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Thread: Iron Fist

  1. #151
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    suckage

    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    The real issue with IF was the choreography and this is from people that don't know much MA.
    Ya think? Honestly, you guys know I'm not a comics guy. I'm only passingly aware of Iron Fist because I'm into the martial arts. This should've been a choreographic masterpiece. That's all I asked of it. Good fight scenes.

    Yesterday, 10:00 am
    Destroy All Monsters: IRON FIST Doesn't Just Suck, It Sucks the Rest of the Marvel Television Universe Down With It

    Matt Brown
    COLUMNIST; TORONTO, CANADA (@TEDERICK)



    Iron Fist isn't just the worst thing in Marvel's nearly-ten-year MCU arsenal; it's indeed one of those rarest of pop cultural entities, an outright creative disaster. It can be used as a teaching case in universities for everything from film classes to project management: just because A was successful (and B, and C, and D in Marvel's case), doesn't mean whatever you do next will be.

    Iron Fist, starring the hopelessly miscast Finn Jones in the title role, behaves as though it smelled the Orientalism controversy coming and decided to lean into the punch. Where Doctor Strange contained, at least, notions of white privilege as it applies to its overall white saviour framework, Iron Fist doesn't seem to know that those notions are there, or could be there (or could make the show better by being there).

    It indeed casts a white man as a traditionally-white character in Marvel's '70s kung fu comic, and buffs up that decision by casting a white man who must be the single least convincing action lead I've ever seen on a screen, anywhere. And it surrounds all this with overall storytelling and production value so unrelentingly ****poor that they begin to serve as a kind of mediocrity cloaking device.

    You've gotta work pretty hard to make an Iron Fist show where the problematic racial elements are just as bad as everyone feared, and yet aren't actually the worst thing going on. Off a guess, I'd say the series' mission statement was: "Let's see what happens when we make a series built around a lead character who is a colossal ******* in an unwavering state of chaos, who doesn't know it, never finds out about it, and never changes it." I'm all for the unsympathetic protagonists, but Breaking Bad, this ain't.

    Marvel is teeing up for a big year at the movies (Guardians 2, the new Spider-Man, and a Thor movie that even non-Thor people are keyed up to see) and, perhaps, a less than stellar year on television. Iron Fist showrunner Scott Buck is beavering away on The Inhumans for this fall, a series that is already a downgrade from a feature film project and which covers ground better handled elsewhere already. The Defenders is on its way, but between last year's flawed-but-worthy offerings (Daredevil season 2; Luke Cage) and this Iron Fist mess, I'm mostly looking forward to it as an opportunity to spend some more time with Jessica Jones (and Sigourney Weaver).

    Surprising everyone including myself, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is in the middle of its best season yet, but now feels so divorced from the rest of the MCU that it scarcely seems to matter. It got walled off back when it was the worst thing Marvel had done, and is doing just fine.

    Iron Fist, by dint of being the anchor leg of the Defenders project, doesn't have that luxury. Whether its failures will torpedo The Defenders remains to be seen, but watching the series, I was more amazed (and disappointed) by how quickly and effectively it rubbed the shine off its preceding series as well.

    Look, I'm a big booster overall for both seasons of Daredevil and for Jessica Jones, and think that Luke Cage gets off to a great start. Iron Fist's mess spills over onto them, though. The latest series takes a can of pink spray paint to the shoddy workmanship of its predecessors.

    It makes the various Netflix series' reveals feel more like tricks, their predictable beats feel more like laziness, and the shoestring budgets feel more like a bug and less like a feature than ever before.

    Daredevil, Jessica Jones and Luke Cage each, in their way, felt like Marvel pushing the boundaries of the established House Style. Iron Fist makes the quadruped feel more like what it is: bargain basement stories married to low-rent production values and dangled before an audience long since presumed to be "captive." It feels, disappointingly, like it was true all along. This was just the one where the seams burst, the illusion no longer able to carry the flimsiness of the construction.

    It takes a pathological kind of creative bankruptcy to take a franchise that is, by any rational analysis, a kung fu movie, and strait-jacket it into the established Defenders universe visual language without even the courtesy nods towards stylistic innovation that marked the first couple episodes of Jessica Jones and Luke Cage. This is some cheap, cheap chicken.

