Page 3 of 11 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 157

Thread: Tea

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    307
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    If you're just talking types like green, oolong or whatever, that's not like talking varietals.

    Right now, I'm drinking some tieguanyin that was kindly gifted by one of our contributors. I'm not sure about the actual pedigree of it since he didn't give me all the facts. It's quite good tho and I'm not a big tieguanyin person.

    At home, I'm drinking some lu jian pi lo chun which is really fine. I confess, I liked the name lu jian (green sword - after the shape of the leaves). I've also got some organic snow peony white at home.
    Hey, give us a break, huh? A lot of places in this country you'll still be lucky to find some random brand of generic green tea in with the Lipton and herbals.

    Of course, I'd be happy to get to know specific varietals if you'll send me some examples...

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    307
    Quote Originally Posted by PlumDragon View Post
    A friend and student purchased a bag of Green Tea Chai for me while he was in hawaii. While I enjoy the spiciness of Chai, I find it is much more balanced with the addition of milk...

    I agree sugar is no good, but I do enjoy some good wildflower honey in certain teas.
    Oops, I stand corrected. Yeah, chai does need milk. That's the only one it goes in, though, and actually some house-recipe chais I've had do very well even without it.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    桃花岛
    Posts
    5,025
    I actuall have managed to learn a bit about varietals. It comes from my time in China, where people DO take that stuff seriously.

    I also know a bit about varietals of coffee. I am more of a coffee conniseur than a tea conniseur.

    To date my favorite coffee is Celebes Kalossi.
    Simon McNeil
    ___________________________________________

    Be on the lookout for the Black Trillium, a post-apocalyptic wuxia novel released by Brain Lag Publishing available in all major online booksellers now.
    Visit me at Simon McNeil - the Blog for thoughts on books and stuff.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,078

    give us a break

    A break? Hell no. This is a martial arts forum. Next thing you know, you'll be wanting a water break.

    Just kidding, Reverend Tap. It looks like the conversation has bumped up a notch since my last post and I'm glad to see that. I *know* there are plenty of hardcore tea connoisseurs out there. And ultimately, that's what I hope this forum is about - expanding your education. If you want to start getting into tea, there a plenty of resources on the web. I posted a fine one on this thread above.

    On to matcha, I've got some pure matcha and some matcha/green tea blend. It's ok and gives me a decent caffeine bump, but that's not what I drink tea for necessarily. I still prefer the delicacy of fine fresh greens. Green is the closest you get to the live plant and there's a certain purity about that which I enjoy personally. A lot of people seem to start with the tieguanyin, which is much more robust in flavor and aroma. I still prefer the subtlety of a good green.

    I forgot to mention that I also have some organic dragon pearl jasmine from Red Blossom on my desk here too. It's delightful.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    桃花岛
    Posts
    5,025
    An ex-girlfriend in China gave me a gift of a large tin of Longjing while I was in my first year in China. I honestly didn't like it much at all. I prefer a tea that is a bit more robust than that.

    Also Longjing gave me a bit of an acid stomach.
    Simon McNeil
    ___________________________________________

    Be on the lookout for the Black Trillium, a post-apocalyptic wuxia novel released by Brain Lag Publishing available in all major online booksellers now.
    Visit me at Simon McNeil - the Blog for thoughts on books and stuff.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX USA
    Posts
    121

    Classification and Quality Grading of Chinese Teas

    Tea Classification:

    There are hundreds of tea varieties in China. The long history of the product and the diversity of the climatic and geographical characteristics of the Chinese territory have helped to create such a wide selection of teas that it would take a lifetime to get to know them all.

    There is no universal standard for classifying all teas. In the West, where the number of tea varieties is significantly smaller, the method normally used to assess the quality of tea leaves is based on their degree of oxidation. According to the level of oxidation, teas are classified as black tea, semi-fermented wulong tea or green tea, which has not been oxidized.

    Because of the wide range of tea processing methods in use in China, a more detailed classification system has been developed. There teas are generally divided into six main categories, although tea merchants can have varying opinions on the subject. The most commonly used classification system is based on the color of the tea at the end of the preparation process:

    Green tea (lücha)
    White tea (baicha)
    Yellow tea (huangcha)
    Black tea (heicha), name varies in the West
    Blue-green tea (qingcha), Oolong in the West
    Red tea (hongcha), black tea in the West

    In addition to classifying teas according to their color, tea merchants have also established another system for making some sense of the thousands of tea blends. The system involves assigning twelve different grades to teas based on such factors as the place of origin, vintage and whether the tea is comprised of only the buds of the tea plant, the buds and the outermost small leaves, or the buds and the two outermost leaves.

    Top grade teas are picked and processed by hand. Others are processed industrially in significantly larger quantities and they are often mixed with other varieties to enhance their flavor. The highest quality teas are such a rare luxury that their price per kilogram can reach thousands of euros. For this reason, an etiquette indicating that a tea is "green tea" does not say much about the product. Nor does the name Xihu Longjing guarantee that the product in question is top quality tea. The teas sold in most stores are generally grade four, five or six teas. Of these, grade four tea is of the highest quality. Superior grade one teas are almost impossible to obtain because they are usually reserved for consumption at official government functions.

    Green tea

    Green tea can be called the father of all teas. When making green tea, the oxidation process is prevented. This is done by either steaming or roasting the leaves. Steaming allows the leaves to retain their green color and fresh scent longer, but the end product is slightly more bitter in taste. Today, roasting is the more popular method and it results in fresh-tasting, slightly sweet tea. Green tea is produced all over China, but the most famous one is Xihu Longjing from Zhejiang province.

    White tea

    White tea is a newcomer in the world of teas because its production only commenced at the end of the 18th century in Fujian province. The tea is made from the large-leafed and long-tipped dabai and shuixian tea trees. White tea is not rolled or roasted, instead, the tea leaves are allowed to dry and oxidize slightly in the sunlight. Some varieties are also steamed. The most famous white teas include Baibao yinzhen, Baimudan and Shoumei.

    Yellow tea

    Yellow tea is even more rare than white tea and for a long time, its processing method was kept a secret. Yellow tea is processed by rolling the tea leaves in paper after a light roasting, where they are kept for a few days. During this process, the buds take on a slightly yellowish color and develop a very distinctive scent through a nonenzymatic oxidation process. The most popular variety of yellow tea is Junshan yinzhen from Hunan province.

    Blue-green teas

    In China, partly oxidized blue-green teas are divided into baozhong, which is enclosed in a paper bag during processing, and the more strongly oxidized wulong, more commonly known as oolong. The production of blue-green teas is concentrated in the provinces of Fujian and Guangdong and in Taiwan. The tea leaves needed to produce blue-green teas need to fairly large in size, so they aren't picked until in May or June. Stopping the oxidation process at just the right time is crucial in influencing the flavor of blue-green teas but many other factors linked with the roasting process can also impact the aroma and the different combinations of all these factors make for a large variety of tea blends. The best known blue-green tea is Tie Guanyin from Anxi.

    Black tea

    Black tea is not widely known outside of China. Most varieties of black tea are compressed into different shaped cakes and bricks. The tea is mostly produced in the provinces of Yunnan, Hubei, Guangxi, Sichuan and Hunan. The largest family of teas classified as belonging to black teas is pu’er tea, although it also includes several white and green teas as well. Pu’er teas are compressed into cakes, which, unlike other tea varieties, improve with age. Pu’er tea is known for its heath promoting effects. The most widely known black teas are the pu’er teas from Yunnan, as well as Qizibingcha and Tuocha.

    Red tea

    The fully oxidized tea varieties, known as red teas in China, go more commonly by the name of black tea in the West. In China, black tea has not gained great popularity, which is not to say that Chinese tea producers hadn't applied their centuries old tea making expertise to develop this variety further as well. Chinese red teas generally have a slightly lower caffeine content and a softer aroma than "black" teas in the rest of the world. Red tea production is mainly concentrated in the provinces of Yunnan, Anhui and Fujian. The most famous red tea is Qimen (qihong) from Anhui.

    Doc Stier

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX USA
    Posts
    121

    Four Basic Steps to Selecting Quality Tea

    There are Four Basic Steps to Selecting Quality Tea.

    1. Inspection. Good or fresh tea has a green luster in a tight shape, but poor tea is loose and dull. The leaves should be dry enough to make a rustling noise in the palm.

    2. Fragrance. The fragrance of tea should be pure without a charred taste or acid smell. Good tea, especially fresh tea, has a natural aroma like orchid or jasmine while poor tea smells stale.

    3. Taste. You can taste the leaves by chewing them carefully. Good tea leaves have a fresh mellowness. You can also infuse some tea to see if the leaves extend smoothly and sink slowly to the bottom. Good tea liquor is emerald green or golden. It has a tint of bitterness with a lasting sweet aftertaste. Stale tea liquor is malodorous and dark brown.

