Page 2 of 27 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 394

Thread: Successful Street Applications

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,029

    This doesn't quite count....yet

    It may be perceived as some martial arts schools jumping on the bandwagon to get some publicity, unless of course, their teachings help to improve the situation. Sad story really. We had a horrible bullying case here that made the local papers.

    Bullied Jason goes from hell to hero
    Katie Miller
    08May08

    BULLYING victim Jason Nicholls was treated like a hero by his classmates after publicly telling his story yesterday -- but his courage was ignored by teachers.

    The 14-year-old has been repeatedly attacked, called names and robbed by students at his school because of the mannerisms he has due to Asperger's syndrome, which impairs his social and communication skills.

    During the worst incident, which is under police investigation, another student allegedly held Jason by the throat, punched him, broke his hand in three places and stole his mobile phone during class while the teacher was absent from the classroom.

    The bullying has become so bad that the Year 10 student is required to leave his classes five minutes before other students and eat his lunch in a separate 'safe zone' at Palm Beach Currumbin High School to avoid being picked on.

    But there were no negative incidents at school for Jason yesterday after a school essay he wrote about his condition in an effort to be understood was printed in The Bulletin.

    The Currumbin Waters local said he was nervous about going to school with his picture on the newspaper's front page but in the end he didn't have to face any bullies, only friends.

    Jason said not one teacher had said anything to him about his newspaper appearance but added that not everyone may have seen it yet.

    The bright student said many classmates did not know what the article was actually about but knew he had featured in the paper and asked questions.

    "I had people asking me to sign my autograph and everything," he said.

    "It was a bit weird ... something new."

    Jason said he was glad he had spoken out.

    "A lot is off my chest," he said.

    "Maybe it will be (better now), we'll have to see."

    Jason and his 13-year-old brother Blake, who started at PBC yesterday, rode their bikes to school together, which also helped the situation.

    Mum Elise Nicholls said there had been some inconvenience to the family from TV media going to great lengths to contact them -including following Jason's grandmother to the rubbish tip -- but it was worth it to speak out.

    "This was a big thing for Jason because he didn't know what sort of response he would get at school," she said.

    "I think he's finally been able to reach the community and let them know that he's different.

    "The overwhelming response from the community has been greatly received and appreciated."

    Gold Coasters opened their hearts after Jason's story, offering encouragement and a range of gifts to boost his confidence.

    Multiple business owners called The Bulletin offering to give something to the teen and his family, including a complimentary five-star experience from a Surfers Paradise hotel that wished to remain anonymous.

    A personal trainer, a fishing charter company, a singing teacher and two martial arts clubs also offered their services free of charge.

    The Toya Kan Karate Club at Oxenford and the Combined Martial Arts Academy at Nerang both said they had students with Asperger's or other autistic spectrum disorders.

    "I was bullied all through my childhood just because we moved around a lot in the UK so my accent was a bit different to everyone else," said Paul Butterfield of Toya Kan Karate.

    "I was absolutely appalled and disgusted by what I read about Jason and wanted to try and offer some support.

    "People look at it as a self defence ability but ultimately martial arts gives you a lot of self-confidence and selfesteem and people tend not to pick on you so much when you have that."

    There was also an offer from Robina local Aiden Grimes for Jason to walk the Kokoda Track next year, which Mr Grimes has done 53 times.

    Mr Grimes, who himself has Asperger's syndrome, said he cried when he read the story because it mirrored his own life experiences.

    Despite requests to his media personnel, education minister Rod Welford could not be reached for comment yesterday.

    An Education Queensland spokeswoman said she could not discuss Jason's case specifically because of privacy legislation and provided an overview of general school bullying policies.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    fort lauderdale
    Posts
    371
    not sure if its a good thing or not but a few of these were in good old Fl. there was a story i saw on the news down here a while ago were a kid ordered a pizza. he left the door unlocked waiting for the pizza guy. a robber snuck in and the kid used aikido to subdue the criminal.

