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Thread: Weird stuff in TCM...... List it!

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I'm not sure why. I'm ok with fungus and I'm ok with bugs. In fact, I have a taste for fried scorpions. But cordyceps - a parasitic fungus off a caterpillar's head? That's just nasty.
    Bugs...

    Dried waterbugs used to treat bedwetting.

    Dried bumblebees used with dried plums for sore throat, IIRC.

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjurakpt View Post
    oh, and the dried urine of a pre-adolescent boy...
    I was told that the fresh urine was used to treat heart attack.

  3. #48
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    Shifu Augustine Fong's Iron Palm herbs contains dried concentrated baby urine. Something about the uric acid helping to breakdown the other herbs and pull them into solution.
    Mouth Boxers have not the testicular nor the spinal fortitude to be known.
    Hence they hide rather than be known as adults.

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by -N- View Post
    Bugs...

    Dried waterbugs used to treat bedwetting.

    Dried bumblebees used with dried plums for sore throat, IIRC.
    I remember seeing the waterbugs in plastic bags at the snack counter in the Sun Sing theater(or was that Great Star?) in SF Chinatown.

    The bees were a type that lived inside the hollow part of bamboo trunks.

  5. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Dale Dugas View Post
    Shifu Augustine Fong's Iron Palm herbs contains dried concentrated baby urine. Something about the uric acid helping to breakdown the other herbs and pull them into solution.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Interesting .
    I don't think that he currently makes his jow(s) for the public. Sifu can tell a lot about what's in a jow- evn ones that he did not make.
    My late friend Pete Robinson had quite a collection of jows.With his death I have no oidea what happened to his extensive collection. He had some excellent teachers over the years including Gin Foon Mak.
    Last edited by Vajramusti; 04-07-2013 at 05:54 PM.

  6. #51
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    huang zhong huang

    Quote Originally Posted by -N- View Post
    huang zhong huang

    That's when a cow takes a dump, and a dog comes by and craps on top of that.

    Don't know what it's used for though.
    It's used for laowai.
    Gene Ching
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  7. #52
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    The herbs were included in Randy Williams' book on Wing Chun: Iron Palm training and Weapons. Being that Randy had trained with Shifu Fong as well as Shifu Fong selling the same liniments under the same names I assumed Randy got the formulas from Shifu Fong.

    The Chinese formula listed there included the Dried Urine. The injury Dit Da Jow formula was presented as well. I have filled both formulas for various people who said they work well.
    Mouth Boxers have not the testicular nor the spinal fortitude to be known.
    Hence they hide rather than be known as adults.

  8. #53
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    Virgin boy urine

    I've encountered Virgin boy urine as an element in many tiedajiu recipes. Anyone know where that comes from? There was even a reference to that in the movie King of Masks (1997)
    Gene Ching
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  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I've encountered Virgin boy urine as an element in many tiedajiu recipes. Anyone know where that comes from? There was even a reference to that in the movie King of Masks (1997)
    I wonder if there is a double blind 'taste test' or something to distinguish the virgin boy from the other.
    p.s. I think I am a virgin boy

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    It's used for laowai.
    Belly goot foh yoo!!!

  11. #56
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    bee sting therapy

    So this is the cure for cancer. Obviously we've been looking in the wrong place.

    Bee sting therapy causes buzz in China
    POSTED: 13 Aug 2013 1:58 PM

    Patients in China are swarming to acupuncture clinics to be given bee stings to treat or ward off life-threatening illness, practitioners say.


    A patient receives a bee sting administered by a doctor of traditional Chinese medicine at a clinic on the outskirts of Beijing, China. (AFP/Ed Jones)Bees are prepared by a doctor of traditional Chinese medicine at an acupuncture clinic in Beijing, China. (AFP/Ed Jones)

    BEIJING: Patients in China are swarming to acupuncture clinics to be given bee stings to treat or ward off life-threatening illness, practitioners say.

    More than 27,000 people have undergone the painful technique -- each session can involve dozens of punctures -- at Wang Menglin's clinic in Beijing, says the bee acupuncturist who makes his living from believers in the concept.

    But except for trying to prevent allergic reactions to the stings themselves, there is no orthodox medical evidence that bee venom is effective against illness, and rationalist websites in the West describe so-called "apitherapy" as "quackery".

    "We hold the bee, put it on a point on the body, hold its head, and pinch it until the sting needle emerges," Wang said at his facility on the outskirts of the capital.

    The bee -- Wang said he uses an imported Italian variety -- dies when it stings.

    "We've treated patients with dozens of diseases, from arthritis to cancer, all with positive results," said Wang.

    Bee stings can be used to treat "most common diseases of the lower limbs," he added, and claimed they also work as a preventative measure. But sciencebasedmedicine.org, a US-based website, says that such claims of panaceas and cure-alls are "always a red flag for quackery".

    "There is no scientific evidence to support its use," it says of "apitherapy", or treatment with bee products.

    One of Wang's patients said doctors told him he had lung and brain cancer and gave him little over a year to live, but he now believes he has almost doubled his life expectancy and credits bee stings for the change. "From last year up until now, I think I'm getting much stronger," the patient told AFP.

    But on its website, the American Cancer Society makes clear: "There have been no clinical studies in humans showing that bee venom or other honeybee products are effective in preventing or treating cancer.

    "Relying on this type of treatment alone and avoiding or delaying conventional medical care for cancer may have serious health consequences."

