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Thread: Iron Fist

  1. #166
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    Finn says he is training for it now...

    ...what a novel idea.

    Iron Fist’s Finn Jones is actually training for season two
    By Kervyn Cloete Posted on September 28, 2017 5 min read



    There were many, many things wrong with the first season of Marvel’s Iron Fist. From the head-scratching abandonment of the source material’s unique old-school kung-fu fantasy tone in favour of an Arrow clone, to pointless narrative wheel-spinning and absolutely terrible villains. Easily the most grievous offence though was the show’s fight scenes.

    Marvel’s Daredevil had already set the bar **** high for fight choreography when it came to their Netflix TV series. Follow-up series Jessica Jones and Luke Cage didn’t have that same level of fisticuffs, but it was never expected from those characters or their stories. Danny Rand aka the Immortal Iron Fist though is supposed to be one of, if not the best, kung fu practitioners in the Marvel universe – so the TV series needed to step up.

    It stepped up alright… and then flailed around sloppily like a hyperactive child who had just walked out of a kung fu movie at the cinema and was now trying to copy all the moves using his dodgy memory and no real physical skills. To call the fight scenes poor would be an understatement. And as we learned later, there was a good reason for their terribleness: Iron Fist himself.



    Star Finn Jones had already been cast in the role with no actual martial arts background, but then doubled down on his lack of preparedness by only learning the fight choreography for scenes 15 minutes before they were about to be shot. Jones’ tight schedule was apparently to blame, but whatever the reason it was embarrassing.

    With Marvel’s The Defenders – the miniseries that brought all four the Netflix series together – basically shooting back to back with Iron Fist, that didn’t allow Jones to get in any proper training for a second time. However, at this point he had been winging it enough that there was a clear higher level of comfort with many of the moves, resulting in far more believable fight sequences. It still wasn’t quite as impressive as it should be, but it was a huge improvement.

    Well, I’m hoping that this upswing in pugilist quality continues for the upcoming Iron Fist season two, as Jones officially won’t have any excuses to hide behind. Despite still being months away before going in front of the cameras for the second season, Jones has reportedly already started hitting the dojo to prepare.

    View image on Twitter
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    Finn already started his martial arts training for Iron Fist season two! 🐉👊🏻


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    Jones himself revealed back to Inverse back in August that he was going to get an early start on his martial arts training this time around, and is now just living up to promises.

    We’re at least four or five months away from shooting so this time around, I’m being given a lot more preparation leading up to Season 2, which I think is really gonna have a huge improvement on the quality of the fight scenes in Season 2 of Iron Fist.
    It **** well better. Now if only there was a dojo we could send Jones to where he could train to have his Danny Rand come across as less of a petulant man-child, or where the writers could learn that we really could not care less about corporate takeovers when you have a lead character who literally went around punching dragons in the heart.

    Iron Fist season two does not have a release date yet, but it will follow on from the rest of the Phase Two for Marvel’s Netflix shows in The Punisher, Jessica Jones season two, Luke Cage season two and Daredevil season three.

    Last Updated: September 28, 2017
    Gene Ching
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  2. #167
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    Season 2 is happening

    ‘Iron Fist’ Season 2 Adds ‘Star Trek’ Alum Alice Eve (EXCLUSIVE)
    By Joe Otterson @JoeOtterson
    TV Reporter


    CREDIT: STEPHEN LOVEKIN/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK

    Alice Eve is set to appear in “Iron Fist” Season 2 on Netflix, Variety has learned exclusively.

    Eve’s role in the series is being kept under wraps, but she joins a returning cast that includes series star Finn Jones along with Jessica Henwick, Tom Pelphrey, Jessica Stroup, and Sacha Dhawan. An English actress who has appeared in film, television, and theatre, Eve is best known to American audiences for her role as Carol Marcus in the film “Star Trek: Into Darkness.” She also recently appeared in the third season of “Black Mirror” and the Lionsgate film “Misconduct.” She will also co-star in the Dakota Fanning-led film “Please Stand By,” due to be released in theaters in January.

    “We are very excited to have an actress of Alice’s stature join the cast of ‘Marvel’s Iron Fist,’” said Marvel’s head of television and series executive producer Jeph Loeb. “Her exceptional talent brings an intrigue and danger to her character unlike anyone else.”

    Eve is repped by Independent Talent Group in the U.K and CAA and Untitled Entertainment in the U.S.

    “Iron Fist” stars “Game of Thrones” alum Jones as Danny Rand, the heir to the multi-billion dollar Rand Corp. who returns to New York after training in martial arts for years in the mysterious city of K’un-Lun. Through his training, he was chosen to be the living weapon known as the Iron Fist, which allows him to channel his chi energy into his fists. It was the fourth Marvel-Netflix series to be released. The show was preceded by “Daredevil,” “Jessica Jones,” and “Luke Cage.” All four main characters then teamed up for “The Defenders” event series, which debuted on Netflix in August.

    Season 2 will also see Raven Metzner take over as showrunner from Scott Buck, who left “Iron Fist” to work on the Marvel-ABC series “Inhumans.”
    I liked Alice Eve in Star Trek: Into Darkness, but I doubt she can redeem Jones.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #168
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    Iron Fist is #1 with Business Insider

    6 new Netflix original shows got trashed by critics in 2017 — here's the list
    John Lynch
    Dec. 15, 2017, 2:11 PM

    For the most part, Netflix had an accomplished year in producing a number of great original shows.

    But the company also had a handful of new series that critics tore apart.

    From the lackluster Naomi Watts-led series "Gypsy," to the disappointing Marvel show "Iron Fist," six shows that Netflix debuted in 2017 received heaps of negative reviews on their way to earning a "Rotten" score from the reviews aggregator Rotten Tomatoes.

    Here are the six worst Netflix original shows that debuted in 2017, ranked from bad to worst, according to critics:

    6. "Girlboss" — 31%
    Critic score: 31%
    Audience score: 72%

    Netflix description: "Rebellious and broke, Sophia stumbles into creating an online business and learns how to be the boss. A comedy inspired by the best-selling memoir."

