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  1. #1
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    Iron Fist movie

    Anyone hear about this lately?
    I read some stuff on it last year or the year b4 it was supposed to star the guy who played darth maul i believe.
    [i]Originally posted by [Censored]

    And I would never ever train at any cult school with a "wall of shame".

  2. #2
    currently in production limbo...

  3. #3
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    Iron Fist

    so my sources tell me that this movie is a go ahead. with ray park playing iron fist. theven got veteran hong kong star and real life triad michael chan wai man(you can read this old but amazing interview with him here saw it on the kungfy cinema forum and had to post it here) when i told my friend that chan wai man was the real deal in terms of fighting and that he's is or was a real life triad he "****" himself. i don;t have a filming date yet (if they didn;t start already) but i will soon. peace guys

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the info, Doug.
    It would be great to see Chan Wai-Man in a new film, seeing him in an American one will be strange but welcome.

  5. #5
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    yeah my boy is supposed to be A.D.(assistant director) on this film i'm trying to get him to get me in there. told him he should give CWM a wallet that says bad mutha ****a

  6. #6

    Rough cut on you tube


  7. #7
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    I sure hope that it doesn't look anything like that Rough cut on you tube....
    RAYNYSC

  8. #8
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    Continued from previous post

    From there, other folks on Twitter replied with jokes about other instances of white actors playing Asian characters, like this reference to how Iron Fist actor Finn Jones briefly quit Twitter (they always come back) after scathing criticisms.


    VIA TWITTER


    VIA TWITTER


    VIA TWITTER


    VIA TWITTER


    VIA TWITTER


    VIA TWITTER


    VIA TWITTER


    VIA TWITTER


    VIA TWITTER


    VIA TWITTER

    (Via Paramount Pictures, Screen Crush, ValerieComplex, helpmeskeletor, Maria_Giesela, Nice_White_Lady, DLohRidah, IWriteAllDay_, gleebix, and ZweiXross)
    Whatev about Danny Rand being originally white - these Ghost in the Shell meme spoofs are pretty funny.
    Gene Ching
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  9. #9
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    Just another example of SJW not having any clue about what they are actually "protesting".

    Sure there is white wash in Hollywood, there has always been BUT not in the case of Iron Fist.
    Psalms 144:1
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    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  10. #10
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    Not so simple

    The real question here is the source material. The source material was whitewashing. So should filmmakers stay loyal to that or update it for modern times when whitewashing is a sin? Here's the reply from the show producers and cast.


    MYLES ARONOWITZ/NETFLIX
    CULTURE WARS
    The ‘Iron Fist’ White Savior Controversy: Creator and Stars Respond to the Backlash
    ‘Iron Fist’ stars Finn Jones and Jessica Henwick, along with showrunner Scott Buck, address concerns over casting and cultural appropriation in Marvel’s latest Netflix show.

    MELISSA LEON
    03.15.17 1:21 AM ET

    Marvel’s Iron Fist doesn’t premiere on Netflix until Friday, but the show’s racial politics have already sparked debate for years.
    As far back as 2014, a vocal contingent of fans have called for the traditionally blond-haired, blue-eyed martial-arts superhero, created by comic book writer Roy Thomas and artist Gil Kane, to be realized onscreen by an Asian-American actor. The website Nerds of Color published a plea for Marvel to consider the change that year, and helped launch an online movement in the hashtag #AAIronFist.
    The piece, by writer Keith Chow, laid out the case: By casting an Asian-American lead, Marvel and Netflix would avoid the uncomfortably dated tropes of the character’s 1970s origins. Orientalism, cultural appropriation, and the “white savior” fantasy (in which a displaced white foreigner comes to a new land, adapts to its ways, often surpasses the natives in skill, and becomes their leader or last hope/samurai/Mohican, etc.) would go poof.
    The parts of Iron Fist’s backstory integral to his identity, meanwhile, could be preserved: his parents’ tragic deaths, his New York billionaire upbringing, his gift for martial arts, and his difficulty fitting in. Even his training in the mystical Asian city of K’un-Lun would be lent more depth, as writers like Comics Alliance’s Andrew Wheeler argued: “A white American Danny Rand has to appropriate Asian heritage; an Asian-American Danny Rand gets to reconnect with it.”
    Still, Netflix and Marvel chose to stick to the character’s comic-book depiction, casting Game of Thrones actor Finn Jones for the part. Onscreen, little about comic book Danny has changed. He’s still orphaned in a plane crash and raised by the monks of K’un-Lun, where he defeats a dragon and becomes the latest in a long line of Iron Fists. He returns to New York 15 years after his supposed death and becomes a chi-harnessing, Buddhist-quote-dropping, kung fu-wielding superhero. With blue eyes.



    Yet Jones, for his part, asserts quite passionately that he sympathizes with fans’ frustrations at Hollywood’s penchant for white saviors. While Iron Fist comes at an awkward time—so soon after the debacle of Matt Damon’s Great Wall and just before Scarlett Johansson’s manga-originated role in Ghost in the Shell—he insists this story is different.
    “I am the first to stand up for more diversity in television shows, especially when it comes to Asian actors,” he says, sitting beside his Iron Fist co-star Jessica Henwick (who plays Japanese martial artist Colleen Wing) on a wintry afternoon in New York. “I get that and I stand up for it. But I think people will find that what we’re doing with the show addresses those issues intentionally. We actually talk about those issues and we try to address them, rather than just being the white savior and coming in and going, ‘Oh, Danny’s gonna take care of everything!’”
    “Well, actually,” he continues, breaking into a chuckle, “he tries, but that’s one of his flaws. We don’t celebrate that. Danny may come in and be like, ‘I can fix this!’ But it’s not something the show celebrates.”
    In the first six episodes released to critics, Danny does exude a kind of childish naivete. He’s earnest, idealistic, and often overly confident. He waltzes into complicated situations with what he believes are easy solutions, whether at high-stakes business meetings or in Colleen Wing’s dojo. He’s immature, a bit of a mansplainer, and severely lacking in self-awareness.
    “Danny Rand can’t even save himself, let alone an entire race of people,” Jones says. “And I think that really is what runs through the storyline. So I understand the issues, I respect them, and I stand up for what people are shouting against. But I just wish that people would see the whole picture before commenting on the headline, you know?
    “I understand it,” he reiterates. “We live in a world right now which is incredibly unequal. Incredibly unequal. That knee-jerk reaction is because of a much wider injustice politically, economically, and culturally. So I get where that comes from. I just think, in the world there’s a larger picture right now that people need to see before they just comment on the headlines.”



    No explicit acknowledgment of cultural appropriation issues comes in those first six episodes (there’ll be 13 total this season). But both Jones and showrunner Scott Buck (Dexter, Six Feet Under) say a key change to the demographics of K’un Lun, the city where Danny trains and which is only accessible through a secret portal in the Himalayas, helps diffuse the situation.
    “What you may not know about K’un-Lun yet is that in our version of the story, K’un-Lun isn’t predominantly an Asian culture,” Jones says. “K’un-Lun is a diverse place with people from all over the world—South America, Europe, Asians, and Caucasian people all reside in this place.”
    “It’s a celestial city that exists in another dimension and because of that there’s nothing that we felt made it specifically Chinese or Tibetan,” says Buck, in a later phone conversation with The Daily Beast. “We certainly modeled it after Tibetan monasteries, but it felt like we just naturally wanted to open it up to make it a little more diverse just because it gives us a lot more options in writing about it, I believe.”
    “The entry to the city is somewhere in Asia but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s an Asian city, wholly,” he concludes.
    On the issue of casting, Buck says he wasn’t aware of fans’ calls for a nonwhite lead until after Jones was cast—despite early reports that Marvel and Netflix did meet with several Asian American actors, before ultimately deciding to keep Danny white.
    “To me it was just about finding the best actor for that,” says Buck. “It wasn’t until after we cast Finn that I became aware that there had been, you know, some controversy over that.”
    “I understood where it was coming from,” he says, “but we just weren’t thinking in that way, at least I certainly wasn’t. I was just concentrating on the story and who would be a great actor to play this character.”
    Buck says he and his writers “certainly wanted to avoid any stereotypes” in their treatment of Danny and Colleen, but their No. 1 priority was always to write simply “the best story we possibly could about these two complicated characters.”
    “For me at least, that was part of the reason I wanted to make Colleen such a strong character,” he says, “because here we do have an Asian lead who is a martial arts expert and is every bit the match for Danny Rand. Even without that added pressure, I would have done the same thing because it was a character I found really compelling and fascinating.”
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  11. #11
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    continued from previous post



    Jones goes a step further: “Danny needs Colleen I think more than Colleen needs Danny,” he says. “Danny is in complete pieces and he needs the strong women around him to kind of hold him up and help him get through this adjustment in his life, this transition of coming from boy to man and taking hold of his responsibility.”
    His first point, at least, rings true. In the first six episodes, Colleen Wing is the show’s real street-level hero: she’s steel-tough, complicated, and invested in her community. While Danny breaks into luxury brownstones and strolls through Midtown high-rises trying to take back his family’s billions, Colleen runs a dojo that keeps at-risk youth off the street.
    Like Danny, Colleen’s life is also split between two cultures, in her case Japanese and American. For Henwick—best known for her roles on Game of Thrones (she plays Nymeria, one of the Sand Sisters) and Star Wars: The Force Awakens (as rebel X-Wing pilot Jessika Pava)—this is something of a departure.
    “I’ve always made a point to play roles that aren’t specified by their ethnicity,” she says. “With [Colleen], it was the first role in quite a while that was defined by her culture. She was raised in Japan and now she lives in New York, and those are two polar opposite cultures.”
    Henwick has heard fans’ concerns about cultural appropriation in Iron Fist, she says. It’s an issue she broaches delicately.
    “Look,” she begins, slowly. “I am Asian.” (Jones bolts up next to her in faux-shock at this, making her laugh: “Whaaaat?”)
    “I am Asian and I am an actor,” she continues. “If anyone understands, it’s me. I have faced it in my career. I’ve been working eight years and I’ve experienced it firsthand, the disparity when it comes to Asian representation—even more than that, Asian misrepresentation.
    “But I also have seen what Finn’s done in this role and I honestly, honestly think that he smashes it out the park.”
    Jones promises that, as Iron Fist progresses, new characters from “all over the globe” join the action. “Like, we have a very diverse cast,” he says, to nodding agreement from Henwick: “I think we have the most diverse cast out of all the Netflix Marvel shows,” she says.
    “I remember just working with [the actors], thinking, ‘**** me! This is great!’” Jones says. “Like, look at all these powerful female roles. I think this is essentially a feminist ****ing show.”
    He then turns to Henwick, eyes wide and gesticulating. “I think it’s also really important that people can identify with roles like yours,” he tells her. “With female roles or Asian roles, so people can look at television and be inspired by what they see because they’re being represented in a very strong and not-stereotyped way.”
    “I really think the show is gonna, hopefully, transcend all of the noise that is out there at the moment,” Jones says, a touch of Danny Rand-style earnestness in his voice. “Because that was the intention. The intention was never to create something that didn’t represent people, that didn’t represent cultures.”
    Henwick nods again, this time adding an emphatic “Yeah.”
    “The intention has always been good,” he says. “So I just hope people will understand that.”
    Personally, I don't really care. I mean I do, I hear the cries of Asian actors in Hollywood, but I sided with the swaps for the Mandarin and the Ancient One because the actors (Kingsley and Swinton) that replaced the old racist characters were great and totally elevated what both films were doing. And I'm probably going to watch Ghost in the Shell because nekkid asskicking ScarJo ('nuf said, right? Maybe I'll try to see the Japanese dubbed version to be more PC....eh, that's probably too much hassle). The bottom line for me will be if the show is any good. The pre-press buzz is pretty bad, but so was the talk before the presidential election. We'll know tomorrow.
    Gene Ching
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    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    And I'm probably going to watch Ghost in the Shell because nekkid asskicking ScarJo ('nuf said, right?
    Not to be a killjoy, Gene, but you do realize that Scarjo is most likely body doubled (or CGI'd?) in any nude scenes?

  13. #13
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    tipping point?

    How many nails doth a coffin make?

    Is a Disappointing Ghost in the Shell the Nail in the Coffin of Hollywood Whitewashing?
    The film’s anemic box office is only the latest financial fallout of Asian erasure.
    by JOANNA ROBINSON
    APRIL 2, 2017 3:54 PM


    From left: courtesy of Netflix, courtesy of Paramount, courtesy of Legendary

    It’s become increasingly impossible to ignore general social pushback when it comes to Asian representation in film and television. Whether it’s cut-and-dried whitewashing (e.g., casting a white performer in an Asian role) or slightly more complex cases of cultural appropriation, the hue and cry from progressive voices in film and TV criticism has called for an end to white leads in Asian and Asian-inspired properties. But Hollywood—a town driven by dollars and not always sense—is more likely to listen when protests hurt the bottom line. Ghost in the Shell, the Scarlett Johansson-starring adaptation of the popular Japanese manga, is only the latest controversial project to stumble at the box office. Will this misstep finally put an end to whitewashing?

    According to Box Office Mojo, in its first weekend, Ghost in the Shell pulled in approximately $20 million domestically on a $110 million budget—below even the conservative prediction that site made earlier in the week. That number looks even more anemic when compared with Lucy, Johansson’s R-rated 2014 film, which pulled in $43.8 million on its opening weekend. Unlike Ghost in the Shell, Lucy wasn’t based on a pre-existing property and didn’t have an established fanbase to draw on. But the Johansson casting has clearly alienated fans of the original manga and anime versions of Ghost in the Shell, and their dampened enthusiasm appears to have discouraged newcomers as well.

    The controversy around Johansson’s casting has plagued Ghost in the Shell since late 2014. Johansson stars as Major (whose full name is “Major Motoko Kusanagi” in the manga), a synthetic, cybernetic body housing the brain of a dead Japanese woman. Both fans of the original and advocates for Asian actors in Hollywood argued that a Japanese actress should have been cast in the role, while a spokesperson for Ghost in the Shell publisher Kodansha gave Johansson its blessing, saying the publisher “never imagined it would be a Japanese actress in the first place.” Johansson herself defended the film this week, saying:

    I think this character is living a very unique experience in that she has a human brain in an entirely machinate body. I would never attempt to play a person of a different race, obviously. Hopefully, any question that comes up of my casting will be answered by audiences when they see the film.
    But it seems audiences weren’t inclined to give the film that chance. There’s no ignoring the fact that controversy cast a cloud over the film, and it’s difficult not to draw a direct line from that to the movie’s disappointing opening weekend.

    Ghost in the Shell is not the first project to feel the burn of “race-bent” casting. Though other factors may have added to their unpopularity, The Last Airbender, Exodus: Gods and Kings, Aloha, Pan, and more have all foundered at the box office. (These films also received unfavorable reviews, but bad reviews alone can’t snuff out box-office potential.) Matt Damon’s heavily criticized, China-set film The Great Wall didn’t fare much better. In addition to becoming an Oscar night punchline for Jimmy Kimmel, the movie grossed only $45 million domestically on a $150 million budget. Marvel’s too-big-to-fail Avengers installment Doctor Strange is the recent exception that proves the rule: not even Tilda Swinton’s controversial casting in the historically Asian role of the Ancient One could slow this film down. It made more than $232 million domestically and $677.5 million worldwide.

    But since Netflix won’t release ratings data to the public, the jury is still out on whether the Marvel brand was also enough to combat the furor over Finn Jones being cast as the historically white Danny Rand in the latest Defenders installment, Iron Fist. (This is a case in which “cultural appropriation”—Danny is a better martial artist than all the other Asian characters around him—inspired public outcry, rather than “whitewashing.”) While various tech companies have claimed in the past to be able to analyze Netflix’s data, Netflix CEO Ted Sarandos himself has historically pushed back on those results. One such company, 7Park Data, claims that Iron Fist defied both bad reviews and controversy to become Netflix’s “most-binged drama premiere”—meaning audiences allegedly tore through episodes at a faster clip than usual. But by the only Netflix-sanctioned metric available—the site’s soon-to-be-gone star rating—Iron Fist is lagging behind other Defenders shows. As of publication, it had earned only three stars from users, compared with Daredevil, Jessica Jones, and Luke Cage—which all pulled in 4.25 or higher.

    Even if Marvel’s bottom line is controversy-proof so far, it’s unlikely that its parent company, the increasingly and intentionally diverse Walt Disney Studios, will want to weather further public relations storms like the ones that swirled around both Doctor Strange and Iron Fist. Paramount, too, seems to have kept its head down when it came to deploying Ghost in the Shell. After it was revealed that the visual effects company Lola VFX had done tests on Ghost in the Shell in order to digitally “shift” the “ethnicity” of a Caucasian actress and make her appear more Asian in the film (there’s disagreement over whether that actress was Johansson herself), the wind went out of the studio’s sails. Ghost in the Shell also screened very late for critics—a sure sign that a studio would prefer to mitigate any damage caused by negative word of mouth and early reviews.

    But what has tipped the needle on the issue of Asian erasure in film and television from progressive social concern to bottom-line disrupter? Pushback on both whitewashing and limited opportunities for Asian performers in Hollywood has recently gotten a boosted signal, thanks to both social media and the uncensored honesty of popular Asian and East Asian actors like Kal Penn, John Cho, Constance Wu, Aziz Ansari, and Ming-Na Wen. And that boosted signal comes at a time when, according to a 2016 MPAA study, younger (and likely more socially progressive) Asian-American film-goers between the ages of 18 and 24 are going to more movies, while the Caucasian film-going population is on the decline.

    But domestic box office alone may not be enough to bring about social change. With Hollywood increasingly obsessed with appealing to lucrative Asian markets abroad, it’s as yet unclear whether casting white leads in Asian-centric or inspired properties hurts the global bottom line. The Great Wall, directed by Chinese legend Zhang Yimou, did decently overseas, making 86.4 percent of its total intake on foreign screens. And while Ghost in the Shell has yet to open in either Japan or China, it took in roughly $40.1 million in other foreign markets this weekend, including Russia, Germany, and South Korea. Then again, the massive global box-office returns of films with diverse casts, including Rogue One and the Fast and the Furious franchise, render any argument that Caucasian actors are required for international success null and void.

    Meanwhile, at home, the protests against Asian erasure are only growing more intense. While still licking its wounds from the critical drubbing it received for Iron Fist, Netflix is staring down the barrel of another appropriation controversy. This time, it’s the popular manga Death Note that has gotten a Seattle-based makeover, putting Caucasian actors Nat Wolff and Margaret Qualley in roles that originally had the last names Yagami and Amane. Willem Dafoe will voice the Japanese spirit Ryuk. The protest around Death Note is already significantly louder than for other past American adaptations of Asian properties like The Ring, The Grudge, and The Departed.

    Though America itself is a very socially divided country, the cool, impartial truth of box-office returns reveals a film and TV industry that is facing a sea change when it comes to Asian representation. History may soon look back on the Asian erasure of Doctor Strange, Iron Fist, and Ghost in the Shell with an even more unfavorable eye. Just as blackface in film and TV gradually became unacceptable (and more recently than you may think), the marginalization and appropriation of Asian culture could be on its way out the door—with these recent financial disappointments only serving as a last gasp of a bygone era.
    Gene Ching
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    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  14. #14
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    The real issue with IF was the choreography and this is from people that don't know much MA.
    The fights were simply not as good as the other Marvel series on Netflix or Arrow for example.
    The casting wasn't as much an issue as the SJW in social media want people to think.
    No one I have spoken to cared about WHO was cast other than their clear lack of skill.

    As for Ghost in the shell, you will see it rebound overseas where no one gives an ass about the "whitewash" controversy.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  15. #15
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    suckage

    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    The real issue with IF was the choreography and this is from people that don't know much MA.
    Ya think? Honestly, you guys know I'm not a comics guy. I'm only passingly aware of Iron Fist because I'm into the martial arts. This should've been a choreographic masterpiece. That's all I asked of it. Good fight scenes.

    Yesterday, 10:00 am
    Destroy All Monsters: IRON FIST Doesn't Just Suck, It Sucks the Rest of the Marvel Television Universe Down With It

    Matt Brown
    COLUMNIST; TORONTO, CANADA (@TEDERICK)



    Iron Fist isn't just the worst thing in Marvel's nearly-ten-year MCU arsenal; it's indeed one of those rarest of pop cultural entities, an outright creative disaster. It can be used as a teaching case in universities for everything from film classes to project management: just because A was successful (and B, and C, and D in Marvel's case), doesn't mean whatever you do next will be.

    Iron Fist, starring the hopelessly miscast Finn Jones in the title role, behaves as though it smelled the Orientalism controversy coming and decided to lean into the punch. Where Doctor Strange contained, at least, notions of white privilege as it applies to its overall white saviour framework, Iron Fist doesn't seem to know that those notions are there, or could be there (or could make the show better by being there).

    It indeed casts a white man as a traditionally-white character in Marvel's '70s kung fu comic, and buffs up that decision by casting a white man who must be the single least convincing action lead I've ever seen on a screen, anywhere. And it surrounds all this with overall storytelling and production value so unrelentingly ****poor that they begin to serve as a kind of mediocrity cloaking device.

    You've gotta work pretty hard to make an Iron Fist show where the problematic racial elements are just as bad as everyone feared, and yet aren't actually the worst thing going on. Off a guess, I'd say the series' mission statement was: "Let's see what happens when we make a series built around a lead character who is a colossal ******* in an unwavering state of chaos, who doesn't know it, never finds out about it, and never changes it." I'm all for the unsympathetic protagonists, but Breaking Bad, this ain't.

    Marvel is teeing up for a big year at the movies (Guardians 2, the new Spider-Man, and a Thor movie that even non-Thor people are keyed up to see) and, perhaps, a less than stellar year on television. Iron Fist showrunner Scott Buck is beavering away on The Inhumans for this fall, a series that is already a downgrade from a feature film project and which covers ground better handled elsewhere already. The Defenders is on its way, but between last year's flawed-but-worthy offerings (Daredevil season 2; Luke Cage) and this Iron Fist mess, I'm mostly looking forward to it as an opportunity to spend some more time with Jessica Jones (and Sigourney Weaver).

    Surprising everyone including myself, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is in the middle of its best season yet, but now feels so divorced from the rest of the MCU that it scarcely seems to matter. It got walled off back when it was the worst thing Marvel had done, and is doing just fine.

    Iron Fist, by dint of being the anchor leg of the Defenders project, doesn't have that luxury. Whether its failures will torpedo The Defenders remains to be seen, but watching the series, I was more amazed (and disappointed) by how quickly and effectively it rubbed the shine off its preceding series as well.

    Look, I'm a big booster overall for both seasons of Daredevil and for Jessica Jones, and think that Luke Cage gets off to a great start. Iron Fist's mess spills over onto them, though. The latest series takes a can of pink spray paint to the shoddy workmanship of its predecessors.

    It makes the various Netflix series' reveals feel more like tricks, their predictable beats feel more like laziness, and the shoestring budgets feel more like a bug and less like a feature than ever before.

    Daredevil, Jessica Jones and Luke Cage each, in their way, felt like Marvel pushing the boundaries of the established House Style. Iron Fist makes the quadruped feel more like what it is: bargain basement stories married to low-rent production values and dangled before an audience long since presumed to be "captive." It feels, disappointingly, like it was true all along. This was just the one where the seams burst, the illusion no longer able to carry the flimsiness of the construction.

    It takes a pathological kind of creative bankruptcy to take a franchise that is, by any rational analysis, a kung fu movie, and strait-jacket it into the established Defenders universe visual language without even the courtesy nods towards stylistic innovation that marked the first couple episodes of Jessica Jones and Luke Cage. This is some cheap, cheap chicken.

    The average issue of Ed Brubaker, Matt Fraction and David Aja's run on The Immortal Iron Fist had more kinetic imagery on the page (pages which do not, last I checked, actually move) than any given fight scene in Iron Fist. None of the season's directors seem to want to make even token efforts to stretch the resources they've been given to arrive at something even slightly more artful and daring than what the terrible scripts have given them. Even RZA, who really ought to know better, is brought in to direct the season's only "tournament" style episode and never finds a moment of wuxia grace in any of it.

    I give Netflix maximum kudos for their push towards house-owned content and the speed and effectiveness with which they've gotten there. The more entries like Iron Fist show up, though, the more it starts to make the entire Netflix-style 13-episode binge series feel mightily threadbare.

    If everyone knows that the middle third of a Netflix season is going to be wild-goose-chase plotting, why are those episodes there? Would subscriptions actually dip if Iron Fist was 8 episodes, or 6, or a TV movie? Would a single viewer notice or care if the Meachums - Ward, June, and Faramir - weren't in Iron Fist at all? I doubt it. They're padding, wandering around on two legs apiece.

    Just as the visual blandness of Iron Fist shows the limitations of its sister series, the proscribed run of episodes shows how haphazardly arbitrary the 13-episode order actually is. It's based on a model of network television to which Netflix has literally never been beholden. If the studio is the only one with the balls to bank Scorsese's next movie, might they also have the balls to find a television creator and ask him or her what the natural extent of their storytelling frame is? Are audiences still this dim-witted, that they think they're being duped if they don't see more episode titles in their queue than they have room on the screen?

    I've written before about the dangers of pipeline content, where every new show or movie is just streaming media to eventually be sent down the digital delivery pipes regardless of shape, size, or colour. Iron Fist feels like the grey paste that comes out of that pipe when no one cares what's being delivered any more, so long as something is being delivered.

    If this is television's new "golden age," studios are going to tailor the medium to the content, not the other way around. The flexibility is there, and the field is wide open. Television is an embarrassment of riches right now - why would anyone waste their time with Iron Fist?


    Destroy All Monsters is a weekly column on Hollywood and pop culture. Matt Brown is in Toronto and on Letterboxd.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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