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Thread: Bacon!!!!!!

  1. #76
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    tradition for 1,400 years

    Anyone who has done even a cursory study of Buddhism and Daoism in China knows the longstanding tradition of meat substitutes. China is way ahead of the world on this one.

    The challenges of selling mock meat to China
    Firms trying to break into the market have to be aware that alternatives are far from new; mock meat has been part of the culinary tradition for 1,400 years and the nation already has numerous players with a wide range of products
    SCMP Editorial
    Published: 9:30pm, 27 Oct, 2019


    A pressing reason China may be a prime market for the alternative meat products would also seem to lie in the African swine fever outbreak that, since last year, has decimated the nation’s pork stocks. Photo: AFP

    China is a prime market for the alternative meat phenomenon sweeping the West. The nation ticks all the right boxes – plant-based options help ensure food security, are environmentally friendly and, as a result of the way industry trends have moved, are hi-tech. Three years ago, in an effort to ward off health problems such as cancers, obesity and diabetes, Beijing also issued dietary guidelines recommending a halving of meat consumption. But a pressing reason would also seem to lie in the African swine fever outbreak that, since last year, has decimated the nation’s pork stocks.
    A Hong Kong-based company is already making plans to sell its pork substitute products on the mainland. Prices of the white meat have skyrocketed as a result of the outbreak, which has forced the culling of, by some estimates, half of the country’s pigs. China is the world’s biggest pork consumer, accounting for 50 per cent of the global total. But the nation’s 1.4 billion people are lovers of all sorts of meat, last year consuming 86 million tonnes, more than any other country.
    Demand increased by 14 per cent between 2017 and 2018, in keeping with global trends that the wealthier a society gets, the more it can afford meat. Companies that produce alternatives promote products as being plant-based, which sounds healthy, and eating vegetables is claimed to be better than livestock, which are sometimes raised inhumanely and cause 14.5 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions. But firms trying to break into the Chinese market have to also be aware that alternatives are far from new; mock meat has been part of the culinary tradition for 1,400 years and the nation already has numerous players with a wide range of products. Nationwide sales of alternative meats are the biggest in the world.
    The industry is not new to China, but science means there have been innovations that improve productivity and taste. That does not necessarily also mean healthier products, nor ones that are less expensive. But in a world with a fast-growing population and rising appetite for meat, with Asia and Africa the biggest growth areas, governments have to look to sustainability. Encouraging and welcoming competition and promoting plant-based meat alternatives makes good sense.

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: Selling mock meat to China is a challenge

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    Shaolin diet, vegetarianism and stuff
    Bacon!!!!!!
    Gene Ching
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  2. #77
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    pig poop. it's what's for dinner.

    ‘Waiter, there’s excrement in my pig intestine,’ Chinese diner complains
    Offered about US$70 in compensation after finding nasty surprise in rice noodles, the customer holds out for US$4,000
    He challenges pork supplier’s manager to eat the offending material for the sum he was offered, after firm admits fault
    Mandy Zuo
    Published: 8:44pm, 16 Dec, 2019


    Wang discusses compensation with restaurant staff, who are shown a piece of the pig intestine containing excrement. Photo: Handout

    A restaurant customer in northeastern China is demanding higher compensation after he was served pig intestine filled with excrement at a well-known chain then offered a sum he considered inadequate, according to news video app PearVideo.
    The diner, identified only by his surname Wang, was enjoying a pot of rice noodles with pig intestine on Friday when he found a piece that was tougher to chew, he said.
    He complained to staff at the restaurant, a branch of Axiang Rice Noodles in a mall in Changchun, Jilin province, and it was established that there were pieces of excrement in the meal.
    An unnamed manager from the restaurant’s supplier told PearVideo in Sunday’s report that the supplier’s staff had failed to clean the intestine properly and that it would take full responsibility.
    The manager telephoned Wang, offering to compensate him with an amount equivalent to 10 times the value of the dish, in line with consumer rights regulations – which would give Wang up to 500 yuan (US$72).
    But Wang said he felt insulted by the offer and asked for 30,000 yuan (US$4,300). “I’d like to invite their boss to come over and have a try – I can pay him a few hundred yuan for every piece of excrement he eats,” Wang said.
    The supplier, a small pork business in eastern China, said it could not afford the amount Wang was asking for, especially with business suffering after an African swine fever epidemic that has decimated China’s hog herd.
    “He asked for 30,000 yuan, and later 20,000 yuan,” the manager said. “This year pork prices have been so high that we have barely made any profits. Under such circumstances, such a sum of compensation would be a big blow to a small business.”
    The report included a clip of Wang’s earlier complaint to a restaurant manager, alongside a piece of pig intestine containing a dark filling.
    “I want an apology,” Wang told PearVideo. “And if you do apologise, you should apologise to all consumers nationwide.”

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: Man served with pig faeces wants more compensation
    There's about a month left of the Year of the Pig, then on to the Year of the Rat. This thread has had a good run.

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  3. #78
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    Wi

    It was actually the ginseng angle of this story that caught my attention. I wonder where we are at with this now?


    In this Friday, Oct. 11, 2019, file photo, President Donald Trump watches as Chinese Vice Premier Liu He speaks to U.S. Trade representative Robert Lighthizer, right, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

    Wisconsin Farmers Await Chinese Trade Deal Details On Ginseng, Pork, More
    'Phase One' Of A Trade Deal Was Announced Dec. 13, But So Far Few Details Are Known
    By Rob Mentzer
    Published: Tuesday, December 24, 2019, 6:20am
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    Wisconsin farmers hope the "phase one" trade deal with China announced this month by President Donald Trump will mean increased exports in 2020.

    But until all the details are out, some are holding off on celebrating an end to the trade war.

    Escalating tariffs between the two nations have hurt exports of a number of Wisconsin-grown products, including pork, dairy products, cranberries and ginseng.

    The Dec. 13 announcement from the two governments of an initial deal helped to lower tensions, but those affected by the tariffs warn that "phase one" could be a long way from a finished deal.

    Will Hsu, president of Hsu's Ginseng Enterprises in Marathon County, analogized the situation to having an offer put in on a house. It marks the beginning of a new phase of negotiations, but can be a far cry from having completed a sale.

    "Without knowing the exact details, it's hard to know whether or not you're actually going to close the deal," Hsu said.

    United States ginseng is grown almost entirely in central Wisconsin, and the majority of the market for it is in China. The skyrocketing tariffs of the last 18 months have hit the industry especially hard, and have sent ginseng prices plunging from nearly $50 per pound of cultivated ginseng to closer to $20 per pound, Hsu said. That's because U.S. growers have to essentially deduct the added cost of Chinese tariffs from their own prices. Chinese consumers won't pay more for the root when Wisconsin ginseng is already a premium product there.

    Wisconsin's ginseng industry accounts for more than $30 million in revenues per year.

    Pork producers are also disproportionately affected by the tariffs. China is the world's largest consumer and importer of pork products.

    But Wisconsin farmers now face a 72 percent tariff on pork sales in China, said Keri Retallick, executive vice president of the Wisconsin Pork Association. That's wiped out their competitive advantage in the export market.

    "We need to do whatever we can to get (Wisconsin) pork back to the Chinese population," Retallick said.

    Wisconsin is the largest U.S. producer of cranberries, which saw a steep decline in exports to China amid high tariffs. The dairy industry was affected, too, though milk prices have recently begun to rise for other reasons related to the global market.

    Farmers of all of these products received some federal aid under a $28 billion federal aid program intended to compensate for losses related to the trade war. But in many cases available aid does not cover the losses, and to many farmers it would be an inferior option even if it did.

    "Our producers would much rather have their markets opened up, and to be able to get their revenues directly from what they've produced and sold on the market," Retallick said.

    Ginseng growers are eligible for federal aid payments under a formula that takes into account acreage and caps payments at $250,000. Hsu said that's too little to be all that significant for large growers, and aid payments haven't covered farmers' losses at virtually any scale.

    "Every single farmer would rather have gotten the market value that we were getting a year or two ago," Hsu said. "I've heard of some guys getting $30,000, $40,000 or $50,000, but their loss is probably three to five times what they're actually getting back from the government."

    The possibility of winding down the trade war was treated as good news by Retallick and Hsu. On Monday, China announced it would lower tariffs on hundreds of goods from other nations, a move understood as a response to domestic economic challenges.

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  4. #79
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    Remember swine flu?

    BUSINESS NEWS AUGUST 3, 2020 / 10:36 PM / UPDATED 12 HOURS AGO
    China's hog futures set to make debut, but faces big challenges
    Emily Chow
    6 MIN READ

    SHANGHAI (Reuters) - China’s long-awaited live hog futures contract is almost ready, offering a vital hedging tool for the world’s largest pork industry, which has been roiled by an African swine fever outbreak that devastated herds and sent pork prices soaring.


