Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 29 of 29

Thread: Yin shou gun

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    ᏌᏂᎭᎢ, ᏥᎾ
    Posts
    3,257
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Deyang's form is a lot like Decheng's form, only Deyang has his own unique energy that he brings to all his stuff. The pattern is very similar to what I learned however. Yanfei's form is quite different in the end. That's cool. I like variations.
    yeah, i wish more of decheng's performances were available to take a look at. i've only seen his xiaohongquan from way back posted on youtube.

    but then, he doesnt have a video series like deyang. but then again, those videos arent full speed and power performances.

    i've found, its interesting how some of their forms are very similar, whereas others are vastly different.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    1,671
    Quote Originally Posted by Pk_StyLeZ View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YONe5kU-tQ
    i like that variation...first time seeing it done like that
    everything is really broken down
    That's how i learned it.
    When seconds count the cops are only minutes away!

    Quote Originally Posted by wenshu View Post
    Sorry, sometimes I forget you guys have that special secret internal sauce where people throw themselves and you don't have to do anything except collect tuition.

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Yao Sing View Post
    That's how i learned it.
    really??...awesome
    dis is the way i learned it
    http://www.nacma.net/popwin2.cfm?f=MarkStaff.wmv
    =)
    same moves......but the *youtube* one is really broken down into details
    i like i like a lot

  4. #19
    not yin shou gun
    but i like dis staff form also
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tlHmh29FYo
    dnt know if it a real shaolin staff form or not..but look like it to me..and it looks nice IMO

  5. #20
    Hi

    1- if somebody got the lyrics for yinshougun i would be grateful .(also in chinese if possible)

    2- there is a instructional video of yin shou gun but the vcd's title is qimeigun(and yin shou gun is performed with a normal height staff)
    whats the connection between them after all?

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    shanghai/dengfeng
    Posts
    74

    ing shou gun

    hay all, need some help with some research and thought that the forum would be the best place to come.

    im looking for info on ing shou gun. any info would help me. iv studied the form for 4 years but still dont know that much about it. iv tried wiki, google and youtube but didnt get much info so here i am.

    who made the form?
    how old is it?
    has it changed over the years?
    is there a modern equivalent?

    thanks guys.
    its not the destination that is important it is the journey getting there

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    ᏌᏂᎭᎢ, ᏥᎾ
    Posts
    3,257
    Quote Originally Posted by UK MONK View Post
    im looking for info on ing shou gun. any info would help me. iv studied the form for 4 years but still dont know that much about it. iv tried wiki, google and youtube but didnt get much info so here i am.

    who made the form?
    how old is it?
    has it changed over the years?
    is there a modern equivalent?
    spelling it as yinshougun would possibly help.

    in the ming dynasty general yu dayou (俞大猷, 1503-1580) visited shaolin monastery and passed on the stick methods trained by his troops to the shaolin monks. the monks through generations then blended those methods with what they already had and came out with the yinshougun set, so it goes.

    so it is at least from late ming since it is also recorded in the "exposition of the original shaolin stick methods" (少林棍法阐宗) from around 1610.

    basically it is at least a late ming dynasty creation then, but it has a section that comes from shaohuogun (烧火棍), "tending fire stick", from the yuan dynasty, credited to monk jinnaluo (紧那罗).

    the section also shows up in the ming dynasty set fengmogun (疯魔棍), "crazy devil stick", which is identical to shaohuogun until halfway through. this was created by monk zhishan (智善) who expanded the original 19 postures of shaohuogun into 25 postures.

    this sequence may have been monk zhishan's addition or jinnaluo's original 19 posture creation, placing that in at most the yuan dynasty, and at least the ming. but yinshougun also shares the same strategy as fengmogun- the "crazy" (feng), inverted (yin), logic of the sets. it belongs to the lost tracks boxing (mizongquan 迷踪拳) system. fengmogun using drunken arhat stepping.

    so it is obviously most related to the fengmogun set from the ming dynasty. it is possible that monk zhishan who lived in the 1500's, about the time of general yu dayou's visit, also created yinshougun. but it may have just come from other monks still in the ming dynasty who used the older sets in its creation.
    Last edited by LFJ; 11-06-2009 at 04:05 AM.

  8. #23

    Wookie,

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaolin Wookie View Post
    Oh, okay. I guess Shaolin-Do was right after all........


    Welcome to Hell! Man is it cold in here. Is that snow?
    you crack me up

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    DengFeng
    Posts
    1,469
    Yin shou gun,

    It has been in shaolin long enough to be considered Shaolin whether it was first created there or not.

    Since 'yin shou' refers to both hands holding the staff in the downwards grip, this is a very common name for a staff form, that and 'yin yang gun' where the hands oppose. I wouldn't be surprised if many styles have a yin shou gun.

    Yin Shou is the most common stick form in shaoin. Lots of schools add some extra moves to make it cooler, but in reality it is a fairly simple form.

    It may interest you all to know that there are at least 3 forms, YIn shou gun yi lo, er lo, san lo... this is certain, I also heard there were 6 from another source but I am not sure.

    YeCha gun has 5 forms (2 xiao, 2 Da and another). All similar, it tends to use the staff likea spear... shaolin gun should be 30% staff, 70% spear according to old maxims.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    ᏌᏂᎭᎢ, ᏥᎾ
    Posts
    3,257
    Quote Originally Posted by RenDaHai View Post
    Since 'yin shou' refers to both hands holding the staff in the downwards grip, this is a very common name for a staff form, that and 'yin yang gun' where the hands oppose.
    i think this is a common misinterpretation that perhaps came from other styles that do that with their yinshougun, since a lot of the shaolin yinshougun set does not actually use both hands in a downward grip, such as the whole last section. while other sets like shaohuogun use the downward grip throughout the entire set, yet make no special mention of it.

    as i learned, shaolin yinshougun belongs to the mizongquan system. the "yin" refers to its strategy being opposite of normal logical thinking, in order to confuse the opponent, having them incorrectly anticipate your next move. as explained in chinese here:
    http://baike.baidu.com/view/1288701.html?fromTaglist
    所谓阴者,就是把这个动作用反打的方式表现出来,它不按正常的思维逻辑进行演练,往往是你看到演练的动作会猜想它的下面动作是什么样子,可是按照猜想得出的结果是错的,它指上打下,声东击西,忽左忽右,令人捉摸不定,防不胜防。

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    DengFeng
    Posts
    1,469
    Yeah, I heard that too,

    But I heard from older teachers that it referrs to the grip. YIn shou uses that grip in most of the form... It is certainly the reason yinyang gun is so named. It seems to make more sense that it refers to the grip.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    california
    Posts
    357
    Everyone has a variation of this form. Even USSD has one...

  13. #28
    Greetings,

    I had the opportunity to meet with someone who performed a set that reminds me of this one. It was called the Black Tiger Pole. I was wondering if the two forms are related. I will share some of what was shared with me. The set I saw was performed with both hands facing downwards; but, involved such a flexible appoach to the grip, that the opponent would not know what end the practitioner would use (shades of Lost Track here). There were times when I saw the guy change his grip each time he did the form, changing/hiding intent to each action. The term Yin as used to describe the form could also be translated ask "dark," a conceptual suggestion of the mysteriousness and the unpredictability to the opponent when that hand position is used that is similar to the strategy of the Black Tiger Pole.

    mickey

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,066

    Slightly OT

    Spain GT not
    America-s-Got-Talent. We have a Britain GT thread which has more posts but no Spain one yet - maybe I should just merge them all.



    threads
    Yellow-Black-Jumpsuit
    Yin-shou-gun
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •