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  1. #1
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    Hong Kong protests

    protesting new law

    Hong Kong Gripped by Massive Anti-Govt. Street Protest
    Tue Jul 1,11:01 AM ET Add World - Reuters to My Yahoo!


    By Carrie Lee and Rico Ngai

    HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hundreds of thousands of protesters took to Hong Kong's streets on Tuesday to denounce the government and its planned anti-subversion law in the city's biggest demonstration since the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre.







    "Return rule to the people," they chanted as the rally began to denounce the bill which critics say will impose Beijing-style control over free speech and the media.


    Brandishing banners, umbrellas and fans, many wore black on a sweltering day to mourn what they said was the demise of rights and freedoms in one of the world's key financial centers.


    Critics say the law, which Beijing has been pressing Hong Kong to enact, poses the biggest threat to basic rights in the former British colony since it reverted to Chinese rule in 1997.


    Earlier, a group of protesters burned the Communist Party flag as Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao tried to reassure the territory that its freedoms would be protected. But the afternoon march was peaceful.


    By nightfall, organizers said around 500,000 people had turned out, while police said they counted at least 350,000 people as of 6 p.m. (1000 GMT). It was the largest protest in Hong Kong since 1989, when a million turned out after troops killed hundreds of pro-democracy demonstrators in the Chinese capital.


    The government has said it would not back down on the national security legislation regardless of Tuesday's turnout. Despite renewed criticism from the United States and Britain, the bill is bound to be passed by the territory's legislature, which is packed with pro-Beijing and pro-government supporters.


    Hong Kong Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa, who was mocked on many of the placards, issued a statement saying it was the government's responsibility to pass the security law as required by the Basic Law, its mini-constitution.


    "The government has promised the rights and freedom enjoyed in Hong Kong now won't be affected by the legislation," he said.


    The anti-subversion measures, to be enshrined as Article 23 of the Basic Law, were the prime target of many of the protesters. But others said they were frustrated by the government's handling of the ailing economy and the SARS (news - web sites) epidemic, which killed some 300 people in the territory.


    Marchers came from all walks of life with retirees and young couples pushing baby strollers walking alongside veteran democracy supporters, highlighting the depth of dissatisfaction with the government. Many were demonstrating for the first time.


    PUBLIC ANGER


    Political commentator Andy Ho said he was not surprised by the extent of public anger.


    "Those who have come out are from all walks of life, and are not only opposed to Article 23 but a host of government policies," Ho told Reuters.


    "This should serve as a wake-up call for the government. If it does not heed people's views, grievances will deepen and it will make it more difficult for it to rule Hong Kong."


    The flag-burning took place a few hundred meters (yards) from the convention center where Wen and local leaders were celebrating the sixth anniversary of Hong Kong's return to China.


    In what are believed to be the first public comments by a senior Chinese leader on the controversial issue, Wen repeatedly assured Hong Kong that its special status would be protected.





    "The legislation according to Article 23 will not affect the different rights and freedoms enjoyed by Hong Kong people, including journalists, under the law," Wen told reporters.

    He did not refer to Tuesday's marchers directly, but said stability was the key to the territory's long-term prosperity.

    Though Hong Kong was promised a high degree of autonomy after the handover, critics say there has been a subtle roll-back of freedoms, especially as it grows more economically dependent on the mainland.

    The government's push to pass the law this month has stoked concerns that any dissent may soon be treated the same way it is in China. Beijing fears that without the law, Hong Kong will be used as a base for subversive activities against it.

    The Falun Gong (news - web sites) spiritual group for instance practices freely in Hong Kong but has been banned in China as an "evil cult."

    Under the legislation, people can be jailed for life if convicted of subversion, treason or secession from China. It also allows gives police sweeping search powers without court orders.

    But the government's much-criticized handling of the bill and many other issues may have set the stage for a bigger battle.

    Its refusal to allow more consultation and widespread anger at Tung have spurred calls for more democracy and may have galvanized generations into becoming more politically active.
    I do not ever see Sifu do anything that could be construed as a hula dancer- hasayfu

  2. #2
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    I Am Jackie Chan

    What's Jackie to do? I'm sure his album promo tour has been in the works for months. He couldn't account for the protests.

    Nevertheless, I want to hear I Am Jackie Chan.

    In Taiwan to promote a new album, Jackie Chan pleads ignorance on mass protests in Hong Kong
    "I only found out yesterday there was a big march in Hong Kong. I don't know anything about it."
    by Alex Linder June 13, 2019 in News



    Jackie Chan has evidently been so busy promoting his new album that he hasn’t had any time to notice the mass protests rocking his home city.

    On Wednesday, the movie star was in Taipei at a media event hyping up his latest album “I Am Jackie Chan,” his first album in 16 years. The event happened to coincide with tens of thousands of protesters surrounding the Legislative Council building in Hong Kong, angry over a controversial bill that would allow criminal suspects to be taken to mainland China for trial.

    When asked to give his thoughts on the situation, Chan pleaded ignorance. “I only found out yesterday there was a big march in Hong Kong. I don’t know anything about it,” he said.

    Chan has long been criticized in Hong Kong for his pro-Beijing views. The actor has never been shy to sing out China’s praises, literally doing so at two straight CCTV Spring Festival Galas. Last month, he was one of 200 of the city’s elite who joined in to sing the Chinese national anthem in a “flash mob” propaganda video.