    What critics said: "Watching an ignorant but energetic youngster rebel against adulthood is nothing new, and Girlboss' iteration would be fine if it showed some semblance of self-awareness." — IndieWire

    5. "Neo Yokio" — 30%
    Netflix
    Critic score: 30%
    Audience score: 56%

    Netflix description: "Joined by his faithful mecha-butler, Kaz Kaan pursues love, fashion and supernatural forces amid Neo Yokio's sinister high society."

    What critics said: "There's a lot of talent involved in Neo Yokio... Yet, somehow, the show has no soul. It's dead on arrival." — The Verge

    4. "Gypsy" — 24%
    Critic score: 24%
    Audience score: 85%

    Netflix description: "Therapist Jean Holloway develops dangerous and intimate relationships with the people in her patients' lives in this simmering psychological thriller."

    What critics said: "It's all fun and games until you desperately start hoping that your protagonist loses her malpractice suit." — The Village Voice

    3. "Friends From College" — 23%
    Critic score: 23%
    Audience score: 73%

    Netflix description: "Twenty years after graduation, a tight-knit group of college friends reconnects and discovers that love hasn't gotten easier with age."

    What critics said: "What a cast. And what a waste. Friends From College is one of the year's biggest disappointments." — Entertainment Weekly

    2. "Disjointed" — 21%
    Critic score: 21%
    Audience score: 74%

    Netflix description: "Pot activist Ruth Whitefeather Feldman runs a medical marijuana dispensary while encouraging her loyal patients to chill out and enjoy the high life."

    What critics said: "There's not enough weed in the Golden State to wring consistent laughs from a show that's mostly as stale as an unwashed bong." — CNN

    1. "Marvel's Iron Fist" — 19%

    JoJo Whilden/Netflix
    Critic score: 19%
    Audience score: 76%

    Netflix description: "Danny Rand resurfaces 15 years after being presumed dead. Now, with the power of the Iron Fist, he seeks to reclaim his past and fulfill his destiny."

    What critics said: "This series takes everything good Marvel has done, takes it on a joy ride, then returns it scratched, bruised, and smelling like patchouli and broken promises. After the 13-hour slog, I'm not angry — I'm just disappointed." — Vox
    Even that photo makes me angry. So wrong on so many levels.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #169
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    We covered 3 of these here.

    Top Breakout TV Stars of 2017
    By Joe Otterson @JoeOtterson
    TV Reporter

    CREDIT: NETFLIX/CBS

    As 2017 draws to a close, Variety takes a look back on some of the fresh faces in television who helped us survive another year.

    Of course, fresh can mean many things. In this list, we honor people appearing on new shows, people who joined returning shows, as well as people who made the jump to TV this year. Take, for example, relative unknowns like “Young Sheldon” star Iain Armitage or the young cast of “Riverdale,” who all exploded in popularity this year.

    Then there are veteran actors like Sean Astin and Rachel Brosnahan, who took on new roles this year to great fan and critical acclaim. Brosnahan stole hearts and laughs for her powerhouse performance in “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.” Astin, meanwhile, became part of the phenomenon that is Netflix’s binge-worthy series “Stranger Things.”

    Read the full list below. Each of those mentioned, in their own way, made us want to keep watching.

    Iain Armitage, “Young Sheldon” (CBS)

    It was the closest thing to a sure thing you could get that “The Big Bang Theory” prequel series “Young Sheldon” would be a hit. The burden of continuing the legacy of the incredibly successful parent program fell largely on the pint-sized shoulders of Iain Armitage, who plays the child version of Jim Parsons’ Dr. Sheldon Cooper. The young Armitage pulled it off, though, and the series has proven to be number one new comedy of the 2017-2018 season in the Nielsen ratings.

    Sean Astin, “Stranger Things” (Netflix)

    The original Goony appeared in “Stranger Things” Season 2 and quickly proved to be one of the most lovable characters on television in 2017. Astin played Bob Newby, the boyfriend of Joyce Byers (Winona Ryder) and would-be stepfather to her two sons. Astin brought a tear-jerking amount of humanity and heart to the role, playing Bob as a normal guy who stepped up in the biggest way possible when the people he loved were in danger.

    Rachel Brosnahan, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

    Rachel Brosnahan is no stranger to TV audiences after recent turns on “House of Cards” and “Manhattan,” but her starring role on “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” gives the talented actress her best role in years. Brosnahan effortlessly inhabits Miriam “Midge” Maisel, a 1950s New York housewife who discovers a talent for stand up comedy. The series is the brainchild of “Gilmore Girls” creator Amy Sherman-Palladino, providing Brosnahan with no shortage of snappy dialogue. Her onscreen friendship with Alex Borstein as talent manager Susie is also the stuff of TV gold.

    Nick Frost, “Into the Badlands” (AMC)

    Nick Frost joined AMC’s martial arts series for its second season this year, injecting a welcome dose of comic relief. Frost starred as Bajie, a fast-talking hustler who spends the beginning of the season literally chained to Daniel Wu’s Sunny. “Into the Badlands” truly seemed to hit its stride this season, and Frost was a major component of that. Pairing him with the no-nonsense character Wu portrays allowed for a fantastic odd couple dynamic that provided balance to the show’s breathtaking fight sequences.

    Jessica Henwick, “Iron Fist” (Netflix)

    Jessica Henwick turned out to be a rose among a lot of poorly-reviewed thorns in the first season of the Marvel-Netflix series “Iron Fist.” Henwick played Colleen Wing, a martial arts master who becomes the ally and lover of the titular hero, played by Finn Jones. Despite the show receiving a rash of negative reviews upon its release, Henwick was one of the few elements of the series to earn real praise. Hopefully, her role will be expanded going forward. The chances of that look good, as Marvel TV head Jeph Loeb teased Wing would team up with Det. Misty Knight (Simone Missick) in a future season in keeping with the comic books.


    Sonequa Martin-Green, “Star Trek: Discovery” (CBS All Access)

    Sonequa Martin-Green made the leap from one massive series to another this year, leaving “The Walking Dead” to take on a starring role in “Star Trek: Discovery.” Despite a lot of negative news coming out ahead of “Discovery’s” premiere (including multiple premiere date delays), Martin-Green deftly took on the challenge of leading the new installment of the iconic sci-fi franchise. Her portrayal of convicted Starfleet mutineer Michael Burnham made the new show truly binge-worthy.


