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Thread: Suffrajitsu

  1. #1
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    Suffrajitsu

    This is an amazing story.

    'Suffrajitsu': How the suffragettes fought back using martial arts
    By Camila Ruz & Justin Parkinson
    BBC News Magazine
    5 October 2015


    Image copyrightJet City Comics/Joao Vieira

    The film Suffragette, which is due for release, portrays the struggle by British women to win the vote. They were exposed to violence and intimidation as their campaign became more militant. So they taught themselves the martial art of jiu-jitsu.
    Edith Garrud was a tiny woman. Measuring 4ft 11in (150cm) in height she appeared no match for the officers of the Metropolitan Police - required to be at least 5ft 10in (178cm) tall at the time. But she had a secret weapon.
    In the run-up to World War One, Garrud became a jiu-jitsu instructor to the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU), better known as the suffragettes, taking part in an increasingly violent campaign for votes for women.
    Sick of the lack of progress, they resorted to civil disobedience, marches and illegal activities including assault and arson.
    The struggle in the years before the war became increasingly bitter. Women were arrested and, when they went on hunger strike, were force-fed using rubber tubes. While out on marches, many complained of being manhandled and knocked to the ground. Things took a darker turn after "Black Friday" on 18 November 1910.


    Black Friday protest, 1910: Suffragettes were assaulted by police and men in the crowd

    A group of around 300 suffragettes met a wall of policemen outside Parliament. Heavily outnumbered, the women were assaulted by both police and male vigilantes in the crowd. Many sustained serious injuries and two women died as a result. More than 100 suffragettes were arrested.
    "A lot said they had been groped by the police and male bystanders," says Elizabeth Crawford, author of The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide. "After that, women didn't go to these demonstrations unprepared."
    Some started putting cardboard over their ribs for protection. But Garrud was already teaching the WSPU to fight back. Her chosen method was the ancient Japanese martial art of jiu-jitsu. It emphasised using the attacker's force against them, channelling their momentum and targeting their pressure points.


    A suffragette's guide to self-defence

    The first connection between the suffragettes and jiu-jitsu was made at a WSPU meeting. Garrud and her husband William, who ran a martial arts school in London's Golden Square together, had been booked to attend. But William was ill, so she went alone.
    "Edith normally did the demonstrating, while William did the speaking," says Tony Wolf, writer of Suffrajitsu, a trilogy of graphic novels about this aspect of the suffragette movement. "But the story goes that the WSPU's leader, Emmeline Pankhurst, encouraged Edith to do the talking for once, which she did."


    Jet City Comics/Joao Vieira

    Garrud began teaching some of the suffragettes. "At that time it was more about defending themselves against angry hecklers in the audience who got on stage, rather than police," says Wolf. "There had been several attempted assaults."
    By about 1910 she was regularly running suffragette-only classes and had written for the WSPU's newspaper, Votes for Women. Her article stressed the suitability of jiu-jitsu for the situation in which the WSPU found itself - that is, having to deal with a larger, more powerful force in the shape of the police and government.
    The press noticed. Health and Strength magazine printed a satirical article called "Jiu-jitsuffragettes". Punch magazine showed a cartoon of Garrud standing alone against several policemen, entitled "The suffragette that knew jiu-jitsu". The term "suffrajitsu" soon came into common use.


    Islington Local History Centre

    "They wouldn't have expected in those days that women could respond physically to that kind of action, let alone put up effective resistance," says Martin Dixon, chairman of the British Jiu-Jitsu Association. "It was an ideal way for them to handle being grabbed while in a crowd situation."
    The Pankhursts agreed and encouraged all suffragettes to learn the martial art. "The police know jiu-jitsu. I advise you to learn jiu-jitsu. Women should practice it as well as men," said Sylvia Pankhurst, daughter of Emmeline, in a 1913 speech.
    As the years went on, confrontations between police and suffragettes became more intense. The so-called Cat and Mouse Act in 1913 allowed hunger-striking prisoners to be released and then re-incarcerated as soon as they had recovered their health.
    "The WSPU felt that as Mrs Pankhurst had such a vital role to play as motivator and figurehead for the organisation that she was too important to be recaptured," says Emelyne Godfrey, author of Femininity, Crime and Self-Defence in Victorian Literature and Society.
    She needed protectors so Garrud formed a group called The Bodyguard. It consisted of up to 30 women who undertook "dangerous duties," explains Godfrey. "Sometimes all they would get would be a phone call and instructions to follow a particular car."
    The Bodyguard, nicknamed "Amazons" by the press, armed themselves with clubs hidden in their dresses.


    Rex Features
    Filming on the Suffragette set: A protester defends herself against a policeman's truncheon

    They came in handy during a famous confrontation known as the "Battle of Glasgow" in early 1914.
    The Bodyguard travelled overnight from London by train, their concealed clubs making the journey uncomfortable. A crowd was waiting to see Emmeline Pankhurst speak at St Andrew's Hall. But police had surrounded it, hoping to catch her.
    Pankhurst evaded them on her way in by buying a ticket and pretending to be a spectator. The Bodyguard then got into position, sitting on a semi-circle of chairs behind the speaker's podium.
    Suddenly Pankhurst appeared and started speaking. She did so for half a minute before police tried to storm the stage.
    But they became caught on barbed wire hidden in bouquets. "So about 30 suffragettes and 50 police were involved in a brawl on stage in front of 4,000 people for several minutes," says Wolf.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  2. #2
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    continued from previous post


    July 1914: Suffragettes advertise a meeting at which Emmeline Pankhurst will speak

    Eventually police overwhelmed The Bodyguard and Pankhurst was once again arrested. But the difficulty they had in dragging her away showed just how effective her guards had become.
    Garrud did not just teach them physical skills. They had also learnt to trick their opponents. In 1914, Emmeline Pankhurst gave a speech from a balcony in Camden Square.
    When she emerged from the house in a veil, escorted by members of The Bodyguard, the police swooped in. Despite a fierce fight she was knocked to the ground and dragged away unconscious. But when the police triumphantly unveiled her, they realised she was a decoy. The real Pankhurst had been smuggled out in the commotion.
    The emphasis on skill to defeat and outwit a larger opponent was what first impressed Garrud about jiu-jitsu. She came across it when her husband William attended a martial arts exhibition in 1899 and started taking lessons.

    Women's suffrage - a brief timeline


    Getty Images
    1867: MP John Stuart Mill supports equality for women in the Second Reform Act, but is defeated
    1903: The Women's Social and Political party, later referred to as the suffragettes, holds its first meeting
    1918: Representation of the People's Act allows women over 30 to vote
    1928: Women over 21 get the vote

    BBC iWonder: Beyond suffrage - how did women battle their way into Parliament?

    Garrud was soon teaching it herself and became one of the first female martial art instructors in the West. In exhibitions, she would wear a red gown and invite a martial arts enthusiast dressed as a policeman to attack her.
    "As far as the suffragettes were concerned, she was very much in the right place at the right time," says Wolf.
    "Jiu-jitsu had become something of a society trend, with women hosting jiu-jitsu parties, where they and their friends underwent instruction."
    Garrud and her jiu-jitsu students continued their fight for the vote until a bigger battle engulfed them all. At the outbreak of WW1, the suffragettes concentrated on helping the war effort.
    At the end of the war, in 1918, the Representation of the People Act was finally passed. More than eight million women in the UK were given the vote. But women would not get the same voting rights as men until 1928.
    As time passed, The Bodyguard and their trainer began to be forgotten. "It was the leaders that wrote the books and set the history," explains Crawford. The stories of those who helped them were less likely to be recorded.
    Edith Garrud does not feature in the new film but one of its stars, Helena Bonham Carter, has paid her own tribute by changing her character's name from Caroline to Edith in her honour.
    She was "an amazing woman" whose fighting method was not about brute force, Bonham Carter has said. "It was about skill."


    Getty Images
    Helena Bonham Carter's character in the film Suffragette is named Edith in homage to Edith Garrud

    It was this skill that helped the suffragettes take on powerful opponents. As Garrud recalled in an interview in 1965, a policeman once tried to prevent her from protesting outside Parliament. "Now then, move on, you can't start causing an obstruction here," he said. "Excuse me, it is you who are making an obstruction," she replied, and tossed him over her shoulder.
    Impressive. I never knew.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #3
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    More on jujutsuffragettes

    THE SUFFRAGETTES WHO LEARNED MARTIAL ARTS TO FIGHT FOR VOTES
    BY TAO TAO HOLMES / 03 NOV 2015


    Famous suffragette Edith Garrud demonstrates a jujitsu move on a policeman. (Photo: Tony Wolf/Public Domain)

    Beneath the folds of their Victorian dresses, the jujutsuffragettes concealed wooden clubs—preparation for hand-to-hand combat with the London police.

    The Indian clubs, shaped like bowling pins, were used in exercise classes of the era, flaunted in leg lunges, or alternatively, brandished against cops. When policemen heard that radical suffragettes were arming themselves, they began worrying about pistols and firearms; what they didn’t expect was to be met with an eclectic form of the Japanese martial art of jujutsu (also spelled jiujitsu or jujitsu). The women pulled out their clubs, the police pulled out their truncheons, and the sparring began.

    This is a story of female armed resistance that has been little told until recently, when a studio film and a new graphic novel trilogy aim to show the harder side of British feminism.

    ADVERTISING

    This contingent of British women fighting—very physically—for votes was officially named the Bodyguard, but they soon earned other monickers through local papers and word-of-mouth like the Amazons and the jujutsuffragettes. They were an underground unit of the Women’s Social and Political Union, trained and organized in response to England’s Cat and Mouse Act, which was an effort to handle the hunger strikes of imprisoned suffragettes in an ethically palatable manner, officially known as the Prisoners (Temporary Discharge for Ill Health) Act of 1913. The Act was the culmination of an intense propaganda war between feminists, who viewed force feeding as torture, and the government, whose response was to release protesters from jail long enough for them to recover their health before tracking them back down to rearrest and re-imprison them on the original charge.


    The Suffrajistus are not here to mess around. (Image: Joao Vieira/Jet City Comics)

    And that’s where the Bodyguard stepped in—in between their sisters-in-arms and members of law enforcement, their mission to keep these prison breaks as long as possible. The women of the Bodyguard were extremely fit, willing to risk their health, safety and freedom, and almost always single, since it was considered unfair for mothers to be thrown in jail. They came from the ranks of the most radical suffragettes and studied jujutsu in a network of secret locations, using codenames and whatever subterfuge necessary to keep their activity private from prying eyes.

    Jujutsu, a centuries-old form of armed combat, roughly translates to the “art of yielding.” First introduced in Britain in 1898, jujutsu was considered suitable for women, even elegant and feminine. Jujutsu, unlike English wrestling, is not about overpowering someone with force; instead, you skillfully yield to your opponent’s movements and use their weight and strength in your favor. Jujutsu became a kind of metaphor for the women’s suffrage struggle, says Tony Wolf, one of the world’s top experts on archaic martial arts. Since the radical movement was small in numbers, jujutsuffragettes had to rely on skill and trickery to overpower the government.

    How has a secret army of radical suffragettes defending their cause against the Man with mixed martial arts remained so unknown until now? Wolf thinks that Suffrajitsu, like many other movements of the time, was forgotten amidst the cultural chaos brought about by the First World War. The 2015 film Suffragette is the first time this movement has been highlighted in popular media, and for the past several years, Wolf and a handful of others have been doing serious research to bring this band of bodyguards back into the popular consciousness.


    Who's gonna take this chick on? (Image: Tony Wolf/Public Domain)

    Suffrajitsu, released earlier this year, is a graphic novel trilogy set in 1914, is a collaboration between Tony Wolf and illustrator Joao Vieira. It’s the story of the Amazons’ efforts to protect their leaders against arrest and assault, the story of women living in an extremely patriarchal society at the height of what was almost a civil war in England. The first chapter of the trilogy is closely based on real events, while the subsequent chapters diverge into an alternate-history action-adventure story. One of the biggest challenges, says Wolf, was picking and choosing appropriate characters from real life who could have plausibly been involved in the 1913 women’s rights movement and have joined the Amazon team. All but two of the characters are fictional representations of historically real women, who he researched through reading extensive first-person diaries and accounts. Wolf sees Suffrajitsu as a compelling form of “edutainment,” and hopes especially that it will get teenage girls interested in history, martial arts and defense training.

    Wolf, a native of New Zealand, grew up training in martial arts, gymnastics and fencing, and when he started looking for a career, he says he was “basically qualified to be a professional assassin.” Instead, he segued into the entertainment industry, becoming a fight choreographer for theater, film and television. Throughout this time, he was always interested in the unusual history of martial arts, especially a form known as bartitsu that incorporates jujutsu, boxing, and cane fighting, popularized by the revival of Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes (where it was mislabeled “baritsu”).


    Amazons secretly practice their martial arts in a scene from Suffrajitsu, the graphic novel. (Image: Joao Vieira/Jet City Comics)

    A small, like-minded community began tracking down obscure newspaper and magazine articles on the subject, and Wolf volunteered to edit the first of two volumes of the Bartitsu Compendium, which led to his discovery of Suffrajitsu. Wolf has since co-directed and co-produced a documentary on bartitsu and written a biography, Edith Garrud: The Suffragette Who Knew Jujutsu. When science fiction writer Neal Stephenson asked him if he would write a graphic novel about the Bodyguard, Wolf jumped on the opportunity to get creative with a trove of themes and information he’d been involved with for so long.

    Wolf describes himself as a “very staunchly feminist sort of guy,” and while writing Suffrajitsu, he approached the women as a group of professionals, political radicals committed to an ideological goal. “The fact that they were female was third or fourth in the list of priorities in terms of how I wanted to present them,” he explains. At the same time, he didn’t want it to be “women: good; men: bad.” There were many men who very assiduously supported the radical suffrage movement to the point that they earned their own nickname: suffragents. Suffragents supported these women while they engaged in very aggressive, though non-violent civil disobedience. “These women were very careful and also very lucky that no one was physically harmed in their protests—even the extreme stuff like bombing,” says Wolf.


    The Bodyguard takes on the police! (Image: Joao Vieira/Jet City Comics)

    The need for self defense, then and now, is a reminder of continuing power imbalances, says Wolf. In the 1980s, he taught classes in women’s self defense. “A thing I learned from my students was how very vulnerable a lot of them felt,” he says. “I recognized that a lot of women feel threatened doing things that basically guys don’t need to worry about, such as walking down to the store to get some milk. I’d sort of known that intellectually, I guess, beforehand, but working with large number of women over several years really drove that point home.” Now, if he’s walking to the convenience store at night and there’s a woman approaching in the opposite direction, he’ll cross the road to avoid making her feel uncomfortable or threatened.

    This week in Chicago, Wolf is hosting an Obscura Society event to share the story of the Suffrajitsu. It is “a kind of Edwardian soirée,” he says, involving martial arts demonstrations and Q&A. The event will offer certain touches, with pictures of actual members of The Bodyguard in action, popular ragtime of the era, and subtle tributes to the purple, white and green that symbolized the radical suffragette movement.

    When asked whether Suffrajitsu has a modern-day equivalent, Wolf is quick to name FEMEN, an Eastern European activist organization. “I’ve been waiting for someone to make this connection, actually,” says Wolf. “The parallels between this group and the suffragette Amazons is quite extraordinary.” FEMEN activists train similarly to the Amazons in 1913, learning self-defense techniques that make it difficult for security guards to easily remove them. They practice active resistance and tend to operate in conditions of secrecy. They’re most known for their topless protests, their basic thesis being that the only way for women’s issues to receive popular attention is for FEMEN women to go topless. Activists will wait for a large televised event to take place, and then stage a radical protest, jump over barriers, strip off their tops, and yell slogans—a reminder that the world still needs jujutsuffragettes.
    I wonder if this will be depicted in the movie.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #4
    I believe her husband wrote this book- http://www.paladin-press.com/product...outheast_Asian

  5. #5
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    Our latest ezine offering

    Gene Ching
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  6. #6
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    More on Bartitsu

    Same pic, and I like the term 'sufferajitsu' more.



    THE MARTIAL ART THAT (SORT OF) WON BRITISH WOMEN THE RIGHT TO VOTE
    By Fiona Zublin

    WHY YOU SHOULD CARE
    Because they were fighting … with walking sticks.

    Some British women literally fought for the right to vote. Edith Garrud, at all of 4-foot-11, was demonstrating outside the House of Commons when a policeman told her she was obstructing traffic. She faked a handkerchief drop — a classic move — then flipped the policeman over her shoulder and onto the ground. Into the crowd she went, the queen of jiu jitsu. Or, more specifically, Bartitsu.

    But let’s back up to the late 1890s, when Bangalore-born Englishman Edward William Barton-Wright returned to his home country from Japan. He had studied martial arts in two cities there and knew an opportunity when he saw one: He created his own self-defense system, one that melded jiu jitsu with boxing, stick fighting and wrestling. It was a martial art, of course, but it was an Edwardian gentleman’s art too, with a walking stick serving not only as a prime mode of defense but also as a stylish accessory.

    BLOWS CAN BE MADE SO FORMIDABLE THAT, WITH AN ORDINARY MALACCA CANE, IT IS POSSIBLE TO SEVER A MAN’S JUGULAR VEIN THROUGH THE COLLAR OF HIS OVERCOAT.
    EDWARD BARTON-WRIGHT, ‘SELF-DEFENSE WITH A WALKING STICK’

    “Bartitsu was what we would think of today as a cross-training system,” says Tony Wolf, author of Suffrajitsu, a graphic novel about the suffragettes’ use of martial arts. Bartitsu was designed to give its students jiu jitsu skills “as a sort of ‘secret weapon,’ ” Wolf explains. When Barton-Wright introduced his system, Japanese combat was taught in only one place in the Western world: his school on Shaftesbury Avenue.

    In his 1902 essay “Self-Defense With a Walking Stick,” Barton-Wright sang the praises of the accoutrement’s effectiveness as a weapon: “Blows can be made so formidable that, with an ordinary Malacca cane, it is possible to sever a man’s jugular vein through the collar of his overcoat,” he wrote, before detailing potential moves in various situations. He also cautioned that certain blows should be made with care when being shown to a friend. Athletes, politicians, military men and other prominent members of London society flocked to train under Barton-Wright, digging his combination of familiar fighting skills and seemingly exotic hand fighting.

    Even Sherlock Holmes got in on the craze — though Bartitsu enthusiasts will point out that Arthur Conan Doyle misspells it as “Baritsu” and has Holmes use the method in 1894, several years before Barton-Wright invented it. Bartitsu — or an approximation thereof — shows up occasionally in adaptations of the Holmes stories, often not mentioned by name but reflected in the fight choreography’s hat-and-umbrella antics mixed with boxing and various martial arts. Sure, it may seem silly when, in character as fiction’s favorite sleuth, Benedict Cumberbatch or Robert Downey Jr. begins throwing kicks and dodging blows, but Conan Doyle started Holmes off by including his martial arts background in the literary canon.

    Beyond the fictional detective and real-life luminaries, though, were multitudes of fitness professionals, men and women who learned and transmitted Barton-Wright’s martial art. One of these was Edith Garrud, whom with her husband, William, trained under Barton-Wright. The couple took over the running of jiu jitsu master Sadakazu Uyenishi’s London dojo when he returned to Japan in 1908; by 1910, Edith was teaching self-defense to suffragettes in Kensington and posing for photo shoots. She trained the suffragettes’ bodyguard unit, an all-female team familiar with hand-to-hand combat whose members were charged with protecting prominent women campaigners from arrest and who often came to blows with the police. But, says Wolf, “it’s important to carefully distinguish between that romantic badass image and the reality of their history.” He notes that Garrud, Emmeline Pankhurst and the other suffragettes would have been regarded as violent insurgents at the time. Today, Garrud is more of a historical footnote — and a reminder that self-defense systems can be extremely effective in the real world.

    Though Barton-Wright’s club lasted only a few years — it had closed down by 1903 — his promotion of jiu jitsu had a lasting impact on British society, which was crazy for martial arts until the advent of World War I. And Bartitsu is still with us, thanks to a cadre of fighter scholars who’ve resurrected Barton-Wright’s texts alongside a “neo-Bartitsu” drawn from the work and training preserved by the master’s students. Wolf is one of those, and he’s not alone — he estimates that there are 50 clubs currently active in Europe and the Americas, training would-be Bartitsu masters inspired by Holmes, Garrud, Barton-Wright and good old-fashioned curiosity. “Our challenge today is to continue [Barton-Wright’s] experiment,” Wolf says. “If we can avoid dissolving into steampunk-hipster irony, then I think we have a fighting chance at doing that.”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  7. #7
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    I meant Suffrajitsu

    SEPTEMBER 24, 2020
    The Martial Arts of “Enola Holmes”


    Enola Holmes: Netflix Poster With Millie Bobby Brown Teases New Mystery | Collider
    The new Netflix movie Enola Holmes stars Stranger Things actress Millie Bobby Brown in the title role as Sherlock Holmes’ younger sister. Based on the popular book series by Nancy Springer, the movie is the first mainstream production to feature suffrajitsu-style action as a major plot point (not counting the blink-and-you’ll-miss-it self-defence training scene in the 2015 movie Suffragette).

    The first martial arts shout-out comes very early in the film. During a montage in which Enola admiringly describes her famous older brother’s many talents, viewers are treated to a cute animation based on Bartitsu founder E.W. Barton-Wright’s 1901 “Self Defence with a Walking Stick” article.

    Bartitsu (or “baritsu”, as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle rendered it) was immortalised in Doyle’s 1903 short story The Adventure of the Empty House, in which Holmes explains that he’d used the art to defeat his arch-nemesis, Professor Moriarty, during their infamous battle at the brink of the Reichenbach Waterfall. The animation is especially notable in that Barton-Wright’s face has been replaced with that of Superman/The Witcher star Henry Cavill, who plays Sherlock Holmes.



    Having absconded from the Holmes family estate in search of their mysteriously missing radical suffragette mother Eudoria (played by Helena Bonham Carter), Enola makes her way to London where her investigations lead her to a women’s jiujitsu class taught by Edith Grayston (Susan Wokoma). Edith’s first name is clearly inspired by that of Edith Garrud, who was the first female professional jiujitsu instructor in the western world. It’s worth noting that Helena Bonham Carter’s character in Suffragette, self-defence instructor Edith Ellyn, was also named in honour of Mrs. Garrud, at the actresses’ own request. Enola Holmes is, thus, the second film in which Carter has been cast as a jiujitsu-fighting suffragette!



    Allowing for the artistic license of portraying a women-only Japanese martial arts class in London during the year 1900 – the Bartitsu Club was open for business then and did offer women’s classes, but it would be another nine years before Edith Garrud started her “Suffragette Self Defence Club” – the class itself is highly accurate. The trainees’ uniforms are period-accurate hybrids of Japanese martial arts do-gi and Edwardian ladies’ physical culture kit and even the mats on the floor are typical of the quilted style used in circa 1900 gymnasia. The techniques being practiced by the jiujitsu trainees in the background of this scene are also entirely plausible for this time and place.

    Retiring to the school’s office, Edith and Enola engage in a wary parlay – Edith clearly knows much more about Eudoria Holmes’ whereabouts that she’s prepared to reveal – and an impromptu, semi-playful physical challenge during which the frustrated Enola attempts a takedown nicknamed the “corkscrew”. This occasions another quick pictorial interlude, featuring a section of a (fictional) book titled Jujutsu: The Martial Art, whose cover may well have been inspired by the (real) Fine Art of Jujutsu, which was written by Emily Diana Watts in 1906.



    We’re treated to a quick riff through the pages – which are montages of photographs from actual early 20th century jiujitsu magazine articles – and then a step-by-step guide to performing the corkscrew manoeuvre, which will clearly be significant later on in the story.



    After some further skullduggery, Enola finds herself engaged in a desperate back-alley fight with walking-stick wielding assassin Linthorn (Burn Gorman) who is stalking her friend, the young Viscount Tewskbury, Marquess of Basilwether (Louis Partridge). This is, by far, the movie’s most elaborate and spectacular fight scene, well-choreographed by stunt co-ordinator Jo McLaren:

    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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    continued from previous post


    Although Enola again fails in attempting the corkscrew technique during this encounter, the astute viewer suspects that she’ll pull it off in the end … which is exactly what happens when, after many more machinations, she finds herself again at a disadvantage in taking on the same assassin, this time in the shadowy hallway of Viscount Tewksbury’s family manor:



    Having rescued the hapless Tewksbury, it only remains for Enola to solve the Mystery of the Missing Mother – which does happen, after a fashion, though we suspect that there is more to discover in that regard during the inevitable and welcome sequel.

    In the meantime, here’s a featurette on the fight scenes of Enola Holmes:

    EDWARDIAN AMAZONS: THE ENGLISH SUFFRAGETTE
    by Lori Ann White

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