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Thread: Successful Street Applications

  1. #46
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    don't mess with shuai jiao team managers...

    ...especially if your 83.
    Woman uses martial art to subdue car burglar
    The Yomiuri Shimbun

    KYOTO--An 83-year-old man was arrested Monday on suspicion of attempted theft after he was found ransacking a car in Kita Ward, Kyoto, and caught by a woman who used her Chinese martial art skills to subdue him, police said.

    According to the police, Keiko Kurisaki, 45, found the man ransacking a car in a parking lot at about 1:40 p.m. and called the police. As the man tried to flee, Kurisaki apprehended him using a shuai jiao technique in which an opponent's arm is twisted and one of his legs brushed aside to knock him off balance. Kita Police Station officers arrested the man when they arrived at the scene.

    According to the police station and others, Kurisaki was the general manager of the Japanese men's team that recently participated in an international competition of Chinese martial arts in Taiwan. The team won first prize in one of the techniques.
    (Oct. 22, 2008)
    Gene Ching
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  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    ...especially if your 83.
    LOL, a JAPANESE SJ person to boot !
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  3. #48
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    Slightly OT

    But then again, perhaps this gets to a core issue with applications.
    The link between martial arts and teen delinquency
    Published Thursday October 23rd, 2008
    Chris McCormick

    A good kick: Teaching martial arts to youths at risk for violence and delinquency has proven to be helpful in curbing their aggression, resistance to rules, impulsiveness and inappropriate behaviour.

    During the recent federal election, the leader of the Conservative Party announced he was going to get tough on juvenile crime.

    Among other things, he said he was going to allow the media to publicize the identity of young offenders. I doubt his tough on crime approach will work, but in the spirit of collegiality, I want to describe a different approach which might.

    Several psychiatrists wrote recently in the journal Adolescence of their attempt to reproduce other, smaller studies which showed that juveniles at high risk for violence and delinquency were less violent after taking a school-linked course in traditional martial arts.

    Such research often shows mixed results, because participation in the studies is voluntary, or the juvenile is already in a martial arts program. Both factors self-select for more aggressive youth, with the result that some studies even show an increase in violence for students who take martial arts.

    However, in this study, teachers identified students at high risk for violence and delinquency. There was no lack of such students, as the school was located in a poor area of a large urban city that had a very high juvenile arrest rate. The students who were identified as high risk were required to take the course if their parents agreed, and an outside martial arts teacher was brought in to teach them.

    To make the study scientific, 60 students with similar problematic behavior profiles were paired and then randomly assigned to either a treatment group or to a wait-list control group. For ten weeks the students took three classes per week of a traditional martial art which emphasized self-protection and calmness, which used a combination of meditation and patterned movements called a kata.

    At the end of the study, of 14 variables that were measured, the treatment students improved on almost all of them, while the control group actually deteriorated on most, including teacher-rated violence. In addition, there were significant differences between the groups on self-reported happiness, resistance to rules, impulsiveness, and inappropriate social behavior.

    A follow-up on teachers' ratings of the students showed that improvement remained, and in some cases increased, for months after completion of the course.

    The concern over youths is not new, and the idea of teaching them positive ways of dealing with aggressiveness and impulsivity is not new either. However, it is usually a soft approach, criticized for not being tough enough. What this study shows is that using traditional martial arts for intervention teaches self-confidence, and in turn increases the individual's sense of confidence and self-worth.

    Why did the program work? Well, it probably helped that the intervention involved physical exercise. Kids have a lot of energy to dissipate. Second, the emphasis was on the development of skills of self-defense. Knowing how to protect yourself builds confidence. Third, the martial arts teacher was not a middle school teacher, and thus represented an authority from outside the system.

    The study was so successful that in the following term, the school offered a similar class for disruptive girls, who can also benefit from learning martial arts.

    Some teachers were reluctant to assign students to the course because it seemed like a reward, but that's just one of those things that make you shake your head.

    Martial arts requires attention, commitment, and discipline.

    One very quickly learns that before you can control someone else, you have to learn to control yourself. And this betrays one of the big secrets that is tangential to the training involved. The students were being paid attention to, and offered something unique that can turn into a life-changing experience. I'm not surprised they changed.

    This approach is more than 'getting tough on youth crime' can offer. But if Stephen Harper is serious about youth crime, he could set an example and take up martial arts with his kids. He did say in the campaign that he likes to spend time with them, throwing balls and so on.

    Who knows, maybe in the process he'd learn something himself.

    Chris McCormick teaches criminology at St. Thomas University and his column on crime and criminal justice appears every second Thursday.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  4. #49
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    Which country is this article from?
    Simon McNeil
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    Be on the lookout for the Black Trillium, a post-apocalyptic wuxia novel released by Brain Lag Publishing available in all major online booksellers now.
    Visit me at Simon McNeil - the Blog for thoughts on books and stuff.

  5. #50
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    Another successful sport application

    Rugby is pretty street. I learned how to head butt from a rugby player.

    Boks turn to martial arts
    Sapa Published:Oct 30, 2008

    Springbok coach Peter de Villiers is leaving no stone unturned to ensure his team is literally fighting fit ahead of their three-Test tour starting against Six Nations champions Wales in Cardiff on Saturday, November 8.

    Hennie Bosman, the reigning World Senior Karate Champion and kickboxing expert, was leading the charge when the Boks started off their training session at the University of Cape Town’s Groote Schuur field yesterday afternoon.

    There he was, with the help of another martial arts expert, teaching the Boks the art of handing off opponents in the tackle situation. He also drilled the players in exercises which were aimed at freeing themselves when held up in tackles.

    Once the 7th Dan Black belt Bosman and his partner gave way, Springbok assistant coaches **** Muir and Gary Gold put the players through their paces. Muir kept the backs busy with basic handling exercises although players did not run in structured playing patterns.

    As a result one could not gauge how new flyhalf Ruan Pienaar and new cap Earl Rose would be fitting into the Boks’ playing pattern, or what roles have been set out for them.

    Jean de Villiers, the Boks’ key backline decision maker, was absent at training. He has been laid low with a stomach bug and has been kept indoors at the team’s Foreshore hotel in the Mother City.

    Gold spent the afternoon working the forwards hard on the Australian-made scrummaging machine and there was lots of interest from the few thousand spectators in John Smit who was packing down at an unaccustomed tighthead position, alongside hooker Bismarck du Plessis and loosehead prop Tendai ’Beast’ Mtawarira.

    This front row was backed up by second rowers Victor Matfield and Bakkies Botha, flanked by Juan Smith and Pierre Spies, who usually plays at eighthman. However, the opposing pack also packed down without a No 8.

    Later on in the scrummaging session Gold, who was assisted by Saru referees expert Neville Heilbron, moved the permutations around which saw Smit locked with hooker Chilliboy Ralepelle and loosehead strongman Gurthrö Steenkamp, at one stage.

    However, the only position which remained constant as Gold moved the players around was that of the ’scrumhalf’ who would-be spies might have mistaken as the Boks’ new secret weapon.

    The ’scrumhalf’ was none other Springbok flanker Schalk Burger who was sitting out at training because of a hamstring strain, which apparently is no cause for concern.

    Weather conditions were fair in Cape Town yesterday afternoon and totally unlike what the Boks will encounter on their UK tour.

    "It can be tough in the cold, rain and wind which we are bound to experience on tour," said Bok skipper Smit. "The really good teams adapt quicker to the local conditions. It’s the same when teams tour here.

    "There are other aspects like the mistiming of the seasons, but given there’s not really an off-season any more, you can’t blame the fact that we’re at the end of our season."

    Smit also spoke about the importance of this tour in the light of the British and Irish Lions’ campaign in South Africa next year.

    "The bulk of the (British and Irish) Lions squad will come from the teams that we meet on this tour," said Smit. "Although the conditions will be different in South Africa than they will be on this trip, it is important that we win.

    "Beating Wales, Scotland and England make it easier to set the tone for next year.

    "Every player who goes on this tour will understand the magnitude of what is waiting for us next year.

    "This is a great opportunity to suss out what they (the Lions) have in store for us and for us to score early psychological points."

    "Any advantage we can gain against Wales, Scotland and England will be beneficial."
    P.S. SimonM, if you follow the link in the post above, you'll find your answer. I always link to the source to credit them.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  6. #51
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    Thanks, eh.

    Never been to frederickton.
    Last edited by SimonM; 10-30-2008 at 10:10 AM.
    Simon McNeil
    ___________________________________________

    Be on the lookout for the Black Trillium, a post-apocalyptic wuxia novel released by Brain Lag Publishing available in all major online booksellers now.
    Visit me at Simon McNeil - the Blog for thoughts on books and stuff.

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    LOL, a JAPANESE SJ person to boot !
    then again...how hard is it to run down and dump an 83 yr old?
    "The true meaning of a given movement in a form is not its application, but rather the unlimited potential of the mind to provide muscular and skeletal support for that movement." Gregory Fong

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by TaichiMantis View Post
    then again...how hard is it to run down and dump an 83 yr old?
    That depends, some 83 years old can whip a mean walker !
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  9. #54
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    no witnesses

    I'm always a little skeptical of teenagers telling stories like this, but we'll give Kyle the benefit of the doubt for now.

    Martial arts student uses his skills to foil carjacking
    A 19-year-old Jiu-Jitsu student thwarted a knife-wielding carjacker outside a Fort Lauderdale training center.
    BY ADAM H. BEASLEY
    abeasley@MiamiHerald.com

    A martial arts center in northern Fort Lauderdale offers Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, which the studio claims is the most effective self-defense in the world.

    Wednesday night, one of its students -- 19-year-old Kyle Yates -- found himself in need of the training.

    Yates fought off a knife-wielding carjacker in the center's parking lot and was able to speed away without injury, according to Fort Lauderdale police.

    His attacker remained on the loose Thursday.

    Reached by phone, Yates, of Fort Lauderdale, said his reaction was half-instinct, half-skill.

    ''The windows were down,'' Yates said, 'and I was thinking, `He ain't getting in my car.' ''

    Here's how Fort Lauderdale police and the victim said it happened:

    About 7 p.m., Yates was leaving Pablo Popovitch's Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Center, 1594 E. Commercial Blvd., following a practice.

    As he got into his white Thunderbird, a man in his 20s approached, held a knife to Yates' neck, then demanded his car.

    The demand was declined.

    Yates shoved the thief's arm away, knocking him backward, then threw the car into reverse.

    He later called police and told them what happened. There were no witnesses and the knife was not recovered, according to police.

    Despite having a knife to his neck, Yates was nonchalant a day later.

    ''I really didn't take it seriously at all,'' he said.

    The art student began his martial arts training earlier this year during a brief stint in the military. After his discharge in March, he started attending sessions at Pablo Popovitch's center.

    The facility also offers classes in Gracie Jiu-Jitsu, kickboxing/Muay Thai and mixed martial arts.

    ''Since I've been there, I've been more of a calm person,'' Yates said. ``I react faster and make more rational decisions.''

    His quick decision Wednesday night may have saved his Thunderbird.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  10. #55
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    Isn't that a case of Car-Fu rather than BJJ ?
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  11. #56
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    i woner if thats a case more of the guy didnt want to actually slit a throat so when he was pushed he just went 'oh well, he called my bluff'

    who knows but the 'attacker'
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  12. #57
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    Karateka takes on three robbers, each less than half his age.

    I'm disappointed to see UPI lists this as "odd news". This is excellent news.

    Karate senior scares off would-be crooks
    Published: Nov. 12, 2008 at 12:22 PM

    NEW YORK, Nov. 12 (UPI) -- A 57-year-old New York man with a history of karate lessons says he used his martial arts skills to scare off three young would-be thieves.

    Grandfather-of-six Diogenes Angeles said after being confronted by the three young men on his way to a pharmacy, he punched one of his would-be robbers and all three quickly fled the scene, the New York Daily News said Wednesday.

    "They see that I am kind of old and figured they can just come and rob me," the retired sign painter said.

    "Once they saw I could defend myself, they ran away," Angeles added. "I hope they learn from this and don't attack other people."

    Angeles credited karate lessons he began taking at the age of 14 for thwarting Tuesday's potential robbery.

    Police later arrested three suspects in relation to the incident, the Daily News said.

    Those men have been identified as Eugene Sanchez, 19, Rakeem Johnson, 23, and Jason Lopez, 25.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  13. #58
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    From the Police Chief

    Anyone here from Bridgeport, CT of Richmond, VA?
    New Police Chief: Martial Arts is Key
    Posted: Nov 18, 2008 02:29 AM

    Could martial arts help end gang activity and school violence? It's a question CBS 6 put to Richmond's new top cop.

    Chief Bryan Norwood says kids need to be engaged and have strong role models. Norwood started martial arts programs as chief in Bridgeport, Connecticut. He calls those programs a huge success.

    Now, he wants to implement these programs in Richmond city schools. "The martial arts provides that specific discipline that allows them to really focus on certain parts of their life," says Chief Bryan Norwood.

    Strong discipline, strong minds and self confidence. They're a life long lesson for Brady Taylor. He believes he would be dead if he had not taken part in a martial arts program. Taylor's been enrolled in the program for several years. In middle school, Taylor says older kids picked on and physically abused him. "They punched me, kicked me, pushed me, threw me up against the chairs," says Taylor. This worried Taylor's mother. At one point, Patti Hobbs thought her son may turn violent. "Columbine really scared me because Brady was the child who nobody ever paid any attention to unless they were pounding on him," says Hobbs. But Hobbs say that changed when Brady signed up for Martial Arts. "If he could control his own environment and feel safe then he wouldn't need to lash out and it has worked...it's been wonderful."

    CBS 6 contacted Richmond Public Schools. Right now, the district says it doesn't have Martial Arts programs in place. But Felicia Cosby tells CBS 6 the district is excited Chief Norwood is willing to work closely with students and looks forward to discussing this concept.
    Gene Ching
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  14. #59
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    Spina Bifida

    This is one hardcore 10-year-old practitioner.
    At Hospital, Wresting Control From Spina Bifida
    By John Kelly
    Wednesday, November 19, 2008; Page B03

    If you have children who complain about the injustices of life -- about, say, the punishing chores they are required to complete -- may I suggest you share the story of Jessica Gregory?

    Jessica, a 10-year-old from Forestville, is a stellar reader and an accomplished martial artist. She was born with spina bifida, a congenital disorder of the spine that can cause a variety of problems. Jessica has been visiting Children's National Medical Center since she was a baby. Three years ago, doctors there performed a series of procedures to make possible the bodily functions most people take for granted. A hole in Jessica's abdomen gives access to her bladder so she can be catheterized. Another, called a stoma, is in her belly button and allows the contents of her bowel to be flushed out.

    These rituals must be performed several times a day, and almost from the start it's been Jessica who's been doing them.

    "They believe in children being independent," said Jessica's mom, Sheila, of the staff at Children's. "They said: 'She has to do this on her own. If you start doing it, she's not going to do it.' "

    Jessica was not thrilled by the prospect at first. Sheila drove the point home so often -- you must do this for yourself -- that Jessica appealed to a higher authority.

    "I overheard her praying, and she said, 'God, that woman gets on my nerves,' " Sheila said. "I had to get myself together. I had a laugh, then I said: 'You can talk to the Lord all you want, but you still have to do it. I'm not going to do it.' "

    Jessica did learn to do it and in the process took ownership of the situation. Mom Sheila and dad William used to call the regular irrigation of Jessica's bowel and bladder doing "the boo-boo thing." One day Jessica announced, "Can we call it 'the fluids'?"

    A much better name.

    "She's very self-sufficient, which is another thing the hospital trains them to do," Sheila said. The self-sufficiency extends in all directions. When she was younger, Jessica wore braces on her ankles and had difficulty walking. Sheila said Dr. Laura Tosi, a Children's Hospital orthopedic surgeon, told her that Jessica had to learn to pick herself up when she fell. Sheila should resist the urge to help.

    When they'd go the mall, Sheila got scowls from shoppers suspicious of the stumbling child's inattentive mom. "People would look at me like, 'Okay lady, should we call child protective services?' "

    It was Dr. Tosi who recommended that Jessica do either ballet or martial arts as a way of strengthening her legs. Said Dr. Tosi: "A critical challenge to pediatric hospitals is what happens when [patients] turn 18 or 21? How do we care for the adult with a congenital disorder?"

    Research revealed that kids with spina bifida and cerebral palsy were entering adulthood with atrophied muscles, their bodies prematurely aged.

    "Working with that knowledge base, I started kicking my kids in the can," Dr. Tosi said. Exercise became critical, not just to help minimize bone loss and help minimize weight gain but to improve morale.

    Jessica's parents enrolled her in the Little Ninjas program at Full Circle Martial Arts Academy in Capitol Heights, where her older brothers had been students. Now the fourth-grader has a blue belt in kung fu.

    On a recent day at Children's, Jessica stood on one foot, her arms birdlike at her sides. She had assumed her favorite kung fu position: the crane.

    Why is it your favorite, I asked. "You get to have fun with it," Jessica said. "You have to stay focused."

    Helping Children's

    As I admired her martial arts poses, I asked Jessica what she wants to be when she grows up. "A doctor," she said. "That's easy."

    When you see the lifesaving work done at Children's Hospital, it's hard not to want to help. It's too late for me to go to medical school. It's probably too late for many of you. But we can make a difference in another way: By taking part in The Washington Post's annual Children's Hospital fundraising campaign.

    Our goal is to raise $500,000 by Jan. 9 to help pay the bills of poor sick children. To donate, write a check or money order payable to "Children's Hospital" and mail it to Washington Post Campaign, P.O. Box 17390, Baltimore, Md. 21297-1390.

    To donate online using a credit card, go to http://www.washingtonpost.com/childrenshospital.

    To contribute by phone using Visa or MasterCard, call 202-334-5100 and follow the instructions on the recording.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Anyone here from Bridgeport, CT of Richmond, VA?
    Yep!.... "in the past".
    I ran a couple of clubs and a school in Bridgeport, Ct during the 1960s and 1970s.

    Probably not during the time of Norwood, but his name sounds a little bit familiar.

    Bridgeport has/had "a certain amount of fame" as the home of one of the earliest "questionable" MAtists in the US.... guy actually put on shows as part of some Barnum & Bailey gigs.

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