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Thread: Tai Chi as medicine

  1. #271
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    Tai Chi: Postural Balance & Dementia

    Randomised Controlled Trial Of The Effect Of Tai Chi On Postural Balance Of People With Dementia

    Authors Nyman SR, Ingram W, Sanders J, Thomas PW, Thomas S, Vassallo M, Raftery J, Bibi I, Barrado-Martín Y

    Received 28 August 2019

    Accepted for publication 26 September 2019

    Published 19 November 2019 Volume 2019:14 Pages 2017—2029

    DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S228931

    Checked for plagiarism Yes

    Review by Single-blind

    Peer reviewers approved by Dr Nicola Ludin

    Peer reviewer comments 3

    Editor who approved publication: Dr Richard Walker

    Article has an altmetric score of 28


    Video abstract presented by Samuel R Nyman.

    Views: 436

    Samuel R Nyman,1 Wendy Ingram,2 Jeanette Sanders,2 Peter W Thomas,3 Sarah Thomas,3 Michael Vassallo,4 James Raftery,5 Iram Bibi,1 Yolanda Barrado-Martín1

    1Department of Psychology and Ageing & Dementia Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bournemouth University, Poole House, Talbot Campus, Poole, Dorset BH12 5BB, UK; 2Peninsula Clinical Trials Unit, Peninsula Medical School, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA, UK; 3Bournemouth University Clinical Research Unit, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bournemouth University, Royal London House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth, Dorset BH1 3LT, UK; 4Centre of Postgraduate Medical Research and Education, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bournemouth University, Royal London House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth, Dorset BH1 3LT, UK; 5Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Highfield Campus, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK

    Correspondence: Samuel R Nyman
    Department of Medical Science and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bournemouth University, Poole House, Talbot Campus, Poole, Dorset BH12 5BB, UK
    Tel +44 1202 968179
    Email snyman@bournemouth.ac.uk

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Tai Chi exercise on postural balance among people with dementia (PWD) and the feasibility of a definitive trial on falls prevention.
    Patients and methods: Dyads, comprising community-dwelling PWD and their informal carer (N=85), were randomised to usual care (n=43) or usual care plus weekly Tai Chi classes and home practice for 20 weeks (n=42). The primary outcome was the timed up and go test. All outcomes for PWD and their carers were assessed six months post-baseline, except for falls, which were collected prospectively over the six-month follow-up period.
    Results: For PWD, there was no significant difference at follow-up on the timed up and go test (mean difference [MD] = 0.82, 95% confidence interval [CI] = −2.17, 3.81). At follow-up, PWD in the Tai Chi group had significantly higher quality of life (MD = 0.051, 95% CI = 0.002, 0.100, standardised effect size [ES] = 0.51) and a significantly lower rate of falls (rate ratio = 0.35, 95% CI =0.15, 0.81), which was no longer significant when an outlier was removed. Carers in the Tai Chi group at follow-up were significantly worse on the timed up and go test (MD = 1.83, 95% CI = 0.12, 3.53, ES = 0.61). The remaining secondary outcomes were not significant. No serious adverse events were related to participation in Tai Chi.
    Conclusion: With refinement, this Tai Chi intervention has potential to reduce the incidence of falls and improve quality of life among community-dwelling PWD [Trial registration: NCT02864056].
    THREADS
    Tai Chi as medicine
    Fall prevention
    Gene Ching
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  2. #272
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    Posting this for the science links which I've copied for you.

    There's an embedded vid too.

    Medicine in motion: How Tai Chi heals body and mind
    By Sandee LaMotte, CNN
    Updated 6:23 AM ET, Fri December 13, 2019

    (CNN)As the sun breaks over the skyscrapers of Hong Kong, the smooth, graceful moves of Tai Chi sweep across the green spaces below. Surrounded by dozens of people from all ages, former ballet dancer Linda Fung joins them in breathing deeply in and out, her face calm and serene.

    "It is the most unbelievable, beautiful, harmonious, blissful exercise," Fung says, as she lifts her arms to the sky in the preparatory movement called Wu Chi.
    "We breathe in, we open palms down, absorb the energy from Earth. We breathe in, palms up towards the sky, absorb the energy from heaven," she explains, bringing a dancer's innate elegance to the motions.
    It was dance that brought Fung to the practice of Tai Chi, as she searched for ways to heal multiple injuries she sustained as she practiced her craft.
    "As a ballerina, you always strive harder to break through the limits," Fung said. "Your body is getting sick and is injured all the time.
    "Why Tai Chi has good, amazing health benefits is because it's a self-healing process." she said. "When I started, I thought, 'This is quite phenomenal.'"

    A balance of yin and yang

    Evolving from ancient martial arts, the core principles of Tai Chi are based on Taoism, an ancient Chinese philosophy which stresses a natural balance between two opposing forces called yin and yang.
    Think of yin and yang as the complementary but opposite sides of a coin that together form a perfect whole.
    "Yang is your mind, it's a cerebral activity. It's your emotions. Yin is your body," Fung said. "By practicing Tai Chi, you connect these two parts, and you balance the yang energy with the yin energy."
    "When these two things balance, then harmony is achieved," she continued. "When harmony is achieved, then transformation follows. And the transformation is -- you feel better."
    When you are in balance you feel your "chi" or life force which traditional Chinese medicine considers a form of energy that can heal mind and body. When chi is unlocked and flowing through the body, Fung said, it can address the body's injuries.
    "When the chi actually start working, your body improves. Your balance gets better. You sleep better. You have enhanced vitality, energy," said Fung, who now teaches classes in Hong Kong combining dance and Tai Chi. "And it keeps flowing. That's why it's amazing."

    Science behind the mystery

    While all that sounds rather mystical, science shows Tai Chi can improve health. Researchers have discovered that even a shorter, modified exercise series of Tai Chi movements can improve muscle strength, balance and flexibility, while also reducing stress and lowering blood pressure.

    Bone health: Tai Chi doesn't require any resistance or weight-bearing exercise, both known to increase bone formation, yet studies have shown that it can improve bone mineral density. It's also been shown to reduce bone loss and fractures in post-menopausal women. Research on men, however, has been contradictory.
    Tai Chi also reduces falls and improves balance in the elderly, and is easier than traditional exercise for some with frail health or physical limitations.

    Cardiovascular disease: Tai Chi and Qigong, a very similar centuries-old system of movement, breathing and meditation, have shown to be extremely beneficial for cardiovascular health.
    Significant blood pressure reduction was a key finding in most studies, showing the ancient practices to be as effective in reducing hypertension as weight loss, a low-sodium diet or reducing alcohol use. Some randomized clinical trials, the gold-standard for research, have found Tai Chi can reduce cholesterol levels; other studies have seen improvements in blood sugar control.

    Inflammation: A few small studies have shown Tai Chi can reduce levels of C-reactive protein in the blood, a cardinal sign of inflammation. If that research is replicated, it could explain some of Tai Chi's health benefits due to a reduction of disease-causing inflammation in the body.

    Mental health: The calming, meditative trance needed to do a Tai Chi series has been shown to greatly reduce anxiety and stress, even lowering levels of cortisol, the stress hormone, in the blood of participants.

    A city of healthy elderly

    In Hong Kong, where Fung lives, the practice of Tai Chi is common.
    In addition to a healthy diet of fish, rice and vegetables, access to green spaces and a lack of crime, experts point to the health benefits of Tai Chi as a reason lifespan has increased in Hong Kong over the last 50 years.
    "For women, it is 88 years," said geriatrician Timothy Kwok, a professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. "Less in men, it is 82 years."
    The health benefits are so impressive the Hong Kong government promotes the practice of Tai Chi by providing free classes.
    "All around the parks in Hong Kong, every morning, you have some people just getting groups of people and teaching them how to Tai Chi," Kwok said. "It is all for free."
    For Fung, the ancient Chinese movements are a key to self-healing she cannot live without.
    "If you understand how it works, you understand the nature, the fundamentals, the inner workings of what Tai Chi is," Fung said," then when you apply it, and when it works, then it's no turning back."
    Gene Ching
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  3. #273
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    Yoga, Tai Chi, and Qigong for Back Pain

    Whenever the Tai Chi & Qigong newsfeeds have several articles on the same topic, it's the result of a recently published study. I always search for the original source to post here. This is the back pain study that's getting a lot of play right now.

    Holistic Nursing Practice. 34(1):3–23, JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020
    DOI: 10.1097/HNP.0000000000000360,
    PMID: 31725096
    Issn Print: 0887-9311
    Publication Date: January/February 2020
    A Narrative Review of Movement-Based Mind-Body Interventions: Effects of Yoga, Tai Chi, and Qigong for Back Pain Patients

    Juyoung Park;Cheryl Krause-Parello;Chrisanne Barnes;

    Abstract
    This narrative literature review evaluated the effects of movement-based mind-body interventions (MMBIs; yoga, tai chi, and qigong) on low back pain. A search of databases was conducted to identify relevant studies. Thirty-two articles met inclusion criteria and were included for this narrative review. Of the reviewed studies, the highest number focused on yoga intervention (n = 25), 4 focused on qigong, and 3 focused on tai chi in managing back pain. The selected articles showed MMBI to be effective for treatment of low back pain, reporting positive outcomes such as reduction in pain or psychological distress (eg, depression and anxiety), and improved functional ability. However, little is known about the effects of MMBI, in particular qigong and tai chi. More clinical trials are needed to determine how to reduce back pain, improve physical function, and minimize behavioral and psychological symptoms associated with low back pain. Nurse practitioners may introduce such mind-body interventions for managing pain, especially for patients at high risk for adverse effects from pharmacological treatment, and refer them to a yoga therapist, tai-chi instructor, or qigong instructor.
    THREADS
    Qigong as Medicine
    Tai Chi as Medicine
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    Gene Ching
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  4. #274
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    Tai Chi helps reinvigorate stem cells

    Tai Chi intervention increases progenitor CD34(+) cells in young adults.
    Ho TJ1, Ho LI, Hsueh KW, Chan TM, Huang SL, Lin JG, Liang WM, Hsu WH, Harn HJ, Lin SZ.
    Author information
    Abstract
    Tai Chi has been shown to have many great health benefits. However, few research attempts have been made to explore the effects of practicing TCC on life span. This study provides direct evidence of Tai Chi's antiaging effects. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study to compare the rejuvenating and antiaging effects among Tai Chi group (TCC) and brisk walking group (BW) and no exercise habit group (NEH). Thirty-two participants were selected out of a possible 60 based on a survey, and they were separated into three groups: the TCC group (practicing for more than 1 year), the BW group (practicing for more than 1 year), and the NEH group. The CD34(+) cell counts in peripheral blood of the participants was determined, and the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to evaluate and compare the antiaging effects of the three groups. Of the 32 participants in this study, the participants in the TCC group (N = 10) outperformed the NEH group (N = 12) with respect to the number of CD34(+) progenitor cells. No significant difference was found between the TCC group and the BW group. TCC practice sustained for more than 1 year may be an intervention against aging as effective as BW in terms of its benefits on the improvement of CD34(+) number.
    Here's the abstract for the article behind recent news of Tai Chi and Stem Cells.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #275
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    Never practiced in a hazmat suit before...


    Chinese medic in hazmat suit teaches coronavirus patients martial arts to keep them active during quarantine

    The nurse is seen giving coronavirus patients a lesson in quarantine units
    Tai Chi is a style of Chinese martial arts and is known for its health benefits
    The medic claims the exercise can help patients stay active and optimistic
    Coronavirus has infected over 64,400 people globally with at least 1,383 deaths
    By EMILIA JIANG FOR MAILONLINE
    PUBLISHED: 07:28 EST, 14 February 2020 | UPDATED: 13:41 EST, 14 February 2020

    Chinese medical workers have started to teach coronavirus patients martial arts to help them stay active during quarantine.

    A new video has captured one hazmat suit-clad medic giving his patients a Tai Chi lesson in a hospital ward in Anhui Province, eastern China.

    The footage comes after medics in Wuhan's makeshift coronavirus hospitals leading their patients to dance during isolation to help them keep fit.


    A Chinese medical worker is seen giving coronavirus patients a Tai Chi lesson to help them stay active during quarantine at hospital in Hefei, a city of Anhui province in eastern China


    The hazmat suit-clad medic, Zhang Chao, who is in his early 20s, demonstrates a few simple Tai Chi moves and encourages patients with minor symptoms to keep exercising


    Zhang explains that simple Tai Chi moves can help the coronavirus sufferers stay active and maintain a positive attitude towards the illness as he is pictured practising the movements

    The video was filmed on Monday at a hospital in Hefei, the provincial capital of Anhui.

    The nurse is called Zhang Chao and in his early 20s.

    In the clip, a patient with minor symptoms is seen practising the moves. The health worker tells him to 'do it slowly because you are still quite weak'.

    Tai Chi is a school of Chinese martial arts and it is known for its self-defense purposes and health benefits.


    Tai Chi is a school of Chinese martial arts and it is known for its health benefits. In the picture above, an elderly woman is seen practising at a park in Beijing during the coronavirus outbreak


    The novel coronavirus, formally known as COVID-19, has infected over 64,400 people globally and claimed at least 1,383 lives. The majority of the cases and fatalities happened in China

    Chinese people believe the exercise can improve one's health and balance, especially for the elderly.

    Zhang explains that simple Tai Chi moves can help coronavirus sufferers stay active and maintain a positive attitude towards the illness.

    'It is harder than it looks,' the nurse tells his patients as he is giving them a demonstration, 'just take it easy and practise slowly'.


    Due to the restrictions to large crowds in public places imposed by the authorities after the coronavirus outbreak, patients have decided to move the exercise to the quarantine units


    The deadly virus continues to affect the daily life of millions of people across China as a woman pictured in front of the Forbidden City, one of the top tourist attractions in Beijing
    continued next post
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  6. #276
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    Continued from previous post

    The novel coronavirus, formally known as COVID-19, has infected over 64,400 people globally and brought the total number of deaths to 1,383.

    Nine cases have been confirmed in the UK after a woman flew in London from China a few days ago and was diagnosed with the virus.

    A line of Chinese senior officials were removed from their posts on Thursday, including the Communist Party chiefs of Hubei and Wuhan, after being accused of shirking responsibilities during the outbreak.


    A health worker is pictured talking on her phone as she leaves for Wuhan from Nanchang and joins other medical staff on the front line at the epicentre of the coronavirus outbreak


    The picture shows a group of medical workers in hazmat suits at a checkpoint for registration


    Nine cases have been confirmed in the UK after a woman flew in London from China a few days ago and was diagnosed with coronavirus. 116 British people are in quarantine with 11 untested

    WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE DEADLY CORONAVIRUS IN CHINA?
    Someone who is infected with the coronavirus can spread it with just a simple cough or a sneeze, scientists say.

    Over 2,000 people with the virus are now confirmed to have died and more than 75,000 have been infected. But experts predict the true number of people with the disease could be as high as 350,000 in Wuhan alone, as they warn it may kill as many as two in 100 cases. Here's what we know so far:

    What is the coronavirus?

    A coronavirus is a type of virus which can cause illness in animals and people. Viruses break into cells inside their host and use them to reproduce itself and disrupt the body's normal functions. Coronaviruses are named after the Latin word 'corona', which means crown, because they are encased by a spiked shell which resembles a royal crown.

    The coronavirus from Wuhan is one which has never been seen before this outbreak. It has been named SARS-CoV-2 by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. The name stands for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2.

    Experts say the bug, which has killed around one in 50 patients since the outbreak began in December, is a 'sister' of the SARS illness which hit China in 2002, so has been named after it.

    The disease that the virus causes has been named COVID-19, which stands for coronavirus disease 2019. The virus itself is called SARS-CoV-2.

    Dr Helena Maier, from the Pirbright Institute, said: 'Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that infect a wide range of different species including humans, cattle, pigs, chickens, dogs, cats and wild animals.

    'Until this new coronavirus was identified, there were only six different coronaviruses known to infect humans. Four of these cause a mild common cold-type illness, but since 2002 there has been the emergence of two new coronaviruses that can infect humans and result in more severe disease (Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronaviruses).

    'Coronaviruses are known to be able to occasionally jump from one species to another and that is what happened in the case of SARS, MERS and the new coronavirus. The animal origin of the new coronavirus is not yet known.'

    The first human cases were publicly reported from the Chinese city of Wuhan, where approximately 11million people live, after medics first started publicly reporting infections on December 31.

    By January 8, 59 suspected cases had been reported and seven people were in critical condition. Tests were developed for the new virus and recorded cases started to surge.

    The first person died that week and, by January 16, two were dead and 41 cases were confirmed. The next day, scientists predicted that 1,700 people had become infected, possibly up to 7,000.

    Just a week after that, there had been more than 800 confirmed cases and those same scientists estimated that some 4,000 – possibly 9,700 – were infected in Wuhan alone. By that point, 26 people had died.

    By January 27, more than 2,800 people were confirmed to have been infected, 81 had died, and estimates of the total number of cases ranged from 100,000 to 350,000 in Wuhan alone.

    By January 29, the number of deaths had risen to 132 and cases were in excess of 6,000.

    By February 5, there were more than 24,000 cases and 492 deaths.

    By February 11, this had risen to more than 43,000 cases and 1,000 deaths.

    A change in the way cases are confirmed on February 13 – doctors decided to start using lung scans as a formal diagnosis, as well as laboratory tests – caused a spike in the number of cases, to more than 60,000 and to 1,369 deaths.

    Where does the virus come from?

    According to scientists, the virus has almost certainly come from bats. Coronaviruses in general tend to originate in animals – the similar SARS and MERS viruses are believed to have originated in civet cats and camels, respectively.

    The first cases of COVID-19 came from people visiting or working in a live animal market in the city, which has since been closed down for investigation.

    Although the market is officially a seafood market, other dead and living animals were being sold there, including wolf cubs, salamanders, snakes, peacocks, porcupines and camel meat.

    A study by the Wuhan Institute of Virology, published in February 2020 in the scientific journal Nature, found that the genetic make-up virus samples found in patients in China is 96 per cent similar to a coronavirus they found in bats.

    However, there were not many bats at the market so scientists say it was likely there was an animal which acted as a middle-man, contracting it from a bat before then transmitting it to a human. It has not yet been confirmed what type of animal this was.

    Dr Michael Skinner, a virologist at Imperial College London, was not involved with the research but said: 'The discovery definitely places the origin of nCoV in bats in China.

    'We still do not know whether another species served as an intermediate host to amplify the virus, and possibly even to bring it to the market, nor what species that host might have been.'
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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    Continued from previous post

    So far the fatalities are quite low. Why are health experts so worried about it?

    Experts say the international community is concerned about the virus because so little is known about it and it appears to be spreading quickly.

    It is similar to SARS, which infected 8,000 people and killed nearly 800 in an outbreak in Asia in 2003, in that it is a type of coronavirus which infects humans' lungs.

    Another reason for concern is that nobody has any immunity to the virus because they've never encountered it before. This means it may be able to cause more damage than viruses we come across often, like the flu or common cold.

    Speaking at a briefing in January, Oxford University professor, Dr Peter Horby, said: 'Novel viruses can spread much faster through the population than viruses which circulate all the time because we have no immunity to them.

    'Most seasonal flu viruses have a case fatality rate of less than one in 1,000 people. Here we're talking about a virus where we don't understand fully the severity spectrum but it's possible the case fatality rate could be as high as two per cent.'

    If the death rate is truly two per cent, that means two out of every 100 patients who get it will die.

    'My feeling is it's lower,' Dr Horby added. 'We're probably missing this iceberg of milder cases. But that's the current circumstance we're in.

    'Two per cent case fatality rate is comparable to the Spanish Flu pandemic in 1918 so it is a significant concern globally.'

    How does the virus spread?

    The illness can spread between people just through coughs and sneezes, making it an extremely contagious infection. And it may also spread even before someone has symptoms.

    It is believed to travel in the saliva and even through water in the eyes, therefore close contact, kissing, and sharing cutlery or utensils are all risky.

    Originally, people were thought to be catching it from a live animal market in Wuhan city. But cases soon began to emerge in people who had never been there, which forced medics to realise it was spreading from person to person.