    It adds that there is a Koranic reference to the medicinal properties of the liquid produced by bees, and that Charlemagne (742-814), the first Holy Roman Emperor, is said to have been treated with bee stings.

    In the West bee stings have also been used by sufferers of multiple sclerosis (MS), an often disabling disease that attacks the central nervous system.

    But the National Multiple Sclerosis Society of the US says on its website: "In spite of long-standing claims about the possible benefits of bee venom for people with MS, a 24-week randomised study showed no reduction in disease activity, disability, or fatigue, and no improvement in quality of life."

    The trend for bee acupuncture comes at a time when colonies of the insect around the world are mysteriously collapsing. Environmentalists fear dwindling numbers of bees, which help pollinate crops, could have a serious effect on agricultural production.

    Bee venom is one of the many traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatments derived from animals and plants -- some of which are blamed for endangering particular wildlife species.

    TCM is a major part of China's healthcare system and a booming industry which continues to receive significant investment and support from the central government.

    Many people in China cannot afford to buy the latest orthodox pharmaceuticals as national health insurance is limited.

    Older people -- who are more likely to fall ill -- also favour traditional remedies because of deep-rooted cultural beliefs in the power of natural, rather than modern, ingredients.

    Most hospitals in China have traditional medicine treatments available.

    It can be a lucrative field for companies and practitioners -- in 2012, the TCM industry in China produced goods worth 516 billion yuan ($84 billion), more than 31 percent of the country's total medicine output, according to the National Bureau of Statistics.
    Gene Ching
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  12. #57
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    bee stings

    Wow, I guess it is a good thing I got stung 5 times last week (once in the head) by bees when I was up-rooting saplings from the ground w/ my bare hands to clear a path through the woods. Whichever kind nests in the ground, those were the ones.

  13. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by MarathonTmatt View Post
    Wow, I guess it is a good thing I got stung 5 times last week (once in the head) by bees when I was up-rooting saplings from the ground w/ my bare hands to clear a path through the woods. Whichever kind nests in the ground, those were the ones.
    Those were most likely "ground bees" a type of yellow jacket. One of the more ornery species.

    I used to do bee removal professionally in Louisiana. If it was just honey bees, I often wouldn't wear a bee suit, since I'd rather deal with a couple stings then the sweating to death in the suit. I used to get stung all the time, I should be good on cancer treatments for the next few lives.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    This is 100% TCMA principle. It may be used in non-TCMA also. Since I did learn it from TCMA, I have to say it's TCMA principle.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    We should not use "TCMA is more than combat" as excuse for not "evolving".

    You can have Kung Fu in cooking, it really has nothing to do with fighting!

  14. #59
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    ****roaches

    The Million Roach March: Horde of ****roaches flee Chinese farm
    By MICHAEL BLAUSTEIN
    Last Updated: 9:22 AM, August 26, 2013
    Posted: 9:02 AM, August 26, 2013

    Over 1,000,000 ****roaches escaped from a Chinese farm.

    More than one million ****roaches have escaped from a Chinese farm and fled into nearby corn fields.

    The bugs broke free on Aug. 20 from a nursery in western China where they were being raised for use in traditional Chinese medicine, according to the Modern Express.

    According to the Express, the facility's owner Wang Pengsheng returned to his farm to find that an "unknown perpetrator" had destroyed the plastic greenhouse he used to raise the crunchy critters.

    Authorities in the area started a "large scale disinfection" on Aug. 22 and urged residents to stay calm, according to Shanghaiist.

    Pengsheng started his roach farm by buying 225 lbs. of Periplaneta americana cochroach eggs which he used to hatch over 1,500,000 roaches that were being fed "fruit and biscuits" everyday.

    Pengsheng was expecting to make around $160 for every 2 lbs of ****roaches he sold, but now the farmer is facing huge losses because of the great roach escape.

    Although ****roaches are thought of as pests in much of the world, they are valued in China where extracts from the bugs are used in medicines to treat cancer, reduce inflammation and improve overall autoimmune system health, according to Discovery News.
    Man, if I was this guy's neighbor, I'd be really ****ed off.
    Gene Ching
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  15. #60
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    Slightly OT...

    Thatís the spirit: Snake preserved in wine for 3 months bites woman
    Globaltimes.cn | 2013-9-9 16:14:27
    By Globaltimes.cn

    The Year of the Snake has proved unlucky for one woman in northern China who received hospital treatment after opening a bottle of wine containing a snake that suddenly jumped out and bit her hand.

    The surprise attack occurred after the woman surnamed Liu from Shuangcheng, Heilongjiang Province decided to add more alcohol to the bottle when the snake, which she had bought live in June and since kept pickled in spirits, pulled a Jesus and sprung to life, dbw.cn reported on September 3.

    Liu received treatment at a local hospital for inflammation, explaining she drank snake wine regularly to cure her rheumatism. Alcohols containing preserved snakes boasting medicinal properties are common in China.

    A similar case involving a serpent resurrection occurred in 2009 when a Hubei Province resident surnamed Zhang was bit two months after he attempted a similar brew. Zhang was not severely injured, unlike a villager from Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in April 2001 who died a day after being bitten from a preserved wine snake.

    Web editor: pangqi@globaltimes.com.cn
    I've had snake wine. It's actually not that weird, which just goes to show how weird TCM ingredients can get.

    Now, getting bit by a snake in wine, that's weird.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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