Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 76 to 84 of 84

Thread: Qigong and Yoga

  1. #76
    I like qigong for the practice, and yoga for the pants.

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Hobart Tasmania - Australia
    Posts
    701
    Alot of Yoga people starting to come across to Qigong these days in Oz...

    See it alot, Yoga practitioners that have been training for 15-20+ years and get the light bulb moment after their first class.

    Im also starting to do alot of health and wellbeing programs for businesses and their staff with Qigong - they love it!
    Last edited by Blacktiger; 05-07-2014 at 11:58 PM.

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,294

    'Chinese yoga' vs. 'Indian qigong'

    China's ancient form of mind-body aligning exercise Qigong a challenge for Yoga?
    ET Bureau Jun 24, 2015, 05.31AM IST


    (It is not surprising that…)
    With yoga hogging so much of the limelight around the world — that too on the longest day of the year — a suitable riposte from China is awaited. After all, as India claims first dibs on this au courant wellness art and science, China may think it is high time to put yoga on the mat with qigong (cheegong), its own 4,000-year-old healing technique apparently practised by 80 million people there.

    While it has not yet caught the fancy of San Francisco or colonised Times Square on the summer solstice, qigong, with adherents in 29 other countries, already could pose a challenge to yoga. But as qigong seems suspiciously like yoga, given that it comprises exercises and postures, regulated breathing, meditation and massage, and is said to calm the mind and tone the body, confucian is practically guaranteed.

    It is not surprising that people have begun to call qigong 'Chinese yoga'; hitting back by calling yoga 'Indian qigong' simply does not have the same impact yet. Besides, China will also have to deal with the possibility of yoga gurus deciding — as per hoary Indian tradition — to assimilate qigong as a form of pranayama, before China claims exactly the opposite as part of its general thesis that everything of relevance actually originated in that country. Both sides would be stretching it a bit, but then that's par for the course.
    Funny, I was just having a conversation with one of my shimei about this very topic last night after practice.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Canada!
    Posts
    23,101
    I guess the whole competition thing between India and China as cultures is in play here.

    Oh well. Personally, I don't find Qi-Gong to be like Yoga in many regards. Though they do have some similar connections (breath, movement etc) they are quite different.

    I practice Yoga, I practice chi kung, I practice Kung Fu, I practice boxing, I practice guitar too! and piano! lol.
    It's all good. But beef claiming it's chicken and chicken claiming it's beef is silly.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,294

    Less popular cousin?

    This HuffPost blog has a cute hook, but I'm not sure it works for me. Besides, there's the whole field of hard (or martial) qigong, which I would argue is far more 'flashy' than Yoga. And when it comes to sexy, there's Jade Egg and Iron Crotch.

    10 Reasons to Get to Know Qigong: Yoga's Less Popular Cousin
    Posted: 08/10/2015 2:24 pm EDT Updated: 08/10/2015 2:59 pm EDT



    If you're looking to boost your energy and calm your mind, I know someone you've got to meet: her name is Qigong. She's Yoga and Meditation's less-sexy, easy-to-underestimate cousin -- and she's amazing.

    Qigong (pronounced "chee gung") is originally from China and her name means "energy exercise." Like her Indian cousin Yoga, Qigong links up the body, breath, and intention. She's less flashy than her cousin Yoga. But don't overlook her -- those still waters run deep.

    Here are 10 reasons why you'll love getting to know Qigong:

    1. She's an incredible healer. She can reduce arthritis, chronic pain, high blood pressure, fatigue, diabetes, and cancer side effects, while boosting your immunity, energy, bone density, sleep, mood, and balance. She's even got the studies to prove it.

    2. She's over 3000 years old and still looks great. She's got gorgeous curves. Unlike the straight lines of her angular cousin Yoga, Qigong moves in circles and spirals: she flows.

