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Thread: Muay Thai

  1. #181
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    Pressure point vs. Muay Thai

    Kung fu fail as Muay Thai practitioner makes mockery of master’s pressure point techniques
    Kung fu master tries to show bicep pressure point technique can beat Muay Thai clinch
    However it just proves hilariously and embarrassingly ineffective
    Nick Atkin
    Published: 6:11pm, 10 Oct, 2019


    A Muay Thai practitioner clinches a kung fu master. Photo: YouTube/Fight Commentary Breakdowns

    It seems the only people who believe pressure point kung fu is actually real are the “masters” who practise it themselves.
    In a video that has gone viral, a Chinese kung fu master pitted his skills against a Western Muay Thai practitioner.
    The master claimed his bicep pressure point technique could counter the traditional Muay Thai clinch, despite his opponent also being a lot bigger than him.
    The results are as hilarious as you’d expect.



    The Muay Thai practitioner applies the clinch, and the kung fu master starts hitting him with chops to the bicep – one of the supposed pressure points that, if struck with a direct hit, can instantly defeat an opponent.

    The opponent just shrugs off the chops and keeps the clinch tight, fastening his arms around the back of kung fu master’s neck to reduce the distance.
    Kung fu ‘master’ gets comeuppance from taekwondo fighter after sucker eye-poking Chinese kick-boxer
    Seemingly frustrated, he then tries to knee his opponent (which, of course, is a dangerous game against a Muay Thai fighter if you’re signalling that knees are OK).
    Thankfully our Muay Thai man goes easy on him – it’s just a sparring session after all.
    THREADS
    The Effectiveness of Pressure point fighting (?)
    Muay Thai
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  2. #182
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    ttt 4 2019

    From weight-loss plan to first ever Hong Kong wushu world championships sanda medallist
    How combat sports on leitai helped Nana Tsang regain confidence in life
    The 38-year-old veteran still has fire in her belly and considers 2022 Asian Games next target
    Chan Kin-wa
    Published: 8:00am, 9 Nov, 2019


    Muay Thai boxer Nana Tsang Hoi-lan. Photos: Xiaomei Chen

    Nana Tsang Hoi-lan was often called “a crab with soft limbs” in her younger days, a time when she had little or no desire to do any physical exercise, even though her siblings were active in sport.
    As she grew up, her body expanded to the extent that, at just 1.66 metres tall and weighing 64 kgs, she was inevitably teased by her work colleagues.
    “I sometimes fell down on the street when walking during my younger days,” said Tsang, now 38. “At that time, I thought I was simply weak and lacked body coordination, but now I know it was because I had lacked proper physical exercise.”
    Working as a clerk in a sedentary office job up until her mid- to late-20s only exacerbated her weakness. “I finally thought enough was enough and started picking up sports, hoping it could make me healthier and at least look better. Since my sister, who is married to a Muay Thai fighter, does combat sports, I decided to follow her.”

    Kin-wa Chan
    @Kinwachan1024
    Nana Tsang, Hong Kong’s first sanda medallist at Wushu World Championships!

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    She started Thai boxing over a decade ago but did not have her first competitive bout until 2010, in shoot boxing, a popular Japanese combat discipline. She slowly gathered momentum in a variety of combat sports until last month in Shanghai, when she lifted a wushu world championships silver medal in the women’s sanda under-60kg category, the first ever sanda medal for Hong Kong.

    Sanda is one of two streams in wushu, a modern unarmed combat sport developed from traditional wushu techniques, primarily making use of punching, kicking, throwing, wrestling and defensive techniques. It is also contested in major multi-sport events such as the Southeast Asian Games and the Asian Games.


    Muay Thai boxer Nana Tsang Hoi-lan.

    “Hong Kong have been doing very well in taolu the other stream of wushu, and have produced many world champions over the years, but this is the first time we came back with a sanda medal,” said Tsang who cherishes the moments when she won two bouts in Shanghai to reach the final, where she lost to the champion, mainlander Qi Yumei.
    “The team was already thrilled when I beat an Austrian athlete in the first round to move to the medal match. It’s the result they have been looking for over many years, not only a strong boost for my own career but also for a minor discipline that needs to attract more young athletes to take up the baton.”

    .
    Muay Thai boxer Nana Tsang Hoi-lan.