    The average issue of Ed Brubaker, Matt Fraction and David Aja's run on The Immortal Iron Fist had more kinetic imagery on the page (pages which do not, last I checked, actually move) than any given fight scene in Iron Fist. None of the season's directors seem to want to make even token efforts to stretch the resources they've been given to arrive at something even slightly more artful and daring than what the terrible scripts have given them. Even RZA, who really ought to know better, is brought in to direct the season's only "tournament" style episode and never finds a moment of wuxia grace in any of it.

    I give Netflix maximum kudos for their push towards house-owned content and the speed and effectiveness with which they've gotten there. The more entries like Iron Fist show up, though, the more it starts to make the entire Netflix-style 13-episode binge series feel mightily threadbare.

    If everyone knows that the middle third of a Netflix season is going to be wild-goose-chase plotting, why are those episodes there? Would subscriptions actually dip if Iron Fist was 8 episodes, or 6, or a TV movie? Would a single viewer notice or care if the Meachums - Ward, June, and Faramir - weren't in Iron Fist at all? I doubt it. They're padding, wandering around on two legs apiece.

    Just as the visual blandness of Iron Fist shows the limitations of its sister series, the proscribed run of episodes shows how haphazardly arbitrary the 13-episode order actually is. It's based on a model of network television to which Netflix has literally never been beholden. If the studio is the only one with the balls to bank Scorsese's next movie, might they also have the balls to find a television creator and ask him or her what the natural extent of their storytelling frame is? Are audiences still this dim-witted, that they think they're being duped if they don't see more episode titles in their queue than they have room on the screen?

    I've written before about the dangers of pipeline content, where every new show or movie is just streaming media to eventually be sent down the digital delivery pipes regardless of shape, size, or colour. Iron Fist feels like the grey paste that comes out of that pipe when no one cares what's being delivered any more, so long as something is being delivered.

    If this is television's new "golden age," studios are going to tailor the medium to the content, not the other way around. The flexibility is there, and the field is wide open. Television is an embarrassment of riches right now - why would anyone waste their time with Iron Fist?


    Destroy All Monsters is a weekly column on Hollywood and pop culture. Matt Brown is in Toronto and on Letterboxd.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  2. #152
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    Daniel Wu on INTO THE BADLANDS, IRON FIST & TOMB RAIDER

    INTERVIEW, MARTIAL ARTS, TELEVISION
    One-on-One with Into the Badlands’ Daniel Wu
    AMC’s Into the Badlands is in their second season and are going strong with their viewership, storyline, and martial arts. Unlike other series that attempts the martial arts genre, Into the Badlands’ stellar moves can be attributed to executive producer, and star of the series, Daniel Wu.

    The Nerds of Color got a chance to sit down and chat with the actor about the second season and what makes the show so appealing to audiences.



    LAURA: So, the series is getting a lot of comparisons with another controversial “martial arts” show that was released on the same weekend as season two of your show. Into the Badlands was deemed the cure to your Iron Fist blues and the show that Iron Fist should have been. With the controversy over the Asian American Iron Fist campaign and critics panning Iron Fist for the lack of martial arts, what are your thoughts regarding these issues?

    DANIEL: I think if you’re going to sell a show as a martial arts show and you don’t have martial arts in it or the martial arts sucks, then that’s obviously a problem. When we created this show, Badlands, our main point was to try to bring Hong Kong level martial arts action to American television. That was our goal. That was our main goal. Everything else was trying to make a good show — secondary to that main goal. Of course, we want to have a good show so you have to have a good story, good characters, and all that kind of stuff. But, that’s what we were selling and that’s what we’re going to do. That’s what we did sell in the first season. I think, you know, again with this Marvel property, I don’t know because I haven’t seen it yet. But again, if you’re going to be selling martial arts, you guys should know how to fight well. If they don’t fight well, then that’s a big problem.



    In terms of the whitewashing issue, I don’t know if it’s a whitewashing issue because their character was already white to begin with. And, then you talk about cultural appropriation, I think Asian Americans need to chill out a little bit, because that’s like saying “white people can’t rap,” right? That’s like saying “Asian people can’t play American football” or Jeremy Lin shouldn’t be playing basketball. It’s ridiculous to say that white people can’t do martial arts. That’s cultural appropriation. I don’t buy that. That’s not fair. I mean, Bruce Lee, the King of Martial Arts, was key to bringing martial arts to America, not just Asian America. He taught white people. He taught black people. He taught all kinds of people. That’s my philosophy. Martial arts is an equalizer. It doesn’t matter what culture you’re from. If you feel like you’re weak, you can become strong. Martial arts can give that to you. It’s not about your race at all, in any way.

    A lot of people had a lot of issues with Iron Fist because it was not whitewashing, but following the white savior trope — where the white guy saves Asian people or the white guys saves them using Asian methods.
    Is that’s what happening in the show? I don’t know if he’s saving Asian people in that show. In the comics, it was a white guy who went to Asia to learn martial arts and comes back and becomes a superhero.



    There are some awkward moments where he’s speaking Chinese to a girl. There are also moments where he’s better than people who have been training their entire life.
    Sure. If you made that character Asian, would all those issues still be a issue? If the character becomes Asian and he becomes better than his master, who has been training for thousands of years. It’s still an issue.

    At the same time, if an Asian guy used a language to talk to a girl or study their background, it’s much more acceptable.
    Yeah. I haven’t seen the show, so it’s really hard for me to really judge that. I want to be fair. At the same time, they are obviously paying for their mistakes now. I’ve seen the backlash, so I know people are ****ed off. I feel, probably what happened is, what you can blame there was an opportunity for Marvel to make it better and they didn’t do it. That’s all I could say there.



    Into the Badlands has proven that a series can break away from the Asian martial arts trope with its character development. The character is not defined by their skill and instead is allowed to grow. What elements do you feel that Into the Badlands was able to accomplish with that?
    I think what is interesting is that we don’t talk about race in the show at all, but it’s a very diverse show. There’s black, white, Latino, and other Asians, but we don’t talk about race. It’s about their abilities. It’s about what these people are doing. It’s about their stories. So, we don’t make it an issue about race. That’s what I like about it. I don’t know if I could do a show about Asian American issues. That’s kind of boring to me. Having grown up in America as an Asian American and then lived in Asia for twenty years, then come back. I’m not interested in Asian American whining. You know, “we’re not represented enough.” It’s like, go do it. That’s the kind of person I am. I don’t sit around and complain and wish I had better opportunities. I make the opportunities happen for me. I think that’s what we need to do as Asian Americans now. There are no boundaries, especially now with the digital era. If you want to make film and put it on YouTube, you can. Look at all these people who are YouTube stars right now. They’re Asian American. They’re doing it. They found a way to make it work for them. I give all those people a lot of credit for it.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  3. #153
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    continued from previous post



    I’m very proud that we’re diverse without having talked about “diversity.” Like, these characters, Sunny and Veil — that relationship — a black woman and an Asian man. You’ve never seen that on anything in the world ever actually before. I think it’s very cool that we’re just people in love. We’re not a black person or Asian person. We’re just people in love. We’re trying to have this baby. It’s very cool. I’m proud of that. We’re being diverse without raising a diversity flag, because that’s not what the show is about. Again, what we’re trying to do is make a good show and if it happens to be diverse. Those are great bonuses to jump along with, but that shouldn’t be the catalyst for the show. That shouldn’t be what makes the show run.

    Director and stunt woman extraordinaire Lexi Alexander has highly praised Into the Badlands as a whole. Many of the cast and creatives have also interacted with her on Twitter. Is there any chance of a collaboration with Into the Badlands or even outside of the series?
    Yeah, I think we’re open to all kinds of possibilities for our show, especially with television directors. We switch out directors every two episodes. So with a ten-episode season, that means there are five directors per season. So there’s a lot of opportunities to work with great people. So if they’re a good storyteller, then I’m definitely open to the fact to bring them in.

    Into the Badlands has been praised for its strong female characters. Aside from Veil, there were few WOCs on the show last season, but this year we have The Master and Baron Chau. Was it a conscious decision to include more WOC characters?

    I would say it was a conscious decision to add more characters of color, I think, to be more diverse. Yeah. So you see it this season in the first episode, you see a lot of the Butterflies in the background, there’s all kinds of girls there. That is a conscious decision to reflect upon what we think American society would be in the future and what it is now. I think most people, when you talk about the post-apocalyptic genre, it’s not really about the future, it’s reflecting on what’s happening right now. So, to reflect on now, you have to be true to that. So, we definitely made the decision to cast more diverse with all the roles, whether it’s female or male. You’ll see the other barons. There are a few other barons that are different races and different sexes. We’re trying to make a world that everyone can understand and relate to.



    In an article last year, you made a statement that you would have to wait a bit to see what impact Into the Badlands has made for people, whether it’d be in the Asian American community or the martial arts world. Since this is the second season, and it has been highly praised, what impact do you feel the series has made?

    I mean, I think we made a little blip on the pop culture meter for sure. I mean, in multiple levels. One, we have a martial arts show that is successful on television right now. There aren’t many martial arts shows, so that was one of our main points. Then secondly, to have the action lauded as it is. People love the action. People come back for the action. Then to have a great story that happens to be with a very diverse cast. That’s also a great thing that people are in to. There are characters that people can get into, whether you want to follow Sunny’s storyline or not. Some people just like the Widow. The #ColorMeBadlands Twitter people just love Sunny and Veil and that relationship. So that’s what I think is great about the show.

    It doesn’t just follow one person or one storyline. There are multiple storylines. As an audience, if you’re a teenager or a twelve-year-old, you might be really into MK and Tilda and their storyline. If you’re a full grown adult, you might be into the Sunny storyline. You might be into Quinn’s storyline. There are so many different things there for everyone to relate to. Then, [you’ll see] what these characters and storylines represent in the real world. What are they trying to say? And, that’s all in the subtext. I think we slide all that stuff in there for the audience trying to figure out what we’re talking about. You’ll see references. You’ve seen episode two with the wall. There are all these references that we’re talking about and we’re putting them in there as kind of Easter eggs, but also to get people thinking a bit more. This is a show about the future and about how the world got ****ed up and how it ended up this way. We’re putting in things about how that happened. You have to be careful as a human race, as Americans, and how we run this country in the future. It could end up like the Badlands and we don’t want that to happen.

    It’s almost time to wrap up, but what can you tell us more about your role in the new Tomb Raider film starring Alicia Vikander since you’ve entered production for the film?

    I can’t talk too much, but the character is named Lu Ren. Lara Croft comes to Hong Kong after she finds some clues about [her father]. It’s an origin story, so it goes back to the very beginning before she becomes Lara Croft: Tomb Raider that you know from the game. She’s looking for her dad. The story is that her dad has disappeared for seven years. She thinks he’s dead, but she finds some clues [showing] that he may still be alive. That leads her to Hong Kong and that’s where she finds me and enlists me to help her along this journey to go to this place where her father might be. So I’m there to help her along with her journey.



    Is there a potential love interest or friendship?

    It’s more of a partnership because there is something that I’m also looking for as well. I wouldn’t say it’s a love relationship. It’s more of a partnership.
    They're calling Into the Badlands 'the cure to the Iron Fist blues'. I don't think that's really fair because ITB is it's own thing, but given the Netflix Marvel precedents, I get it.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #154
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    Daniel Wu was 100% on the button, the issue of whitewashing was ridiculous in this case and should never have been raised.
    The HUGE issue was the bad choreography and tremendous lack of skill of the lead characters ( not Just Danny but Colleen).
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  5. #155
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    digital exclusive

    I feel it's important to discriminate between Immortal Iron Fist (the comic) and Iron Fist, which has become our Marvel Netflix thread.

    JULY 20, 2017 6:00pm PT by Graeme McMillan
    Marvel Launching Digital-Exclusive 'Iron Fist' Series on ComiXology


    Kaare Andrews/Marvel Entertainment

    'Immortal Iron Fist' will be the first in a series of comics created exclusively for Amazon's ComiXology platform.

    Following in the footsteps of Valiant Entertainment and BOOM! Studios, Marvel Entertainment has announced that it will be providing exclusive comic book content to Amazon.com's digital comics platform ComiXology as part of the latter company's ComiXology Originals imprint.

    The announcement came during Thursday's Marvel Next Big Thing panel at San Diego Comic-Con, with the partnership going into effect Friday with the launch of Immortal Iron Fists, a six-issue series released on a bi-weekly basis, with each issue available for purchase for $2.99 or part of the monthly ComiXology Unlimited subscription package. Additional series will be announced in coming months.

    Immortal Iron Fists will be written by Kaare Andrews with art by Afu Chan, and will feature Danny Rand and Pei, the latest possessor of the Iron Fist as introduced in Andrews' 2014 print series Iron Fist: The Living Weapon. The series was originally teased, as a print title, under the title Iron Fists as one of Marvel's 2016 Marvel NOW! launches, appearing in the July 2016 Marvel NOW! catalog. Iron Fists never appeared, with its slot in the Marvel NOW! lineup taken by a separate Iron Fist title.

    The ComiXology Originals line launched earlier this year with Valient Entertainment's Valiant High series; the imprint was intended to offer material outside the comic book mainstream as a way of reaching out to newcomers to the medium.