    Back in 2014, Chan did offer his opinions on the Umbrella Movement, worrying that the protests were hurting Hong Kong’s economic future, writing on Weibo that:

    “I found out through the news that Hong Kong’s economic losses reached HK$350 billion [$51.9 billion] and I’m really worried . . . I believe every Hong Kong resident loves Hong Kong and wishes it well! Hong Kong’s bright tomorrow requires everyone’s support and hard work . . . In the song ‘Country,’ one line goes: ‘There is no prosperous home without a strong country.’ I am willing to work hard with everyone and return to rationality, to face the future, love our country, love our Hong Kong.”


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  3. #3
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    Troubled times for HK

    I'm trying to imagine having to apologize to my fan base for having dinner with Jackie Chan.

    I'm also trying to imagine having a fan base.

    X Japan’s Yoshiki apologizes for having dinner with Jackie Chan
    Master Blaster
    yesterday

    For a drummer, he really doesn’t have the best timing in the world.

    Although the visual kei style of Japanese rock group X Japan is often dark and violent, fans know all too well how sweet and endearing its members really are. From the occasionally befuddled charm of drummer Yoshiki to the Christmas pancakes of singer Toshi, these guys don’t seem to have a bad bone in their body.

    And on 12 June, Yoshiki’s social media accounts revealed what he thought would be an exciting image for his fans depicting a private dinner between himself and legendary martial arts actor Jackie Chan.


    View image on Twitter

    Yoshiki

    @YoshikiOfficial
    Wonderful dinner with #JackieChan .#ジャッキーチェン @EyeOfJackieChanhttps://www.instagram.com/p/BynBkdCA8l8/

    10.5K
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    Considering your perspective on current events, you could interpret this photo two ways. On the one hand, it’s two giants of their respective arts having a chat over a nice dinner. On the other hand, it’s Yoshiki smiling and laughing with a prominent and outspoken supporter of the Communist Party of China, especially regarding issues with Taiwan and Hong Kong.

    And considering the bitter and violent protests currently taking place in Hong Kong over a controversial law that would allow the mainland to extradite people from the territory, it’s understandably not the best time to be yucking it up with Jackie Chan. So, Yoshiki did take a little heat from his photo in the replies on his Instagram and Twitter accounts: (replies presented as originally posted, with minor changes)

    “Shame….”
    “Jackie Chan is a supporter of dictatorship, you rather have dinner with him and ignored the president of the first democratic republic country in Asia?”
    “We hate jackie! just a running dog of communist china!”
    “We are X, and f*ck Jackie chan”
    “Why you can dinner with a sh*t?”
    “I live in Hong Kong I like [Chan], he is no saint but he has his merit.”
    “I am sorry, X and you is very important to me and i love you very much. but your photo with this guy made me cry and tear.”

    For the most part it was Chan who took most of the verbal abuse with Yoshiki only receiving the occasional “shame on you” and questions of “why?” Still, being the sensitive guy he is, Yoshiki couldn’t sit quiet after causing fans even mild discomfort.

    Yoshiki

    @YoshikiOfficial
    My dear fans,
    If any of my posts made you feel like... I'm not considering any situation,
    I deeply apologize.
    I really care about all of my fans and friends.
    Love you,

    YOSHIKI

    10.1K
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    And of course, being the sensitive bunch they are, X Japan fans were quick to support him.

    “I don’t know what kind of tweets you’ve got or seen, but we’ll always love you and you don’t have to worry about that.”
    “[Yoshiki] doesn’t do business with JC, neither he is involved with politics. It’s just a personal meeting for dinner, nothing more.”
    “Please don’t apologize for us. We know exactly how you feel. Thank you for your concern about us.”
    “What happened?”
    “I like Jacky chen and Yoshiki!!”
    “I think it’s his freedom to eat with any one. You should not argue about our own political issues with him.”
    “You guys should keep your politics and personal hatred out of Yoshiki sama’s page. Have some respect.”
    “It’s definitely bad timing, but no big deal really.”

    All’s well that ends well for the rock star who is by all accounts just a swell guy. Jackie Chan, however, seems to be hemorrhaging goodwill left and right these days. We can only hope that this isn’t hurting our good friend Jackie Chen‘s impersonation business too badly.

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  4. #4
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    If Jackie needs a dinner date, I'm free.



    Jackie Chan dined with two stars. Hong Kong is not amused
    Photo: EPA/Dan Himbrechts
    by Stephanie Ma

    Taiwanese megastar Jay Chou and X Japan leader Yoshiki are facing a backlash for hanging out with Jackie Chan.

    Chou and Yoshiki were panned on social media by their fans after they shared pictures of themselves having dinner with Chan on Wednesday.

    While the Hong Kong-born actor is widely adored globally for his kung-fu movies, Chan is spurned by many at home in Hong Kong for being pro-Beijing and dismissive toward the city’s aspiration for democracy.

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    The musicians’ association with Chan didn’t sit well with their fans as Hong Kong was wrapping up a series of massive demonstrations against a controversial law allowing extraditions from the semi-autonomous city to mainland China.

    When asked his opinion about the protests while promoting his new album last Tuesday in Taipei, Chan said he was unaware of the rally.

    “I only just found out yesterday that there was a big parade in Hong Kong. I don't know anything about it,” he said.


    Jackie Chan attends the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing in March 2018. Photo: AFP/Wang Zhao

    Two days before he spoke, Hong Kong saw one of the largest marches in its history, as opposition to the extradition bill made international headlines.

    Chan is also remembered in Hong Kong and Taiwan for openly dissing the two places at an international forum in 2009.

    “I’m not sure if it’s good to have freedom or not. I’m really confused now. If you’re too free, you’re like the way Hong Kong is now. It’s very chaotic. Taiwan is also very chaotic,” he said.

    Chou was criticized for being ignorant of Hong Kong’s political situation after he posted Wednesday on Instagram a picture with Chan, captioned: “Wishing Big Brother big sales for his new album.”


