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Thread: China MMA

  1. #16
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    s'about freakin time.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  2. #17
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    UFC China

    I mentioned this yesterday on the Zhang Tie Quan - Chinese fighter in WEC thread.

    * August 31, 2010, 9:10 AM HKT
    China, Here Comes Fight Club

    The country that brought the world martial arts is about to get a taste of American-style extreme fighting, with the introduction of the Ultimate Fighting Championship organization in Asia.

    The fight organizer and promoter for the form of sports-combat called mixed martial arts announced that it would be setting up a foothold in Asia. The company didn’t specify where it would set up shop, but its new chief in Asia is Mark Fischer, a former exec with the National Basketball Association Inc., who lives in Beijing.

    As part of its sop to Chinese audiences, the UFC is also touting the addition of an Inner Mongolian lightweight bruiser named Zhang Tiequan to a televised bout through its sister organization, World Extreme Cagefighting. The group said it will also leverage its existing ties with the China National Wushu Federation to drum up support and talent.

    Mixed martial artists may combine elements from many styles of hand-to-hand combat or wrestling in their repertoire, or fights can pit combatants who specialize in one type of combat against someone who trained in a different fighting form.

    To manage UFC’s Asian business, the fight group owned by Las Vegas-based Zuffa LLC is turning to Fischer with the hope that some of his magic touch in marketing the NBA can rub off on their fledgling Asian franchise.

    Basketball has been one of the few American sports imports to become a winner in China.

    Under Fischer’s direction from 2003 to 2008, the NBA managed to ink more than 20 marketing partnerships with leading brands in the country. Tsingtao, for instance, is now the official beer of the NBA in China. The NBA has actually set up a separate corporate entity for its China operations, which was valued at $2.3 billion when it was set up in 2008.

    Other sports, which came to the party a little later, just haven’t had the hot hand when it comes to gaining acceptance in the Chinese market.

    National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing Inc. executives went on a China junket in 2007 to drum up sponsors and gauge what potential interest might exist for its brand of high-octane, fuel-fired racing thrills. So far, the answer appears to be very little. Meanwhile, the National Football League set its sights on China in 2009 and has been staging exhibitions and rebroadcasting games in the country with Chinese color-commentary. However it, too, seems to be getting blitzed in China.

    Sports like auto-racing, football, and even baseball suffer from a want of attention in a country where the focus is on winning medals and national glory.

    Major League Baseball has a 10-year development program that it has recently put in place in the country, but there are doubts about how successful it can be, according to reports in state media outlets. The marquee stadium in Beijing, built for the Olympic Games in 2008, has already been demolished to make room for new real estate developments.

    Some sports fans and industry experts are skeptical about the UFC’s prospects as well. “I think that it’s interesting, but not sure how much of a market exists here, since people are very much into wushu, taekowndo and other ‘traditional’ martial arts,” said one sports marketing professional. “UFC is a little out of the mold.”

    Meanwhile, a 30-year-old Taiwanese fan of the UFC who was educated in the US, said the UFC bouts might be too much for Chinese fans. “I don’t know how the Chinese will react to the violence of the UFC, but it’s going to be exciting to see it come home after being treated by the wash cycle of western entertainment.”

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  3. #18
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    It looks like this is the right forum for me to post my view on MMA. I have been studying lately on sparring program design for my personal training purpose. MMA is one way of free fight included in my study. Here is my view - as a contest and training format, it is too violent and unsafe. For example, attack continues when the opponent is knocked down to the floor. In other MA context like San Da, it will be stopped by the referee way earlier. Another difference is that in San Da training, elbow and knee strike are allowed. While in context, these two weapons are forbidden.

    From the statistics of fatality in the two MA events of Boxing and MMA, have we taken into account of the number of matches done yearly, and thus figure out the ratio of fatality? Also, the rules of the game are one thing, and how they are being carried out is another.



    KC
    Hong Kong
    Last edited by SteveLau; 09-07-2010 at 06:57 PM.

  4. #19
    Meanwhile, a 30-year-old Taiwanese fan of the UFC who was educated in the US, said the UFC bouts might be too much for Chinese fans. “I don’t know how the Chinese will react to the violence of the UFC, but it’s going to be exciting to see it come home after being treated by the wash cycle of western entertainment.”


    interesting that the guy thinks mma might be too violent for the chinese audience...

    really??? you'd think they could handle a fair fist fight that involves no eye pokes, throat tears crotch beatings and no freakin swords... i mean come on... too violent??? it doesnt sound right to me... but im not chinese from china so i dunno... anyone have an opinion about that???

    do chinese feel ufc is too violent for their tastes???

  5. #20
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    Another point I would like to mention is that in advance level San Da tournament, the mandatory protective gears for the fighter to wear are less than that of lower levels. At first, I wonder how come. But then, the reason is probably because advance level in San Da means that the fighters have better skill level, better self-control, and better ethics.



    KC
    Hong Kong

  6. #21
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    lol.

    That tournament is like 5 or 6 years old already.

    The first one was a tiny invitational around Beijing set up by "Andy" a local BJJ instructor (blue belt at the time, I think he's purple now) The initial tournament had a lot of traditional guys mostly getting whupped by a small crew of BJJ kids but a couple of exciting 1st round KO's between the Chinese fighters. Nowadays the big star is Bao Li Gao who used to be a Sanda Wang champion.

    Video of the fights are super easy to find online. They also broadcast them every sunday afternoon on the Mongolian station from noon to about 2 or so when they switch to boxing.

    Here's a pile of completely random fights for everybody's enjoyment:
    http://video.baidu.com/v?word=%D3%A2...0&s=0&fbl=1024

    rofl at the guy who thinks the Chinese can't handle the "violence". It's getting bigger with every event.

    For comparison:
    Art of War 1: http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMzQyODAyNDg=.html

    Art of War 15:http://v.ku6.com/show/VNVFbNZxgSMgwQWG.html

    Incidentally, the first guy to come on stage in AOW 15 is that ex-Sanda champ I mentioned, Bao Li Gao.
    Last edited by omarthefish; 09-08-2010 at 02:11 AM.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveLau View Post
    It looks like this is the right forum for me to post my view on MMA. I have been studying lately on sparring program design for my personal training purpose. MMA is one way of free fight included in my study. Here is my view - as a contest and training format, it is too violent and unsafe. For example, attack continues when the opponent is knocked down to the floor. In other MA context like San Da, it will be stopped by the referee way earlier. Another difference is that in San Da training, elbow and knee strike are allowed. While in context, these two weapons are forbidden.

    From the statistics of fatality in the two MA events of Boxing and MMA, have we taken into account of the number of matches done yearly, and thus figure out the ratio of fatality? Also, the rules of the game are one thing, and how they are being carried out is another.



    KC
    Hong Kong

    quite right rather than stopping the fight as soon as the opponent cant defend themselves its much better to let them recover and then get knocked down again and again, this is much safer and wont lead at all to percussive brain injury.....


    Most victories by elbows come about from cuts not knockouts (especially standing)

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveLau View Post
    Another point I would like to mention is that in advance level San Da tournament, the mandatory protective gears for the fighter to wear are less than that of lower levels. At first, I wonder how come. But then, the reason is probably because advance level in San Da means that the fighters have better skill level, better self-control, and better ethics.



    KC
    Hong Kong
    umm no you need to actually think things through and us logic not wishful thinking, at higher levels they wear less protective gear because they are BETTER fighters with BETTER defensive skills and BETTER conditioned to withstand blows, it has nothing to do with ethics or self control,

    And its the same in ALL combat sports including MMA, someamature events use shin guards, head guards and limit strikes on the ground, in boxing they also use headguards in amature events

  9. #24
    yeah i dont believe mma is too violent for chinese... they are used to seeing people get ko'd and the wrestling and ground fighting wont be worse than that... the only issue is the ground and pound, but the guy can tap anytime he wants to and the ref isnt gonna let him get manhandled for long...

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Syn7 View Post
    interesting that the guy thinks mma might be too violent for the chinese audience...

    really??? you'd think they could handle a fair fist fight that involves no eye pokes, throat tears crotch beatings and no freakin swords... i mean come on... too violent??? it doesnt sound right to me... but im not chinese from china so i dunno... anyone have an opinion about that???

    do chinese feel ufc is too violent for their tastes???
    At least in Taiwan there's a history of violent contests:

    "....This research was not done by theory but by using it in a method that was painful and did produce some damage to each opponent. The training was designed to 4 of my students to fight in the full contact tournament in Taiwan, which is bare knuckle. The rules in Taiwan were simple, you could use ground work, low kicks, take downs, etc. I had approximately 3 years to produce winners. I taught them a type of iron hand that required boiling in medicine; being able to fight full contact with just a mouth guard and a cup. They were celibate for the period of training, (or supposed to be). They could run 5 miles or more each day and do knuckle push-ups on gravel – anything. I taught them body conditioning so they could take a punch and how to deal with strikes anywhere on their body. The rules used in Taiwan were simple and few at that time. An example of the first time, held two fighters were killed. Some papers in Asia billed it as the Taiwanese blood bath. The times that my four were challenged before hand, they never lost. The bouts were three, 3 minute rounds and you could even throw a man out of the ring. It was brutal and the injuries were staggering!..."

    http://www.pakmei.net/articles/article.asp?ID=16
    I was on the metro earlier, deep in meditation, when a ruffian came over and started causing trouble. He started pushing me with his bag, steadily increasing the force until it became very annoying. When I turned to him, before I could ask him to stop, he immediately started hurling abuse like a scoundrel. I performed a basic chin na - carotid artery strike combination and sent him to sleep. The rest of my journey was very peaceful, and passersby hailed me as a hero - Warrior Man

  11. #26
    sounds badass!!! any video???

  12. #27
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    This old comp is tagged as being in Taiwan: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lqdL3cze00

    Here's a 2004 Taiwan Kuo Shu comp: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpviclkMdfc

    I love the floating Lei Tai!

    Don't see any groundwork though.
    "It is the peculiar quality of a fool to perceive the faults of others and to forget his own." -Cicero

  13. #28
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    at higher levels they wear less protective gear because they are BETTER fighters with BETTER defensive skills and BETTER conditioned to withstand blows, it has nothing to do with ethics or self control,


    by Frost

    Yep, it is very probable that higher levels fighter has better defensive skills. What I said of ethics and self control reasons are my speculation only.



    quite right rather than stopping the fight as soon as the opponent cant defend themselves its much better to let them recover and then get knocked down again and again, this is much safer and wont lead at all to percussive brain injury.....


    by Frost
    This is the point what I stand firm on. There is no need to beat the guy to a pup in order to decide who is the winner. And a fighter is unlikely be able to tap for the fight to stop when his head kept getting punched. Not even the opponent who is in heat punching. The referee is the guy who is likely able to stop it at such a moment. Besides, it is part of his duty to do so. That concludes my view on the violence of MMA.


    P.S. If we add more mandatory protective gears and instruct for earlier stop of the fight in its rules, then MMA will be a good event.




    KC
    Hong Kong
    Last edited by SteveLau; 09-08-2010 at 11:27 PM.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveLau View Post
    Yep, it is very probable that higher levels fighter has better defensive skills. What I said of ethics and self control reasons are my speculation only.

    This is the point what I stand firm on. There is no need to beat the guy to a pup in order to decide who is the winner. And a fighter is unlikely be able to tap for the fight to stop when his head kept getting punched. Not even the opponent who is in heat punching. The referee is the guy who is likely able to stop it at such a moment. Besides, it is part of his duty to do so. That concludes my view on the violence of MMA.


    P.S. If we add more mandatory protective gears and instruct for earlier stop of the fight in its rules, then MMA will be a good event.




    KC
    Hong Kong
    how can a sport that stops the action as soon as a fighter cant defend himself be more violent than a sport that stops the action, lets the guy recover and then lets him take a beating again and again?

    The fact is that the biggest cause of short and long term injury in fighters is percussive brain injury, you see long term injuries in the form of parkinsons etc, and short term injuries like michael watson.

    Any art that encourages people to repeatadly hit someone in the head as the only real way of winning (apart from points) and lets a fighter recovery and take the same kind of beating within a matter of seconds is far more dangerous than a sport that allows for multipul ways to win and does not allow for repeated blows to the head of a barely recovered fighter

  15. #30
    yeah i dont see a problem with the intelligent defence rule... some guys can turtle and take a beating for a few minutes then get back up and win because the othe guy is gassed... but these arent the guys we want to promote and use as examples of skill... if you take like ten unanswered shots in "turtle cover face in fetal position" then the fight should be done... its a sport after all, its about skills... it isnt a fight to the finish like it was promoted in the early days in the us... vale tudo is more like the old stuff... i like the rioheroes too... no gloves... opens up the grappling world some more... but in the US and other "westernized" countries its gonna be regulated as a sport and will always be biased towards skill rather than brute force... not that brute force doesnt have its place...

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