    3. She's unpretentious. There's nothing showy about her. Her movements are slow, mindful, graceful, and powerful. While she's great at building strength and balance, her moves aren't particularly difficult, and you probably won't see her on the cover of a glossy magazine sporting lululemon. No stretchy pants are required to hang with her.

    4. She's energizing. After spending time with her, you'll likely feel strong and more mobile throughout your day.

    5. She's easy to be with. Unlike her cousin Meditation (who's awesome, but let's face it, can be kind of uptight sometimes), Qigong doesn't ask you to sit there and try to not pay attention to your thoughts. Instead, she helps the mind and nervous system to settle down by giving you lots to pay attention to, like your breath, and simple movements that repeat.

    6. She'll help you relax. She can help tame anxiety and stress. You might even sleep better.

    7. She'll help you get out of your head better than Yoga. Don't get me wrong: I'll love Yoga forever, but a lot of what she does is so challenging that it often feels like a "mind-over-body" practice rather than one of mind-body unity. It can be hard to get in touch with your body while at the same time trying to dominate it. With Qigong, the struggle to do it "right" or make it look like someone else's practice goes away. The simplicity of the movements makes it easy to feel the qi flowing in your body and between your hands.

    8. She'll make you feel good. She'll love you no matter how strong or how flexible you are, and you'll love her back.

    9. She'll help you love your body. Rather than seeing the body as something you need to ignore or transcend (like Meditation sometimes says), Qigong encourages you to tune into the body as a focal point for concentration. Your body becomes a portal for tuning into the more subtle layers. (So she's kind of a feminist -- none of that "body is dirty and mundane" baggage here.)

    10. She's sophisticated. She's got different routines designed to support each system of the body. She'll even teach you some points that acupuncturists use to get qi to move properly.

    Follow Brodie Welch, L.Ac., M.S.O.M. on Twitter: www.twitter.com/brodiewelch
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,294

    Qigong vs. Yoga



    QIGONG WILL BE EVEN BIGGER THAN YOGA
    Reasons why Qigong will become even more popular.

    By TCRN STAFF - Sep 16, 201654 0

    Not too long ago, not many people had heard of qigong, an ancient form of exercise used in China for centuries. While it is not as widely recognized as yoga, awareness is growing. Over time it will continue to grow in popularity as more learn of the myriad of benefits that can be achieved.


    Meditating by sunset

    Some Qigong masters even believe that it will grow to become more popular than yoga. Here’s why:

    It is easier than yoga. Absolutely everyone can learn and become proficient in qigong, from extreme athletes to extreme couch potatoes. All ages can benefit. These exercises can be done sitting, in a wheelchair, and even those with disabilities. The only prerequisite for success is a strong desire to practice for 15 minutes a day (or more).


    Qigong can be easy.

    It is easier than tai chi. Although tai chi has been practiced in the US for over 50 years, it never achieved the same boom as yoga. Many people have found tai chi to be rather intimidating, confusing, frustrating, and stressful. Compared to tai chi, there is no need to memorize long, complex routines, or the martial aspects of the art. It allows you to dive immediately into the meditative and energetic aspects of the art, which is also what brings you quick results.

    It is challenging. The art of qigong can grow with you as you become more proficient and comfortable. It can start with physically easy exercises, and then increase the level of difficulty once you are ready to be more challenged, both physically and mentally. There are appropriate techniques you can use whether you are ill, out of shape, or even an Olympic athlete looking to improve.


    ‘Swallow flying through clouds’ Qigong pose

    It is medicine. There are many things you can do to improve your health such as yoga, but even just walking or laughing helps too. But what makes qigong unique is that it was actually engineered to be medicine. In China, there are entire hospital wings dedicated to the practice of qigong.

    It is complementary. Qigong can greatly complement many other forms of healing such as acupuncture, massage therapy, chiropractic, reiki, even psychologists and nutritionists use elements of qigong in their practice.

    It is empowering. Qigong doesn’t require physical strength or flexibility to receive positive benefits. An exercise program that doesn’t need brawn for success is empowering to women, to the physically unfit, to the disabled, to children, and to those smaller-sized folk.


    Time Magazine cover

    The world is ready for mindfulness. Time Magazine has even highlighted the growing importance of mindfulness in the North American lifestyle and business arena. Major corporations are now talking about mindfulness these days. Qigong has long been known as a traditional form of mindfulness meditation.

    It is accessible. You actually need very little training to start getting remarkable results with qigong. Within a quick 3-hour class, you can learn enough to take home, practice on your own, and gain all sorts of health benefits. Compared to some of the other martial art forms and exercise programs, qigong emphasizes internal aspects like mindfulness, breath, and energy flow rather than physical postures and alignment.


    ‘Pushing Mountain’ Qigong pose

    It flows. Performing a simply exercise repeatedly allows you to forget about the form itself, and instead focus on the internal aspects. Repeating a form up to 20 times creates a wonderfully enjoyable flow that is different from yoga.

    People are learning Chinese. China is becoming a powerhouse on the world stage and in business. Even high school students are studying Chinese in order to be prepared for the changing world. As Westerners learn to speak and read Chinese, the qigong and tai chi classics will become better studied and translated. This will only serve to strengthen the art of qigong.

    It’s all about the qi. (pronounced ‘chee’) We are becoming more and more awareness of the importance of chi energy, or vital energy, for over-all good health and well-being. Although this exercise practice is historically Chinese, it is a phenomenon that transcends culture. More and more are becoming interested in learning about the ancient art of cultivating chi.

    It is spiritual. Qigong is a wonderfully practical tool to work on your spiritual health and well-being, in fact, it is not associated with any religious background. It allows us to heal not just our body, not just our mind, and not even just our spirit — but rather the combination of all three. Some wellness practitioners set up practices that require exercises that focus on the mental/emotional/spiritual blockages to achieve good health.


    Tibetan monks in qigong pose.

    It supercharges sitting meditation. According to legend, monks who spent hours in sitting meditations were found to be sick, weak, and unable to go deeply into their mediation practices. Until they added qigong to their spiritual practice, and went on to be some of the best meditators in history. Many people are finding they are not getting the rewards they are seeking just from sitting meditation.

    It is a quicker path to healing. Because it is designed as a form of medicine, qigong can be a faster path to achieving the health benefits that you want. Even those who have practiced yoga for years are now turning to qigong.
    If you practice for 15 minutes/day, you will achieve great results in just weeks. If you can make the time for 15 minutes twice a day, you will see truly remarkable results!
    Tibetan monks in qigong pose
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #82
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,294

    ttt 4 2017!

    16 Reasons Qigong Will Be Bigger Than Yoga in 16 Years
    by Sifu Anthony Korahais

    “Maybe if I spell it differently,” I thought. “Maybe that will attract more people to my qigong classes!”

    Qi Gong. Chi Kung. Chi Gong. Qigong.

    I tried different spellings on different brochures.

    I quickly learned that the spelling wasn’t the problem.

    The problem was that Americans had never heard of such a thing as qigong.

    I considered using the words “tai chi” instead. After all, there’s a ton of overlap between the two arts. And of course I also practice tai chi.

    But the qigong that I teach is significantly different than the tai chi that is commonly practiced. I wanted to differentiate between the two, so I continued to use the word “qigong”.

    Zoom ahead 12 years into my teaching career, and the world has changed.

    Today, the word qigong — however you choose to spell it — is much more widely recognized.

    I wouldn’t go so far as to say that it’s widely recognized.

    Most Americans still haven’t heard of it. But awareness is growing, and that’s a wonderful thing.

    (Note: if you are new to qigong, then I recommend you read my article: The 15 Most Frequently Asked Questions about Qigong )

    Change takes time. It took time for yoga to become the billion-dollar, global industry that it is today.

    But I believe that if you give qigong a little time, it will be huge.

    In fact, I think qigong will be bigger than yoga one day. Here’s why:

    1. Qigong is easier than yoga.

    Qigong is accessible to absolutely everyone. I’ve taught extreme athletes, and extreme couch potatoes. I’ve taught 20-somethings and 80-somethings. I’ve taught disabled veterans and marathoners (and also disabled marathoners).

    For example, the picture above shows the exercise called Pushing Mountains, which involves gently moving your palms back and forth in a flowing manner, and coordinating your breath with the movement.

    Anyone can do this exercise. It can be done sitting, it can be done in a wheelchair, and it can even be done with one arm.

    There is only 1 prerequisite for success with qigong: a strong desire to practice for 15 minutes a day (or more).

    I probably don’t need the rest of this list. This reason is enough to explain why qigong will explode in popularity.

    2. Qigong is easier than tai chi.

    There are many reasons why the art of tai chi didn’t experience the same boom as yoga, despite it being practiced in the US for over 50 years.

    In my experience, the biggest reason is this: people are intimidated by tai chi.

    I can’t tell you how many students have come to me over the years telling me that they previously tried tai chi, but found it confusing, frustrating, and stressful.

    With qigong, you don’t need to memorize long, complex routines. Nor do you need to worry about the martial aspects of the art.

    Qigong allows you to dive immediately into the meditative and energetic aspects of the art, which is also what brings you quick results.

    3. Qigong is challenging.

    IMG_4875
    A challenging qigong pattern called “Swallow Flying through Clouds”
    Although some qigong exercises are physically easy, other exercises are incredibly challenging — both physically and mentally.

    Because there are so many different qigong techniques, it’s easy to raise the difficulty level for those who are ready.

    Just as there are techniques that are appropriate for those who are ill or out of shape, there are also techniques that even an olympic athlete would find challenging.

    And this is wonderful because it means that the art of qigong can grow with us.

    4. Qigong is medicine.

    Yes, yoga can be medicine. And so can walking. And so can laughter.

    But qigong is unique in that it was actually engineered to be medicine.

    (Note: Not all styles of qigong were designed to be medicine. For example, Iron Shirt Qigong is not meant to be medicine, although it can have therapeutic effects.)

    Qigong is a branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine, along with acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine.

    In China, you can find qigong in the hospitals. In fact, in some hospitals there’s an entire qigong wing!

    5. Qigong is complementary.

    If you see an acupuncturist in the United States, you will often be prescribed both herbs and acupuncture.

    This is because the two forms of medicine compliment each other well.

    Perhaps the main reason why qigong is so complementary is because you can take it home and use it safely on your own — something that isn’t possible with most forms of medicine.

    Over the years, I have collaborated with acupuncturists, massage therapists, chiropractors, psychologists, MDs, reiki healers, osteopaths, and nutritionists.

    I have seen with my own eyes how qigong can greatly complement other forms of healing.

    6. Qigong is empowering.

    Yoga is empowering too. But unlike yoga, Qigong doesn’t require physical strength or flexibility.

    In fact, too much physical strength can be a hindrance with qigong. Body builders, for example, often struggle to relax the muscles and let go of deeper layers of tension.

    An art that doesn’t need brawn for success is empowering to women, to the physically unfit, to the disabled, to children, and to smaller-sized men like myself.

    7. The world is ready for mindfulness.

    time-magazine-mindfulness

    Mindfulness and meditation have been on the cover of Time Magazine several times.

    Even major corporations are talking about mindfulness these days.

    The world is falling in love with mindfulness, and this is a beautiful thing.

    Wait — didn’t you know that qigong is a traditional form of mindfulness meditation?

    It is.

    If you’d like to learn more about the connection between qigong and mindfulness, then read my article: 5 Things You Should Know About the Mindfulness Craze

    8. Qigong is fun.

    I imagine that yoga is fun for many people. I prefer qigong.

    Let’s call this one a tie.

    9. Qigong is accessible.

    Compared to other arts, you actually need very little training to start getting remarkable results with qigong.

