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Thread: Hung Gar

  1. #361
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    I try to get the newer students to become comfortable with the 4 treasures: rising, sinking, opening, closing. The Chin Jee Sao sequence in Gung Jee Kyun is a good example of forward advancing techniques that utilize that concept.

  2. #362
    this looks like an interesting thread.

    as for hung ga's bread&butter techniques, wouldn't it depend. hung ga seems to have a wide body of techniques that can be tailored to a student depending on his build and stuff.

  3. #363
    Rik,

    I consider these to be the basics of Hung Ga fighting 101:

    - Sup Ji Sau (can trap, transition to Tiger or Wu Dip techniques to name a few)
    - Wu Dip Jeurng (parry, evasion, transition to traps or Tiger to name a few)
    - Chop Chuy (direct, piercing, hard to stop because of the angle of entry)
    - Fu Jow (for seizing and ripping)

    - the fighting technqiues within the 5 major stances (applied below the waist of course)

    Variations on how you throw these techniques allows for a full gamut of parrying, trapping, jabbing, slipping in, slipping out, breaking, and much much more.

    Yui

  4. #364
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    Quote Originally Posted by SifuYui View Post
    Rik,

    I consider these to be the basics of Hung Ga fighting 101:

    - Sup Ji Sau (can trap, transition to Tiger or Wu Dip techniques to name a few)
    - Wu Dip Jeurng (parry, evasion, transition to traps or Tiger to name a few)
    - Chop Chuy (direct, piercing, hard to stop because of the angle of entry)
    - Fu Jow (for seizing and ripping)

    - the fighting technqiues within the 5 major stances (applied below the waist of course)

    Variations on how you throw these techniques allows for a full gamut of parrying, trapping, jabbing, slipping in, slipping out, breaking, and much much more.

    Yui
    Very nice Yui, thanks for the input.

    ginosifu

  5. #365
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    similar topic discussed over here:

    http://www.hungkyun.com/forum/viewto...t=seed&start=0

    some interesting info in this thread, thnx guys!
    PM

    Practical Hung Kyun 實用洪拳

    www.practicalhungkyun.com

  6. #366
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    for me, it's Bik Kiu and its many permutations-sup ji sao, seurng gung fook fu, tiet moon, hak fu jow, etc
    Hak Fu Jow-which is our side horse stance with high and low guard in fu jow, some just call it bong sao, or other things, but I feel that limits its scope of application.
    Ng Hang
    yeu ma hop yat-whole body is the fist
    short bridging techniques drawn from Moi Fa Kuen for beginners, Fu Hok Seurng Ying Kuen in the more advanced stages.
    I'm not big on dai ma cheurng kiu-I think it's overemphasized. People try too hard to bridge, bridge, bridge, and become rigid and dead hands.
    My bridging comes from the short-handed techniques-sensitivity, close range. All found in FHSYK. It's a more complex skill, and much time is needed for its development, but for me, it's a worthwhile endeavor.
    "My Gung-Fu may not be Your Gung-Fu.
    Gwok-Si, Gwok-Faht"

    "I will not be part of the generation
    that killed Kung-Fu."

    ....step.

  7. #367
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    Actually, if you had a student come to you and ask you to give him something that he could defend himself with, you will not be able to teach him the entire gambit of moves. First and foremost, you need to teach him how to defend himself through blocks and paries as well as moving out of the way, footwork. This is far more important than learning how to pound someone. You have to be able to hit him in the first place and if he is hitting you, chances are you are going down rather than him. So defense is first. As much defense as he can learn in so short a time. This means that you teach him your best defensive moves. The ones that are the easiest to learn. Then you can teach him a small number of attack techniques that are easy to learn and use.
    When I was in the military in the mid 60's, I taught combat jiujitsu and even put together a manual for teaching and learning. I only used about half a dozen defense techniques and attack techniques, but the guys were quickly able to develop several different versions of each of these. It was soon that they had quite an array of attack and defence techniques. I also gave a quick run down on how to fall. That is important, but it can be secondary to the other stuff when it comes down to it. Just enough so that you can practice a few moves with a partner. Push or shove, you can defend yourself in short order against someone that is the average individual. We are not talking about contenders for a title.
    I would imagine that this would amount to the same with any fighting system.
    Jackie Lee

  8. #368
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    I actually teach attacking sequences first.
    Our defensive techniques are also attacks, so they come next.
    We refer to "blocks," as "Defensive strikes."
    "My Gung-Fu may not be Your Gung-Fu.
    Gwok-Si, Gwok-Faht"

    "I will not be part of the generation
    that killed Kung-Fu."

    ....step.

  9. #369
    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Yeah, well you aren't going to get some silly terminology from me, you know how I am about that.
    We both been around the block TOO MUCH to say that there is anything that unique in the CORE of HK, at least in regards to your original question.
    That is why, when in action, HK looks like "typical KB" but also has a hint of "something else".

    Whether you wanna call a straight punch a "reverse punch" or "heart piercing punch" or "rams head punch", doesn't change what it is.
    To an outsider the separate techniques will look like kickboxing, but to an insider the power generation should be different and noticeable, IMHO.

    Besides core/seed/whatever techniques, I think the strategy should really be where it shows you are a Hung Kuen stylist. Dotted around our sets are hints at how to make contact over the bridge, which should be expanded upon and personalized by the individual practitioner to make his own fighting-fingerprint so to say.

    My personal fighting drills all have their own specific principal to practice. From defending and counterattacking certain attacks to setting up the bridge, crossing distances and overwhelming the opponent. Many Hung Kuen tactics can be used to confuse or setup the opponent for followup techniques. Those are far more interesting IMHO then the discussion of a few separate techniques that in Southern TCMA seems to be executed pretty much the same cross-style. But then again, understanding those tactics also heavily depends on understanding, which takes time to build and is not easily given away.

    Just my 0.01 cents

  10. #370
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    Quote Originally Posted by Asmo View Post
    To an outsider the separate techniques will look like kickboxing, but to an insider the power generation should be different and noticeable, IMHO.

    Besides core/seed/whatever techniques, I think the strategy should really be where it shows you are a Hung Kuen stylist. Dotted around our sets are hints at how to make contact over the bridge, which should be expanded upon and personalized by the individual practitioner to make his own fighting-fingerprint so to say.

    My personal fighting drills all have their own specific principal to practice. From defending and counterattacking certain attacks to setting up the bridge, crossing distances and overwhelming the opponent. Many Hung Kuen tactics can be used to confuse or setup the opponent for followup techniques. Those are far more interesting IMHO then the discussion of a few separate techniques that in Southern TCMA seems to be executed pretty much the same cross-style. But then again, understanding those tactics also heavily depends on understanding, which takes time to build and is not easily given away.

    Just my 0.01 cents
    From my experience it MAY seem that way, until one has expereinced what OTHERS do.
    Then we notice how much we have in common and how little is unique.
    THAT said, I agree that it is in the principals and strategies that we do find what makes Hung Kuen, Hung Kuen.
    THAT said, we are also talking about "bread and butter" TECHNIQUES and if I recall correctly from the OP, for competition.
    My point, which you quoted, was that I ( personally) don't "bother" with "exotic" names for what I do anymore.
    It's just not me.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  11. #371
    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    THAT said, we are also talking about "bread and butter" TECHNIQUES and if I recall correctly from the OP, for competition.
    Fair enough I'll shut up again, hehe.

  12. #372
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    Quote Originally Posted by Asmo View Post
    Fair enough I'll shut up again, hehe.
    LOL !
    No need to shut up Bro, we are exchange ideas and views and opinions.
    Please share.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  13. #373
    Quote Originally Posted by TenTigers View Post
    I'm not big on dai ma cheurng kiu-I think it's overemphasized. People try too hard to bridge, bridge, bridge, and become rigid and dead hands.
    Could you explain a little more on how bridging could become rigid and "dead hands". Not even sure what you mean with dead hands

    Bridging is bridging, even just landing a punch directly is, but the beauty of Hung Kuen (in my view of it) is in the bridging. Just to keep jabbing keeps a lot of options out that are offered in the three treasures, and even weapon forms like 5B8D pole which gave me some excellent setups for unarmed combat.

  14. #374
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    I see many people, when trying to look "Hung-Garry"(Hung-Garish?) stick out their arms like rigid trees and force their way into you. "Ahh, very strong bridge, Grasshopper!"
    That was a huge exaggeration, but just to illustrate.
    Strong is good, rigid is not.
    A dead hand is when you "block" or are blocked and your arm stops, rather than once feeling opposition, continues like water flowing around a rock.
    Tim Tacketts trapping youtube vid illustrating the swinging gate, is an excellent example of a live hand. Nice drill, too.
    "My Gung-Fu may not be Your Gung-Fu.
    Gwok-Si, Gwok-Faht"

    "I will not be part of the generation
    that killed Kung-Fu."

    ....step.

  15. #375
    Thanks for the explanation, clear

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