    It is the second time Tsang has competed at the world championships. She was at the 2015 worlds in Indonesia, but was stopped in the first round.
    While many people consider combat sports very dangerous and crude and therefore not suitable for females, Tsang does not agree.
    “Any sport has potential danger, but if you follow the rules, you have less chance of exposure to danger,” she said. “Combat sports are exciting for obvious reasons, and, in sanda, we can win by a knockout, but more often we win by scoring points through hitting the legitimate parts of your opponents, such as head, trunk [including chest, abdomen, waist and back], and the legs. You don’t have to beat your opponent to death. After all, we have to wear protective gear, such as head guard, chest protector, gloves and mouth guard during a match.
    “You may get some nasty bruises if you are hit, and your face will look terrible because you sweat a lot during competition.”


    Muay Thai boxer Nana Tsang Hoi-lan.

    Tsang lacked self confidence when she was young, but that changed after she picked up combat sports, especially when she walks on to the leitai, an elevated platform where bouts take place.
    “I enjoy the moments of being on the leitai, where the spotlight is all on you,” said Tsang. “I have spent a lot of effort over the years to overcome challenges. Sometimes I win, sometimes I lose, but it gives me the courage to deal with them.
    “Even if you lose in the end, you still win something. You can have a fitter body and a better mental outlook. You gain a lot of experience dealing with different people, both on and off the leitai.
    “Of course, you can also learn this through practising other sports, but combat sports are exciting and not as boring as running on the track or swimming in the pool. You can enjoy great satisfaction when you evade the attack of your opponents and fight back with a successful hit.”
    With her silver medal from Shanghai, Tsang will soon be eligible for elite training grant support awarded by the Sports Institute, which should keep her focused and provide her with a full-time career.


    Muay Thai boxer Nana Tsang Hoi-lan.

    “We have been on our own for a long time because we didn’t achieve the required benchmark,” she said. “I have to work as a coach in different combat sports to support my athletics career, but this is going to change. Support from the Sports Institute means more than just financial backing. Sports science and sports medicine services also available, and this is important especially when we get injured. I am so happy the hard work over these years is paying off.”
    Tsang will now focus on next year’s World Cup in Australia, with the 2022 Asian Games in Hangzhou possibly her final target. “Yes, I will be 40 by then, but if there is no age limit in sanda set by the organisers, I definitely want to start in Hangzhou to strive for more honours for Hong Kong,” she said. “I still feel the energy and have the spirit to fight on the leitai for a couple more years.”

    Nana Tsang’s major achievements
    2016 – 6th TAFISA Games silver medal (Muay Thai)
    2016 – World Cup Sanda bronze medal
    2015 – IFMA Royal World Cup bronze medal
    2014-15 – Hong Kong Muay Thai champion
    2013-16 – Hong Kong Wushu champions (Sanshou)
    2010-13 – Hong Kong Energy Fight champion

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: From shedding weight to a milestone for HK in wushu
    THREADS
    Sanda in Hong Kong
    15th World Wushu Championships
    Muay Thai
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  3. #183
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    Our freshest exclusive web article

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  4. #184
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    TKD v Muay Thai in PRC =7s KO

    Skip to 45s on the vid to see the actual fight. I'm not convinced this TKD player really knew TKD. He just walks into that and doesn't even know fist bump etiquette. Some peeps are just making these sorts of vids now because they're good clickbait and I feel a bit tainted reposting them here.

    Chinese taekwondo black belt challenges Muay Thai fighter; gets KO’d in seven seconds
    Huang Xiaolong didn’t last long in footage of fight that has gone viral on social media
    ‘At least that belt kept his trousers up,’ one commenter jokes after style-vs-style mismatch
    Nick Atkin
    Published: 5:34pm, 21 Feb, 2020


    Chinese World Taekwondo Federation black belt Huang Xiaolong lies concussed on the floor. Photo: YouTube/Fight Commentary Breakdowns

    It was never going to take too long for footage of another embarrassing style-vs-style challenge match to emerge from China.
    This time it was a Chinese World Taekwondo Federation black belt Huang Xiaolong, who is also trained in Muay Thai and karate, taking on a Chinese Muay Thai fighter in a match in Chengdu from back in 2009, but which has only recently gone viral on social media.
    Huang looks dazed after getting clipped straight away by a left hook from the Muay Thai fighter but manages to circle to his left, keeping the distance.
    He checks one of his opponent’s low kicks but leaves himself open up top with his hands by his waist, and that’s the beginning of the end.



    Attempting a jump kick, Huang launches himself off both feet at the same time as the Muay Thai fighter lands a high kick flush on the side of his head.
    Huang is propelled up into the air and on to his back – luckily his head doesn’t hit the gym’s wooden floor, but he will certainly have had some bad whiplash.
    Huang is unable to get to his feet, even with help from his coach, and slumps down on to his back again, while the Muay Thai fighter bows his head in a show of traditional respect.
    “Gotta love how the coach immediately starts jerking his head and neck around, trying to stand him back up whilst he's KTFO,” wrote one commenter on YouTube, where the video was posted by the Fight Commentary Breakdowns channel.
    Chengdu is also the Chinese city were MMA fighter Xu Xiaodong famously knocked out tai chi “master” Lei Lei in around 10 seconds in 2017.
    “He didn’t know taekwondo at all. He was only wearing the uniform,” said one commenter. “At least that belt kept his trousers up,” another wrote.



    Nick Atkin
    Nick is a production editor on the South China Morning Post’s sport desk, where he covers mixed martial arts (MMA). He was previously a sports writer and editor for ESPN.
    THREADS
    TKD
    Muay Thai
    Gene Ching
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  5. #185
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    So saddened to here this.


    Lumpinee Stadium To Close Permanently
    News / By George Gordon
    News recently broke that the famed Muay Thai stadium, Lumpinee, will likely not be re-opening. This is thought to be a part of military reform plans. The stadium came under scrutiny back in March 2020 for proceeding with an event, despite a government lockdown being implemented just a few days prior. The stadium is likely to be converted into a sports centre instead.

    Lumpinee, along with Raja****ern stadium are two of the most historic and prestigious Muay Thai arenas in Bangkok. The stadium moved in 2014 to a new site, to accommodate more spectators. Stadium title holders are considered to be some of the most elite fighters in the sport and it is a huge goal of many fighters to achieve such status. Previous Lumpinee stadium champions include Saenchai, Anuwat and the only foreigner to win the title twice, Damian Alamos.

    The sport of Muay Thai has struggled immensely during the Coronavirus pandemic. With fighters not earning to support their families, gyms all over the world closing and now potentially a pivotal stadium closing, it is paramount now more than ever that fans come together and support fighters, gyms and promotions where possible to keep the sport growing.

    ONE Championship have done exceptionally well to keep events flowing regularly, and events will slowly but surely return across the rest of the world, but with a lack of finances to accommodate for fighters’ isolation and minimal revenue due to no fan attendance this will have long-lasting impacts. Support your gyms, keep training where you can, and tune in for your favourite fighters when they return


    Author
    George Gordon
    @goodgame_muaythai
    threads
    Muay-Thai
    covid
    Gene Ching
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  6. #186
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    Resort training

    Luxury Resorts Are Using Martial Arts to Highlight Local Cultures
    Plan a trip that's worth fighting for.
    By Jennifer Flowers
    May 26, 2021, 10:25 PM PDT

    Capoeira practice at the UXUA Casa Hotel & Spa in Trancoso, Brazil Source: UXUA

    I’d spent three intense years training in jeet kune do—an expression of martial arts Bruce Lee developed—before finally making it to Leung Ting Gym in Hong Kong’s neon-lit Yau Ma Tei neighborhood. Among fruit and jade markets, a narrow staircase leads up to this living piece of history. It’s named for one of the last disciples of Grandmaster Ip Man, one of Lee’s most influential teachers, who helped popularize a 300-year-old kung fu style called wing chun.

    Leung Ting Gym doesn’t normally allow visitors or drop-in students, so it’s a treat that my concierge at the Rosewood Hong Kong has brought me this far. Through a small window on a mustard-colored door, he and I watch in awe as three students perform the circular and linear hand motions of chi sau. Cantonese for “sticky hands,” it’s a calm, fluid way to diffuse the energy of an attacking opponent, a centuries-old lesson in grace under pressure.

    Peering in, I think about wing chun’s founder, a Buddhist nun named Ng Mui from China’s legendary Shaolin Temple. Her fighting system tailored for smaller people has emboldened me as a 5-foot-2 Asian-American woman.


    Silat at One&Only Desaru Coast,Source: One&Only Resorts

    When I started training, I thought it would just be something to practice at home. But as I learned at Leung Ting Gym, martial arts in their original context are a compelling portal into other cultures, each movement intertwined with heritage and philosophy. In France there’s savate, a 19th century kicking art that evolved from Parisian street fighting but has the elegance of ballet. The highly efficient krav maga used by the Israeli military was developed by Jews in 1930s Czechoslovakia to defend themselves against violence. Filipino martial arts is a beautiful but deadly practice that had to masquerade as a cultural dance after Spanish colonists banned it in the Philippines; now it’s recognized as a national treasure.

    Several forward-thinking resorts today are harnessing the martial arts industry—which racks up an estimated $4 billion in the U.S. each year—as a way to meet travelers’ demands for authentic adventure experiences. An invitation into a master’s private world can feel like the kind of genuine insider hospitality that many travelers seek; it’s as culturally enriching as museums, theater, or food.


    UXUASource: UXUA
    At the recently opened One&Only Desaru Coast, a resort on the tropical southern tip of Malaysia, guests can privately study the fundamentals of silat, a Southeast Asian fighting style practiced to the beat of single-headed kompang hand drums. The teacher is Muhammad Muiz, who holds the elusive master title with the country’s National Silat Federation. A 45-minute lesson costs $60 per person, the same as a private session with a tennis pro at the resort, but with the added dimension of showcasing Malaysian culture.


    Kru Toom at Capella Bangkok Source: Capella Bangkok
    In Thailand the eight-month-old Capella Bangkok provides a similar service. When the pandemic subsides, the resort will be the only place in the city to take a private lesson with former muay thai champion Parinya Kiatbusaba, better known as Kru Toom. For $145 she’ll teach you the secrets behind using shins, knees, elbows, and fists as “eight limbs” for fluid combat in the resort’s tree-shaded courtyard by the Chao Phraya River. With the help of a translator, she’ll also offer some historical context for muay thai, derived from centuries of tactics used in the ancient Siamese kingdom, and share her personal journey becoming one of the world’s few transgender boxers.

    The UXUA Casa Hotel & Spa in Trancoso, Brazil, pays allegiance to capoeira, an acrobatic regional dance created by enslaved West Africans in the 16th century. The resort, co-founded by Bob Shevlin and Wilbert Das, ex-creative director of fashion label Diesel SpA, opened in 2009 with a capoeira program for underprivileged kids at a local school—many of whom now teach at an academy that raises money by offering $60-an-hour private lessons to guests.


    While I watch the class at Leung Ting Gym, my concierge improvises in Cantonese, hoping to broker access on my behalf. Eventually the door opens. The space is so minuscule, only I can enter—and just for a few minutes. I take in the elegant Chinese calligraphy on the walls, the soft-spoken direction from the sifu, or teacher, and the shuffling of the students’ feet.

    I fixate on the wooden mook jong practice dummy in the corner, a replica of which sits in my own school back in Brooklyn. It’s an emblem of a tradition that’s crossed many generations, and the sight of it here, thousands of miles from New York, reminds me that these students and I share a rare and refined language. I’ve never felt so at home.
    threads
    Leung-Ting-Wingtsun
    Muay-Thai
    Capoeira
    Silat
    Gene Ching
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  7. #187
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    3 new martial IFs



    GAISF President Raffaele Chiulli welcomes six new IOC recognised International Sports Federations
    July 20, 2021
    GAISF President Raffaele Chiulli praised the six International Sports Federations (IFs) who were granted full International Olympic Committee (IOC) recognition at today’s IOC Session. The six fully recognised IFs granted full IOC recognition at the 138th IOC Session in Tokyo, Japan, are as follows:

    ♦ The International Cheerleading Union (ICU)

    ♦ The International Federation of Muaythai Associations (IFMA)

    ♦ The International Sambo Federation (FIAS)

    ♦ The International Federation Icestocksport (IFI)

    ♦ The World Association of Kickboxing Organisations (WAKO)

    ♦ World Lacrosse (WL)

    GAISF President Chiulli said:

    “This is a historic day for the global sports community and an incredible milestone for each of these respective sports. Today’s decision will provide a major boost for each of these now fully recognised IFs to continue to grow their sports around the world. GAISF will continue to provide its expertise and support throughout the next stage of their journeys, in addition to the ongoing support provided by ARISF and AIMS.”

    As a service to our readers, Around the Rings will provide verbatim texts of selected press releases issued by Olympic-related organizations, federations, businesses and sponsors.

    These press releases appear as sent to Around the Rings and are not edited for spelling, grammar or punctuation.
    Hold the phone...cheerleading?

    threads
    Tokyo-Olympics
    Muay-Thai
    And we don't have a basic Kickboxing thread so I'm using this one: revert-to-kickboxing
    Gene Ching
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    Author of Shaolin Trips
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