    4. Appearance of Infused Leaves. Look at the infused tea leaves. The infused tea leaves should be even without impurity.

    After you purchase good tea, keep it in a dry cool place, avoiding direct sunshine. An airtight container is a good choice. Avoid putting teas of different aromas too close.

    Doc Stier

    http://www.shenmentao.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=197
    Last edited by Doc Stier; 01-14-2009 at 02:51 PM.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    307
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    A break? Hell no. This is a martial arts forum. Next thing you know, you'll be wanting a water break.

    Just kidding, Reverend Tap. It looks like the conversation has bumped up a notch since my last post and I'm glad to see that. I *know* there are plenty of hardcore tea connoisseurs out there. And ultimately, that's what I hope this forum is about - expanding your education. If you want to start getting into tea, there a plenty of resources on the web. I posted a fine one on this thread above.

    On to matcha, I've got some pure matcha and some matcha/green tea blend. It's ok and gives me a decent caffeine bump, but that's not what I drink tea for necessarily. I still prefer the delicacy of fine fresh greens. Green is the closest you get to the live plant and there's a certain purity about that which I enjoy personally. A lot of people seem to start with the tieguanyin, which is much more robust in flavor and aroma. I still prefer the subtlety of a good green.

    I forgot to mention that I also have some organic dragon pearl jasmine from Red Blossom on my desk here too. It's delightful.
    So...does that mean you won't be sending me any, then?

    Heh. I would really like to expand my knowledge on tea. The couple of times I've been able to sample really high-quality teas have just been exquisite, but unfortunately I've yet to find anywhere nearby I can go for that. All the really good suppliers seem to be on the west coast; all we've got nearby is Celestial Seasonings in Boulder.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Midgard
    Posts
    10,853
    hey i live in portland oregon, im not a smarty tea guy like you guys, but if there is any place local you find on the web, or just know of, that you want some tea from, ill pick it up and ship it to you. im nice like that.
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Midgard
    Posts
    10,853
    but hey, I want to be a smarty tea guy like you all. ill get to my learnin.

    where should i start, help a guy out!
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,078

    Nice posts, Doc Stier

    Chinese tea cultivation is actually called gong fu cha (gong fu as in kung fu but in pinyin romanization - cha means tea but you probably already figured that out by Doc Stier's post) and I'd just beginning in that myself, truth be told. A lot of Shaolin monks cultivate gong fu cha. They've spoiled me. It's a Buddhist monk thing tho - tea is intimately connected with zen/chan practice.

    The best place to start beyond this thread is at your closest Chinatown. There's sure to be a tea vendor there and they will happily educate you.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Midgard
    Posts
    10,853
    you dont know portland chinatown

    the city is a ******* here about that. they have pushed most of the drug addicts across over into chinatown. most of the chinese shops have closed down, due to lack of business because people are just not wanting to go there. we have a wonderful classical chinese garden though that i know has a tea shop inside, i suppose that would be a great place for me to start. you see more crack heads wandering the sidwalks than chinese people. it ****es me off. they have what they call the 'pearl district' which slowly but surely encroaches upon chinatown with their rich white people buildings. ya im white, but sometimes white people freaking **** me off.

    ok, rant over. ill be looking for a good tea shop
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Midgard
    Posts
    10,853
    The Tao of Tea

    stop el numero uno located!
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    640
    Quote Originally Posted by Lucas View Post
    The Tao of Tea

    stop el numero uno located!
    Yeah, the Chinese Garden's Tao of Tea teahouse is a way better experience than the Tao of Tea teahouse down on Belmont.

    I love it there, thinking about having my 10th weddingt anniversary party there. Of course, I need work to pick up so I can save for the next 2 years...

    Tao of Tea has some really good teas. Their Jasmine Pearl is one of the most fragrant Jasmine teas I've ever had. Of course, I'm just getting into brewing loose leaf teas... so that's not saying much. They also have a really great black tea from Yunnan called Tippy South Cloud that I really like. Looking forward to getting into Puerh.

    As far as bagged teas, one of the best out there is Numi. Honestly, I have yet to have a pre-bagged tea be so good. My wife got this huge gift set from them with tons of samples, including some flowering teas which I'm sure I'm doing something wrong with because they don't seem to turn out quite right, one of which was their new magnolia Puerh... and it is fantastic! If a bagged Puerh is that good, I can't wait to buy the real deal!
    Last edited by Zenshiite; 01-20-2009 at 07:21 PM.

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Canada!
    Posts
    23,101
    high mountain tea from taiwan.

    it's the best.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •