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Thread: Weird stuff in TCM...... List it!

  1. #61

    Travis Barker and Cupping

    Okay this probably isn't that weird considering what has gone before (virgin boy pee?) but it seemed like the spot for it.

    Here is Travis Barker of the band Blink-182 getting the cupping treatment. I wonder how this effects his tats?


  2. #62
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    *****es & blood

    And more...
    *****es and blood: Asia's libido-boosting foods
    Published on Oct 4, 2013

    From ***** hotpots to snake blood and fried animal organs, around Asia there are many meals that can supposedly help boost libido. Duration: 02:30
    "taste *****, talk about *****, but don't say there's no culture in it"
    Gene Ching
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  3. #63
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    This isn't too weird

    It's just for the nooBs to TCM (and an excuse to ttt this thread)

    Off the Beaten Palate: Snake wine and other medicinal liquors



    It can be all too easy to stick to your culinary comfort zone in Shanghai, be it KFC or gōngbǎo jīdīng. As a challenge to break these habits and avoid the rut, every few weeks Shanghaiist will explore one of the more intriguing options out of China's endless array of curious cookery. Although bizarre to most Western palates, these oft-avoided edibles usually boast unique medicinal properties, nutritional benefits, and intriguing culinary histories. We'll explore for you where they came from and where you can sample these rare eats for yourselves.

    Suffering from erectile dysfunction? Drink 25 milliliters of snake and deer ***** liquor once a day. That's just one of the exotic wine prescriptions in the more than one thousand-year-old Chinese pharmacopeia, Sheng Nong's Herbal Classic. Despite being called "wines," Chinese animal liquors were traditionally used as medicines and not social lubricants, with hundreds of varieties for every ailment imaginable, set dosages, and even side effects.

    Even today, people don't treat them as hocus-pocus. My friend and snake maven Mr. Hu believes so strongly in snake and deer ***** wine that he was hesitant to cough it up, just like a pharmacy would be if a 20-something asked for Viagra. And no way was I having a second shot of it. He even asked if I'd drunk other snake liquors within the past week. Again, much like a doctor asking if you're on medication during a check-up.

    China boasts hundreds of exotic animal wines from monkey to pangolin, that animal that looks an anteater mated with an artichoke. We'll stick with the equally exotic, but less taboo tipples for this article.

    Deer antler (lùróngjiǔ, 鹿茸酒)


    You've probably encountered these at Asian medicinal markets without even realizing it. Tan, velvety, and circular the slices are often mistaken for dried mushrooms. You can buy them in bunches and boil them in tea to help your joints, improve circulation, and supposedly make you "*****." For the latter effect, you're better off consuming them in paired with ginseng in baijiu. Unlike deer antler, ginseng has been scientifically proven to strengthen your own "deer antler." You can find deer antler and ginseng wine at Jackie's Beer Nest for 45RMB a shot. It tastes essentially like baijiu, but mustier, as if decaying leaves were tossed in. The apothecary advises no more than 25 milliliters a day.
    Jackie's Beer Nest // 76 Zhaozhou Lu, near Dongtai Lu (肇周路76号, 近东台路). Tel: 138-1650-2260. Hours: 5-11pm.

    Snake bile wine (shédǎnjiǔ, 蛇胆酒)


    Swamp green with an iridescent tinge, you could easily see vials of this stuff being touted by a bayou-dwelling witch doctor with skull face paint. The elixir is a mixture of baijiu and bile from snake gallbladders, which often come bobbing about in the same flask as the liquor. They resemble fleshy gray-blue pills. Drinking 25ml of this elixir once a day is said to improve eyesight and reduce inflammation. Not gonna lie, knocking back a tumbler evoked downing formaldehyde that a toad had been sitting in, and was one of the most vile things I've ever tasted. 10RMB per shot.
    Dahushedao (大胡蛇岛) // 222 Kangding Road, near Jiangning Road (康定路222号, 近江宁路) // Closest Metro Stop: Changping Road (昌平路) Line 7.

    Deer ***** wine (lùbiānjiǔ, 鹿鞭酒)


    This holy sex grail didn't resemble anything too extraordinary at first glance, just a drum of swamp detritus. Then Mr. Hu grabbed the head of what looked like a plant stalk and pulled. And I saw it. It was about 8 inches long and brown. And that was just the nozzle. As he pulled, lengths and lengths of it uncoiled from the container like a gasoline hose from its holster. If this was indeed an aphrodisiac, it could probably help you penetrate kevlar. To help enhance its effects, like with deer antler, deer ***** is often paired with ginseng in an aphrodisiac speedball. At Dahushedao, it usually sword fights with smaller snake *****es in a jar. A shot runs you 35RMB. It tastes similar to deer antler wine and allegedly benefits middle aged and older men, who should take it in 20-25ml doses once a day. You can also try the version at Jackie's Beer Nest, which comes with lizard and snake and costs 45RMB.
    Dahushedao (大胡蛇岛) // 222 Kangding Road, near Jiangning Road (康定路222号, 近江宁路) // Closest Metro Stop: Changping Road (昌平路) Line 7, OR Jackie's Beer Nest // 76 Zhaozhou Lu, near Dongtai Lu (肇周路76号, 近东台路). Tel: 138-1650-2260. Hours: 5-11pm.

    Three Snake Wine (sānzhòngshéjiǔ, 三种蛇酒)


    As the legend goes, a Tang Dynasty emperor (AD 618-907) lost his appetite and tried every known remedy to regain it, but to no avail. Only after consuming a certain robust snake bearing markings similar to his imperial stamps, did his hunger return. The exuberant emperor decreed that locals living in the region of Hunan where the miracle serpent dwelled would be exempt from taxes if they captured a snake, a ruling that eventually depleted the population. Nowadays, the snake, the Hunan pit viper, remains confined to a few forest patches in Hunan province.

    The specimen Mr. Hu showed me was captured 15 years ago and was as thick as a speed skater's calf (above left). Few attain that size anymore, and hunting them is now illegal. No one's ever proved the Hunan viper to be an appetite stimulant, but it does have purported health properties best observed when it's paired with banded krait and Zaocys snake in a tonic called "three snake wine."

    The viper most famously speeds up blood clotting, healing your wounds faster alla Wolverine - a belief stemming from the fact that when the viper bites you, your blood coagulates. Of course, if you take it on its own, you can experience side effects like overheating and sores. The Zaocys snake serves to depress these effects, while the krait helps prevent paralysis. All three in conjunction allegedly aid the joints.

    Mr. Hu points out that, like with wine or whiskey, the older the vintage the more prized it is. The alcohol content dwindles over time but the health effects become stronger. Unfortunately so does the funk factor, making it taste like baijiu with notes of pond scum. Mr. Hu recommends taking 20-25ml once a day, which'll set you back 50RMB. Just don't drink if you're already taking snake bile liquor, or you'll apparently break out in mouth ulcers.
    Dahushedao (大胡蛇岛) // 222 Kangding Road, near Jiangning Road (康定路222号, 近江宁路) // Closest Metro Stop: Changping Road (昌平路) Line 7.

    Our verdict

    Health tonics with deer ***** and snake bile might sound like witches brew- might as well throw in "eye of newt," right? But while they don't always align with modern science (though they often do), they're based in a scholarship as rich and complex as you'll find in any Western medical journal. Not to mention they allow you to strike both snake and deer ***** off your culinary bucket list without having to wolf all 20 inches of either one.
    Anyone try any of these? I've had several snake wines before.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #64
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    Weird you out

    11 traditional Chinese therapies that will weird you out



    A number of mysterious therapies have surfaced in recent years as people have strayed from the typical herbal remedies and cupping procedures to seek out alternative "cure-all" treatments. We've taken a look at some of the more baffling out-of-the-box remedies across China that have proven, for the most part, to be pretty ineffective.

    1. Urine therapy



    On August 8, 2004, around 30 elderly folk gathered at a hotel in Guangzhou to share their experiences in urine drinking and toasted one another with a fresh glass of the stuff.

    Since then, it's been reported that chugging down one’s own urine could cure illnesses such as hyperthyroidism. Founded in Hong Kong in 2008, the China Urine Therapy Association claims to have gathered more than 100,000 followers who've turned to urine therapy, even though medical experts pointed out that the practice is likely more harmful than effective.


    These two people claim to have been using urine therapy for over 10 years and swear by it (June 24, 2014 in Chongqing).

    2. Ant-eating therapy



    In 2001, a Hangzhou hotel hosted a free event for live ant tasting, inviting “experts” from ant farms to demonstrate ant-eating to the public. Claiming that the critters are rich in protein, the eating of ants is believed to have anti-aging effects.

    3. Fire therapy



    It's believed that fire therapy has various advantages, including stimulating blood circulation. In 2005, authorities issued a notice regarding the management of Chinese medicine massage, Gua sha (scraping sha-bruises), cupping and so on. Fire therapy, somehow, was not mentioned.

    4. Apitherapy



    Apitherapy, a folk therapy using bee venom, is claimed to be effective in curing rheumatism, arthritis, migraine headaches, stomach pains, high blood cholesterol and other ailments, although the state has not approved Apitherapy as a useful Chinese medical treatment. Experts say the biggest risk is allergies, which could be deadly. This picture taken in August 2013 shows a very unpleasant-looking patient in Beijing undergoing the treatment.

    5. Sand therapy



    On 30 October, 2013 a new health concept called "Western Yusha (sand) therapy" was introduced in Nanjing. The idea is basically to bury your body in sand until you begin to sweat. The treatment claims to be a combination of "magnetic therapy", "hyperthermia", "light therapy" and "massage”. On the plus side, you could probably go to the nearest beach and do it for free.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  5. #65
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    continued from previous

    #6 ain't so weird.
    6. Plant therapy



    On July 12, 2008, the summer that Beijing hosted the Olympic games, an artist drew an Olympic Fuwa (the mascot of the games) on the back of two women with the essence of flowers and grass. The artist said that the plant "juice" had skin revitalizing effects.

    7. “Stretch and Beat therapy”



    On April 11, 2011, Xiao Hong-ci, the author of a book introducing the idea of muscle-stretching and body-slapping, spoke at a press conference in Taipei to boast benefits of the therapy that he said could cure hundreds of diseases. Since 2009, the “stretch and beat therapy" has become increasingly popular in Beijing, Shanghai, Nanjing, Guangzhou and other cities that offer lessons, workshops and books promoting the treatment.

    8. Green bean therapy



    In 2010, “miracle doctor” Zhang Wu promoted the idea in his best-selling book that by simply eating green beans, one could cure diseases of all sorts. Ironically, in February 2014, Zhang was diagnosed with cerebral infarction. In an interview, he admitted that his green beat diet wasn't working and had to cease the treatment.

    9. “Electricity” treatment



    Li Yi, who was dubbed a “fairy priest”, claimed he had found a way to “master 220 volt electricity," allowing him to cure patients' cancer with electrical current. A paraplegic patient of his was able to have conscious control of the body after the treatment, and medical experts have strongly questioned it.

    10. “Holy water” therapy



    Images from October 5, 2012 show nearly a hundred people fighting over the so-called “holy water” from a creek in Zhejiang. It was believed by residents that the water could cure ailments, although medical tests showed that it was no more special than the tap water in their kitchen.

    11. Dietary supplement therapy



    On December 5, 2005, a group of businessmen visited a remote village in Hunan, boasting a health care supplement which they claimed could cure illnesses. One of the buyers happily showed off her "achievement", which cost her 160 yuan, although she was completely unaware that the supplements had a value of only 10 yuan.

    Not only are they overpriced and ineffective, sometimes the supplements can prove dangerous. Earlier this month, supplements meant to treat cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases were blacklisted after they were found to have damaging impurities inside the liquid.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  6. #66
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    aw man

    I was just about to eat a biscuit...now I've lost my appetite for it.

    Human placenta 'biscuits' being sold in Hong Kong shops, despite ban
    PUBLISHED : Sunday, 24 August, 2014, 4:52am
    UPDATED : Monday, 25 August, 2014, 12:57pm


    Human placenta biscuits on sale

    While the sale of human placenta remains illegal in Hong Kong, it was available under the counter at several traditional Chinese medicine shops approached by the Post.

    Three of the six Causeway Bay shops reporters visited said they sold placenta in biscuit form, colloquially known as tseh ji hong. It can be eaten like a biscuit or broken up and mixed with water, one seller said.

    Prices ranged from HK$40 to HK$50 a piece or HK$100 per tael.

    Asked where the products came from, one seller said Hong Kong and the other two did not respond.

    At one dispensary, a seller talked about Sheila Chan Suk-lan, a Hong Kong actress who was once reported in the Chinese-language media as saying eating human placenta was her secret for good skincare. "I tried it once on the mainland. Although it was very inhumane, I ate it in the end," she reportedly said.

    In image-obsessed Hong Kong, the black-market trade is probably fuelled by claims that consuming human placenta improves the complexion.

    The mainland banned the sale of human placenta in 2005, though the trade continued to flourish for some time on online marketplace Taobao. Today only sheep placenta products can be found there.

    For new mums looking to boost iron levels, the consumption of human placenta is something they have been turning to more frequently. Scot Stacy Wallace consumed her placenta in a fruit smoothie and found it "delicious". Wallace, who had no problems claiming her placenta from the private Matilda International Hospital in February, had the organ encapsulated.


    Human placenta biscuits sold at Traditional Chinese Medicine dispensaries in Causeway Bay. Photo: SCMP

    "I took capsules three times a day for the first six weeks post birth. The biggest impact was on my milk supply. It was plentiful," she said.

    "I still think eating one's placenta is a little nuts, but I'd do it again. I have leftover capsules in the freezer for when I hit menopause and feel lucky to have this secret weapon when that big change in life comes."

    In 1998, British chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall flambéed placenta during an episode of his TV Dinners, saying it was "enjoyed by the baby's family and friends". Viewers complained, comparing eating placenta to cannibalism.

    The placenta encapsulation process involves steaming it with ingredients such as lemon, ginger or chilli. It is then dehydrated and ground into a powder and placed in vegetable capsules.

    And the placenta is not just eaten. In various cultures, it plays a vital ceremonial role.

    In Cambodia it's buried, often surrounded by spiked plants, to ward off evil spirits, while in Yemen it is placed on the roof of a family home so birds can eat it - the idea being that it will guarantee love between the parents.

    In Turkey, the proper disposal of the placenta is said to promote the devoutness of the child later in life. Nepalis believe the placenta is a friend of the baby. Malaysia's Orang Asli believe it's the baby's older sibling.

    The Igbo of Nigeria consider the placenta the deceased twin of the baby and hold a funeral.
    Gene Ching
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  7. #67
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    Happy Halloween

    Another trick. Not a treat. Not at all.
    Just a load of crap? Villagers in China claim drink made with manure is effective against cancer
    Philip Kendall 5 hours ago



    Villagers in a rural Chinese village have stumbled upon a drink which they believe to be effective against cancer, with dozens of households now partaking in the special brew on a twice-daily basis.

    We’re sure that anyone would be prepared to make time in their daily routine for a warm drink every morning and night if it potentially meant staying fit and healthy well into retirement, but we doubt many would be so keen once they heard that said drink was little more than cow dung and sheep’s droppings mixed with warm water.

    The story of the unusual remedy’s creation goes, Xinhua.jp reports, that an elderly woman living in the village of Xiangtan in China’s Hunan Province was last year diagnosed with lung cancer and told that she would not have long to live. Her son, who was at that time working far away in China’s southernmost province of Hainan, heard tell of a “remedy” – a drink made from ground-up animal feces and water – that was said to be especially effective against cancer, which he then conveyed to his mother.

    As unpalatable as it sounds, some eight months after having started drinking the brown brew, the old woman is not only still alive but claims to have seen vast improvements in her health, prompting families in the area to start drinking the poopy mixture themselves as a preventative measure.



    The manure used in the odd concoction is reportedly collected from mountains and hills around the village, with both cow and sheep feces being used. The animal waste is dried out, stir-fried, and then crushed down into a fine powder. This powder is then mixed with hot water and drunk twice a day; once in the morning and again at night.

    It is not clear whether the elderly woman has been back to her doctor for tests since beginning her self-prescribed treatment, but we wish her all the best and hope she continues to feel better. All the same, we’d advise against accepting any cups of coffee or strong tea if you ever happen to find yourself in the village and are offered a quick brew…



    Source: Xinhua.JP
    Photos: QQ via Toychan.net
    Gene Ching
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  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Another trick. Not a treat. Not at all.


    It sounds like more studies + time will show if this remedy is indeed worthy of fighting off cancer. It makes sense though. I have seen animals eat the feces of other animals before, such as dogs. Why not humans? We process it, dry it out, and brew it up with water using fire and it seems to make sense. I know a few threads back one of the features was urine drinking, which also makes sense. I would want to make sure that my dung is from an animal with a more organic diet, though.

  9. #69
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    Cane Toads

    'premium cane toads' no less.

    Poisonous remedy: Millions of Australian cane toads may be shipped to China so their potent venom can be used in traditional medicines which help battle cancer

    Cane toad venom could be used in medicines to battle cancer
    Millions of toads could be exported to China for use in traditional remedies
    Australian cane toads are healthier than those found in Asia
    Venom has been used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years

    By Freya Noble for Daily Mail Australia
    Published: 08:35 EST, 26 March 2015 | Updated: 09:25 EST, 26 March 2015

    Cane toads are one of Australia's most invasive pests, and pose a huge threat to native species. But now they could be turned into a successful commodity.

    Their venom could be effective in fighting cancer, researchers have discovered, and the potency of Australian cane toad's venom is stronger than those in China.

    This means that potentially millions of toads could be shipped to China, so they could have their venom extracted and turned into medicine, to be sold on the multi-billion dollar traditional medicine market.


    Millions of Australian cane toads could be shipped to China so their potent venom can be used in cancer medicine

    Harendra Parekh, from the University of Queensland's pharmacy department where the research took place, said this discovery could lead to a 'potentially a very lucrative export market'.

    'People are killing cane toads by the millions for free, but it’s potentially a very lucrative export market for Australia with the Chinese being extremely interested in naturally derived health products,' Dr Parekh said in an article published by the UOQ.

    He added that the Australian cane toad has close similarities to the Asiatic species, 'whose venom has been used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years.'


    The venom would likely be mixed with herbs and sold in tablet form (file photo)


    Cane toads are a pest in Australia, which were introduced in Queensland in 1935 to control cane beetles

    'We already have several companies interested, as the Chinese value Australian toads because of the environment they enjoy here,' Dr Parekh said.

    The researcher spoke to the Guardian Australia about how the cane toad's venom could be used as a medicine, and said it would most likely appear in a tablet form.

    'We could process the venom for medicine, ideally in a tablet because it tastes absolutely awful if you drink it,' Dr Parekh said.


    New research shows that the pests could be turned into a huge economic commodity

    'Look at lamb, beef and chicken – these Australian products are seen as premium goods in China. Cane toads would be no different. They’d be premium cane toads.'

    The can toads would be squeezed for their potent venom which would then be mixed with herbs and turned into medicine. The venom extraction can be done while the toads are alive.

    Cane toads were first introduced to Queensland in 1935, in an attempt to control cane beetles.

    However, like rabbits, they quickly multiplied are were deemed a pest. They have since spread to New South Wales, West Australia and the Northern Territory.
    Gene Ching
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  10. #70
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    Poor toads.

    I do not know the words for that one "medicine" where someone is dying of dysentery uncontrolled by regular means so the "pill" is a piece of crap of someone not dying of intractable dysentery it is legit. Others do it. US does it, "so you know it's true".

    Best motivator to maintain bowel health I know of
    "The perfect way to do, is to be" ~ Lao Tzu

  11. #71
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    Is that a chocolate shake you are drinking?

    Curenado - are you referring to a "fecal transplant"? A doctor friend of mine told me about this when they were just starting to use it to combat clostridium difficile, a terrible bacterial infection of the intestines that occurs after prolonged antibiotic use kills off our beneficial bacterial gut flora.

    At first he mentioned administration if the material by nasogastric tube - so basically snorting a glass of a poop-shake...

    Glad to hear recently they are going in from the other end.

    I will be sticking to vanilla ice cream from now on, thank you...

    Herb ox

  12. #72
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    Yup, but they didn't invent it, they're probably just the record holders for price charged and fuss made.
    US is low on health quality, but if you want to put something out say "US does it" and of course, like time, god and every right thing we invented it. Haha
    "The perfect way to do, is to be" ~ Lao Tzu

  13. #73
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    Young women skull powder

    Not traditional in TCM. Definitely quackery. And definitely post worthy here.

    Jiangxi dad digs up graves of women, grinds their skulls to powder, hoping to cure daughter's mental illness



    Last month, police in Jiangxi province arrested a man who confessed to digging up the graves of young women and stealing their skulls, which he then ground into powder and gave to his mentally disabled daughter.

    The man had actually been doing this for months after having been advised by a quack doctor that the skull caps of young women could help cure mental illness, according to Sina News.

    The man would grind the skulls into a powder and mix it with water, forcing his daughter to drink the concoction. He reluctantly admitted that his daughter's condition did not seem to have improved at all in the time since he began the bizarre ritual.



    Traditional Chinese medicine is still quite prevalent in China and is becoming more popular in many Western countries as well. This year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was won by a Chinese scientist, Tu Youyou, for discovering an effective antimalarial treatment based off of traditional Chinese medical practices. That said, with few clinical trials, the efficacy of most Chinese medicine is very suspect in the opinion of the medical community at large.



    Typically, grave robbing in China is done for less pure motives than helping cure one's daughter's mental illness. We've seen corpses stolen by officials to meet strict cremation quotas and female corpses unearthed to take part in "ghost marriages." So, let's just hope that this father's intentions were genuine and he wasn't out to make a knock-off Indiana Jones home movie -- but let's be honest -- it probably would have been better than that last horrid installment in the series.

    By Kevin Engle
    Contact the author of this article or email tips@shanghaiist.com with further questions, comments or tips.
    By Shanghaiist in News on Nov 4, 2015 3:30 PM
    Gene Ching
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  14. #74
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    Owl wine

    'probably not the best method prescribed by TCM of combating rheumatism'


    Can't get rid of the shakes? Try out TCM's latest surefire elixir 'Owl wine'



    On Wednesday afternoon, a Weibo user uploaded pictures of some Class II protected species stuffed inside jars of liquor, asking if perhaps this might need some looking into.
    The post spread quickly, freaking the hell out of netizens across China with images of pale-eyed, alcohol-infused owls staring blankly out at them. Many called for quick and severe punishment for whomever was responsible.
    According to Sina, a Sichuan-based journalist followed up on the post, getting the contact details of the seller and calling him up. In what must have been a true shocker, he was from Guangzhou. The TCM merchant named Li admitted to selling the 5kg jars of "owl wine" and said that it could be used to cure headaches and pain in the joints.
    "The owls are all soaked alive. They are submerged inside and choke on the alcohol, that way they are infused inside and out, making the medicine more effective," Li explained.
    When the journalist asked about acquiring some of Li's special product for himself, the seller was reluctant to ship all the way to Sichuan and canceled the deal.
    A professor from the Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine told the reporter that this was probably not the best method prescribed by TCM of combating rheumatism. Since owls are under second class protection in China, they should not be drowned alive in baijiu.



    However, if you are under some serious distress, a jar of liquor infused with owl AND snake might just be exactly what the (quack) doctor ordered:



    [Images via Sina]
    Contact the author of this article or email tips@shanghaiist.com with further questions, comments or tips.
    By Alex Linder in News on Jan 8, 2016 11:30 AM
    Gene Ching
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  15. #75
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    I have never heard of owls being used.

    Snakes, Geckoes, Bugs, placenta.

    But owls?

    Going to help your night vision?

    SMH
    Dr. Dale Dugas
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