    There is now evidence that it can spread third hand – to someone from a person who caught it from another person.

    What does the virus do to you? What are the symptoms?

    Once someone has caught the COVID-19 virus it may take between two and 14 days, or even longer, for them to show any symptoms – but they may still be contagious during this time.

    If and when they do become ill, typical signs include a runny nose, a cough, sore throat and a fever (high temperature). The vast majority of patients – at least 97 per cent, based on available data – will recover from these without any issues or medical help.

    In a small group of patients, who seem mainly to be the elderly or those with long-term illnesses, it can lead to pneumonia. Pneumonia is an infection in which the insides of the lungs swell up and fill with fluid. It makes it increasingly difficult to breathe and, if left untreated, can be fatal and suffocate people.

    What have genetic tests revealed about the virus?

    Scientists in China have recorded the genetic sequences of around 19 strains of the virus and released them to experts working around the world.

    This allows others to study them, develop tests and potentially look into treating the illness they cause.

    Examinations have revealed the coronavirus did not change much – changing is known as mutating – much during the early stages of its spread.

    However, the director-general of China's Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Gao Fu, said the virus was mutating and adapting as it spread through people.

    This means efforts to study the virus and to potentially control it may be made extra difficult because the virus might look different every time scientists analyse it.

    More study may be able to reveal whether the virus first infected a small number of people then change and spread from them, or whether there were various versions of the virus coming from animals which have developed separately.

    How dangerous is the virus?

    The virus has a death rate of around two per cent. This is a similar death rate to the Spanish Flu outbreak which, in 1918, went on to kill around 50million people.

    However, experts say the true number of patients is likely considerably higher and therefore the death rate considerably lower. Imperial College London researchers estimate that there were 4,000 (up to 9,700) cases in Wuhan city alone up to January 18 – officially there were only 444 there to that date. If cases are in fact 100 times more common than the official figures, the virus may be far less dangerous than currently believed, but also far more widespread.

    Experts say it is likely only the most seriously ill patients are seeking help and are therefore recorded – the vast majority will have only mild, cold-like symptoms. For those whose conditions do become more severe, there is a risk of developing pneumonia which can destroy the lungs and kill you.


    Can the virus be cured?

    The COVID-19 virus cannot currently be cured and it is proving difficult to contain.

    Antibiotics do not work against viruses, so they are out of the question. Antiviral drugs can work, but the process of understanding a virus then developing and producing drugs to treat it would take years and huge amounts of money.

    No vaccine exists for the coronavirus yet and it's not likely one will be developed in time to be of any use in this outbreak, for similar reasons to the above.

    The National Institutes of Health in the US, and Baylor University in Waco, Texas, say they are working on a vaccine based on what they know about coronaviruses in general, using information from the SARS outbreak. But this may take a year or more to develop, according to Pharmaceutical Technology.

    Currently, governments and health authorities are working to contain the virus and to care for patients who are sick and stop them infecting other people.

    People who catch the illness are being quarantined in hospitals, where their symptoms can be treated and they will be away from the uninfected public.

    And airports around the world are putting in place screening measures such as having doctors on-site, taking people's temperatures to check for fevers and using thermal screening to spot those who might be ill (infection causes a raised temperature).

    However, it can take weeks for symptoms to appear, so there is only a small likelihood that patients will be spotted up in an airport.

    Is this outbreak an epidemic or a pandemic?

    The outbreak is an epidemic, which is when a disease takes hold of one community such as a country or region.

    Although it has spread to dozens of countries, the outbreak is not yet classed as a pandemic, which is defined by the World Health Organization as the 'worldwide spread of a new disease'.

    The head of WHO's global infectious hazard preparedness, Dr Sylvie Briand, said: 'Currently we are not in a pandemic. We are at the phase where it is an epidemic with multiple foci, and we try to extinguish the transmission in each of these foci,' the Guardian reported.

    She said that most cases outside of Hubei had been 'spillover' from the epicentre, so the disease wasn't actually spreading actively around the world.
    THREADS
    Tai Chi as medicine
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    Gene Ching
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    Traditional Chinese medicine nurses lead COVID-19 patients practice Tai Chi

    Gene Ching
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    Tai Chi in quarantine

    This isn't quite Tai Chi as medicine, unless you count COVID-19 quarantine activities as medicine. However, if I ever get quarantined like this, It'll surely be my Kung Fu practice that keeps me sane.

    Fresno couple first heard of coronavirus on Hawaii cruise. Now they await another quarantine
    BY CARMEN GEORGE
    MARCH 11, 2020 08:13 AM
    BY BETHANY CLOUGH

    Paula and Tom Yost of Fresno, both 80, have been doing more of their tai chi martial arts exercises lately as a way to stay active during a coronavirus quarantine that’s kept them confined to their room on the Grand Princess cruise ship.

    They and many other passengers haven’t been able to leave their rooms since Saturday – also the first day the Yosts learned of the contagious virus that’s been causing worldwide concern. The California couple didn’t have internet access during a four-day journey from Hawaii across the Pacific Ocean. The Grand Princess docked in Oakland on Monday.

    Paula said she’s not worried about catching coronavirus – even though at least 26 people on the Grand Princess tested positive for the virus.

    “I think I’m making a lot of memories,” Paula said positively on Tuesday from her room on the Grand Princess, “and will have a lot of things to talk about in the future.”

    Paula said while she and her husband hadn’t been tested for the virus, they haven’t experienced virus symptoms and felt OK.

    COVID-19 has killed more than 30 people in the U.S. and more than 4,000 people around the world. Thousands more have fallen ill and recovered.


    Paula Yost, pictured at right, with a plastic baby doll on the Grand Princess cruise ship; and people dressed in hazmat suits in the Port of Oakland, as seen from a balcony of the ship that docked in Oakland on March 9, 2020. PAULA YOST SPECIAL TO THE BEE

    The Yosts were still waiting Tuesday night to be unloaded from the Grand Princess – what they think will happen Wednesday. From there, the Yosts expected to bused to a California military base for a 14-day precautionary quarantine.

    State officials said the nearly 1,000 Grand Princess passengers who reside in California will be taken to Travis Air Force Base, near Fairfield, or Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, near San Diego.

    The Yosts’ quarantine has been a very unexpected ending to a fun Hawaiian vacation for their 62nd wedding anniversary, but they have been making the most of their confinement.

    Paula has been keeping herself busy with crafts and movies, including “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” about beloved children’s show host Mr. Rogers.

    Tom was standing on the balcony of their room Tuesday, watching the world below with interest as buses zipped in and out of a parking lot where people dressed in hazmat suits moved back and forth.


    Ambulances and buses near the Grand Princess, as seen from the balcony of Tom and Paula Yost’s cruise ship room. The ship docked in the Port of Oakland on March 9, 2020. PAULA YOST SPECIAL TO THE BEE

    They left California at the end of February for a journey that took them to several Hawaiian islands. The ship bypassed its last planned stop, in Mexico, on the way back because some passengers had coronavirus.

    People dressed in hazmat suits have been delivering food to their room, which has its own balcony, bathroom, and small fridge. The Yosts have been keeping in touch with their children and grandchildren by telephone and Facebook.


    Paula Yost’s plastic baby doll next to information about how to disembark the Grand Princess cruise ship, which docked in the Port of Oakland on March 9, 2020. PAULA YOST SPECIAL TO THE BEE

    Paula posted three photos on her Facebook as the Grand Princess entered the Port of Oakland – two featuring a small plastic baby doll that she likes to put in various travel photos. One shows the doll next to information about how to disembark the ship, with the caption, “Guess who is having a good time. Lots of chocolate on board.”

    Despite her upbeat attitude, Paula said is eager to leave the ship and be able to resume her daily 2-mile walks.

    She doesn’t know what to expect next, but said she isn’t concerned about a military base quarantine. Her husband is a former Marine.

    Paula said she and her husband didn’t have any immediate upcoming plans, but their cat will now have to stay with a cat sitter a little longer than expected.

    “I feel very safe. I feel taken care of. If you could see all of this, you’d understand,” Paula said of what’s been happening in and around the Grand Princess. “The ship organized it very good. … If people would just see how hard these people are working. I would like to thank every one of them.”

    Any other messages to share with the public? From Paula’s standpoint: Don’t let coronavirus mess with your vacation plans.

    “I would say that if they got a trip planned, go ahead and do it,” Paula said. “Don’t let them stop you from enjoying life.”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  10. #280
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    This article is dated too...

    ...and I don't quite agree with it, but it's relevant to our forum here.

    Culture China 22:32, 20-Feb-2020
    Tai Chi, Baduanjin, Chinese-style exercises help you fight coronavirus
    By Wu Yan



    Chinese-style exercises such as Tai Chi and Baduanjin have become popular among patients during the novel coronavirus outbreak, and have been recommended by medical experts to ordinary people to improve physical strength.

    Photos and videos of doctors leading patients with mild symptoms to practice Tai Chi and Baduanjin in makeshift hospitals in Wuhan have gone viral on social media recently. Experts say the exercises are good for patients' recovery and reducing their anxiety.

    What's so good about Tai Chi and Baduanjin?

    Developed from ancient Chinese philosophies and breathing techniques, Tai Chi is a system of meditative physical exercise. Tai Chi is best known as a martial art which has developed into many genres over the centuries.

    In 1956, the then-national sports authority introduced 24-Form Tai Chi. Adapted from traditional Yang-style Tai Chi but simplified and standardized, 24-Form Tai Chi is widely adopted by many nowadays for relaxation and health.

    "In China, a great way (to strengthen the body) is Tai Chi," renowned Chinese respiratory expert Zhong Nanshan said during an interview, "When doing Tai Chi, the practitioner is in a half-squatting posture. Although the static movement does not have significant effect on tachypnea (rapid breathing), it is good for training muscles."

    He said that he had a dozen patients whose lung function level was only 20 to 30 percent of that of a normal person. But by continuing to take medicine, walking and practicing Tai Chi, the patients' movement was greatly enhanced and some were even able to climb a mountain.


    A doctor leads patients of mild symptoms in a Tai Chi practice in a makeshift hospital in Wuhan, Hubei Province. /People's Daily

    Similar to Tai Chi in that it emphasizes breathing, Baduanjin, or Eight-Section Brocade, refers to eight sections of movements performed repetitively and nonstop, reminiscent of brocade weaving.

    Originating from the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127), Baduanjin traditionally contains both a standing and seated set of eight sections of movements each, but has also been expanded to twelve-section movements and sixteen-section movements.

    In 2003, the General Administration of Sport of China re-choreographed the standing version of the aerobic exercise, and promoted it as one of eight health qigongs nationwide. Featuring slow movement and low intensity, Bajuanjin is suitable for all ages.

    For epidemic prevention and control, people are currently being advised to stay at home.

    To help people strengthen the body and develop a healthy lifestyle, the General Administration of Sport of China recently recommended a list of indoor exercises. Tai Chi, Baduanjin and other traditional Chinese-style exercises are on the list.

    "The key is perseverance. It's better to practice every day," Zhang Boli, general counsel to Wuhan's Dahuashan makeshift hospital and president of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, told China Sports Daily.

    He also suggested ordinary people practice according to one's abilities and advance gradually in due order.

    (Cover image: A man practices Tai Chi. /VCG)

    THREADS
    Tai Chi as medicine
    Baduanjin]
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    Gene Ching
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  11. #281
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    Tai Chi for coronavirus disease 2019 in recovery period

    Tai Chi for coronavirus disease 2019 in recovery period: A protocol for systematic review and meta analysis
    August 9, 2020

    This article was originally published here
    Medicine (Baltimore). 2020 Aug 7;99(32):e21459. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000021459.

    ABSTRACT

    BACKGROUND: Assessing the effectiveness and safety of Tai Chi for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in recovery period is the main purpose of this systematic review protocol.

    METHODS: The following electronic databases will be searched from inception to April 2020: MEDLINE, Ovid, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, VIP Database and Wanfang Database. In addition, Clinical trial registries, like the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, the Netherlands National Trial Register and ClinicalTrials.gov, will be searched for ongoing trials with unpublished data. No language restrictions will be applied. The primary outcome will be the time of disappearance of main symptoms (including fever, asthenia, cough disappearance rate, and temperature recovery time), and serum cytokine levels. The secondary outcome will be the accompanying symptoms (such as myalgia, expectoration, stuffiness, runny nose, pharyngalgia, anhelation, chest distress, dyspnea, crackles, headache, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea) disappear rate, negative COVID-19 results rate on 2 consecutive occasions (not on the same day), CT image improvement, average hospitalization time, occurrence rate of common type to severe form, clinical cure rate, and mortality. Two independent reviewers will conduct the study selection, data extraction and assessment. Review manager software V.5.3 will be used for the assessment of risk of bias and data synthesis.

    RESULTS: The results will provide a high-quality synthesis of current evidence for researchers in this subject area.

    CONCLUSION: The conclusion of the study will provide an evidence to judge whether Tai Chi is effective and safe for COVID-19 in recovery period.
    threads
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    Gene Ching
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  12. #282
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    The Effectiveness of Tai Chi in Patients With Breast Cancer

    The Effectiveness of Tai Chi in Patients With Breast Cancer: An Overview of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses
    Jinke Huang, MD
    Haolin Liu, MD
    Jiajie Chen, MD
    Xiaowen Cai, MD
    Yong Huang, PhD
    Published:October 14, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2020.10.007
    PlumX Metrics

    Abstract
    Background
    As a mind-body exercise, Tai Chi (TC) may have a positive impact on physical function and psychological well-being in patients with breast cancer (BC). The aim of this current overview of systematic reviews (SRs) and meta-analyses (MAs) was to identify and summarize the existing evidence regarding the effectiveness of TC in patients with BC.

    Methods
    A computerized search of electronic databases was performed to identify relevant SRs/MAs of TC related to BC from inception to June 2020. The Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews 2 (AMSTAR-2) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklists were used to assess the methodological quality and reporting quality of SRs and MAs, respectively. The Grades of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used to assess the evidence quality of outcome measures.

    Results
    Six SRs/MAs in which quantitative synthesis was used to assess various outcomes of TC related to BC were included in this overview. The quality of the SRs/MAs and the evidence quality of the outcome measures were generally unsatisfactory. The limitations of the past SRs/MAs were the lack of a protocol and registration, a list of excluded studies, or inadequately reported computational details of meta-analyses. The critical problems were that the qualitative data synthesis relied on the trials with small sample sizes and of critical low quality.

    Conclusions
    TC is possibly beneficial to BC treatment. However, further rigorous and comprehensive studies are required to provide robust evidence for definitive conclusions.
    Not overly conclusive.
    Gene Ching
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  13. #283
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    Thought I posted this already

    Maybe I saw it in the news but it was too hard to copy&paste.

    Russian Hospital Uses Tai Chi for COVID-19 Rehab
    AvatarAlfredo Cuadros POSTED ON FEBRUARY 11, 2021


    MOSCOW, RUSSIA (AP)- –

    COVID-19 patients being treated at a temporary hospital in Moscow are being offered Tai Chi lessons as part of their rehabilitation process.

    The Krylatskoye Ice Palace, known for hosting international speed skating competitions, was changed into a temporary hospital in October 2020.