    This is because qigong emphasizes internal aspects like mindfulness, breath, and energy flow rather than physical postures and alignment.

    I can train a fresh beginner to start getting amazing results in just 3 hours.

    In fact, I’ve watched many students learn from me for only 3 hours, but then continue to practice on their own and get all sorts of wonderful health benefits.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,294

    continued from previous post

    10. Qigong flows.

    With yoga, you don’t usually take a single exercise and do it 20 times in a row.

    With qigong, this is the norm.

    Repeating a simple, flowing exercise like Lifting the Sky 20 times allows you to forget about the form, and instead focus on the internal aspects.

    This creates a wonderfully enjoyable flow when practicing qigong.

    11. People are learning Chinese.

    This reason is probably unexpected, but I think it is significant.

    The world is changing, and the East is becoming a powerhouse, especially China.

    People are learning Chinese in order to do business with China.

    Heck, my nephew learned Chinese in middle school!

    If you can speak and read traditional Chinese, then you can make the leap to classical Chinese easily.

    As Westerners learn to speak and read Chinese, the qigong and tai chi classics will become better studied and translated.

    This will only serve to strengthen the art of qigong.

    I think it’s only a matter of time before we start seeing pop psych books about applying the Qigong and Tai Chi classics to business and relationships!

    12. It’s all about the qi.

    There is a growing awareness about acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, and feng shui.

    In all of these arts, qi is the star.

    Although the concept of qi is historically Chinese, it is a phenomenon that transcends culture. It’s all qi — whether you call it qi, or prana, or vital energy.

    I believe that, in the 21st century, humans will start to see that it’s all about the qi.

    And once they do, it’s natural for them to become interested in the ancient art of cultivating the qi — qigong!

    13. Tai chi is empty without qigong.

    Although tai chi is more widely known in the US, it is often devoid of real qi cultivation. This is unfortunate.

    Tai chi is a martial art that should have the concept of qi as a central training tool.

    Many people practice only the external, physical aspects of tai chi, and these people are becoming increasingly interested in qigong to supplement their tai chi training.

    14. Qigong is spiritual.

    Both qigong and yoga can be used to cultivate spirituality regardless of your religious background.

    In fact, I’ve taught religious leaders from all of the major world traditions — and none of them had any issues with practicing qigong.

    Qigong gives us a wonderful and practical way to work on spirituality.

    It allows us to heal not just our body, not just our mind, and not even just our spirit — but rather the combination of all three.

    Qigong is all about unifying mind, body, and spirit, not separating them.

    For example, some stubborn medical ailments will actually required that you practice exercises that work on mental/emotional/spiritual blockages.

    15. Qigong supercharges sitting meditation.

    shutterstock_73873177

    Legend has it that Bodhidharma arrived at the Shaolin Temple only to find that the monks were sick, weak, and unable to go deeply into their sitting meditation.

    To solve the problem, he taught them qigong.

    And it worked. The Shaolin Monks turned into some of the best meditators in history, not to mention some of the best kung fu masters.

    In my experience, the same phenomenon is happening today. People are practicing sitting meditation, but not reaping the rewards that they deserve.

    Simply adding a daily qigong practice can supercharge your meditation, just like it did for the Shaolin Monks 1500 years ago.

    16. Qigong is a quicker path to healing.

    More than ever, people are looking for fast and effective forms of healing.

    Many of these people end up finding qigong — even if they had previously practiced yoga for many years.

    Because it is designed as a form of medicine, qigong can be a faster path to getting the results that you want.

    If you get good instruction and then practice for 15-minutes per day, you will see good results within weeks, if not days.

    And if you practice 15 minutes twice daily, then you’ll see truly remarkable results!

    Conclusion

    There you have it. That’s why I believe that qigong will be bigger than yoga in 10-20 years.

    What do you think? Did I miss any reasons? Do you agree or disagree with my argument?

    As always, I’d love to hear from you in the comments below.