    FILE PHOTO: An employee works next to signs showing pork prices at a market in Beijing, China December 8, 2019. REUTERS/Jason Lee/File Photo

    The country’s first live-animal physical-delivery contract has been planned for a decade, and is expected to be popular with domestic traders on the Dalian Commodity Exchange (DCE).

    But complex delivery logistics, tight quality-control standards, a local lack of experience with futures contracts and a retail trading community that has wildly distorted other markets will be key challenges.

    China typically slaughters about 700 million pigs annually and produces more than 50 million tonnes of pork – about half of global output. Hog and pork producers have traditionally relied on contracts that define volume and delivery requirements, but have little control over or insight into costs, especially in future months.

    (GRAPHIC - China pork output vs world production: here)

    Reuters Graphic

    That lack of cost control was made clear by the country’s widespread outbreaks of African swine fever, which since 2018 have nearly halved the pig herd and disrupted hog and pork supplies throughout the country.

    Producers are now rebuilding the herd, which stands at 339.96 million head as of end-June, but average pork prices remain near record highs, making the launch of a transparent pricing and hedging tool a welcome development.
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  5. #80
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    Bacon!!!!!!

    I thought this might be an April Fool's thing, but the date is the 29th and they don't observe April Fools in Hong Kong.

    Hong Kong Heritage Pork successfully develops a new high-quality pig breed named "Tai Chi Pigs"
    Mon, March 29, 2021, 11:17 PM·3 min read
    HONG KONG, March 30, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- Breeding pigs can be a relatively simple or complicated process. If the main ambition of a pig farm is to cut costs and increase the rate of breeding, there will be a sacrifice in quality. The goal of pig farm owners like John Lau Hon Kit, founder of Hong Kong Heritage Pork, is to breed high quality pigs using modern technology and special processes. This way, they can produce pork that meets the stringent requirements of Hong Kong consumers when it comes to taste, texture, and healthiness.


    Hong Kong Heritage Pork
    John Lau Hon Kit has combined the benefits Berkshire pigs, Danish Landrace pigs, and Spanish Durocs in his new breed of "Tai Chi Pigs". To do this, he specially imported high-quality specimens of each different pig breed into his Hong Kong pig farm. Although this increased costs, it made it far easier to control the purity and health of the pigs.

    Hong Kong people have always loved their pork and have high standards for the pork they consume. With lots of fat, the pork is rich in taste but very unhealthy. On the other hand, pork with little fat is lacking in flavour but better for consumer's health. The trick is finding the right balance.

    John Lau Hon Kit explains that Hong Kong Heritage Pork's breed of "Tai Chi Pigs" is the perfect balance between more fatty and more lean breeds. The meat is perfectly marbled with an even and modest distribution of fat, making it perfect for a wide range of culinary applications, including frying, steaming, and more.

    But producing high-quality local pig breeds is not the only thing important to John Lau Hon Kit and Hong Kong Heritage Pork. To produce the highest quality pork possible, he places great care and effort into the feeding process.

    The food used by Hong Kong Heritage Pork is a mix of premium corn imported from America and soybeans carefully selected by John Lau Hon Kit himself. This way, he is able to ensure that the pigs are fed a natural and nutritious mix certified by the European Union and suitable for feeding pigs growing in Hong Kong's climate. John Lau Hon Kit further brought in a feeding machine from Denmark that helps control and adjust the amount of feed given to the pigs, meaning they eat the right amount to grow in a healthy manner.

    Furthermore, John Lau Hon Kit has specially selected Sheung Shui and Kam Tin as sites to open his pig farms. One of the reasons behind this is to allow his pigs to drink mineral-rich water from the nearby Kai Kung Leng mountain range. In order to ensure the health of the pigs, this mountain water is first disinfected and then filtered before being given to the pigs. John Lau Hon Kit will also regularly send water samples to a laboratory for further testing.

    John Lau Hon Kit understands that the people of Hong Kong attach great importance to food safety. He regularly sends samples of his pork to well known third-party laboratories in Hong Kong and overseas to test for 18 types of antibiotics, 4 types of hormones, and several different types of heavy metals.

    Hong Kong Heritage Pork has received a certificate of safety from the prestigious CASTCO testing centre, proving the pork from "Tai Chi Pigs" is safe for consumption – something which is also pledged by both John Lau Hon Kit and Hong Kong Heritage Pork.

    For more information on John Lau Hon-kit and Hong Kong Heritage Pork, visit https://www.hkpork.com.

    SOURCE Hong Kong Heritage Pork
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    Gene Ching
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  6. #81
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I noticed that price of bacon is really increasing lately due to American Swine Fever(ASF).

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