    Immortal Iron Fists will debut Friday as a ComiXology-exclusive series.
    Gene Ching
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  6. #156
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    Renewed for Season 2 with a new showrunner

    JULY 22, 2017 11:16am PT by Kate Stanhope
    Netflix's 'Iron Fist' Changes Showrunners for Season 2


    Courtesy of Netflix
    'Iron Fist'

    Raven Metzner ('Sleepy Hollow') will replace Scott Buck on the forthcoming second season of the Marvel drama.
    There's a change behind the scenes at Netflix's Marvel drama Iron Fist.

    Raven Metzner (Sleepy Hollow) has been tapped to replace Scott Buck as showrunner for season two.

    "Raven’s love of all things Iron Fist and his extensive knowledge of martial arts films made him the perfect choice to continue telling the adventures of Danny Rand and Colleen Wing," Marvel's head of television and Iron Fist executive producer Jeph Loeb said Saturday in a statement. "Season one and The Defenders are only the beginning of this fantastic action-packed tale."

    Sources tell The Hollywood Reporter that Iron Fist is bringing in an entirely new writers room for season two that will be more grounded than the first season.

    The news comes a day after Loeb announced at San Diego Comic-Con that the show had been renewed for a second season. The panel was timed to the forthcoming Defenders miniseries, which will see Iron Fist (Finn Jones) team with fellow Netflix Marvel characters Daredevil, Luke Cage and Jessica Jones.

    While Netflix's first three Marvel series were well-received by critics, Iron Fist was not. THR TV critic Daniel Fienberg called the drama, which debuted in March on the streaming giant, Marvel's and Netflix's "first big misstep."

    Iron Fist also met controversy early in its run for casting a Caucasian rather than an Asian-American actor in the lead role, despite the character being depicted as a blond Caucasian (which Jones is) in the comics on which the series is based.

    Metzner is no stranger to the Marvel universe, having written the 2005 Daredevil spinoff film Elektra starring Jennifer Garner. His TV credits include Heroes: Reborn, Falling Skies and Daybreak. Metzner is repped by WME.
    Wait, Elektra? Aw man, I was a huge fan of Garner after Alias, and I love the character of Elektra, but that film was a total fail...
    Gene Ching
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  7. #157
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    Does not bold well...
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  8. #158
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    4 out of 15

    And one was even a cover story.

    7 Netflix Shows Cancelled For Ridiculous Reasons (And 8 That Are Next)
    James Scrawler 06.19.17 Entertainment



    There was a long stretch of time when Netflix was the greener pastures of television productions. Really, it still is, but things are a changing. For a while, no shows got cancelled. These days, it’s still rare that a show gets cancelled once they’ve been started on the streaming platform. But, we should expect more soon. According to Netflix’s CEO, Reid Hastings, the platform’s cancel rate is too low. This statement has several meanings. For one, he believes that the cancel rate is bound to increase, which will force them to cancel more shows. He also wants his team to take more chances with the material that gets green-lit. Yes, the other side of that coin means more failures and more cancelled shows, but it also means bigger successes.

    Lately, we’ve seen some Netflix shows go down. This is a new turn for the company, but we should start to get used to it. At this point, seven shows have gone down. We wanted to explore the reasons why these seven shows in particular got the axe. There are also some shows that haven’t been renewed that we’ll discuss. Lastly, we want to look at which shows are next in line for cancellation. We know the axe is going to fall again and probably soon. We listed the six shows that we’re sure are next. Sure, we could be wrong on these predictions, but we’d be surprised if any of these shows last for their entire runs. If you’re a fan of one of the shows on this list, any reasons for it being cancelled would sound ridiculous. Depending on your perspective, the reasons for cancellation may be ridiculous. Or, the reason the show was cancelled was because it was ridiculous. Here are 7 Netflix Shows Cancelled for Ridiculous Reasons and 8 Others That Are Next.

    15. Marco Polo – Cancelled



    After a first season that was plagued with poor reviews, Marco Polo had a very steep uphill climb to try and make it work on Netflix. When the show was greenlit, everyone expected big things. Harvey Weinstein, one of the producers, bragged that the show would be “one of the most expensive shows ever done for pay TV.” It was. The budget was incredible. Yet, after spending at least $180 million over two years and shooting all over the world, Marco Polo was struck down after two disappointing seasons. Actually, most who stuck around for season two were more pleased, but the show had lost too many viewers by that point. Truthfully, the show was just boring. The most successful shows in the historical drama realm are successful because they infuse a strong and powerful narrative into a historical setting. Marco Polo seemed intent on focusing on history and forgot about story and character. The result was one of the most dreadful efforts put forth by Netflix.

    ...

    10. Sense8 – Cancelled



    Since we don’t get to see a detailed report of Netflix’s viewership numbers, we can never be sure about who watches what. By the loud outcry of fans that voiced their displeasure with the recent cancelling of Sense8, it would seem that there are plenty of viewers, but that’s not what Netflix makes it sound like. Call it ridiculous all you like, but the real reason that Sense8 was cancelled is because it was a niche show with an enormous cost. It’s been reported that it cost $9 million per episode to make. That’s insane. Plus, if you’ve ever seen Sense8, you would know that the first season dangerously borders on being incomprehensible and mind-numbingly boring. While this show is one that would really benefit from multiple seasons, it lost far too many viewers between the start of the first season and the second season to be ever be considered worth the exorbitant price tag. Just to be clear, we’re not saying that the show’s cancellation is ridiculous. We’re saying the reason it was cancelled—the cost—was ridiculous.

    9. The Get Down – Cancelled



    Much like Sense8, Baz Luhrmann‘s The Get Down was axed because it had a ridiculous budget. Estimated at around $12 million per episode, the shooting budget for this show is something usually set aside for major shows with incredible special effects. The budget for Game of Thrones season six, for example, was roughly $10 million per episode. The Get Down was a musical drama. Sure, it was incredibly stylish and vibrant, and, at times, it’s almost brilliant. But again, like Sense8, it’s a mess. It’s narrative bounds all over the place, and, even aided by binge-watching, this is troubling for audiences. There’s no doubt that if the production costs were a fraction of what they were in reality, this show would find a suitable audience and thrive. At the ridiculous price tag of $12 million an episode, this show would need to be one of the most popular on television to make it worthwhile for any business.

    ...

    6. Iron Fist – Prediction: Cancelled After Second Season



    It would shock us greatly if Iron Fist was actually cancelled outright. That would require a lot of effort from Netflix, so we’re going to suggest something else. While the other shows in the Defenders series will likely get several independent seasons, we think that Iron Fist will only get two. Even now, the second season for Iron Fist hasn’t been greenlit, but we’re certain the announcement will come soon. The show will get a second season. It will be better than the first, which will be easy considering that the first was one of the worst seasons in Netflix history. But, it won’t be enough to make a third season make sense. There’s just too many good shows on television, Netflix included, for people to waste time watching bad shows too.
    Marco Polo
    The Get Down
    Sense8
    Iron Fist
    Gene Ching
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    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  9. #159
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    The only way to do a 180 with IF is to:
    Make Finn look good doing MA ( no easy task).
    Change the writing to make him likable and less of a spoiled brat.
    Make IF as powerful as he actually IS in the comics.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  10. #160
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    What are you talking about? He is The Immortal Iron Fist. His... Chi... channels through... his hand....
    BreakProof Back® Back Health & Athletic Performance
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    "Who dies first," he mumbled through smashed and bloody lips.

  11. #161
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    I actually didn't mind Marco Polo.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  12. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vash View Post
    What are you talking about? He is The Immortal Iron Fist. His... Chi... channels through... his hand....
    You kidding right?
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  13. #163
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
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    IMO, it's too late to give IF an effective makeover now, unless they just scrapped the whole thing and rebooted it with a whole different cast and crew from the start. And it's too late for that, too.

    I don't believe that Finn Jones has the ability to look good doing MA onscreen. Just like David Carradine never looked good doing MA, no matter how many years he (apparently) tried. Plus, Finn lacks the type of charisma of a MAist. He actually looks more like a hairdresser, or someone you'd see working at Starbucks.

  14. #164
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Science City Zero
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    You kidding right?
    Slightly moreso than the writers and that actor.

    #goodwritingmatters
    BreakProof Back® Back Health & Athletic Performance
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    "Who dies first," he mumbled through smashed and bloody lips.

  15. #165
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,840

    The could reboot IF like they did Batman, Spiderman, or even Daredevil...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    Just like David Carradine never looked good doing MA, no matter how many years he (apparently) tried.
    You know, I thought he looked okay in his final martial arts film, Kung Fu Killer, but that was more for the ultravi - it was kind of Riki-Oh (1991) and I luv that film.

    But I feel ya, Jimbo.

    Now I'm bummed that our forum doesn't have a Riki-Oh thread. I'm always a little bummed when there's nothing on the classics posted here and try to rectify that with fresh reviews and such.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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