    Quote:
    Occasionally the owner of Red Tiger Martial Arts in New Westminster has his instructors sneak-attack students during classes.


    been watching too much Pink Panther lol
    A BJJ player and notorious pimp, Da Big Deezy, in the Crenshaw district tried to "raise up" and "slap a ho" ..... I impaled him with my retractible naginata. I wish there were more groundfighters in the world. They make my arsenal that much more deadly. - john takeshi

    LIKE FROG IN WELL LOOKING UP AT SKY,THINKING SEE ALL WORLD. - truthman

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,029

    post links if you got them, gwa sow

    Meanwhile, here's a really good one. These are exactly the kinds of stories I love to hear.

    Domestic Violence Victim Saved By Martial Arts Student In Front Yard

    National statistics report that one in three women will suffer abuse at the hands of a loved one in their lifetime so when a hero like Tom Hobine comes to the rescue, one can bet that the cheering squad is less than silent.

    In the coastal Texas town of Corpus Christi, domestic violence isn't a foreign topic where a beautiful young woman was killed by her husband just over a year ago after she had tried to escape his violent hand.

    Last week, a hero named Tom Hobine who had just returned from his martial arts class helped save a victim from potential death at the beating hands of her own husband.

    Hobine says he saw a strange man in his front yard on top of a woman pounding her with his fists and in reflex moves, he pushed palm struck the guy from the victim. When the abuser got up and acted as if he were going to come at the good samaritan, Hobine executed a well-placed roundhouse kick to the face then proceeded with a learned martial arts self-defense maneuver that helped restrain the wife-beater until police arrive.

    The abuser, John Michael Lea, Junior, apparently has a repeat history of the abuse. He had beaten up his wife just last week but because she did not come forward and press charges, Lea was released back on the streets to repeat his pattern again.

    Despite his violation of a temporary restraining order, Lea's violent actions are not at all uncommon for an abuser in a domestic violence situation and had it not been for Tom, the courageous neighbour and his timely intervention, this woman might not be alive today.

    As for Hobine, he believed he did what anyone would do and is not a hero.

    Common warning signs that one is in an abusive relationship include things such as if one's partner bites, slaps, pushes, shoves, punches holes in the wall, prevents one from seeking medical assistance or alters the story so that no one gets into "trouble",, lies about the event to make the victim out to be the one who caused the injury or prevents the involvement of law enforcement.

    For further help and anonymous assistance, call The National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE. It is manned 24 hours a day.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    976
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    It may be perceived as some martial arts schools jumping on the bandwagon to get some publicity, unless of course, their teachings help to improve the situation. Sad story really. We had a horrible bullying case here that made the local papers.
    OMG! Thanks for this. My niece has Asberger's, she is 15. The bullying in her school was so bad my sister took her out and my brother-in-law is home schooling her. I'm going to send this to her.
    "The true meaning of a given movement in a form is not its application, but rather the unlimited potential of the mind to provide muscular and skeletal support for that movement." Gregory Fong

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by TaichiMantis View Post
    OMG! Thanks for this. My niece has Asberger's, she is 15. The bullying in her school was so bad my sister took her out and my brother-in-law is home schooling her. I'm going to send this to her.
    It's sort of sickening to know that society in general treats people that way because of a social impairment. When I was in high school, we had a young guy who was socially inept--would run around screaming, or do some other thing else that would make him stand out socially. He didn't have any impairments, he was just different. Needless to say the "in crowd" messed with him a lot.

    Later that year he hung himself from a tree.

    I'm glad this story ended differently.

    I wasn't popular in high school for the first couple of years, so I was screwed with a few times...and when that happened it usually came to blows. The attempts at bullying stopped eventually after a few of the altercations because bullies want easy prey, they don't want to have to work for their "recognition". Eventually I got in with the popular crowd during the last couple years, but I always stuck up for those that couldn't do it themselves....because it was the right thing to do and having been through it myself I couldn't see it happen to someone else.

    It honestly makes me very sad to know that high school kids are just as bad or worse than they were when I was a freshman. Little do they know that after high school none of that "click" stuff matters.
    "I don't know if anyone is known with the art of "sitting on your couch" here, but in my eyes it is also to be a martial art.

