;
    Bolivia, Dark Skull, Kiro Russo, director;
    Bosnia and Herzegovina, Men Don’t Cry, Alen Drljević, director;
    Brazil, Bingo – The King of the Mornings, Daniel Rezende, director;
    Bulgaria, Glory, Petar Valchanov, Kristina Grozeva, directors;
    Cambodia, First They Killed My Father, Angelina Jolie, director;
    Canada, Hochelaga, Land of Souls, François Girard, director;
    Chile, A Fantastic Woman, Sebastián Lelio, director;
    China, Wolf Warrior 2, Wu Jing, director;
    Colombia, Guilty Men, Iván D. Gaona, director;
    Costa Rica, The Sound of Things, Ariel Escalante, director;
    Croatia, Quit Staring at My Plate, Hana Jušić, director;
    Czech Republic, Ice Mother, Bohdan Sláma, director;
    Denmark, You Disappear, Peter Schønau Fog, director;
    Dominican Republic, Wood******s, Jose Maria Cabral, director;
    Ecuador, Alba, Ana Cristina Barragán, director;
    Egypt, Sheikh Jackson, Amr Salama, director;
    Estonia, November, Rainer Sarnet, director;
    Finland, Tom of Finland, Dome Karukoski, director;
    France, BPM (Beats Per Minute), Robin Campillo, director;
    Georgia, Scary Mother, Ana Urushadze, director;
    Germany, In the Fade, Fatih Akin, director;
    Greece, Amerika Square, Yannis Sakaridis, director;
    Haiti, Ayiti Mon Amour, Guetty Felin, director;
    Honduras, Morazán, Hispano Durón, director;
    Hong Kong, Mad World, Wong Chun, director;
    Hungary, On Body and Soul, Ildikó Enyedi, director;
    Iceland, Under the Tree, Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson, director;
    India, Newton, Amit V Masurkar, director;
    Indonesia, Turah, Wicaksono Wisnu Legowo, director;
    Iran, Breath, Narges Abyar, director;
    Iraq, Reseba – The Dark Wind, Hussein Hassan, director;
    Ireland, Song of Granite, Pat Collins, director;
    Israel, Foxtrot, Samuel Maoz, director;
    Italy, A Ciambra, Jonas Carpignano, director;
    Japan, Her Love Boils Bathwater, Ryota Nakano, director;
    Kazakhstan, The Road to Mother, Akhan Satayev, director;
    Kenya, Kati Kati, Mbithi Masya, director;
    Kosovo, Unwanted, Edon Rizvanolli, director;
    Kyrgyzstan, Centaur, Aktan Arym Kubat, director;
    Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Dearest Sister, Mattie Do, director;
    Latvia, The Chronicles of Melanie, Viestur Kairish, director;
    Lebanon, The Insult, Ziad Doueiri, director;
    Lithuania, Frost, Sharunas Bartas, director;
    Luxembourg, Barrage, Laura Schroeder, director;
    Mexico, Tempestad, Tatiana Huezo, director;
    Mongolia, The Children of Genghis, Zolbayar Dorj, director;
    Morocco, Razzia, Nabil Ayouch, director;
    Mozambique, The Train of Salt and Sugar, Licinio Azevedo, director;
    Nepal, White Sun, Deepak Rauniyar, director;
    Netherlands, Layla M., Mijke de Jong, director;
    New Zealand, One Thousand Ropes, Tusi Tamasese, director;
    Norway, Thelma, Joachim Trier, director;
    Pakistan, Saawan, Farhan Alam, director;
    Palestine, Wajib, Annemarie Jacir, director;
    Panama, Beyond Brotherhood, Arianne Benedetti, director;
    Paraguay, Los Buscadores, Juan Carlos Maneglia, Tana Schembori, directors;
    Peru, Rosa Chumbe, Jonatan Relayze, director;
    Philippines, Birdshot, Mikhail Red, director;
    Poland, Spoor, Agnieszka Holland, Kasia Adamik, directors;
    Portugal, Saint George, Marco Martins, director;
    Romania, Fixeur, Adrian Sitaru, director;
    Russia, Loveless, Andrey Zvyagintsev, director;
    Senegal, Félicité, Alain Gomis, director;
    Serbia, Requiem for Mrs. J., Bojan Vuletic, director;
    Singapore, Pop Aye, Kirsten Tan, director;
    Slovakia, The Line, Peter Bebjak, director;
    Slovenia, The Miner, Hanna A. W. Slak, director;
    South Africa, The Wound, John Trengove, director;
    South Korea, A Taxi Driver, Jang Hoon, director;
    Spain, Summer 1993, Carla Simón, director;
    Sweden, The Square, Ruben Östlund, director;
    Switzerland, The Divine Order, Petra Volpe, director;
    Syria, Little Gandhi, Sam Kadi, director;
    Taiwan, Small Talk, Hui-Chen Huang, director;
    Thailand, By the Time It Gets Dark, Anocha Suwichakornpong, director;
    Tunisia, The Last of Us, Ala Eddine Slim, director;
    Turkey, Ayla: The Daughter of War, Can Ulkay, director;
    Ukraine, Black Level, Valentyn Vasyanovych, director;
    United Kingdom, My Pure Land, Sarmad Masud, director;
    Uruguay, Another Story of the World, Guillermo Casanova, director;
    Venezuela, El Inca, Ignacio Castillo Cottin, director;
    Vietnam, Father and Son, Luong Dinh Dung, director.

    Nominations for the 90th Academy Awards will be announced on Tuesday, Jan. 23.

    The 90th Oscars will be held on Sunday, March 4, at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, and will be televised live on ABC.
    Wolf Warrior 2 & The-Academy Awards
    Gene Ching
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  11. #26
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    Following up on yesterday's announcement

    Oscars: China Selects Blockbuster 'Wolf Warrior II' for Foreign-Language Category
    1:30 AM PDT 10/6/2017 by Patrick Brzeski


    Courtesy of Well Go USA
    'Wolf Warrior 2'

    Written, directed by and starring Wu Jing, the film earned $852 million to become China's biggest box-office success ever.
    China has selected mega-blockbuster Wolf Warrior II as its submission for the best foreign-language film category at the 2018 Oscars.

    The film is easily the most financially successful movie ever to be submitted in the Academy Awards category. Written, directed by and starring Chinese martial artist and multi-hyphenate Wu Jing, Wolf Warrior II has earned an astonishing $851.6 million in the Middle Kingdom since its release on July 27. Only one film has ever earned more from a single market — J.J. Abrams' The Force Awakens (2015) with $936.6 million in North America.

    A crowd-pleasing patriotic action flick, Wolf Warrior II follows a former Chinese special-forces operative (Wu) as he battles bloodthirsty Western mercenaries to save Chinese civilians who have gotten caught up in an African civil war. American actor Frank Grillo (Captain America: Civil War, Warrior) plays the film's villain, while American-Hong Kong actress Celina Jade is the female heroine.

    News of the film's selection was first carried locally by China's state-backed newspaper Global Times.

    Wolf Warrior II was co-produced by emerging powerhouse studio Beijing Culture, China Film Group, Bona Films and others. While a distinctly Chinese success story, traces of Hollywood's influence can be detected on the final product.

    Marvel mainstays Joe and Anthony Russo, co-directors of the Captain America franchise, consulted on the film via their Chinese studio venture Anthem & Song, which has strategic partnership with Beijing Culture. The Russos are understood to have introduced Grillo and some of their usual stunt team, led by veteran action coordinator Sam Hargrave (Captain America: Civil War, Atomic Blonde), to boost the production values of the film's fight scenes. Many attribute the film's local success to this seamless combination of Hollywood production polish and rousing, authentically Chinese storytelling.

    China has been nominated in the best foreign-language film category twice — for Ju Dou (1990) and Hero (2002), both directed by Zhang Yimou — but the world's most populous country has yet to bag an Oscar.
    Ah yes, we remember Hero.


    Wolf Warrior 2 & The-Academy Awards
    Gene Ching
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  12. #27
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    Chinese Foreign Language submissions

    Interesting take on this year's candidates.

    This year’s Oscar contenders from China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan are the perfect lens into the places they’re from


    A screenshot from Huang Hui-chen's "Small Talk" (YouTube/Visual Communications)

    WRITTEN BY
    Josh Horwitz
    October 09, 2017

    The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences recently announced the complete list of country submissions for the Best Foreign Language Film category for the 2018 Oscars. Titles garnering hype include Foxtrot, an Israeli film about an IDF soldier’s grieving parents; BPM: Beats Per Minute, a depiction of France’s AIDS crisis in the early 90s; and In the Fade, a German drama about a woman’s search for justice against neo-Nazi terrorists.
    By comparison, the nominations coming from Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China have not attracted much buzz internationally, but each region’s submission touches on issues in that capture the ambitions, desires, and insecurities of its people. Taken as a trio, they provide the perfect glimpse into three culturally distinct, but closely intertwined, places.

    Small Talk: Taiwan’s LGBT movement

    Shot over a nearly 20-year period, Small Talk is a documentary on filmmaker Huang Hui-chen’s attempts to connect with her emotionally distant mother Anu. While working as a Taoist priestess in Taipei, Anu maintained many romances with women in an era when ****sexuality was taboo. While she never attempted to hide her sexuality, she also never discussed it with her daughter. Huang tries to break her mother’s silence on her past, coaxing her through the film’s titular chit-chat.

    Critics describe Small Talk as a portrait of a relationship rather than a politically charged argument about ****sexuality in Taiwan. “The documentary doesn’t aim to criticize the country’s current socio-political climate or use Anu’s accounts to generalize its human rights issues. Quite the contrary: the film charms with its ability to stay compelling and critical by merely centering on one family, whose struggles feel more realistic and salient than those of a whole nation,” writes Point of View Magazine.
    But the film also comes as Taiwan’s LGBT movement reaches its apex. Small Talk hit theaters in Taiwan weeks before the island’s top court declared a civil code barring same-sex marriage unconstitutional—paving the way for its eventual legalization. That landmark decision placed Taiwan well ahead of its peers in Asia on gay rights, including Australia and Hong Kong.


    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  13. #28
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    continued from previous post

    Mad World: Hong Kong’s social ills, packed into 100 minutes

    The first feature film by director Wong Chun, Mad World tells the story of Tung, a finance industry professional whose struggle with bipolar disorder lands him in a psychiatric ward. Upon release, Tung moves in with his absentee father, an impoverished truck driver. Sharing one of Hong Kong’s tiny, often dangerous, sub-divided apartments—as featured on the film’s promotional posters—the two must look after one another as Tung comes to terms with the the impact of his illness on his career and marriage, as well as his role in the death of his mother, who was also mentally ill.
    In its initial review of the film, the South China Morning Post described Mad World as a “bid to shed light on every conceivable challenge of Hong Kong urban living in the film’s 100-minute runtime,” from poverty to housing and the stresses faced by those in the finance industry. Hong Kong’s sub-divided flats house many impoverished and marginalized people, including many with mental illness, and the cramped spaces only serve to compound their illness. Meanwhile, mental health patients in Hong Kong remain stigmatized and underserved. Wait times to visit a psychiatrist in a public hospital can last up to three years. The Economist Intelligence Unit scored Hong Kong behind Singapore, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan—its closest peers in Asia—in its Asia-Pacific Mental Health Integration Index (pdf) last year.

    In order to depict the subject matter realistically, Wong and Chan conducted interviews with mental illness patients and their families prior to shooting. “My ultimate hope is that by showing mental illness in this way through the film, that it can help pull us all a little closer to the understanding of mental illness,” Wong said in an interview. Domestic audiences have responded positively to Mad World—the film grossed HK$16.8 million (US$2.1 million) during its first two months in theaters, compared with its budget of HK$2 million (US$256,000)

    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  14. #29
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    Wolf Warrior 2

    I'm copying this last portion of this article continued from the previous post on the Academy Awards thread on the Wolf Warrior 2 thread.

    Wolf Warrior 2: China’s propaganda smash

    While Taiwan and Hong Kong’s submissions are quiet independent films, Wolf Warrior 2 is an action blockbuster that projects Beijing’s idealized vision of China on the world stage, as well as the growing nationalist sentiment among its citizens.
    The film tells the story of Leng Feng, a Rambo-esque former member of the Chinese Special Forces who leaves China for an unnamed African country after being discharged from the army. There, he winds up fighting to save overseas Chinese workers and locals stuck in a civil war. There’s also a subplot involving a fictitious disease known as “Lamanla,” and a romance between Leng and Rachel Smith, a dual US-Chinese citizen who worked with a team of Chinese doctors to develop the vaccine for the disease.



    Of course, what appears as a generic action film on the surface is really a subversion of the white savior Hollywood trope, with Chinese characteristics. Its theatrical release came days before China opened its first-ever overseas military base in Djibouti, which also coincided with the 90th anniversary of the formation of the People’s Liberation Army.
    The film’s overt politics will likely prevent it from receiving the nomination, but reviews suggest that there’s value in considering what a Hollywood-style action film would look like when the geopolitical context is flipped. Noel Murray of the Los Angeles Times writes, “There’s something bracing about its patriotic fervor, which asserts that the Chinese will act in the best interests of the world’s downtrodden, while the rest of the world just exploits them. It’s instructive to recognize the presumptions we’re used to finding in American blockbusters, but with the heroes and villains reversed.”
    Chinese moviegoers have flocked to Wolf Warrior 2. The film has raked in 5.6 billion yuan ($824 million) to date at China’s box office (link in Chinese), making it the highest-grossing film ever in the country. Explosions and car chases certainly help draw viewers, but there is also a palpable sense of increasing nationalism (paywall) among Chinese citizens themselves. In Africa and elsewhere, China has asserted itself more aggressively, at times championing itself as a bastion of globalization particularly at a time when America’s leadership role is in question. Meanwhile, many Chinese individuals, whether online or in real life, are standing up for China’s interests in the face of criticism from abroad. After years of watching white men save the world, Wolf Warrior 2 gives Chinese audiences a hero of its own.
    Gene Ching
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  15. #30
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    No Oscar nom for WW2

    Oscars: Academy Unveils Foreign-Language Film Shortlist
    5:12 PM PST 12/14/2017 by Gregg Kilday


    Tim Boyle/Getty

    The nine films include the Palme d'Or winner 'The Square,' but not Angelina Jolie's 'First They Killed My Father.'
    The Academy on Thursday announced the nine films that will compete for a nomination for the best foreign-language film Oscar.

    The shortlist includes a number of expected entries, like Ruben Ostlund's Swedish art-world satire The Square, which won the Palme d'Or at this year's Cannes Film Festival, and the Russian drama Loveless, about a divorcing couple searching for their missing son and directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev, which won the Cannes Jury Prize.

    But it also has some striking omissions: Angelina Jolie failed to earn a nomination for her film First They Killed My Father, which was submitted by Cambodia and also has earned a Golden Globe nomination. And the list also failed to find room for France's submission, Robin Campillo's BPM (Beats Per Minute), about AIDS activists, which won the Grand Prix prize at Cannes.

    The shortlist of films was chosen from a record 92 titles that were submitted by their respective countries. The selected films will now screen for committees in New York, Los Angeles and London, which will cast the ballots for the film nominees in the category, to be announced Jan. 23.

    The films on the shortlist, and their country of origin, are:

    Chile, A Fantastic Woman, Sebastián Lelio, director
    Germany, In the Fade, Fatih Akin, director
    Hungary, On Body and Soul, Ildikó Enyedi, director
    Israel, Foxtrot, Samuel Maoz, director
    Lebanon, The Insult, Ziad Doueiri, director
    Russia, Loveless, Andrey Zvyagintsev, director
    Senegal, Félicité, Alain Gomis, director
    South Africa, The Wound, John Trengove, director
    Sweden, The Square, Ruben Östlund, director

    The 90th Oscars will be held Sunday, March 4, at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center and will be televised live on ABC. Nominations will be announced Tuesday, Jan. 23.
    Wolf Warrior 2 didn't make the Academy Awards Foreign language cut. I had my doubts that it would.
    Gene Ching
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