    Jonah Ray, “Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Return” (Netflix)

    “Mystery Science Theater 3000” remains one of the most popular cult TV shows of all time. After a record-breaking Kickstarter campaign, the show was brought back for a new season on Netflix with comedian Jonah Ray stepping in as the host. Ray had a big jumpsuit to fill, taking over a role previously held by series creator Joel Hodgson and later Michael J. Nelson, the original show’s head writer. But with Hodgson’s blessing, Ray took to the task with apparent ease, riffing on movies with the best of them.

    The Cast of “Riverdale” (The CW)

    “Riverdale,” the dark twist on the classic Archie Comics, has quickly become a force to be reckoned with on The CW in just under a year. The young cast includes: K.J. Apa as Archie, Lili Reinhart at Betty Cooper, Camila Mendes as Veronica Lodge, and Cole Sprouse as Jughead Jones. The first season launched on CW in January and was subsequently released on Netflix. With the streaming service helping the show reach a much bigger audience, the second season has skyrocketed past the first in ratings to the tune of nearly 50 percent in the key demo and nearly 60 percent in total viewers.

    Frankie Shaw, “SMILF” (Showtime)

    Frankie Shaw took the short film she entered into the Sundance Film Festival in 2015 and turned it into a TV series that she stars in, writes, directs, and produces this year. Shaw stars as Bridgette, a broke single mother trying to make ends meet for herself and her infant son in South Boston. Shaw has earned critical acclaim for her performance, with many praising her portrayal of a young, flawed woman and the way in which she authentically captured life near the bottom of the socio-economic ladder in America. She was nominated for two Golden Globes for the show’s freshman season.

    Jimmy Tatro, “American Vandal” (Netflix)

    “American Vandal” perfectly skewered the true crime documentary genre and Jimmy Tatro was at the very heart of it. Tatro played Dylan Maxwell, a high school student who is expelled on shaky evidence that he vandalized over two dozen faculty cars. Tatro’s deadpan (and braindead) delivery made Dylan a lovable loser you couldn’t help but root for. But when the show took unexpected dramatic turns, particularly in its final episodes, Tatro proved more than up to the challenge.

    Reese Witherspoon & Nicole Kidman, “Big Little Lies” (HBO)

    Reese Witherspoon and Nicole Kidman both made the jump from film to series television this year with the critically-acclaimed series “Big Little Lies.” Both women won Emmys for their work as executive producers on the show, with Kidman also winning the Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie. All told, the show won eight Emmys and was recently nominated for six Golden Globes. Both women will return as stars and executive producers for the show’s second season.

    Into The Badlands
    Iron Fist
    Star Trek: Discovery
    Gene Ching
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  5. #170
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    Lewis Tan

    Deadpool 2 Trailer May Reveal Iron Fist’s Lewis Tan as Shatterstar
    By Cooper Hood 02.07.2018



    Iron Fist‘s Lewis Tan may have been revealed to be part of Deadpool 2‘s cast as Shatterstar. The marketing campaign for Fox’s highly anticipated sequel may not have aired a spot during the Super Bowl, but they kicked off this week’s coverage with a live-tweet of the big game. In the following days, a new poster was revealed and a viral site launched. The biggest piece came with the release of Deadpool 2‘s first official trailer, and it did much more than just introduce Josh Brolin as Cable.

    One of the moments that stuck out to fans the most was an ensemble shot of Deadpool and other mutants ready to leap out of a plane. Zazie Beetz’s Domino was featured there, but the shot also revealed Terry Crews to be part of the cast – possibly as G.W. Bridge. Two additional team members were featured as well. While one is difficult to identify, the other is widely believed to be Shatterstar – and now we may know who is playing him.

    Twitter user HELLB0YS shared a side by side of Shatterstar from the trailer and Iron Fist actor Lewis Tan along with Tan’s Twitter activity that may indicate he’s part of the cast, too. Shatterstar in the trailer does resemble Tan, but it isn’t clear enough to confirm on its own. However, Tan was liking multiple Shatterstar related images earlier today – ones that he appears to have since unliked after the internet sleuthing began.

    View image on Twitter


    Tom™ // Comissions are Open
    @TH0R0DINS0NS
    Okay so umm.... @THELEWISTAN SEEMS TO BE PLAYING SHATTERSTAR IN DEADPOOL 2 ? THE GUY IN THE TRAILER LOOKS JUST LIKE HIM AND HES BEEN LIKING TWEETS ABOUT THE FILM ALL DAY ?!?

    2:03 PM - Feb 7, 2018
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    Since this isn’t the most concrete evidence, this alone is far from confirmation that Tan is indeed part of Deadpool 2‘s cast. However, in doing further digging, Tan also follows Deadpool himself Ryan Reynolds and the sequel’s director David Leitch on Twitter, and did so one right after the other. He also follows newly revealed cast member Terry Crews. Who follows who on Twitter isn’t the best way to determine if an actor is part of another project, but there’s more. Near the end of November, Tan revealed on Twitter that he recently worked with Lewis on a project. Crews and Tan have never worked on the same project before, and Deadpool 2 wrapped in October.


    Lewis Tan

    @TheLewisTan
    Replying to @Lexialex @terrycrews
    Just worked with him. Legend and a gentleman @terrycrews

    10:52 AM - Nov 21, 2017
    151
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    When all of this evidence is put together, it appears more likely than not that Tan is indeed part of Deadpool 2‘s ensemble, and likely playing Shatterstar. Early reports on Deadpool 2 claimed Shatterstar would be introduced via a post-credits scene, but that was quickly debunked by screenwriter Rhett Reese. It may not be a post-credits intro, but Tan does appear to have a costume extremely similar to Shatterstar. Regardless of whether or not this is Shatterstar, it could be a big role for Tan moving forward if this team has any ties to X-Force‘s future roster. This has yet to be confirmed, but there’s mounting evidence behind Tan being involved. If this is the case, hopefully it will be confirmed sooner rather than later.
    I met Lewis in Dublin while doing a set visit for Into the Badlands. We had dinner together, along with several other cast members. He hinted that he was about to join the MCU but couldn't disclose too much more because he was under NDA.

    Thread: Deadpool 2
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  6. #171
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    More on Lewis Tan

    In my JAN+FEB 2016 cover story - Into the Badlands with Daniel Wu - I opened by saying "If you don’t know the name Daniel Wu by now, he’s the martial artist to watch." I reiterate that with Lewis Tan.

    Interview: Actor Lewis Tan



    LEWIS TAN: A HAPA SUPERHERO ON A MISSION
    By Melissa Slaughter

    For too long, we’ve seen Asian men portrayed as meek computer geeks with no sex appeal and no social currency. Sure, we've had martial arts masters like Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, and Jet Li, but very rarely did they get the girl. More likely they got a pat on the back and a "laugh line" in return for their role as the sidekick. Hell, Jet Li didn’t even kiss Aliyah at the end of Romeo Must Die!

    Well, no more! Asian dudes with sex appeal, gusto, and smarts to boot are here, and they’re not going away. 2017 might have been a garbage fire for Asian-American representation in film/TV, but out of the flames rose guys like Ludi Lin (Power Rangers), Ki Hong Lee (Kimmy Schmidt/Maze Runner), and Henry Goulding (Crazy Rich Asians). Asian actors are breaking stereotypes left and right, and new positive role models abound! Hapa Mag is very happy to have one of these gentlemen with us in this spring issue!

    Type “Guy Who Should Have Been Iron Fist” into your search engine. I dare you. There’s plenty to read about Lewis as the "Almost Iron Fist" here, here and here. However, Tan is much more than a high-flying Marvel drunken monk. He's an accomplished actor, an stuntman, world-traveler, and legacy martial artist.

    Lewis Tan: My father was a national champion martial artist who competed in many different styles. He taught me from a young age how to fight; it was our bonding time. We would sit and watch old Bruce Lee films and stretch in the living room. We traveled a lot because my father was doing different films all over the world. Eventually we came to the USA for Batman and we have lived here ever since.


    PC: Samantha Rebuyaco

    As many a Hapa knows, we’re often told we’re too Asian, not Asian enough, too ethnic, on and on. And often being mixed race isn’t taken into account at all. In casting, this pressure is magnified as one's outside presentation could dictate whether or not you get a job. Our own Sam Tanabe wrote about such inequity in our inaugural issue. So why choose a career path that, more often than not, will throw someone aside for just their looks?

    LT: "I got into acting when I was very young because I fell in love with cinema. It was also all I knew and saw as a child. I grew up on sets with some of the most legendary directors and it was a dream to play make believe and get paid for it. Still is.

    Being mixed in an industry that has been known for casting [people of color] as stereotypes has been frustrating and tiring, but has also made me a better actor and performer because I have had to convince casting directors and producers I am the ONLY choice for the role. As we go into 2018, I think the industry is starting to see the world in a broader perspective. It's about time and I am very grateful for all the hard times that has built me up."

    Born in England to a Chinese father, a British mother, Lewis now calls the USA home. Lewis told us "I love my mixed heritage because it has given me depth and perspective on the world. It has also been challenging in the film industry, but at the same time [it] created a deep discovery of who I am as a man and I am proud of my heritage."

    And it's not just his family heritage that gave him the chance to get a broader worldview. "Traveling has introduced me to the craziest mixes I have ever seen, people with accents you would never expect. It has been such a mind-opening experience and the world is a colorful and beautiful place." Mark Twain would agree; the famed humorist wrote in his travel book The Innocents Abroad that "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts." Lewis expanded upon the idea that travel "makes you judge less...It just shows you that you can not ever put people in a box. There is no box. It's endless, and that is a lovely thought."

    Don't think Lewis has been sitting pretty as a stuntman and action actor; he's no one-trick pony. He's a multi-talented actor with plenty to show the world. He wants to do it all and to work with the best. He's certainly been in enough projects in the works to stretch anyone's artistic ability. He can be seen in the new crime thriller Den of Thieves, with Gerard Butler and 50 Cent, and as Gaius Chau, a leading role in Daniel Wu’s Into the Badlands, as well as “a few more that I can’t announce yet but are huge! ” I will be candid when I say I am very excited to see what Lewis has in store for that AMC martial-arts extravaganza. (Shout-out to Keith Chow of the Nerds of Color and Hard NOC Media who introduced me to both the show and to Lewis himself. #ColorMeBadlands) Lewis has pushed Asian-American representation forward by leaps and bounds and takes seriously his responsibility.

    LT: “It is bigger than me and other actors. It is about the next generation feeling represented correctly and inspiring them to create and be heroes in their own story. I have season 3 of Into the Badlands coming out, which in my opinion is revolutionary when it comes to diversity and also the best action on TV. I am going to continue to do my best to use my platform and skills to inspire others and rep for my people. Count on that.”

    A FEW MORE LEWIS TAN FUN FACTS:
    His favorite martial arts movies: "Enter the Dragon, IP Man, Drunken Master, Kill Bill, Crouching Tiger, The Matrix, Fist of Fury, Ong Bak, Kung Fu Hustle, anything from Jackie Chan, Kurosawa and most recently I saw The Villainess and it blew my mind."

    His biggest martial arts inspirations: "My father had a big influence on me. My sensei and teachers I have had, which are many. I am constantly learning and growing, understanding my body and how it moves."

    His favorite foods: "I eat everything! But my favorite food is Thai, Japanese, Italian and Indian, but I do not discriminate. I love good food and don't look twice at the price."

    Check Lewis out in Iron Fist on Netflix and Season 3 of Into the Badlands airs on April 22nd, 2018. And follow him @lewistanofficial on IG, and @TheLewisTan on Twitter. He's got big things in the works, so stayed tuned!



    *ALL PICTURES WERE TAKEN BY SAMANTHA REBUYACO

    Melissa Slaughter has lived in all four time zones in the contiguous United States. A former actor in Seattle, WA, Melissa now resides in NYC as a content creator. She is the producer of the We're Not All Ninjas podcast, which she also hosts with fellow Hapa Mag writer, Alex Chester. Melissa also writes for online blogs Nerdophiles and On Stage Blog. Find her @NotAllNinjasPod.

    Thread: Into The Badlands
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    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  7. #172
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    I like Luke Cage, but I still can't stand Iron Fist



    Why the Big 'Luke Cage' Season 2 Crossover Is More Than a Marvel Easter Egg
    Cheo Hodari Coker unpacks the history of kung fu in hip-hop.
    By Eric Francisco on June 28, 2018

    Filed Under Fighting, Hip-Hop, Iron Fist, Marvel Comics, Marvel Movies, Marvel Universe, Netflix, Superheroes, The Defenders & TV Shows
    In the tenth episode of Marvel’s Luke Cage Season 2, now streaming on Netflix, the eponymous hero (played by Mike Colter) teams up with an old buddy from The Defenders: billionaire kung fu master Danny Rand, known as the Immortal Iron Fist (Finn Jones). Together in the comics, the two are the “Heroes for Hire,” a dynamic duo of contrasts who fight crime side-by-side.

    But bringing Marvel’s tag team to life on Netflix is more than an ass-kicking Easter egg. For showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker, it represents the intersection where black and Asian-American pop culture meet.

    In Luke Cage, Danny comes to Pop’s Barbershop to help his bulletproof BFF take down Bushmaster. On bringing Iron Fist to his show, Coker says he wanted a throwback to kung fu movies like the Iron Fist comics of yore.

    “I felt if we had the chance to have [Iron Fist] in our show, it would be more like the comic book and a lot more like that friendship,” Coker tells Inverse. “Capture that Enter the Dragon flavor that comic was always supposed to have.”

    But there’s more to evoking kung fu than aesthetics. “There’s so much that comes from that crossing of culture,” he says. “The reason Grandmaster Flash is called ‘Grandmaster’ is because he and his friends would come and go to the kung fu forts on 42nd Street.”


    Finn Jones (left) and Mike Colter (right) in Season 2 of 'Luke Cage' on Netflix.

    In 2018, Asian media like K-pop and anime attract a diverse audience, including many African-Americans. But for Coker’s generation, the racial crossover came in the appetite for kung fu films by black audiences. Ground zero for this intersection were the grimy theaters of Manhattan, like the Cine 42 nestled in the heart of Times Square before it became a sanitized tourist destination.

    If Coker didn’t catch the Saturday kung fu marathons on local TV stations in Connecticut, the soon-to-be producer watched John Woo and Shaw Brothers flicks like The 36 Chambers of Shaolin and The Eight Pole Diagram Fighter in New York for a buck fifty.

    “I’ve always wanted to do a modernized version of Last Hurrah of Chivalry or A Better Tomorrow,” Coker says.

    In fact, it was in the same theaters Coker frequented where the legendary hip-hop outfit the Wu-Tang Clan was born. “I got my introduction to kung fu flicks in ‘78 or ‘79,” wrote Wu-Tang founder RZA in the 2004 book Wu-Tang Manual. “At that point, all of 42nd Street had kung fu movies.”

    On one cold night, RZA and the late rapper ODB found refuge “at this funky theater at 42nd Street and 7th Avenue.” Screening that night was Gordon Li’s 1983 classic, Shaolin and Wu Tang.

    “When it came on, it woke us up,” RZA recalled. “It was the best kung-fu movie I’d ever seen in my life — the fighting, the ideas, the concepts, everything.”


    'Shaolin vs. Wu Tang' (1983).

    A variety of forces led to the crossover of black and Asian cinema in the 1970s: White flight to the suburbs, black veterans returning home from Korea and Vietnam, and the meteoric growth of Asia’s economy created a storm for artistic intersectionality.

    “As white people abandoned the cities, downtown theaters became spaces for people of color,” said Amy Obugo Ongiri, author of Spectacular Blackness, in a 2009 interview with SF Gate. “Theater owners started screening stuff that was less marketable, mostly cheap imports — and that meant martial arts movies.”

    But arguably no one did as much to popularize kung fu as Bruce Lee, the film icon whose achievements exude the mystique of folk hero. Among many things, Lee was a progressive who taught non-Chinese, including black people, kung fu. NBA star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was among Lee’s students.

    “In the 1970s, [Bruce] Lee was a rare non-white leading man, and an unfeasibly cool one at that,” observed Phil Hoad for The Guardian. “His creed of righteous self-reliance appealed to black audiences, who were emerging from the civil rights struggles … Martial arts films, like blaxploitation, were adrenalin-drunk revenge fantasies.”

    “There was a time in hip-hop where people would actually dress like Bruce Lee,” Coker remembers. “They used to call it the kung fu suits, that black suit Bruce Lee would wear. They would walk around in the kung fu suit and maybe had nunchucks. That **** was real.”


    Bruce Lee and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, in the 1978 film 'Game of Death' released several years after Lee's death.

    Lee’s death in 1973, just before the release of his first and only Hollywood film Enter the Dragon, ignited a voracious hunger. Pop culture exploded with martial arts, from the popular TV series Kung Fu with David Carradine to the 1974 pop jingle “Kung Fu Fighting” by Carl Douglas.

    Kung fu’s popularity soon inspired one Roy Thomas. Like many comic book creators, Thomas lived and worked in New York and created Iron Fist after watching a kung fu movie in the city. While Thomas imagined Iron Fist as a white American who learns kung fu in mystical K’un-Lun (which became an issue for the Netflix series decades later), Iron Fist is still energized by the west’s obsession for Asian culture.

    When sales of Iron Fist and Luke Cage’s comics began to decline, Marvel editors paired the two together, creating the iconic series Power Man and Iron Fist. Even after their series ended, the two characters often appeared together in Marvel crossovers and revivals. The most recent iteration of Power Man and Iron Fist, written by David F. Walker in 2016, ran for fifteen issues.


    Cover of 'Power Man and Iron Fist' #15, illustrated by Sanford Greene.

    Now, they’re back again in the Marvel/Netflix franchise. “That was one of the things we wanted to capture in the show,” Coker says about the Heroes for Hire, “these fights having a deep kung fu base.”

    “I’ve told all of my fight choreographers, I want Shaw Brothers’ type coverage, not the hyper-cut Paul Greengrass does in Bourne Identity,” he explains. “I want where you actually see people fighting in frame. The Wachowski Brothers did that. Quentin did it with Kill Bill. Those fight scenes, that’s where the fun is. That’s where the genre is. It’s important to reflect that.”

    Marvel’s Luke Cage is streaming now on Netflix.

    THREADS:
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    Gene Ching
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  8. #173
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    Marvel’s Iron Fist - Season 2 | Date Announcement [HD] | Netflix

    Gene Ching
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  9. #174
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    Thumbs down Rosario out of S2

    She was one of the only redeeming roles in Season 1, her and Lewis Tan.

    Iron Fist: Loeb Addresses Claire Temple’s Season 2 Status
    07.26.2018
    by Meagan Damore



    Don’t expect to see Rosario Dawson’s Claire Temple in Iron Fist Season 2. At Comic-Con International in San Diego, Head of Marvel Television Jeph Loeb revealed Dawson won’t reprise her role as Claire Temple in the upcoming Netflix series, which arrives in September.

    “Claire won’t be in there, but our relationship with Rosario [Dawson] is awesome and we love her, she loves us and — when the story lends itself into that place and hopefully she’s available — we go down that road,” Loeb explained. “Believe me, there isn’t any showrunner who hasn’t come in and said, ‘So where are we with Rosario?’ And we go, ‘Well, let’s tell the story and figure it all out.'”

    “You know, what’s been fun about it is I think Simone [Missick] is now giving her a run for the money in terms of the shows! She’s been on and been running around,” he continued.

    “Look, again, it always comes down to story… You know, some people would be really satisfied if Danny Rand got on a bus and Foggy Nelson was getting off the bus and that’s cool. It isn’t, and to a certain extent, it’s sort of like, ‘Really? That’s what you did?’ We always look at it from the point of view of ‘What’s the best story?’ We don’t run an Easter egg farm. We do put little things in there for people who know, but we certainly don’t want it to be something that people focus on. We don’t want it to be distracting from the story,” he concluded.

    However, fans may get a chance to see Marvel Netflix’s other recurring character. Asked about Turk Barrett’s status, Loeb teased, “I can’t confirm or deny where Turk is going to show up next… Rob [Morgan] is a terrific actor and he’s certainly part of our company, so.” Newcomer Alice Eve agreed with the sentiment, saying, “Yeah, he is!” Since Eve seems familiar with the actor, it’s likely the small-time criminal will turn up somewhere down the line.

    Arriving Sept. 7 on Netflix, Marvel’s Iron Fist Season 2 stars Finn Jones as Danny Rand, Jessica Henwick as Colleen Wing, Sacha Dhawan as Davos, Tom Pelphrey as Ward Meachum, Jessica Stroup as Joy Meachum, Simone Missick Misty Knight and introduces Alice Eve as Mary Walker.
    Gene Ching
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  10. #175
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    Marvel's Iron Fist: Season 2 | Building an Epic Fight Sequence | Netflix

    Gene Ching
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  11. #176
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    Marvel’s Iron Fist: Season 2 | Official Trailer [HD] | Netflix

    Gene Ching
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  12. #177
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    Well at least Finn bothered to train a little Kung Fu this season...about time.

    I started watching the first episode of Season 2 of Iron Fist but only got through the first fight. It was better than Season 1 but nothing extraordinary. I've read some positive reactions on social media so I might give it another go.

    Meanwhile, Finn is now training Shaolin under Shi Yan Ming.

    Inside Finn Jones’ Intense Martial Arts Training For ‘Iron Fist’ Season 2


    Marvel's 'Iron Fist' New York Screening
    Gilbert Carrasquillo / Contributor / Getty Images
    by Charles Thorp

    Screams ring out from inside a warehouse building in industrial Brooklyn Opens a New Window. . Nobody is actually getting their ass kicked inside, but it sure sounds like it. That is because inside is the makeshift dojo built by Marvel Opens a New Window. to create and rehearse the fight sequences for the upcoming sop****re season of superhero series Iron Fist.

    But before stepping through these doors Finn Jones, who stars as Danny Rand Opens a New Window. aka Iron Fist, prepared for his return to the character by committing himself to a pious training regime five months earlier. “I was excited that we had this chance with stunt coordinator Clayton Barber to really dial in the fights,” says Jones. The actor started working with personal trainer Bev Ratcliff who set him up with a gymnastic-based routine Opens a New Window. . “This role requires me to be long and lean so that I can move fluidly, rather than just putting on tons of muscle.”

    Ratcliff, who is a nutritionist as well, also created a strict diet plan for Jones to follow. “I dedicated myself to it,” says Jones. “I cut out alcohol and was eating as clean as possible every meal.”

    Most importantly though, is the time that Jones spent with a Shi Yan Ming, a 34th generation Shaolin warrior monk and head of USA Shaolin Temple in New York. During their days at the temple Jones was put through a wide range of traditional kung fu Opens a New Window. movements while Ming gave strict instruction.


    Finn Jones training for Iron First 2
    Courtesy Image

    “He yelled at me for ‘more chi’ and for ‘more power’,” says Jones. “I was able to find a reserve of energy that I never knew I had through our work together. You never really know what you have until you truly test yourself.”

    Jones also incorporated study in tai chi, wishu, jeet kune do, as well more modern martial arts Opens a New Window. . “I see Danny as a brawler who has this foundation of traditional kung fu but also knows he has to get the job done quickly,” he says. “I love throwing elbows. It is so vicious and effective.”

    The effort that Jones put in paid off when it came time to shoot the stunts. “I wanted to take what they did with the first season and crank it up a notch,” says Barber, who the producers brought in to do just that. Not only was Barber coming off working as fight coordinator on Black Panther Opens a New Window. , but his career as a taekwondo competitor gave him the background needed for the martial arts-anchored show.

    “The first thing that excited me about this project is that there aren’t really any shows dedicated to Kung Fu like this has the chance to be,” says Barber. He also set the goal to have the lead actors perform as many of the sequences as possible, which was made possible through those months of intense martial arts schooling.

    The experience has been so beneficial for Jones that he is already looking towards what could be done with more episodes. “There is some weaponry combat towards the end of this season and I really enjoyed working with the swords,” he says. “If we get a third season, I’ll be bringing my swords with me.”
    Caption 2 'Iron First'
    Gene Ching
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  13. #178
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    No Season 2 reviews yet?

    Come on now. Someone else watch this and let us know. I watch so much for y'all. And after Season 1...well, it still hurts.

    How Sacha Dhawan broke new ground as the villain on Netflix’s ‘Iron Fist’


    Sacha Dhawan stars as Davos in Netflix’s “Iron Fist.” (Netflix/Marvel)
    By David Betancourt
    September 14

    Note: Spoilers for Season 2 of Netflix’s “Iron Fist” below.

    Before Sacha Dhawan became one of the most violent and intriguing antagonists in Marvel’s live-action entertainment era, he was sitting on a bus in London, reading Iron Fist comics, convinced he would never land the role of the mystical martial artist the Steel Serpent.

    Each flip of the page revealed few similarities between Dhawan and the classic villain he had auditioned to play for Marvel and Netflix’s “Iron Fist” series.

    Davos, the man under the mask of the Steel Serpent, seemed almost alien to Dhawan. He saw skin of a different color and a hulking figure that seemed twice his size.

    “I kind of thought there’s no way in a million years I’m ever going to get this job,” Dhawan told The Washington Post’s Comic Riffs.

    But surprisingly to him, Dhawan got the role for “Iron Fist’s” polarizing first season, playing a brother/best friend to “Iron Fist” protagonist Danny Rand (Finn Jones).

    After it came out, famed comic book writer and current Marvel television producer Jeph Loeb called Dhawan to let him know Season 2 of “Iron Fist” was a go, and that Davos would play a much larger and darker part in the plot.

    Knowing he was about to make the transition from friend to foe in “Iron Fist’s” second season, Dhawan began four months of intense training and weightlifting to bulk up, to prepare for turning on the evil switch in front of the cameras.

    Dhawan studied various forms of martial arts, including Wing Chun, Choy Li Fut and boxing, working with his trainers to create a style of fighting for Davos that worked well for both the character and Dhawan’s abilities.

    “I wanted to give the impression that between Season 1 and Season 2, Davos, he had lost everything, but it meant that he trained harder and wanted to come back harder,” Dhawan said. “I started off in London with a range of different trainers and then [was] really upping my training regime, sometimes training twice, even three times of day and living a bit of a kind of lifestyle as Davos would, where your life just revolves around eating and training and focus and discipline. It was a real challenge.”

    The culmination of all that training came during Season 2’s fifth episode, “Heart of the Dragon.” The episode opens with Davos, having just stolen the power of the Iron Fist from Danny Rand, destroying a cement wall with a red chi-fueled closed fist. In that scene, Dhawan wears the Iron Fist mask many fans have been clamoring to see more of. He says a decision was made that he would not continue wearing the mask, so he would not cover up the anger that was written on his face in every scene. But in the moment, he was overcome with emotion and felt like a superhero.

    “It was something that I never thought was possible for someone who’s a British Indian actor,” Dhawan said. “I was thinking about Davos at that time, thinking about his mom and father in K’un-Lun, and me, Sacha Dhawan, thinking about my mom and dad back in the U.K., and I’m thinking, ‘I did it, Mom and Dad.’ It was a very proud moment, not just for me, but for other British Indians or Indians all over the world [to see] that this is possible. It’s a real big step for the Marvel universe.”


    Davos (Sacha Dhawan) and Danny Rand (Finn Jones) are brothers at odds in “Iron Fist.” (Netflix/Marvel)

    Not lost in that moment was Dhawan realizing in that scene he was giving viewers the Iron Fist of color many thought the show needed, even if he was the bad guy. (Many fans thought Marvel and Netflix should have cast an Asian lead actor as Iron Fist.) But what Dhawan, or anyone streaming that episode could have known in that moment, was that would not be the last time they’d see someone other than Danny Rand with the power of the Iron Fist.

    Perhaps the most talked about and controversial moment of Season 2 is leading lady Jessica Henwick (who plays Colleen Wing) gaining the power of the “Iron Fist” in the 10th and final episode after she and Danny Rand successfully take the power away from Davos. Dhawan says no one on set knew the change was coming.

    “It’s something that they were very secretive about telling people. Because if it leaked, then we’re ruining the surprise for everybody,” Dhawan said. “I’m excited to see how Colleen handles it. Is she going to fall in love with the power? And who else is going to have access to it?”

    So much of the hype of this second season has been focused on Dhawan and Henwick’s characters wielding a power intended for the titular character, but Dhawan says he walked away from Season 2 impressed with how strong Jones came back in his performance this year in the lead role after the criticism he received during “Iron Fist’s” debut in 2017.

    “Finn, in my opinion, was the best man for the job,” Dhawan said. “I think the amount of work that he put into [“Iron Fist”] this year, which isn’t easy after you’ve had a literal beating from so many people, [he could have just said] I’m just going to give up, and he didn’t. And I get really moved by [his performance] because he really gave it so much this year, and I enjoyed working with him.”

    As for the more positive online fan reaction to Season 2 of “Iron Fist,” Dhawan attributes much of that to new showrunner Raven Metzner, and conversations Metzner had with cast members before writing began.

    “Raven was very keen to speak to all of the cast and guests about the advantages and disadvantages of Season 1 [to] see how we can do better,” Dhawan said.

    Dhawan is quick to point out that unlike so many comic book villains, Davos is far from dead. And if Danny Rand can be shown with glowing chi-charged hands (as seen in the final moments of the season finale), perhaps the Iron Fist power was not completely drained from Davos, either? Asked if he is ready to suit up for Season 3, Dhawan can barely contain his eagerness.

    “Hell, yeah,” Dhawan said. “[This time] I’m going to try to ask for a whole costume.”
    Gene Ching
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  14. #179
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    Kung Fu hugs?

    There's a vid.

    FIGHTING WITH THE STARS: ‘IRON FIST’S CLAYTON BARBER TALKS KUNG-FU HUGS AND ATHLETICISM VS. HARD WORK
    BY AUTUMN NOEL KELLY ON 9/27/18 AT 1:40 PM

    Clayton Barber has has taught actors how to fight for more than 35 years. He did choreography for Wesley Snipes in Blade II, trained Michael B. Jordan for Creed, was a stunt performer in John Wick and the fight coordinator for Black Panther. He recently finished work on Iron Fist Season 2 and he still considers himself “just a peon” doing his job.

    “At some point I stop listening, and I do what I do,” Barber tells Newsweek.

    Barber has a stern exterior, yet he’s warm and compassionate during our brief stunt training session in a warehouse near the Brooklyn waterfront. “I treat it like a big brother or like a father,” he says of the day he started training the cast of Iron Fist. “I call it the kung-fu hug.”

    Commitment is required when Barber’s involved. “We do this as a family,” he says. “I immediately establish the tone and the philosophy—what we are gonna be doing, how we are going to do it, and what I expect of you. I make a verbal handshake and an eye-contact contract with them.”


    Clayton Barber trains Finn Jones for 'Iron Fist.'
    LINDA KALLERUS/NETFLIX

    To my dismay, our handshake did not grant me the powers of a glowing orange fist as I attempted to recreate a scene from the Season 2 premiere — keyword, “attempted.” Arms flailing, I forgot all the fight choreography as I barely managed to nail Iron Fist’s classic pose — down on one knee, fist into the floor. I remembered something Barber said before we started training, “You can have the greatest athlete, but they can be terrible fighting for film.”

    “You can have the worst athlete, but they are great fighting for film because they put in the work and have heart,” Barber continued. “You don't have to be a kung fu master. We get actors to portray enough to where the audience to believes they can do what they can do. That's the artform. They have to call upon their own sensory memories and lives, at the end of the day they have to act.”

    Iron Fist brought in a new creative team for Season 2, and Barber embraced a motto he’s lived by his entire career: get bogged down in doing good work. “If you build, they’ll come,” he says confidently. “Going second always give you perspective. It’s like a video game, it gives you a redo. You get to put another quarter in the machine and you get to play the game differently with a different mindset.”

    A quick Google search classifies Barber as a Taekwondo black belt, but he likes to describe his skillset more broadly; dance, acrobatics and martial arts technique.“Doing a fight scene isn’t necessarily a stunt, it's a dramatic scene with movement in it,” he says. But he’s emphatically clear that it’s more than choreography. “I create story-o, not choreo. That’s the art of the deal for me.”

    Barber started his film career specializing in Kung Fu and was enthused to return after 18 years. “I wanted to come back and see what I can do with a pure Kung Fu show with an iconic character like Iron Fist, who is supposed to be the greatest Kung Fu fighter in the universe.”


    Clayton Barber behind-the-scenes in 'Iron Fist.'
    LINDA KALLERUS/NETFLIX

    Barber also didn’t want to limit himself to a direct translation. Iron Fist lives in 2018 New York, not in Ku’n-Lun. “ He's having to adapt to the environment, the rhythm and fighters. Fighters in K’un-Lun are priests and monks, but New York has gangsters who fight with no rules. He needs to improvise and overcome,” he says.

    That’s not at all dissimilar to the way he approaches most of his projects, I realize, after asking about the distinct fighting styles of the Dora Milaje, Jessica Jones and Colleen Wing. “You take all the stereotypes and throw them in the wind and out the door. Sometimes I grab them back,” he swiftly added. “Depending on how I’m going to manipulate it.”

    In the end, he knows good action is about creating good story. “I’m not a big fan of doing 45 cuts knowing the guy didn’t do the motions,” he says, noting Michael B. Jordan didn’t use a stunt double for a single scene in Creed. “I’m a big fan of making them participate, forcing them to be a part of the scene in a real organic way for them themselves as actors.”
    Gene Ching
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  15. #180
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    Cancelled

    Netflix Knocks Out ‘Marvel’s Iron Fist’, No Season 3 For Martial Arts Series
    by Dominic Patten
    October 12, 2018 6:04pm


    Netflix; Marvel

    EXCLUSIVE: Just over a month after its significantly improved second season launched on Netflix, the streaming service has delivered a knockout cancellation punch to Marvel’s Iron Fist

    “Marvel’s Iron Fist will not return for a third season on Netflix,” said the Disney-owned comic giant and the streamer in a joint statement to Deadline today. “Everyone at Marvel Television and Netflix is proud of the series and grateful for all of the hard work from our incredible cast, crew and showrunners,” Marvel and Netflix added. “We’re thankful to the fans who have watched these two seasons, and for the partnership we’ve shared on this series. While the series on Netflix has ended, the immortal Iron Fist will live on.”

    This is the first small screen series termination from the comic giant by the Reed Hastings run Netflix and a hard blow for the Finn Jones and Jessica Henwick led show about the mystically empowered NYC-based marital arts hero and Defenders member. Cast members on the series that as most recently run by Raven Metzner were informed of the cancellation in the last few hours, I hear.

    Of course, while out for the count at Netflix, the tale of billionaire Danny Rand and Colleen Wing may “live on,” to quote Friday’s statement, on other platforms. That “other” being the streaming service that Disney is expected to launch next year, which already has series on Marvel fan favorites Loki and the Scarlet Witch in the pipeline, with Tom Hiddleston and Elizabeth Olsen expect to reprise their big screen roles. I hear that while Marvel wanted Iron Fist to continue on Netflix, the parent company’s new rival to the streamer has put the idea of a resurrection in consideration as it fosters the likes of the already announced Jon Favreau produced Star Wars series too.

    At present, a migration of the other three Marvel series that evolved out of the lucrative 2013 deal between Disney and Netflix is not in the cards. A third season of the Krysten Ritter led Jessica Jones was order in April and a third season of fellow Defender Luke Cage is expected to get the formal go-ahead any day now. The first Marvel series to appear on the streamer back in 2015, Daredevil‘s third season is about to launch on Netflix on October 19.

    The expectation is the apparently widely watched and critically acclaimed tale of the Man Without Fear will be back for a fourth Charlie Cox led season. Daredevil spinoff The Punisher was given a second Jon Bernthal fronted season in late 2017, soon after Season 1 launched.

    So, where ever Iron Fist does or doesn’t land, there’s still a lot of Marvel to come for a while on Netflix.
    Anyone watch any of Season 2? I started the first episode, but got as far as the fight scene and gave up.
    Gene Ching
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