    It is the art of avoiding dangerous situations. It helps you to avoid a dangerous situation by not actually being there. So lets say there is a dangerous situation going on somewhere other than your couch. You are safely seated on your couch so you have in a nutshell "difused" the situation."

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    195

    Not just partial to martial.

    This is not quite apropriate but as soon as i find any links I on the subject ill post..however I rememebr sometime last year (maybe) an elderly woman was on the national news because she thwarted a robbery attempt at a fuel pump while filling her car. The assailant tried to take her purse and she doused him from head to toe with 89 Unleaded. The guy ran away but was soon identified from an obvious smell. Not quite martial arts but the mindset of this woman is something to be recognized. She used her surroundings and completly turned he table.

    I think it also helped that she was ready to set him aflame if she didnt get her purse back.
    我听见,我忘记;我看见,我记住;我做,我了解。
    I hear, I forget; I see, I remember; I do, I understand.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Permanent state of Denial
    Posts
    2,273
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I'm almost thinking now that the positive transfer of martial arts to sports deserves its own thread. But for now, these two stay here.
    Ah....that's nothing new. I know it's SD, but you'll have to humor me. Senior Master Gary Grooms of Shaolin-Tao worked with the offensive and defensive lines of the Atlanta Falcons to train them for scrambles, tackling, balance, and defense. When a wide receiver sprints out on his rouute, he has a coouple of seconds where he's basically fumbling around with the defense's hands, trying to clear his route. So, Senior Master grooms taught them methods (Tai Chi based, I think) to pass to the outside and take off unhindered. If I'm nott miistaken, this was ini the early/mid ninetees or so. We've got a newspaper article from the AJC about it on our websitte somewhere. He also worked with the defensive lines to teach them good balancing techniques, etc.

    My teacher was a linebacker for hte Falcons for like 6 years or so and got into martial arts because ofo that traning. Sifu is the kind of guy you'd take one loook at and say: "Now why wouuld he ever have to defend himself?" LOL......
    No, no, no. You're not thinking. You're just being logical---Niels Bohr

    Oh yeah!??!! Well, my dad could beat up your dad!--Lineage-Haters

    For all nonsense there is an equal and opposite nonsense---Wook

    My Youtube Channel

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,029

    what a way to find a tumor

    timely - we needed to ttt this thread with something fresh
    Martial arts master turns energy to helping others fight cancer
    By KEVIN CALLAHAN • Courier-Post Staff • June 3, 2008

    PINE HILL — Master Dominick A. Giacobbe is the holder of an 8th Dan Black belt in the 2,000-year-old art of Tang Soo Do, Korean karate.

    So, it is safe to say, not many fights scare him.

    Except when his wife, Christina, first came down with cancer more than 30 years ago.

    "We were scared, back in '74. In those days, if you had cancer, you died," Giacobbe said last week behind the desk of his karate school office, which is adorned with pictures of Giacobbe with famous people.

    Christina is doing fine and Master Giacobbe is still fighting cancer by raising money with an annual karate tournament in Atlantic City.

    Like the master martial artist he is, Giacobbe turned the pain, hurt and fear of cancer into a weapon to fight the disease.

    When their first child was two weeks late, Christina had a cesarean section. A tumor was found on the pelvic bone. The tumor was malignant.

    Giacobbe called the American Cancer Society. It was a life-saving call, not only for Christina but for the many cancer patients Giacobbe has helped over the years with his fundraising tournaments.

    "I called the American Cancer Society and they said you can conquer it with your mind, by eating right and exercising," he said. "I said, that is what I teach in my martial arts class."

    Giacobbe, 57, teaches three classes a day still at his popular Pine Hill facility. He has taught more than 10,000 students, including many professional athletes.

    So, Giacobbe and his wife took the ACS advice and trained and ate well together and they embraced the positive attitude needed to survive.

    "We said we would conquer this disease," he said.

    When they did, Giacobbe made another call to the ACS. This time, he asked them what he could do to help them. He had felt so fortunate for their help and time, for their care and compassion.

    "They never asked me for a penny, they were always so positive, I said I had to give something back," Giacobbe said. "They didn't call for donations, but they called because they were concerned for my wife. That is what inspired me."

    Giacobbe, a graduate of Washington Township High School, turned his inspiration into perspiration. He went to work to raise money.

    Giacobbe, who lives in Voorhees, first hosted a martial arts show in 1982 at Resorts International in Atlantic City. Then in 1985, he started doing a karate tournament and gave all the proceeds to the ACS.

    To date, he has donated $585,000 to the ACS.

    Giacobbe's goal is to raise $1 million.

    "Some years I gave big chunks and some years small amounts. Maybe this year, I don't know, it might not be a big chunk because of the economy," he said.

    Giacobbe, who was named Man of the Year in 2000 by Black Belt magazine, is attacking the goal with the same positive attitude he and his wife attacked cancer. And, Giacobbe is using the same positive attitude toward beating cancer he saw Sugar Ray Leonard use for his epic fight with Marvin Hagler.

    "He was so positive," Giacobbe said about Sugar Ray, who asked him to help train him. "The odds were so much against him, but he was so positive that he made it happen."

    In addition to Leonard, Giacobbe trained Evander Holyfield and Pernell Whitaker for several of their championship fights. A fighter is a fitting symbol for battling cancer.

    Giacobbe, who has appeared on many TV shows, also trained Eagles players, including greats Reggie White and Mike Quick, when Buddy Ryan was the team's head coach.

    Giacobbe, who recently returned from teaching karate in Ireland, Wales and Italy, also trains the regular guy. He teaches every class at his academy.

    And, he passes onto his students the same message on the karate mat and in the street. He feels attacking cancer with a positive attitude is the way to beat the disease. He and his wife have already proved it works.

    "Cancer can be conquered with the mind," he said. "That is better than any medicine you can take."

    Giacobbe is passing his positive attitude and passionate fight against cancer onto the general public. He just wrote a book called "The Secrets For a Powerful Life (published by AuthorHouse).

    "The book has a lot of philosophy. The greatest part of training for martial arts is all the philosophy," he said. "It is the martial arts philosophy that makes you a better person in life. It is the philosophy you take from martial arts, about the ability to defend yourself."

    Giacobbe tells stories in the book to relate to readers.

    "I call them secrets because the stories aren't written down," he said. "Masters handed them down to other masters."

    Reach Kevin Callahan at (856) 317-7821 or kcallahan@courierpostonline.com.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,029

    Not quite on the street...

    ...but worthy of note for sure.
    Kung-Fu granny beats up soldiers
    June 24 2008 at 03:18PM

    A 77-year-old Japanese grandmother has beaten up Italian soldiers to toughen them up.

    Martial arts expert Keiko Wakabayshi has been hired by the country's military to train recruits in hand-to-hand combat, the Daily Telegraph has reported.

    Miss Wakabayshi, who is just 1,5 metres tall, looks tiny compared to her charges who are mostly about 1,8 metres.

    But the pensioner is a trained master in an array of martial arts disciplines including jujitsu, jojitso, kenjitso, judo, kendo and karate.

    She wipes the floor with soldiers of the Folgore brigade at their barracks in Livorno on a daily basis.

    Miss Wakabayshi was born in Japan but now lives in Northern Italy. She tells her students to look at her and believe that nothing is impossible.

    After flooring an opponent she tells them: "Don't think it's unbelievable. The physique doesn't matter."

    Sparring is regarded as the most effective method of teaching martial arts and senior Italian military officers hope the experience of being humiliated by Miss Wakabayshi will toughen up their soldiers.

    Miss Wakabayshi trained for many years to achieve her level of expertise and believes she can carry on defeating brawny soldiers for years to come. - Ananova
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,029

    and in contrast to the article above...

    I was tipped to this story a while ago, but I had no one to cover it and no place to publish it at the time. I'm glad someone else tackled it.

    Teenage mom finds relief in Taiji
    South city girl one of two St. Louis teens to claim national championships
    By Ron Clements
    Tuesday, June 24, 2008 2:28 PM CDT

    Submitted photos Jardena Green practices an exercise under the instruction of her sifu, Justin Meehan. Green, a 17-year-old single mom in south city, uses Taiji to overcome life's difficulties. Jardena Green does not have an easy life.

    The 17-year-old south St. Louis resident supports herself and her 16-year-old brother. Their mother lives in Morocco and their father, a U.S. Army instructor, is currently in Iraq. Jardena also cares for her 18-month-old daughter. She works part-time at St. Louis Bread Company and attends Forest Park Community College.

    Displaying maturity beyond her years, Jardena has found a way to cope - the Chinese martial art of Taiji (Tai Chi).Using the "Taiji philosophy" to "overcome life's difficulties," Jardena has excelled in the sport since her father introduced it to her three years ago.

    "It has a lot of discipline and commitment," she said. "It really helps me relax. Whenever I'm stressed out, it's really a calming thing for me."

    Jardena and another south city teen, 15-year-old Justin Rice Meehan, made history Memorial Day weekend by becoming the two youngest competitors to win a national championship at the 10th Annual Chinese International Kung Fu Championships in Orlando, Fla. Competing in the Taiji Advanced Adult Push Hands competition, both Jardena and Jason brought home first-place medals. Tournament directors said the the double win by two St. Louis teenagers from the same Taiji school in a nationally recognized Advanced Adult Push Hands competition is an historic first.

    Both teens are taught by their sifu, or instructor, Justin Meehan, Jason's father. Three years ago, Justin was introduced to Jardena by Jardena's father, Gordon, who teaches Aikido.

    "I grew up in a martial arts family," Jardena said. "We used to sit through and wait for my dad to finish teaching Aikido and then Justin would come in and teach the Taiji. One day, I just wanted to see what it was about. Then I really got into it. I never thought he'd take me on as a student."

    Justin told Jardena that "Chinese martial arts have the power to improve understanding and strengthen character."

    "I've been in the Chinese martial arts for 40 years," Justin said. "I often deal with kids who find themselves alienated or in a hostile environment. I've found that, for some kids, Chinese martial arts is a way of obtaining confidence, and a little bit of a boost. It's a kind of applied spirituality. It allows them to feel better about themselves."

    His son, a standout multi-sport athlete at Webster Groves, said working so closely with his dad brings them together, and he was especially pleased to make his father proud in Orlando.

    "It was really great," Jason said. "That was my third time going, but I didn't compete at all. It meant a lot to me just to compete. Then to win, I was really proud of myself and my father was really proud of me."

    The influence of Taiji in Jardena's life has been so profound that she would like to teach the sport herself someday.

    "I like how soft it looks, and it looks really beautiful," she said. "It lets off a lot of stress, and you're not going to be sore afterword. When you find out what each movement means, it's really interesting and really cool. And, you can really fight with it, so that's helpful."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,029

    and in contrast to the two articles above...

    ...just one more from the newsfeeds and I'm done for today...

    Kids with cerebral palsy get kicks from martial arts
    By Jennifer Miros
    06/23/2008

    The sport of martial arts has long been a fun way for children to get fit, learn self-discipline and improve focus. Learning kicks, punches and blocks requires concentration and strict attention and often leads to improved self-esteem.

    Children ages 7 and up who are patients of Dr. Jan Brunstrom, director of the Cerebral Palsy Center at St. Louis Children's Hospital, also have the opportunity to participate in the only known martial arts program specifically adapted to meet the needs of children with cerebral palsy. The classes, called "Fighters With Courage and Power," teach a form of martial arts called Kajukenbo, a blend of karate, judo and jujitsu, kenpo and kung fu. Instructors Ken Sills and Charlie Walton, both black belts, share a vision for bringing the benefits of the martial arts to the disabled.

    "The martial arts help children with disabilities with their balance, stamina, mental clarity, focus, independence and self-esteem," Sills said. "When they are here, they feel like they are superheroes."

    The full-body workout requires students to stand, since most are used to sitting for long periods of time. Sills and Walton pull techniques from different martial arts to customize a movement based on each student's abilities. For example, while one student may be able to use his or her hand to punch, a student with restricted hand movement may use a forearm strike.


    "The ability to defend yourself has a profound effect on confidence," Walton said. "People with disabilities rely on people for a lot of things, but martial arts allows them to take control over that part of their life."

    In addition, involvement in martial arts has helped many patients with cerebral palsy reduce or eliminate the need for physical therapy.

    "While they are in class, we treat them like any other student," Walton said. "We want them to know that they can do the same things as anyone else. They just have to find other ways to do it."

    `Camp Independence, the only known sports camp in the nation for children with cerebral palsy, started its sixth season on June 9 at the Webster Groves Recreation Center and runs each week through July 25.

    In addition to martial arts, campers also participate in other sports including tennis, soccer, pilates, floor hockey, kickball, baseball, dance and adaptive cycling. Children from Missouri, Illinois and several other states plan to attend Camp Independence this year.

    For more information about Camp Independence, call the St. Louis Children's Hospital Answer Line at 314-454-5437 or visit stlouischildrens.org. To learn more about volunteer opportunities for Fighters With Courage and Power classes, visit kajukenbo.org
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    976
    Thanks, keep 'em coming!
    "The true meaning of a given movement in a form is not its application, but rather the unlimited potential of the mind to provide muscular and skeletal support for that movement." Gregory Fong

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,029

    Karate vs. Asperger's

    with a little Christianity thrown in to boot.

    Teen gives physical limitations a karate chop
    June 28, 2008

    When Scott Schultz was 5, a routine exam by his pediatrician found the young boy's reflexes were nearly non-existent. His parents, John and JoAnn Schultz of Neenah, were told to "watch and wait."
    Advertisement

    At 10, Scott's parents enrolled him in Christian Karate, led by the Rev. Bill Stiebs, pastor of Cornerstone Church in New London. The martial arts program, which teaches American-style karate, provides students with both physical and spiritual strengthening.

    Scott struggled to keep up as others progressed through the karate belt ranking system, his mom recalled. He had poor coordination, problems with balance and great difficulty jumping rope.

    "He was so clumsy motor-wise, and couldn't catch a ball or run … and he could not follow directions and had an odd gait," JoAnn said. "People said, 'why's he in this class? He's not going to go far.'"

    His parents started noticing other things as well.

    "Noises that we could tolerate, he could not," JoAnn said. "Scott also exhibited visual spatial difficulty. When he ran up a flight of stairs that were open to the bottom, he could not come down those stairs."

    Scott, who is home-schooled, was easily frustrated by schoolwork and had great difficulty holding a pencil and writing.

    "I think had he been in the public school system, we would have seen issues a lot earlier," JoAnn said.

    After countless tests, time and doctors, at 11 Scott was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome, a neurobiological disorder that is part of a group of conditions called autism spectrum disorders. They are known as spectrum disorders because two children with the same diagnosis, which generally occurs between ages 5 and 9, can exhibit a wide range of skills and abilities.

    Through prayer and the help of mentors — black belt instructors Dr. Jim Ziegler and Scott Simpson — Scott was encouraged and directed to the Bible scripture Philippians 4:13: "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."

    "Scott would come early and practice the whole time before class," Stiebs said. "He never complained about the intensity of the training we did. He would help others to get better even when he was struggling to improve his physical abilities. Scott's parents would drive him twice a week to New London from Neenah to be able to participate in our Home School Karate classes."

    After a couple years Scott's physical abilities began to improve. He became one of the best students performing karate techniques. While the average time it takes to earn a black belt, Stiebs said, is between 3 and 6 years depending on the time a student invests, after 5 years of training Scott recently was awarded his black belt and now is an expert in martial arts.

    More importantly, Scott, now 16, grew spiritually.