    View image on Twitter

    Yoshiki

    @YoshikiOfficial
    Wonderful dinner with #JackieChan .#ジャッキーチェン @EyeOfJackieChanhttps://www.instagram.com/p/BynBkdCA8l8/

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    Yoshiki, drummer and leader of Japanese rock band X Japan, even issued an apology after sharing a picture on the same day of himself having a “wonderful dinner” with Chan.

    "My dear fans, if any of my posts made you feel like... I'm not considering any situation, I deeply apologize. I really care about all my fans and friends," he tweeted on Friday.

    STEPHANIE MA
    Stephanie Ma is an intern reporter at Inkstone.

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  5. #5
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    Protest for your porn

    Does Pornhub do stuff like this? Asking for a friend...

    By Gavin Butler
    |
    17 June 2019, 6:45pm
    Hong Kong Porn Sites Shut Down to Encourage More People to Join the Protests
    One site urged users to attend the “life or death” protests instead of “jerking off at home”.

    [IMG]https://video-images.vice.com/articles/5d083b0a519a23000863e8ed/lede/1560821304177-2019-06-17T112114Z_897959158_RC1229372D70_RTRMADP_3_HONGKO NG-EXTRADITION.jpeg?crop=1xw%3A0.8427xh%3B0xw%2C0.019 5xh&resize=2000%3A*[/IMG]
    Image via Reuters

    Things are heating up in Hong Kong. Over the past two weeks, a swelling tide of protesters has flooded the streets to demand that a contentious extradition bill—one which would allow China to extradite people from Hong Kong to the mainland—be retracted. In the past week alone, as many as two million people are thought to have gotten behind the movement. And an initiative taken by a handful of porn sites might have played at least some small part in bolstering the numbers.

    Adult sites AV01 and ThisAV shut down temporarily last week in a bid to encourage users to get out and join the uprising, Quartz reports. Both sites stopped offering videos and published expletive-laden messages aimed at fuelling the fire and getting more people onside—with ThisAV urging users to attend the “life or death” protests instead of “jerking off at home”.

    “Do you want to live the rest of your life looking over your shoulder?” read the message on AV01’s landing page. “There will be no more safe place or security. The government has failed you, the system has failed you, the society has failed you, do you want to fail yourself?”

    In the time since the porn sites went down, the number of people protesting in the streets has grown to what may well be the largest demonstration in Hong Kong's history—though that's not to say that there's any direct correlation between the two. More than 100 local business have also shut up shop and encouraged their employees to take part.

    The mounting pressure of the mass protests reached such an intensity that Chief Executive Carrie Lam issued a public apology over the weekend for her handling of the extradition bill, suspending it indefinitely. Protesters are now seeking to oust Lam from office.

    As VICE News reported last night: “the size and scale of the protests are a reminder to Chinese President Xi Jinping that his authoritarian control on power does not yet extend to Hong Kong, which has repeatedly shown its willingness to stand up to Beijing’s efforts to erode the territory’s independence.”
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  6. #6
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    Bruce v Jackie

    Hong Kong protests embrace Bruce Lee but reject Jackie Chan in tale of two martial arts heroes

    Bruce Lee becomes a symbol for young demonstrators and their ‘formless’ guerilla tactics in defiance of China’s unpopular extradition law

    But Jackie Chan, already vilified for his pro-Beijing stance, feigns ignorance of historic marches in his home city

    Nicolas Atkin
    Published: 1:00pm, 29 Jun, 2019


    Protesters march in Hong Kong against an extradition bill. A number have been channelling the spirit of Bruce Lee, whose statue is seen in Tsim Sha Tsui. Photos: AFP/Sam Tsang

    Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan may be Hong Kong’s two most famous martial arts sons, but the kung fu superstars are like chalk and cheese to the protesters taking part in historic marches against the city’s extradition bill.
    Enter The Dragon star Lee’s famous “Be water, my friend” saying has become a clarion call among the young protesters demanding Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor withdraw the unpopular legislation which would have allowed for the transfer of fugitive suspects to mainland China and other jurisdictions with which Hong Kong has no extradition deal.
    Lee’s words have also inspired a new form of guerilla tactics that has outfoxed the police and given the government headaches, with protesters moving in unexpected waves, rolling from one spot to another.
    Spontaneous road blockades and the circling of buildings have replaced the prolonged mass sit-ins of the 2014 Occupy movement, creating a “formless” protest.

    View image on Twitter

    Mary Hui
    @maryhui
    One Hong Kong protester channeling Bruce Lee philosophy.

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    “We are formless, we are shapeless, we can flow, we can crash, we are like water, we are Hongkongers!” read one protester’s sign channelling Lee’s philosophy.
    Protesters are also wearing T-shirts and clothing bearing Lee’s words and likeness, with the martial arts icon becoming a symbol of the movement.
    Drunken Master star Chan, on the other hand, feigned ignorance of the protests when asked during a trip to Taiwan to promote his new album, I Am Jackie Chan.
    The visit coincided with police firing tear gas in clashes with demonstrators as tens of thousands surrounded the Legislative Council building in Hong Kong.
    “I only found out yesterday there was a big march in Hong Kong. I don’t know anything about it,” Chan said, despite images of two million marchers being widely disseminated around the world.


    Hong Kong actor and singer Jackie Chan at an event announcing his new album in Taipei. Photo: AP

    It was a less controversial take than his 2014 comments, when he weighed in on Beijing’s side and said he was “worried” about damage to Hong Kong’s financial markets during the occupation of key commercial districts, and called for a “return to rationality”.
    “I am willing to work hard with everyone … to face the future, love our country, love our Hong Kong,” he added.
    Well, Chan may love Hong Kong, but does Hong Kong love him any more?



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    Hong Kong was not amused when Chan dined with two music stars earlier this month. Taiwanese megastar Jay Chou and X Japan leader Yoshiki faced an online backlash after sharing pictures on social media of themselves hanging out with the 65-year-old, who is a member of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference. The legislative advisory body in Beijing is largely made up of members of the Chinese Communist Party.
    The Hong Kong-born actor is adored around the world for his famous kung fu films like the Rush Hour series, but his pro-Beijing views and dismissals of the democracy movement are unlikely to endear him to protesters, two million of whom marched on June 16.
    “I’m not sure if it’s good to have freedom or not,” he said in 2009. “I’m really confused now. If you’re too free, you’re like the way Hong Kong is now. It’s very chaotic. Taiwan is also very chaotic.”
    But while Chan is opposed to chaos, Lee embraced it in his teachings.
    “In the middle of chaos lies opportunity,” was one of his famous idioms. “Out of chaos, find simplicity. From discord, find harmony,” was another.
    Hong Kong’s protesters believe they are taking their opportunity amid the chaos to have their voices heard by the world. They say they are trying to bring the city together as one in harmony against China’s increasing curbs on their freedoms.


    Demonstrators protest outside police headquarters, demanding Hong Kong’s leaders step down and withdraw the extradition bill. Photo: Reuters/Tyrone Siu

    If Lee was alive today, who knows whether he would weigh in on the side of the protesters? Stardom and success often comes with a price to pay for Chinese actors and celebrities.
    Hong Kong film stars Andy Lau, Leon Lai, Donnie Yen, John Woo, Sun Xing and Tony Leung Ka-fai all starred with Chan in the 2009 Chinese propaganda blockbuster Founding of a Republic. The epic was made by the state-owned China Film Group, and marked the 60th anniversary of the Communist revolution and featured a cast made up of almost 200 of China’s best-known stars.
    Perhaps Lee would go the way of China’s other martial arts megastar Jet Li, who has naturalised himself in Singapore away from all the controversy – though Li also starred in Founding of a Republic.


    Protesters make an appeal to consulates for the G20 Summit. Photo: Felix Wong

    There is of course no way to tell. But Lee’s legend is being immortalised by a new generation of Hongkongers who have made him a symbol for their cause. The legend of Bruce Lee is only being enhanced (as if it needed to be any more).
    Chan, meanwhile, continues to turn a blind eye to what is going on in his home city. Maybe his PR people have told him it’s not a good look to make a big fuss again, something he probably doesn’t need telling.
    But with the eyes of the world on Hong Kong, Chan will not be able to escape the questions forever. Sooner or later he will have to answer, and his reputation could suffer, depending on what he says.

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: Lee closer to their hearts than Chan
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    Kurt W. Tong neutered

    The U.S. Should Defend Hong Kong
    America’s recently departed envoy warns that Beijing poses a dire threat to the city’s cherished freedoms.
    By Kurt W. Tong
    July 22, 2019, 2:00 AM PDT


    Protesters clashed with police over the weekend. Photographer: Chris McGrath/Getty Images

    Kurt W. Tong was formerly U.S. consul general for Hong Kong and Macau.

    When I left my post as U.S. Consul General in Hong Kong recently, news organizations reported that the White House had effectively censored my valedictory remarks, as President Donald Trump apparently did not want to disrupt trade negotiations with Chinese leader Xi Jinping. The Washington Post went so far as to say I’d been “neutered.”

    Put the short-term politics aside. What matters is figuring out what’s really driving Hong Kong’s current unrest, and what the governments of Hong Kong, China and the U.S. should do about it.

    The U.S. has more at stake here than many Americans realize. Opening doors to free and fair trade, with China and other partners, has been a consistent core interest of the U.S. in the western Pacific. Hong Kong has been at the center of that effort ever since the U.S. first opened its consulate in the city 175 years ago.

    Today, Hong Kong deserves America’s commercial, financial and strategic respect and support because its economy and society are positive models for all of Asia. The city shows how open markets and transparent governance work together to create prosperity. The city’s value is buttressed by its rule of law -- not just rule by law -- and by its independent judiciary and sense of fair play.

    That’s why more U.S. businesses -- close to 1,400 of them -- now operate in Hong Kong than when the British returned their onetime colony to China in 1997. Many important American firms, especially in finance and services, continue to favor the city for their Asian headquarters.

    Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy is the necessary ingredient for this success. China’s growing encroachments on that autonomy, however, pose a very real threat to the city’s special status and future competitiveness.

    During my three years as U.S. Consul, I saw Beijing’s interference take many forms: the disqualification of electoral candidates based on their political views; the banning of political organizations; and the prosecution of political activists for encouraging others to peacefully block traffic five years ago.

    This year was marked by the Hong Kong government’s dramatic miscalculation to rush through legislation allowing extraditions for trial in mainland China’s unfair courts. A record number of citizens took to the streets in opposition; protests have continued even after Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam declared the legislation effectively “dead.”

    This outcry is proof that leaders in Beijing have thoroughly underestimated the social anxiety and tensions inherent in the “one country, two systems” construct -- exacerbated of course by glaring economic inequalities within Hong Kong society. A more accurate formulation might be “same bed, different dreams.”

    That reality requires much more careful handling. Most important, Beijing needs to not fret so much about Hong Kong and its freedoms of expression. It should be confident in the city’s future and its positive role inside China.

    Let’s be serious: No outside power wants to see a “color revolution” in Hong Kong. Foreign investors hope only to preserve the status quo -- a Hong Kong that is stable, rules-based, transparent and open; one that is part of China but a uniquely easy place to do business.

    The bigger problem is how the incentives for China to interfere in Hong Kong are becoming institutionalized. The Chinese governmental organizations handling Hong Kong affairs are now so large that they have good bureaucratic reasons to eschew the “less is more” approach that the situation requires. Chinese leaders need to realize they could destroy Hong Kong’s economic specialness if they keep trying to align its political culture with mainland norms.

    Hong Kong’s city leaders, on the other hand, need to stay in closer touch with their people’s aspirations. Autonomy is a “use it or lose it” proposition. They must firmly embrace the notion that Hong Kong’s dual identity is an opportunity, not a burden, and convey that message to Beijing.

    Hong Kong is both the most prosperous city in the world’s largest nation and a place with its own cosmopolitan identity and a degree of interconnectedness with the globe that is unique in Asia. Its leaders should double down on being “Asia’s World City.” Commitment to this idea faded in recent years, as Hong Kong leaders devoted energy to echoing mainland priorities.

    A renewed international push should include more outreach to the U.S., which is, after all, Hong Kong’s most important economic and cultural partner outside China. And the U.S. should reciprocate. In my final message home to Washington, I urged colleagues to recognize the city’s abiding strengths. After all, a couple million people validated last month that Hong Kong remains very different from mainland China.

    Most important, U.S. leaders should always remember that the city isn’t a card to be played against Beijing -- neither a means of highlighting flaws in the mainland’s governance when it suits us, nor a token to be exchanged for concessions in trade talks. Rather, Hong Kong is a vision of what we should want China, and indeed much of the rest of Asia, to look like. We should seek ways to bolster its strengths.

    This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

    To contact the author of this story:
    Kurt W. Tong at KTHKMCG@gmail.com

    To contact the editor responsible for this story:
    Nisid Hajari at nhajari@bloomberg.net
    1,400 more U.S. businesses since the turnover - that was over two decades ago. I wonder what the total number is now.
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  8. #8
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    wearing white

    So brutal. I won't complain about my commute again.

    Cook caught up in shocking violence near Hong Kong MTR station recalls horrific ordeal as 20 people attacked him with sticks and canes as he made his way home from work
    Calvin So was left severely injured with skin on his back torn, his hands and shoulders wounded and swollen
    Embattled officers face heavy criticism for arriving at scene too late to stop attacks but pro-Beijing lawmaker Regina Ip calls for understanding
    SCMP
    Elizabeth Cheung
    Peace Chiu
    Athena Chan
    Published: 2:26pm, 23 Jul, 2019


    Calvin So shows the marks on his back caused by a brutal attack near Yuen Long MTR station on Sunday night. Photo: Sam Tsang

    A cook caught up in shocking violence in a northern Hong Kong district on Sunday night has recalled the horrendous experience of his journey home.
    Calvin So, 23, had finished work at a restaurant in Yoho Mall, the shopping centre next to Yuen Long MTR station in northwestern Hong Kong, and was walking towards an exit just after 9.45pm. He was attacked by a group of men after simply saying: “There are lots of people in white clothes here.”
    “Some people approached me. Soon after, a person started beating me and more joined in,” So said, adding he was attacked by about 20 people, armed with sticks and canes, during the assault.
    “I didn’t do anything and asked them to stop beating me. But they just ignored me,” he said.


    A mob of men in white T-shirts attack protesters and passengers at Yuen Long MTR station on Sunday night. Photo: Handout

    The railway station was the scene of unprecedented violence on Sunday night as a marauding gang of men in white T-shirts ambushed people including demonstrators returning home from a protest march elsewhere in the city. Some 45 people were injured and 11 have since been arrested.
    So’s ordeal lasted for around five minutes before he tried to flee to safety. He was chased and struck several more times as he escaped the brutality.
    The violent attacks left his back severely injured with torn skin. His hands and legs were wounded and his shoulders swollen.
    He was admitted to Tuen Mun Hospital for treatment and said the injuries left him unable to sleep on his back on the first night.
    “I was in pain whenever something touched my back,” he said.
    So’s recovery was expected to take several weeks and he hoped police would investigate the assaults.
    “There should be at least a public explanation,” he said. “It is unacceptable to see those people randomly attacking others.”
    There should be at least a public explanation
    Calvin So
    By 6pm on Tuesday, five men were still receiving treatment at Tuen Mun Hospital. Among them, one was critical, one was serious and the remaining three were stable.
    Meanwhile, Hong Kong’s former security chief and veteran pro-establishment lawmaker Regina Ip Lau Suk-yee called for residents to show understanding over police handling of the violence, arguing the force had faced attacks comparable to “guerilla warfare” over the past two months.
    Sales down at least 10 per cent at book fair as protest halts traffic
    “The force has been worked to the point of exhaustion and manpower is strained … with so many large-scale protests and attacks since June 9,” Ip, a member of the government’s advisory panel, said on a radio programme on Tuesday.
    The city’s embattled police force came under heavy fire for arriving at the scene too late to stop the attacks on anti-government protesters, journalists and passers-by at the station, as well as terrified passengers on a train.

    Regina Ip calls on Hongkongers to show understanding to city’s exhausted police force. Photo: Sam Tsang

    Ip, an Executive Council member and New People’s Party lawmaker, believed many officers from Yuen Long were deployed to Hong Kong Island as protesters laid siege to Beijing’s liaison office following a march against a now-suspended extradition bill.
    Hong Kong has seen a wave of anti-government, mostly peaceful, protests since early June. The city’s legislature was stormed and trashed on July 1, after Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor refused to fully withdraw the bill, which would have allowed the transfer of suspects to other jurisdictions including mainland China.
    Lam first suspended the bill, then declared it “dead” on July 9.


    The Chinese National emblem is vandalised by protesters who rally outside the liaison office in Sai Ying Pun on Sunday. Photo: Edmond So

    “I hope Hongkongers can understand our police have done very well handling things such as public security and theft, so the overall crime rate is very low,” Ip said.
    “What happened over the past month or so is not normal violence, but continued violence. It is like facing urban guerillas.”
    Ip added she hoped the Chinese army would not be needed to handle the current crisis.
    “I am worried some people are trying to force the People’s Liberation Army to come here,” she said, though she believed the Hong Kong and central governments would try to prevent this as much as possible.
    I am worried some people are trying to force the People’s Liberation Army to come here
    Lawmaker Regina Ip Lau Suk-yee
    She also warned that while there were no casualties at the siege of the liaison office, there was strong political meaning to the actions, with the compound vandalised and the national emblem on the building front defaced.
    Meanwhile, about 30 members of the Foreign Correspondents’ Club (FCC) Hong Kong and journalists silently protested outside the press club on Tuesday morning to condemn the violence directed at journalists when covering the protests last weekend, particularly the “sickening scenes of mob violence” in Yuen Long.
    At least four local journalists were attacked by the marauding gang on Sunday. Two victims were reportedly from Apple Daily, a Chinese-language newspaper, and one each from the Stand News website and cable broadcaster Now TV.
    One female reporter was attacked during a live online report. The news outlet said her hands and right shoulder were hurt and she suffered swelling on the back of her head.
    President of the press club Jodi Schneider said: “We are out here standing for press freedom and to say yes to press freedom, no to violence against journalists. We are renewing our call for independent investigation by a third party, into any harassment or violence against journalists during the protests in Hong Kong.”


    A soldier stands guard at the People’s Liberation Army’s Hong Kong garrison. Photo: Xiaomei Chen

    In a statement, the club called on Hong Kong police and the authorities to urgently find and bring to justice those who carried out the unprecedented attack.
    A joint statement issued on Monday by the Hong Kong Journalists Association, the Hong Kong Press Photographers Association and the Independent Commentators Association made an urgent appeal to local police to protect citizens and journalists.

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: Cook recalls post-work ordeal as group of about 20 bash him
    Gene Ching
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  9. #9
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    守护香港!驻香港部队的官宣,有态度、有力量!| 小央视频

    Gene Ching
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  10. #10
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    Crystal too?

    Ohhh, Jackie's in hot water for HK comments too.

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  11. #11
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    Last edited by PalmStriker; 08-17-2019 at 05:37 PM.

  12. #12
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    meanwhile, the rappers...

    Bryan Ke·August 16, 2019·13 min read
    Chinese Rappers Rally Together on Instagram in Support of Hong Kong Police



    Rappers in China are reposting a meme that has been circulating on Chinese social media to show support for the Hong Kong police as violent protests continue.

    The patriotic fury was ignited after a Chinese journalist was tied and assaulted by Hong Kong protesters who thought he was undercover police despite wearing a yellow high-visibility vest typically worn by journalists covering the protest on Tuesday night, according to Inkstone News.

    After the attack, two prominent members of China’s rap group Higher Brothers, Melo and DZ Know, shared images of the Chinese flag on their Instagram accounts on Wednesday afternoon.

    melo0729
    Verified




    melo0729's profile picture
    melo0729
    Verified
    Once again.I'm proud i'm a Chinese.
    5d
    Other Chinese artists also joined in, including “The Rap of China” champion PG One, who re-posted People Daily’s post that reads: “I support Hong Kong police, you can hit me” in Chinese characters and “What a shame for Hong Kong” written in English underneath it.


    Screenshot via Weibo

    “Support Hong Kong police, resist violent atrocities!!! I hope everyone is safe and secure!” PG One wrote in a Weibo post, Radii China reported.

    Miss Vava, another star in “The Rap of China” whose song was featured in the movie “Crazy Rich Asians,” shared the same post on her Instagram with a caption that reads, “Hong Kong is part of China forever.”

    vava.mis



    vava.mis's profile picture
    vava.mis
    Hong Kong is part of China forever
    Another Chinese rapper, After Journey, also shared the post on Instagram. “Compatriots, remember this day, remember this moment,” the caption reads in Chinese.

    afterjourney




    afterjourney's profile picture
    afterjourney
    同胞们,记住这一天,记住这一刻
    Featured Image via Instagram / higherbrothers (Left), Instagram / vava.mis (Right)
    Anyone follow Chinese rap and know anything about these rappers?
    Gene Ching
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  13. #13
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    Xu = pro-HK

    Now Xu Xiaodong has chimed in on the Hong Kong protests. It's interesting on which side various Chinese celebs are landing...

    Mixed Martial Arts
    MMA fighter Xu Xiaodong speaks out in support of Hong Kong people amid anti-government protests
    Controversial Chinese fighter suspects a smear campaign against the city
    Users of an online Hong Kong forum say they would welcome ‘Mad Dog’
    Chan Kin-wa
    Published: 2:13pm, 19 Aug, 2019


    Chinese MMA fighter Xu Xiaodong at his Beijing gym. Photo: Tom Wang

    Controversial Chinese MMA fighter Xu Xiaodong has sent a message of solidarity with Hong Kong’s anti-government protesters, but said he hoped the city’s social unity would not suffer lasting damage from tensions arising from recent developments.
    In online posts on social media platforms Sina Weibo and YouTube, Xu doubted whether mainland Chinese media reports on the protests had presented a clear picture of what was happening and many citizens seemed to believe the unrest was the work of gangsters and thugs, leading to some strong anti-Hong Kong sentiment on the mainland.
    Xu cited the case of a mainland citizen who was beaten up by protesters at Hong Kong International Airport last week, saying he felt ashamed of the behaviour of the man, whom he believed had been trying to provoke the crowd.
    The outspoken MMA fighter said he hoped a smear campaign was not being conducted and noted the importance of accepting the city was governed under the principle of “one country, two systems”.
    He posted in his social media accounts that he would kick people he suspected of trying to divide the country and smear Hong Kong people out of his “circle of friends”. Isolated violent acts and extreme individual behaviour were not broadly representative of most Hong Kong people’s attitude, he said.
    “Please let it be remembered, whatever Hong Kong people do, they are still part of our family,” he said. “Don’t be fooled by the evil power trying to turn Hong Kong people and Chinese people against each other.”
    The Beijing-based fighter said Hong Kong was China’s “Pearl of the Orient” and the world’s top free-trade port, as well as being the home of some of the world’s top universities. He said he had been watching Hong Kong movies and listening to Hong Kong music since his childhood. “Don’t forget all the blessings from Hong Kong people to the victims in big natural disasters in China,” he said.



    Last week, Xu also expressed his sympathy to Hong Kong people in his first ever YouTube live broadcast.
    “Hong Kong people are Chinese and I am also Chinese. That’s why I love Hong Kong people,” he said in the broadcast. “Someone asked me if I know what’s happening in Hong Kong and queried my right to make any comment. They may be right, but I want to ask why we don’t know what’s exactly happening in Hong Kong. Why?”
    Xu’s comments were well received online.
    In Hong Kong-based forum LIHKG, many users said they respected Xu, saying he was a brave person for speaking out and said the Beijing citizen would be welcome to emigrate to Hong Kong. However, there were also worries for his safety as the broadcast was closely monitored by the authorities.
    Reports said Xu, who is a fierce critic of what he calls “fake kung fu”, previously had his social credit score lowered to heavily restricted “D” status in China following a court order. As a result, Xu was not allowed to buy plane tickets or train tickets.
    He had the restrictions lifted after he eventually apologised but he said he ended up paying around US$37,250 after legal fees and the cost of paying for a public apology to be placed.
    I guess Xu doesn't need to wear clown make-up anymore. That's too bad. I was rather enjoying that.
    Gene Ching
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  14. #14
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    Oh man, Crystal...

    Yifei really stabbed herself in the foot with this one.

    In China, Disney's #BoycottMulan Problem May Only Be Growing
    3:28 PM PDT 8/20/2019 by Patrick Brzeski , Tatiana Siegel


    Walt Disney Studios
    Crystal Liu in Disney's 'Mulan.'

    As the star of its Chinese warrior epic sides with police amid growing pro-democracy protests, the company may be "dragged into" taking sides as a mass sit-in at Hong Kong Disneyland is considered.
    On Aug. 14, Crystal Liu, star of Disney's upcoming live-action Mulan, weighed in on Hong Kong's police crackdown of pro-democracy protesters. "I support Hong Kong's police, you can beat me up now," she wrote to her 65 million followers on social media platform Weibo, adding the hashtag "IAlsoSupportTheHongKongPolice," with heart and arm-flexing emojis.

    Backlash, and talk of a boycott of Mulan, greeted Liu's post, with many pointing to the various international organizations that have accused the Hong Kong police of brutality and excessive force. And while Disney has chosen to remain silent so far, the problem may not go away any time soon for the studio, whose 10 tentpoles in the past year have earned 12 percent of their $8.85 billion in grosses from China. On a huge film like Avengers: Endgame, which became the all-time box-office champ with $2.8 billion in worldwide ticket sales, China accounted for a stunning 22 percent of that total.

    "Disney can't support the protesters because their business in China is too important," notes Stanley Rosen, a professor at USC who specializes in the Chinese entertainment industry. "But they obviously can't be seen as pandering too much to China either, because that could backfire as well, depending on how the situation in Hong Kong unfolds."

    The studio's studied silence at the least risks tainting the idealism of its brand and inflaming the international #BoycottMulan campaign. But if Disney instead distances itself from its star's statement, it will almost certainly invoke the ire of China's Communist Party authorities, who view control over Hong Kong as one their most urgent concerns.

    A source close to Liu, 31, says she is being unfairly singled out given that other Chinese celebrities have voiced support for Beijing over the Hong Kong protest movement, including the city's own Jackie Chan and Tony Leung Ka-fai. Though protesters bristle at all stars who parrot an autocratic government's talking points, they have an ideal wedge with Liu as the lead of the upcoming global tentpole Mulan — about a young Chinese female fighter of injustice — that Disney will release March 27.

    The studio's apparent decision to try to duck the difficult PR dilemma has put it in the awkward spot of aligning its interests with Beijing and the Hong Kong government, both of which seem to be hoping that the protesters will lose their nerve.

    And yet, it's not as if Disney CEO Bob Iger hasn't taken a stance on hot-button political topics before. He stepped down from President Trump’s business advisory council in response to the president’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate deal, calling the decision “a matter of principle.” Iger also said “I rather doubt [Disney] will” continue shooting in Georgia after the state passed one of the most restrictive abortion laws in the country.

    The Hong Kong movement's determination not to simply fade away was on display Aug. 18, when an estimated 1.7 million protesters braved heavy rain for a peaceful procession through the heart of the city. Protesters are considering staging a mass sit-in at Hong Kong Disneyland next, possibly as soon as Aug. 24. (Some are concerned that the theme park's location — on a remote corner of Hong Kong's Lantau Island — could leave protestors cornered and vulnerable to mass arrests.)

    Should they forge ahead — and should police respond — Disney may not have the luxury of avoiding comment if global newscasts show tear gas wafting over Hong Kong Disneyland's Sleeping Beauty Castle. "If things polarize even further in Hong Kong and China resorts to even greater violence to assert its authority, it will become much harder for [Disney] not to get dragged into it," adds Rosen, noting that further comments from Liu could also inflame tensions. "It's not unthinkable that the release date for Mulan could have to be moved beyond March 2020."

    At the very least, Beijing's refusal to compromise an inch combined with the protestors' unflagging conviction has left even the most informed observers uncertain of how the standoff could conceivably unwind. Thus, Hong Kong's pro-democracy cause could very well continue to be a major news item come early 2020, when Mulan launches its worldwide marketing campaign — with star Crystal Liu front and center, facing the press gauntlet.

    Karen Chu contributed reporting.


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  15. #15
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    Wait...Twitter can ban misinformation in PRC? Why not in the USA?


    Twitter Bans China Accounts for Misinformation Campaign Against 'Mulan' Boycott

    8:50 PM PDT 8/19/2019 by Patrick Brzeski

    The company deleted nearly 1,000 accounts it said were "deliberately and specifically attempting to sow political discord in Hong Kong, including undermining the legitimacy and political positions of the protest movement on the ground."
    Facebook and Twitter said Monday that they had deleted a network of fake accounts used by China to sow political discord over Hong Kong's pro-democracy, anti-police brutality protests.

    The accounts also were used to share pro-Beijing rhetoric in response to the Hong Kong-initiated boycott of The Walt Disney Co.'s upcoming film Mulan, some of the tweet examples shared by Twitter reveal.

    The Mulan boycott was initiated late last week after the film's star, Crystal Liu Yifei, posted a message of support on Chinese social media for the Hong Kong police force. The post ignited a firestorm both within Hong Kong and among pro-democracy sympathizers overseas, given the many accusations by international human rights groups that the police have been using excess force in their confrontations with protesters and the public.

    Twitter said Monday that it pulled down 936 troll accounts, many of which pushed conspiracy theories about the Hong Kong protesters and their motivations.

    "These accounts were deliberately and specifically attempting to sow political discord in Hong Kong, including undermining the legitimacy and political positions of the protest movement on the ground," the company said in a statement. Twitter added that it has "reliable evidence to support that this is a coordinated state-backed operation."

    Many of the deleted accounts claimed to be users based in the United States, in places ranging from New York City and to small towns like Berrien Springs, Mich. Some of the accounts were set up years ago, and slowly amassed followers by tweeting about innocuous pop culture, such as NBC's hit show This Is Us — a common tactic used to cloak misinformation campaigns in credibility.

    Other accounts, such as @HKPoliticalNew, were attempting to pose as legitimate Hong Kong news outlets.

    Facebook responded to Twitter's move by pulling down 16 pages it said were linked to the same troll operation.

    One post highlighted by Twitter’s public safety team read: "We don’t want you radical people in Hong Kong. Just get out of here!"

    A recent China-linked Facebook post compared the pro-democracy protestors to ISIS fighters.

    Another Twitter post said: "Are these people who smashed the Legco crazy or taking benefits from the bad guys?" (Legco is Hong Kong's legislature, which was briefly occupied by protestors earlier this month.)

    Central to Beijing's vast propaganda campaign within Mainland China is the allegation that the protests have been instigated by Western forces allied against China, including the CIA, rather than Hong Kong residents advocating for their own political concerns. China has offered no credible evidence for the claim.

    Shortly after the #BoycottMulan hashtag start trending on Twitter last Friday, users tweeting about the campaign began calling attention to accounts they suspected were being directed by the Chinese government.

    "You should come to Hong Kong to see the truth, not be misled by unscrupulous Western media and politicians," read one reply to #BoycottMulan from the account @shu_zhiyuan, which has since been removed by Twitter.

    The Hong Kong protests began nearly three months ago in response to a bill that would have allowed Hong Kong residents charged a crime to be extradited to mainland China. Nearly 2 million Hong Kong residents took to the streets to contest the bill at the height of the protests in June, believing it would mark the end of the autonomy and rule of law Hong Kong was promised when the territory was handed back to China from Britain in 1997.

    After the Hong Kong police responded with heavy-handed tactics — including firing tear gas into public subway stations and using rubber bullets against crowds — the protests have intensified and the movement's demands have morphed into calls for independent investigations of the police and direct democracy. An estimated 1.7 million Hong Kong residents braved pouring rain in Hong Kong on Sunday to join a peaceful procession through the heart of the city — demonstrating that the movement is not fading away as the Beijing and Hong Kong authorities may have hoped.

    Liu pulled Disney into the fray last week when she shared an image with her 65 million followers on China's Twitter-like social media service, Weibo, reading: "I support Hong Kong's police, you can beat me up now," followed by, "What a shame for Hong Kong." The image had originally been created by the state-backed People's Daily. Liu added the hashtag "IAlsoSupportTheHongKongPolice" and a heart emoji.

    The post was widely praised in China — both by Beijing's vast social media propaganda apparatus and lay patriotic users — but outside the Middle Kingdom it has raised awkward questions about Disney's brand allegiances.

    Both Facebook and Twitter, as well as the websites of the BBC, The New York Times and Bloomberg, are banned in China, blocked by the so-called Great Firewall, a complex system of Internet censorship mechanisms.

    PATRICK BRZESKI
    THRnews@thr.com
    @thr

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