    Mindfully yours,
    Sifu Anthony

    I’m Anthony Korahais, and I used qigong to heal from clinical depression, low back pain, anxiety, and chronic fatigue. I’ve already taught thousands of people from all over the world to use qigong for their own stubborn health issues. I teach online courses, and also lead in-person retreats and workshops.
    Usually I don't post op-ed blogs by various masters because there's so many of them, but I'm a little weary of Jade Egg dominating this subforum for so long...(Sure, I've posted the most about it, but can you blame me?)
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #84
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,294

    More from Korahais

    I missed the 'zen master' part before.

    Could qigong be the next yoga?
    July 20, 2017 By Julie Kailus

    Zen master and blogger Anthony Korahais thinks so.

    “Once people start to realize what qigong [pronounced chee-gong] can really do — help you get to peak performance and stay there — then everyone will be using it,” Korahais, who first used the practice to heal debilitating anxiety and clinical depression, tells GrindTV.

    But what is it? Think of qigong as the grandmother of tai chi, an ancient Asian practice — and one of the four branches of traditional Chinese medicine — that combines gentle breathing, flowing movements and mindfulness meditation.


    Qigong is both an easier alternative to yoga as well as physically and mentally challenging in its own way. Photo: Kyson Dana/Unsplash

    Followers like the simple practice for a variety of reasons, including its purported ability to restore wellness, build mental and emotional strength, reduce stress and increase vitality.

    “Qigong gets your energy, your qi, flowing better. This isn’t mystical. When your energy is flowing better, your immune system functions better, your inflammation goes down, your lymph fluid cleans out the toxic junk faster,” Korahais says.

    So why is this a “well-kept secret among amateur and pro athletes,” according to Korahais, that no one else has heard of it?

    “Martial artists were the stewards of qigong for many years, and they were notoriously secretive of their skills. Their lives depended on their art, and they kept the secrets closely guarded,” says Korahais, whose international organization Flowing Zen has certified 25 qigong instructors.


    Anthony Korahais performs a flowing movement in a video about qigong. Photo: Courtesy of Flowing Zen

    “Even today,” he continues, “it’s hard to find a genuine teacher. You find more and more teachers, but they don’t have much training, so their students don’t get the spectacular results that some people get.”

    Some professional athletes are already tapping the secret sauce, like Korahais’ extreme-runner student. “He does these Spartan and death races where you run for 24 hours or more, carrying your food, doing challenges, overcoming obstacles. He has a pile of medals in races where only 10 percent of the runners even finish.

    “Qigong is his secret weapon. He says the biggest benefit is that it helps him stay focused and relaxed, but that it also helps him be more resilient, avoid injuries or heal faster if he does get injured.”

    Everyday athletes stand to gain a lot from qigong too, says Korahais: “I think it’s especially important for weekend warriors because we tend to overdo it. Qigong can help us build resiliency, like when we were younger.”

    If a flowing fountain of youth isn’t enough to make you want to dig deeper into qigong, these benefits, part of a book Korahais is writing on “the next yoga,” just might.


    Is qigong truly energy, healing and mindfulness in one package? Photo: Courtesy of Flowing Zen

    It’s accessible to all: You don’t need much training to start. Korahais says he can train a beginner to start seeing results in a little as three hours.

    It’s a fast path to healing: Following solid instruction, just 15 minutes of qigong a day can lead to noticeable changes in health and wellness, promises Korahais.

    It’s easier than yoga or tai chi: One movement called “pushing mountains” requires nothing more than gently moving your palms back and forth in a flowing manner while coordinating your breath with the movement.

    It’s mindfulness and medicine: You’ve seen the cover of Time: The world is ready for mindfulness. Qigong facilitates this practice. Plus, like acupuncture, qigong started as a branch of traditional Chinese medicine. Some hospitals in China dedicate an entire wing to qigong.

    It can grow with you: Some qigong techniques are incredibly challenging, physically and mentally, and can be raised to a level that even an Olympic athlete would find difficult, according to Korahais.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •