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Thread: Iron Fist

  1. #46
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    DS said Jessica Jones was the first comic book anal sex

    See? See sanjuro_ronin? That's hecka better than the Goog could've provided me. Good ol' DS. He always gives me the straight **** when it comes to comics.

    That also explains the The-Girl-with-the-Dragon-Tattoo allusion.

    'Daredevil' season 2: Matt-Elektra's college romance; Punisher replaces Iron Fist?
    By Mangala Dilip
    | Updated: October 28, 2015 23:00 IST


    Marvel's Daredevil Facebook/Daredevil

    With solo TV shows for "Daredevil", "AKA Jessica Jones" and "Luke Cage", Netflix has become a haven for Marvel fans. We know that there will be four shows based on Marvel Universe characters on Netflix, but the presence of a sister show remains clouded with rumours.

    It was earlier decided that "Iron Fist" series will debut on Netflix in 2016, but due to the rampant success of "Daredevil", the show's premiere has been pushed back. Now, with no news on the release date or cast, rumours are abuzz that the mystical martial artist may never make his debut, and he might be replaced by The Punisher.

    Many theories suggest that the executive at Marvel are very pleased with Jon Bernthal's portrayal of Frank Castle in "Daredevil" season 2, which will premiere on 15 April, 2016. Although fans are yet to see him in action, Punisher is an anticipated character in the coming season, along with Elektra.

    Meanwhile, time is running thin for "Iron Fist" and they are yet to lock down an actor for the lead role. It makes sense for Marvel to take a slight deviation from the originals plans settle on portraying the Punisher's story, seeing as he has already made an appearance in Hell's Kitchen.

    In the season 2 trailer for "Daredevil" that was released at the New York Comic Con earlier this year, we saw glimpses of Elodie Yung's Elektra and Jon Bernthal's Punisher. They obviously have a huge role in the upcoming season, and their presence also means we might get flashbacks on Matty Murdock's (‎Charlie Cox) college life.

    In the previous season, the show covered his childhood, and seeing as we are meeting Elektra for the first time, we might get to see their college romance. According to comic books she had left Matt and New York after her father got murdered, and joined The Hand as an assassin.

    We will be regularly updating "Daredevil" archive as soon as new developments and updates hit, do not forget to check back here for the same.
    Article Published: October 28, 2015 23:00 IST
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  2. #47

    Iron Fist: the Movie

    Peel the Orange says the following:
    Well, as one of our sources pointed out last week, Marvel was considering replacing the Iron Fist series with a Punisher series. As it turns out, it could actually be a good thing for fans of Iron Fist, as we just received this email from a source who works within Marvel Creative but wanted to remain anonymous:

    Marvel will be turning Iron Fist into a Netflix exclusive feature film. This will give Marvel extra time and a larger budget for this project. The Punisher will replace Iron Fist as one of the four Defenders.

    Interesting. Take this with a grain of salt but that could be pretty cool. If you remember, this past summer the Netflix CEO said that they were open to making feature films for Marvel characters and this could be a way to start.

  3. #48
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    So was Jessica Jones worth splitting off into an indie thread?

    Saw some good feedback on the social networks but didn't watch it myself. Let me know if y'all think it's martially-worthy to have its own thread here. Otherwise, we'll just leave it nested in Iron Fist.

    Speaking of which:
    JEPH LOEB SAYS THERE'S 'NEVER BEEN ANY CHANGE' ON "IRON FIST"
    Fri, November 20th, 2015 at 3:50pm PST | Updated: November 20th, 2015 at 3:55pm
    Albert Ching, Managing Editor26


    "Iron Fist: The Living Weapon" #1 cover by Kaare Andrews.

    Since Marvel Television announced its Netflix plan two years ago, it's been quiet, news-wise, for one of the four main series: "Iron Fist." In an interview with CBR, Head of Marvel Television Jeph Loeb made it clear: Don't mistake no news for bad news, as plans are continuing unabated.

    "There was a lot of speculation about what was going on with 'Iron Fist,' because [fans] hadn't heard anything about it, but there's never been any change at all," Loeb told CBR. When asked if fans can expect news in the near future on a star or showrunner, Loeb responded, "The short answer is, 'Yes, there'll be news.'"

    This past July, an unconfirmed report surfaced that Marvel was facing creative hurdles with "Iron Fist," with the difficulty stemming from how to balance the many mystical elements of the comic book character with the much more grounded world of Marvel's other Netflix shows. Earlier this month, a widely circulated rumor stated that "Iron Fist" may be reconceptualized as a made-for-Netflix film, with a "Punisher" series taking its place -- a claim Marvel Chief Creative Officer Joe Quesada rejected this week at a "Jessica Jones" premiere event.

    According to Loeb, Marvel has deliberately held off on "Iron Fist" because he wanted to give "Jessica Jones," which debuted on Netflix today, the spotlight; especially given that she's a character that was largely unknown to mass audiences.

    "We knew exactly what we were doing at Marvel and at Netflix," Loeb said. "Let's get ['Jessica Jones'] out there, everybody knows that 'Luke Cage' is up and going. What I can say right now is we're very excited about 'Iron Fist.'"

    Marvel's first Netflix show, "Marvel's Daredevil," launched earlier this year, and a second season is now in production. The 13-episode first season of "Marvel's Jessica Jones" is now on Netflix, which introduces Mike Colter as Luke Cage -- who will headline his own Netflix series, "Marvel's Luke Cage," currently filming and developed by Cheo Hodari Coker. No actors or creatives have yet been announced for "Marvel's Iron Fist."

    Following the "Iron Fist" debut, all four of the Marvel/Netflix heroes are scheduled to star in a team-up miniseries, titled "The Defenders."
    Gene Ching
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  4. #49

    Iron Fist showrunner announced.

    According to CBR, Heroic Hollywood and ComicBook.com "Six Feet Under" and "Dexter" veteran Scott Buck will serve as showrunner on Netflix's "Iron Fist."

    Marvel describes Iron Fist as follows: "Returning to New York City after being missing for years, Daniel Rand fights against the criminal element corrupting New York City with his incredible kung-fu mastery and ability to summon the awesome power of the fiery Iron Fist."

    Those two shows (Dexter, and Six Feet Under), both on premium cable, certainly carried the dark tone that’s been established by the first two series, Daredevil and Jessica Jones, but little is known about the plan for Iron Fist so far. The character is by far the most all-out “superhero” out of the four Defenders, with a background that includes a mystical city, a superpowered punch, and kicking a dragon in the face, all pretty far afield of the light use of superpowers and mysticism we’ve seen on the shows so far.

    No new timeline has been given for Iron Fist’s debut. Daredevil season two is next, coming Spring 2016, with Luke Cage season one later that year. Jessica Jones launched a few weeks ago to critical acclaim, so it’s possible a second season could be on the way there, as well.
    PS: Jeff Loeb is kind of a jerk!

  5. #50
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    Asian Iron Fist?

    From THR no less.

    DECEMBER 11, 2015 3:34pm PT by Rebecca Sun
    Why Marvel and Netflix Should Cast an Asian-American Iron Fist
    The upcoming series has finally found its showrunner, ‘Dexter’ alum Scott Buck.


    Courtesy of Marvel

    The upcoming series has finally found its showrunner, ‘Dexter’ alum Scott Buck.
    Iron Fist, the protagonist of Netflix’s fourth and final Marvel Comics series, is a martial arts warrior imbued with a mystical power known as the Iron First, which allows him to channel his chi to superhuman levels, giving him healing, telepathy and super-punching abilities. His alter ego is Daniel Rand, a native New Yorker raised in K’un-L’un, an alternate-dimension city where he attained those martial arts and supernatural skills.

    In the comics, Daniel is portrayed as a blond Caucasian, but over the past year and a half, a grassroots movement has been growing online to urge Marvel and Netflix to cast an Asian-American actor as the titular superhero. (The idea first caught fire in March 2014 with a post by The Nerds of Color’s Keith Chow, who has continued to champion the cause on the genre blog and its Twitter feed.)

    Sources have told The Hollywood Reporter that the clamor actually reached the ears of Marvel and Netflix, who met with Asian-American actors in consideration for the lead, but that the series, which finally revealed its showrunner on Monday (former Dexter executive producer Scott Buck), is now leaning toward keeping Iron Fist white. Marvel declined to comment on that detail.

    Here are three reasons why an Asian-American Iron Fist would make more sense:

    1) It would correct a legacy of cultural appropriation.

    Iron Fist was created during the kung-fu craze of the 1970s, when Hong Kong film imports like Five Fingers of Death and, most notably, Bruce Lee’s canon — Fist of Fury, The Game of Death, Enter the Dragon, etc. — enraptured the American audience. (This trend is also responsible for turning the 1974 novelty single “Kung Fu Fighting” into a chart-topping hit and Hai Karate into a popular aftershave.)

    So it was no surprise that the comic books would introduce new titles featuring chopsock-ing new characters of their own, such as Iron Fist and DC’s Richard Dragon. Both are white men trained by, and eventually surpassing, the Asian communities — or, in Iron Fist’s case, the heavily Orientalist fictional city — they found themselves in. It’s hard to know for sure whether the original writers ever considered creating lead characters native to the cultures whose traditions they were drawing from; perhaps they were concerned about “the problems [facing] a Chinese hero in an American series,” as television host Pierre Berton put it to Bruce Lee in 1971 (fast-forward to 17:00). “They think that business-wise it’s a risk,” Lee acknowledged.

    “That is why The Warrior probably is not gonna be on,” he added, referring to a martial arts Western he was trying to develop with Warner Brothers Television. A year later, WBTV would premiere the ABC drama drama Kung Fu, starring David Carradine as a half-Chinese martial artist traveling through the Old West. Draw your own conclusions.

    In the ensuing decades, white protagonists onscreen have continually been used to tell stories steeped in non-white culture, such as Dances with Wolves, The Last of the Mohicans, The Last Samurai and even Avatar (the principal Na’vi characters were portrayed by minority actors). But ironically, the comics have gotten more diverse during that span. If Iron Fist was launched for the first time today, there’s a good chance that Daniel Rand would not necessarily be white. Marvel’s current print lineup includes a black/Latino Spider-Man, a black Captain America, a Korean-American Hulk, a female Thor and a Muslim Ms. Marvel. There’s no reason why an adaptation in 2015 needs to be restricted to the social norms of forty years ago.

    2) It would provide a fresh story in a cluttered landscape.

    By the time Iron Fist finally comes out more than a year from now (no release date has been announced), the combined Marvel Cinematic Universe on film and TV will contain more than 50 crime fighters in lead or major supporting roles. That’s an incredible amount of superhero saturation to cut through, and that’s before accounting for all of the X-Men, whose rights are owned by Fox, and rival DC Comics’ own rapidly expanding big- and small-screen empire.

    Comic-book casting announcements are no longer as rare and unique as they used to be. With all due respect to Hemsworth, Evans and Pratt, a fourth Marvel superhero named Chris probably wouldn’t grab the same kind of attention that Marvel’s first Asian-American lead would. The MCU currently has four hero characters played by actors of Asian descent: Agents of SHIELD ensemble members Melinda May and Daisy Johnson, Daredevil’s upcoming love interest Elektra (played by Cambodian-French actress Elodie Yung) and Thor sidekick Hogun (Japanese actor Tadanobu Asano).

    Assuming Iron Fist doesn’t premiere before 2016, Marvel will have released 14 movies and five television shows by then. Audiences will have seen incredible martial artists (Daredevil, Black Widow, Agent May) and fish-out-of-water heroes (Thor, Captain America, Star-Lord). They will even already have seen the story of a white man who gains mystical powers from an Oriental realm: Benedict Cumberbatch in Doctor Strange, co-starring Tilda Swinton as the Ancient One, written as a Tibetan male in the comics. An Asian-American Iron Fist would be the refreshing, progressive and surprising pick. (And not even a crazy risky one, given a television landscape where ABC’s Fresh Off the Boat and Dr. Ken are network hits and Daniel Wu is starring as — guess what? a martial arts master — on AMC’s new action drama Into the Badlands.)

    3) If done correctly, it may rake in even more from an Asian market.

    Anyone involved in or following the entertainment industry knows that China is a booming market. Its box office hit $6.3 billion in 2015 to date and is on track to overtake North America as the No. 1 movie market in the world within three years (just in time for Iron Fist to premiere!). And China has a huge appetite for American TV as well, turning shows like The Walking Dead and Netflix’s own House of Cards into hits abroad.

    For the past several years, Hollywood movie studios have partnered with local counterparts to turn big-budget blockbusters into co-productions, and the financial transactions have proven to be less clumsy than the attempts at cultural exchange: Chinese audiences rolled their eyes at Transformers 4’s nonsensical product placement and at the insertion of China-only scenes in Iron Man 3. Yes, they still bought a lot of tickets to those movies — $320 million and $121.2 million’s worth, respectively — but don’t think that Chinese audiences can’t tell when they’re being pandered to.

    Chinese entertainment executives and creatives know it, too. During the annual round of U.S.-China summits and meetings at the American Film Market last month, panelist after panelist spoke of the desire to find a story with Asian cultural elements that could be embraced by a Western audience. Iron Fist could be that story — although it’s doubtful they’d be as enthusiastic if it was fronted by the second coming of Steven Seagal.

    Netflix in particular would be leaving money on the table if it fails to capitalize on such a ripe opportunity to court Chinese civilians, executives and officials. The company has been looking to expand into China, where an estimated 20-plus million people users are already accessing the service via virtual private networks. China’s massive online video market is expected to reach $14.5 billion by 2018, but heavy state regulation has made it arguably the toughest market in the world to crack.

    Iron Fist could be just the hero it needs.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #51
    Greetings,

    There is room for several prequels of Iron Fist characters. Wasn't there an arc where there were several others who preceded Daniel Rand. Wasn't he the first who was not Asian?


    mickey

  7. #52
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    IMO, Iron Fist should be changed to an Asian-American character. It would make him much more interesting, IMO.

    There have always been white characters appropriating East Asian cultures in movies, TV, comics, etc. Look at 'Kwai Chang Caine'. Even the character of Shang Chi had to be half-white.

    DC comics once had the character Richard Dragon: Kung Fu Fighter, who was white.

    Marvel's Sons of the Tiger were a mixed-race trio; one white, one black, and one Asian. But the white character seemed to predominate.

    DC had The Karate Kid (which is no relation to, and preceded the movie Karate Kid, by a decade), and he was or looked Asian, but beyond that I don't remember much about him.

    Remember Shogun? The Octagon? The Challenge? The Kill Bill movies? The Last Samurai? Or the Scott Adkins ninja films? And countless others...the list is actually mind-boggling.

    The practice of white domination in American-made, Asian-themed stories continues to this day, though things seem to be changing slowly. Very slowly. Strides made by Asian-Americans (except for Asian Indians) in Hollywood are still decades behind African-Americans and Latino-Americans.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 12-14-2015 at 10:49 AM.

  8. #53
    Greetings,

    I do see what you are talking about Jimbo. The origins of Daniel Rand was so well written that it really did not appear to be an appropriation thing. Interestingly, I was totally against Bruce Lee for the same reasons you mentioned. Never having seen him before and going by just the spelling of his name, I thought he was some white guy trying to cash in on the kung fu movies. I was blistering hot about that. So, I really do understand your viewpoints. I do think change is a necessary one.

    EDIT: I do think THE CHANGE is a necessary one.

    mickey
    Last edited by mickey; 12-15-2015 at 05:55 AM.

  9. #54
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    Finn Jones

    Does this guy know any Kung Fu?

    Game of Thrones actor Finn Jones to play Iron Fist
    BY JAMES HIBBERD • @JAMESHIBBERD


    (Steve Jennings/WireImage)

    Posted February 25 2016 — 2:23 PM EST

    Marvel has found its newest superhero: Game of Thrones actor Finn Jones has landed the coveted series lead of Iron Fist.

    Jones, who plays Ser Loras Tyrell on the HBO hit, will take on the role of the martial arts master, EW has learned.

    Iron Fist is set to be the fourth Marvel and Netflix collaboration, following Daredevil, Jessica Jones and the forthcoming Luke Cage. Scott Buck (Dexter) has been tapped as showrunner.

    Netflix and Marvel had no comment.

    Much more to come…
    Gene Ching
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  10. #55
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    Has he ever heard of martial arts?
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  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vash View Post
    Has he ever heard of martial arts?
    I don't think it matters anymore.
    It seems that the way to go, at least in regards to caucasians playing a MA type role, is to get a good actor and then train him and let the camera work and choreography handle the rest.
    This has worked very well with the jason Bourne series and well with movies like John Wick.
    The issue is that Iron Fist is a fully MA character and not just a person that know MA in a military type way.
    Of course we don't know if Jones has MA background or if he is naturally athletic.
    Not sure if the actor that plays daredevil had a MA background either..
    Look at Jason Statham as an example.
    Point being that it may be better to get a good actor and train them ( especially if they catch on quickly) and get a great choreographer then getting a good MA that has the acting skills and charisma of a potato.
    Psalms 144:1
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  12. #57
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    Chris Brewster does the fighting in Daredevil:

    http://variety.com/2015/tv/awards/da...ox-1201522194/
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    I don't think it matters anymore.
    It seems that the way to go, at least in regards to caucasians playing a MA type role, is to get a good actor and then train him and let the camera work and choreography handle the rest.
    This has worked very well with the jason Bourne series and well with movies like John Wick.
    The issue is that Iron Fist is a fully MA character and not just a person that know MA in a military type way.
    Of course we don't know if Jones has MA background or if he is naturally athletic.
    Not sure if the actor that plays daredevil had a MA background either..
    Look at Jason Statham as an example.
    Point being that it may be better to get a good actor and train them ( especially if they catch on quickly) and get a great choreographer then getting a good MA that has the acting skills and charisma of a potato.
    This is true. The idea that Hollywood studios, directors and casting agents go out looking specifically for MAists to cast as leads is a thing of the distant past, at least since The Matrix. You can even count the original Kung Fu series. They want box-office or ratings bucks; they won't gamble on casting an even brilliant MAist with mediocre to crappy acting skills, and with no charisma when he isn't fighting, to lead a big-budget film or TV series. Choreographers like Corey Yuen, Yuen Woo-Ping, and others have become experts in taking non-MA actors/actresses and making them look passable, and sometimes even convincing, in MA fight scenes. Simply put, the general American (and international) public doesn't really care about MAists or MA ability; they want a name star they can recognize or identify with. Even if Bruce Lee were trying to make it in the industry nowadays, he likely wouldn't get too far, or would have gotten only limited success, and BL had acting chops and loads of charisma.

    There are still plenty of low-budget (straight-to-DVD) American MA films being made featuring exceptional MAists and fight choreography, but with leading actors whose onscreen personas are as charismatic as drying paint when they're not fighting.

    That said, I think I'll give this Iron Fist a miss.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 02-26-2016 at 07:24 AM.

  14. #59
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    u picked Variety over KFM? I'm crushed.

    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Chris Brewster does the fighting in Daredevil:
    We know, we know...CHRIS BREWSTER: Super Stunts, Marvelous Martial Mayhem and NETFLIX’S DAREDEVIL by Lori Ann White

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  15. #60
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    I was hoping for Scott Adkins, but his acting is . . . Potato adjacent. But Daniel Rand is about the 2nd or 3rd best MA guy in Marvel, I think behind the Prince of Orphans, Shang Chi, and Karnak or whoever. His 'I'm so good at kung fu I don't need an iron suit to make Wing Chun work' ability is his thing. Having a good actor who can fight shouldn't be too hard an order.

    But his mask and disco collar should hopefully make the substituting of a stunt man more viable, a la Daredevil.

    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    I don't think it matters anymore.
    It seems that the way to go, at least in regards to caucasians playing a MA type role, is to get a good actor and then train him and let the camera work and choreography handle the rest.
    This has worked very well with the jason Bourne series and well with movies like John Wick.
    The issue is that Iron Fist is a fully MA character and not just a person that know MA in a military type way.
    Of course we don't know if Jones has MA background or if he is naturally athletic.
    Not sure if the actor that plays daredevil had a MA background either..
    Look at Jason Statham as an example.
    Point being that it may be better to get a good actor and train them ( especially if they catch on quickly) and get a great choreographer then getting a good MA that has the acting skills and charisma of a potato.
    BreakProof Back® Back Health & Athletic Performance
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    "Who dies first," he mumbled through smashed and bloody lips.

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