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Thread: Kung Fu Nuns & Shaolin Nuns

  1. #1
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    shaolin nuns???

    Would love to study with them, and while I know there's like 20 out at shaolin, how do you go about that??? So, they could do discpleships right?

  2. #2
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    none nuns

    It's very hard to get into the Shaolin nunnery to train. However, you might check out Yongtai Nunnery, which is a sister temple to Shaolin, very near by. I have a write up on it in our latest issue - May June 2004, hitting stands right about now.
    Gene Ching
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    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #3
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    I'll look forward to the read

  4. #4
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    Kung Fu Nuns & Shaolin Nuns

    Hey i was just wondering if anyone knew any information on shaolin nuns? I have heard there is a temple close to shaolin somewhere that in the past had trained shaolin nuns and even to this day there is a few still training. If anyone has information on this it would be greatly appreciated.

  5. #5
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    There are only a few nuns at Shaolin...

    ...and they are very secretive. Shaolin's nunnery is the small temple on the trail to Tamo's cave. I've actually had the honor of training there. My master, Shi Decheng took me there because it was a nice peaceful place to train once.

    Shaolin also has a sister temple, which is a short northernly detour on the way to Shaolin via the old road from Dengfeng. I'm not sure how to get there via the new road. Yongtai Nunnery was founded on the site of the hut of Zhuanyun (the first Buddhist nun of China) by the Tamo's female disciple, Princess Minglian. There are many martial nuns living there now. For more info on this, see my article Shaolin Monks and Warrior Nuns: Lotus & Sword Makes Its American Debut in our 2004 May/June issue.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  6. #6
    in the picture attached to this post there are two shaolin nuns, called 'brothers.'

    they are part of xing zhen's lineage, you will also see a young yong xin and yan ming. i don't remember their names.

  7. #7
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    nice pic Richard

    Do you have a date for that photo?
    Gene Ching
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Do you have a date for that photo?
    I'm pretty sure he went alone and the nuns aren't allowed to date.

    rdrr



    Ill be quiet now.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Do you have a date for that photo?
    not sure of the date on this one. I think, from what memory serves me, it was shot before SXZ started in and out of the hospital.

  10. #10
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    Was Xingzheng officially abbot at that time?

    Xingzheng passed in '87 and was only abbot for one year officially, but he served as acting abbot on and off for some time prior. Xingzheng was already blind at that time. At least, that's my understanding.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  11. #11
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    are the nuns hot? chicks with shaved heads can be hot.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho Mantis View Post
    Genes too busy rocking the gang and scarfing down bags of cheetos while beating it to nacho ninjettes and laughing at the ridiculous posts on the kfforum. In a horse stance of course.

  12. #12
    From the stories I've heard he did not go blind all at once, but one eye went and then the other...even blind and sick he was still a firecracker with his cane or walking stick, apparently if he did not like you he had no problem laying down some "action" language. I heard a story once about some government officials who were trying to muscle into the temple and Xing Zhen literally kicked the crap out of them.

    If I recall correctly he was in and out of hospital for about 2 yrs or so...before he finally passed on. Amitabha.

    The nuns in this pic are on the furthest left and furthest right on the bottom row...although I guess the one on the right is the second row...sorta...

  13. #13
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    Not quite a 'Shaolin' story...

    ...but the best story of the day. It even beat out Kingdom of the Little People doing Shaolin kung fu.

    Page last updated at 14:58 GMT, Wednesday, 14 April 2010 15:58 UK
    Kung fu empowers Nepal nuns
    By Jo Jolly
    BBC News, Kathmandu

    Interest in becoming a nun has grown dramatically since Kung Fu classes began at the Amitabha Drukpa Nunnery

    It is early in the morning at the Amitabha Drukpa Nunnery on a hillside just outside Kathmandu and hundreds of devotees are walking clockwise around a golden statue of Buddha.

    But rather than being immersed in prayer, up on the roof something different is happening - they are practising the same kung fu fighting made famous by the Bruce Lee films of the 1970s.

    Young Buddhist nuns from the 800-year-old Drukpa Buddhist sect are being taught by their Vietnamese master.

    The martial art was introduced to the nunnery two years ago and the nuns practise up to two hours a day.

    'More powerful'

    Rupa Lama, a 16-year-old nun from India, says kung fu helps her concentrate.

    "It's good for our health. Meditation is very difficult and if we do kung fu, then afterwards meditation becomes much easier," she says.

    Another nun, Konchok, also from India, says she likes kung fu because it gives her strength.

    "It's very helpful for our safety. If somebody teases us or something, then we can hit them and be more powerful," she says.

    The confidence shown by these young nuns is unusual. Buddhist nuns in the Himalayas are normally seen as inferior to monks.

    Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo, an Englishwoman who became a Drukpa Buddhist nun more than 30 years ago, says traditionally nuns have been neglected and overlooked.

    "The main problem for nuns has always been that they have not normally had a good situation in which to live, they have not received the support from lay people that monks receive and they have not been educated.

    "So often nuns became basically just household servants for their families or working in the kitchens and the gardens in the monasteries," she says.

    Kung fu was introduced into the Amitabha Drukpa Nunnery by the leader of the Drukpa spiritual sect, His Holiness The Gyalwang Drukpa.

    'Well-equipped'

    The Gyalwang Drukpa is the 12th incarnation of the leader of the Drukpa - or dragon - sect of Buddhism, which is the main religion of Bhutan and is widely practised in countries across the Himalayas.

    He says that he felt that previous spiritual leaders had not done enough to advance the rights of women.

    "When I was very small, I was already thinking that it was not right to suppress women in our society," he says.

    "But then when I grew up, I started to think what can I do for them? Then I thought what I can do is to build a nunnery and then give them an opportunity to study and practise spiritually," he says.

    The nunnery built by The Gyalwang Drukpa, the Amitabha Drukpa Nunnery, is a modern, well-funded and a well-equipped place of worship and study.

    "Not only [is it] just beautiful to look at, but it is a nunnery with the guidelines and the full support from their master, me," he says.

    He says he encouraged the nuns to take up kung fu when he saw nuns from Vietnam practising it.

    Emphasis on meditation

    For the past week, the nuns have been giving demonstrations of their new skill to thousands of pilgrims who are attending the Second Annual Drukpa Conference.

    The Drukpa sect, which places an emphasis on meditation, is popular throughout the Himalayas and also with Westerners.

    Jan Duin, who is attending the conference from the Netherlands, says he has been impressed by the kung fu practice.

    "I think it is very helpful physically and also psychologically because they do a lot of sitting practice," he says.

    "In meditation you practise concentration and you also practise concentration with kung fu."

    Buddhist nun Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo says that she'll be introducing kung fu into her own nunnery which is based in the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh.

    "It's excellent exercise, secondly it's very good for discipline and concentration, thirdly it arouses a sense of self-confidence which is very important for nuns, and fourthly when any young men in the area know nuns are kung fu experts, they keep away," she says.

    Jetsunma says since nunneries have begun to offer better education and physical programmes like kung fu, the number of young women who want to become nuns has grown dramatically.

    "Many of them say, wow, if I become a nun I can study, I can practise, I can do these rituals, I can live together with all these other lovely nuns and lamas will visit us and give us teaching," she says.

    "It's a beautiful life option to getting married, having a baby every year, working in the fields, doing the cooking, doing the cleaning.

    "You know for them this is a huge opening up in a whole world that had previously been closed to them."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson View Post
    I'm pretty sure he went alone and the nuns aren't allowed to date.

    rdrr



    Ill be quiet now.


    I think I hear a RIMSHOT!!

  15. #15
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    Kungfu Makes Ladies More Handsome

    gotta love that title

    Chinese ladies are taking up self-defense training that combines boxing and martial arts. They’re choosing power and grace over milder pursuits and say kung fu makes them confident. Fei Lai reports.

    Sweating, punching her opponent and releasing her energy, Sharon Xia feels powerful and exhilarated.

    It’s just the second boxing session for the 27-year-old office worker at IKEA, but already she is completely absorbed and feels she is getting stronger.

    Xia’s even thinking about buying a dental guard and plans to talk to her coach. She is about 1.6 meters tall and of medium build. No fancy workout duds, just a T-shirt and plain pants.

    Xia is one of an increasing number of Chinese women who are taking up self-defense that can feature both boxing and some aspects of martial arts, such as Wing Chun, believed to have been founded by a Buddhist nun.

    Xia practices at Longwu Kung Fu Center where she pays 500 yuan (US$73.30) a month, gets an instructor and attends different classes.

    More and more Chinese women are no longer shrinking from flexing their muscles, and using their gloved fists if necessary.

    They are taking courses in self-defense, boxing, kung fu, kick-boxing, Wing Chun, karate and other martial arts to train mind and body.

    “Classes like yoga are too soft, while kung fu is all about combat and strength,” says Guo Liang, executive director and chief instructor at Longwu Kung Fu Center.

    “Though going to the gym is popular, the trend is for more women to look for a different kind of workout that can sustain their interest in fitness,” he says.

    Women tend to give up easily at the gym after one or two months when it becomes familiar, he observes. In contrast, the diversity of women’s self-defense training is fun and interactive.

    “Women gain real skills to protect themselves in case of danger,” he says...
    "The true meaning of a given movement in a form is not its application, but rather the unlimited potential of the mind to provide muscular and skeletal support for that movement." Gregory Fong

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