    It’s been offering patients lessons in the gentle Chinese martial art as a means to aid their recovery.

    The exercises get them moving, without putting their hearts under heavy strain, medics at the temporary COVID-19 hospital said.

    The number of new coronavirus infections reported by Russian authorities has been on the decline this month, dropping from up to 25,000 a day in early January to under 20,000 this week.

    Russia has reported over 3.9 million confirmed coronavirus cases and over 75,000 deaths in the pandemic.

    In December, Russian authorities launched a vaccination campaign with the domestically developed Sputnik V jab, that is still undergoing advanced trials to ensure its safety and effectiveness.


    This report was created with information provided by the Associated Press
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  14. #284
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    Losing belly fat after 50

    Hey now. This speaks to me.

    One Surprising Exercise Trick for Losing Belly Fat After 50, Says Study
    William Mayle 1 day ago
    |


    Slide 1 of 5: One of the things that makes exercise interesting is that there isn't one way to get fit and burn fat. Sure, some people love running, others walking, some prefer yoga, and others swear by strength training, but at least one leading health expert has made the case for playing more pickleball. One site in the UK did a deep analysis of leisure sports and found that playing golf on foot could burn upwards of 1,640 calories in a single day. Any movement is good movement, and even short bursts of exercise over the course of your day will add up.Depending on your goals and your physique, you may find that some exercise may be better than others, of course. If you want big muscles, you need to perform resistance training, and if you want to improve your stamina for a marathon, it's helpful to pursue more cardio. But if you're approaching middle age or getting even older and you're looking to trim down your waist size, a new study published in Annals of Internal Medicine found that one surprising exercise—an ancient meditative martial-art practice—is actually incredibly helpful. If you're curious to know what it is, read on, because we break it all down right here. And for more life-changing exercise advice, see here for the Secret Exercise Tricks for Keeping Your Weight Down for Good.

    One of the things that makes exercise interesting is that there isn't one way to get fit and burn fat. Sure, some people love running, others walking, some prefer yoga, and others swear by strength training, but at least one leading health expert has made the case for playing more pickleball. One site in the UK did a deep analysis of leisure sports and found that playing golf on foot could burn upwards of 1,640 calories in a single day. Any movement is good movement, and even short bursts of exercise over the course of your day will add up.

    Depending on your goals and your physique, you may find that some exercise may be better than others, of course. If you want big muscles, you need to perform resistance training, and if you want to improve your stamina for a marathon, it's helpful to pursue more cardio. But if you're approaching middle age or getting even older and you're looking to trim down your waist size, a new study published in Annals of Internal Medicine found that one surprising exercise—an ancient meditative martial-art practice—is actually incredibly helpful. If you're curious to know what it is, read on, because we break it all down right here. And for more life-changing exercise advice, see here for the Secret Exercise Tricks for Keeping Your Weight Down for Good.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #285
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    Okay, okay. Here's the real study...

    ... I just posted the news coverage above because the photo is so bad. A Scar-Jo look-alike with horrible Tai Chi alignment? All hail the exposed midriff!

    Seriously now, here's the latest study that's got the Tai Chi news feeds a'buzz today.

    Original Research1 June 2021
    Effects of Tai Chi or Conventional Exercise on Central Obesity in Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    A Three-Group Randomized Controlled Trial
    Parco M. Siu, PhD*, Angus P. Yu, MPhil*, Edwin C. Chin, BScEd,

    Central obesity is a major manifestation of metabolic syndrome, which is a common health problem in middle-aged and older adults.

    Objective:
    To examine the therapeutic efficacy of tai chi for management of central obesity.

    Design:
    Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03107741)

    Setting:
    A single research site in Hong Kong between 27 February 2016 and 28 February 2019.

    Participants:
    Adults aged 50 years or older with central obesity.

    Intervention:
    543 participants were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio to a control group with no exercise intervention (n = 181), conventional exercise consisting of aerobic exercise and strength training (EX group) (n = 181), and a tai chi group (TC group) (n = 181). Interventions lasted 12 weeks.

    Measurements:
    Outcomes were assessed at baseline, week 12, and week 38. The primary outcome was waist circumference (WC). Secondary outcomes were body weight; body mass index; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride, and fasting plasma glucose levels; blood pressure; and incidence of remission of central obesity.

    Results:
    The adjusted mean difference in WC from baseline to week 12 in the control group was 0.8 cm (95% CI, −4.1 to 5.7 cm). Both intervention groups showed reductions in WC relative to control (adjusted mean differences: TC group vs. control, −1.8 cm [CI, −2.3 to −1.4 cm]; P < 0.001; EX group vs. control: −1.3 cm [CI, −1.8 to −0.9 cm]; P < 0.001); both intervention groups also showed reductions in body weight (P < 0.05) and attenuation of the decrease in HDL-C level relative to the control group. The favorable changes in WC and body weight were maintained in both the TC and EX groups, whereas the beneficial effect on HDL-C was only maintained in the TC group at week 38.

    Limitations:
    High attrition and no dietary intervention.

    Conclusion:
    Tai chi is an effective approach to reduce WC in adults with central obesity aged 50 years or older.

    Primary Funding Source:
    Health and Medical Research Fund.
    Gene Ching
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