    "He prayed for others and helped teach others godly principles," Stiebs said. "Over the 30 years I have been in the martial arts very few students have persevered through the physical adversities Scott has. … God has truly blessed this young man."

    Scott said he was happy and relieved when he passed the two-day testing to earn a black belt, especially the sparring portion. Although he won't soon be starring on screen in an action-flick, "I would like to work on some in my backyard," he said with a laugh.

    The karate class, JoAnn said, has been incredible for her son in more ways than one.

    "If you watch him today you would not think this was the same boy at age 10," she said.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,029

    There's something almost stereotypic about this article...

    ...but he's got a nice monk robe, so that counts for something.
    Giving up the gangs for kung fu

    Martial arts group Sanshu UK gives youngsters an alternative to street crime. DAVID MILLS speaks to its founder.

    KUNG fu is helping get teenagers off the streets and into the community.

    Tom Metcalfe is a qualified martial arts trainer who has set up a kung fu school called Sanshu UK.

    The 23-year-old, of Blackbrook Lane, Bickley, has launched a programme called Respect to encourage youngsters to come to the scholl and keep away from a life of street crime.

    Recently News Shopper ran a six-week Voices Against Violence campaign to find solutions to the slaughter among teenagers which is plaguing our streets.

    Already in London this year 20 teenagers have died violently, compared with 26 last year.

    Mr Metcalfe, who has been doing martial arts since he was 15, says Respect was inspired by the murder of 18-year-old Rob Knox outside the Metro bar in Sidcup on May 24.

    The Shaolin kung fu martial artist said: "The murder of Rob Knox was the inspiration because it happened on my doorstep."

    He says Respect is about getting on the streets and speaking directly to the kids on the street.

    Mr Metcalfe, a revenues officer, said: "It involves going out and talking to groups and individuals lurking on street corners, kids in parks smoking, and trying to get them involved in something positive, giving them a way out of gangs and giving them something to do.

    "There's a lack of things to do for young people, they don't have anywhere to go.

    "We need to get them off the streets and into the community where they can hope to achieve something."

    He says young people lack role models and someone to talk to.

    He said: "I want to be some sort of role model and tell these kids there are people you can talk to and things you can achieve.

    "If kids are having a hard time at home, maybe not agreeing with parents, they rebel and turn to gangs as an alternative family."

    Sanshu UK meets every Thursday at St Augustine's Church Hall, Southborough Lane, Bromley, from 8pm to 9pm.

    Sessions are open to both boys and girls and are free for the first month.

    All students bow to begin with before doing a warm up and a series of kung fu techniques.

    Mr Metcalfe said: "Martial arts instil discipline.

    "Kids can take out their aggression on the pads we have.

    "The club gives them a chance to meet up with friends and they also learn self-defence."

    He added: "The kids get really involved, and want to be like Jackie Chan or Bruce Lee.

    "We partner them up and get them used to different people.

    "We have young people with older people so they get used to being around all types of people."

    A typical session ends with everyone seated and discussing issues which concern them.

    Sanshu UK, which has 15 members aged from 13 to people in their late 20s as well as two trainers, plans to visit schools to reach out to youngsters.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,029

    grappling vs. a gun

    Capoeria has grappling?
    Jackson man uses martial arts to stop alleged carjacker
    By Kathleen Baydala • August 19, 2008

    A Jackson man who escaped an armed carjacking attempt credits his martial arts training with his rapid response.

    Marvin Williams, 34, said he was in the parking lot of the Wal-Mart on Mississippi 18 Monday night when an armed man approached him and demanded his keys.

    “I was thinking he was fixing to sell me something or beg,” Williams said today. “But as he got closer, I saw he had a gun. I gave him my keys but he wasn’t walking away.”

    Williams studies the Brazilian martial art known as capoeira and said he used his skills to stay calm while he grappled the gun out of his alleged attacker’s hands.

    Officers who were nearby managed to chase down the suspect after he fled.

    Spencer Walker, 36, of Jackson is charged with carjacking, two counts of resisting arrest and two counts of disorderly contact.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •