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Thread: Lower Back Ache

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Grand Rapids, MI
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    976
    I am 51 and I feel your pain!

    I had been sick this past week and a deep cough aggravated my lower back pain. This Saturday during our qigong exercises Sifu Li notice I was in pain and motioned me to the equipment room where he worked on my lower back. The right side was very tight. He also told me lie on my stomach, bend my knees to 90 degrees, hold knees together and bring legs to the floor side to side. He told me to do this twice a day, 16 times. The man has magic hands! I was much less tight and able to finish class with much less pain. Since many in our class have desk jobs, he told us to, stand once and awhile throughout the day and cup your elbows with your hands, behind your back while letting your head fall back. Breathe slowly in and out a few times.

    I should also do standing meditation every morning. My spine seems to relax more when I focus on posture and breathing.

    "The true meaning of a given movement in a form is not its application, but rather the unlimited potential of the mind to provide muscular and skeletal support for that movement." Gregory Fong

  2. #107
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Man, i really started to have severe low back pain for a bit. i found videos like this and did some stretches and my pain as well declined in a huge way. here is one video i used:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=huUCG01B2qk
    I'm pretty sure the only thing tongs do nowadays is make sure Chinese restaurants don't pay out tips to their waiters. - Pazman[/B]

    https://scontent-b-pao.xx.fbcdn.net/...8a&oe=52848D36

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Hong Kong
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    In the last two weeks, I have been doing daily stretch on my psoas muscles. It is based on medical expert opinion that tight psoas will cause pain in our lower back. One end of the three muscles is attached to the front part of our lower vertebate. So from the construct of the muscles, it is convincing to me. The stretch is easy to do. Just keep our hip and upper trunk straight on the same vertical plane. Yank the leg of the stretched side to the back with its knee on the floor. Keep the back leg turned outward during the stretch. If you feel only the front part of the hip stretched, you are on the right track. The pain of my lower back has gone now for certain. But I will still do this exercise daily, because I am not a young man any more.



    Regards,

    KC
    Hong Kong

  4. #109
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Hobart Tasmania - Australia
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    701
    Quote Originally Posted by TenTigers View Post
    I started teaching a "Tao Yoga" class in my school. It is a self-created class made up of Dao-Yin, Eight Pieces of Brocade, and Yoga movements. Since I started teaching it, my lower back pain is gone, including my sciatica. Like mentioned by the other posters, there are several back bends, forward bends, and also side bends, and strengthening poses, such as during the Sun Salutation, when you take one leg back, you raise the body, stretching the hands overhead and hold the position, similar to a warrior pose/standing lunge.
    Exactly... Training long term you have to incorporate this into what you do....otherwise you won't last in older years. Get into your qigong!

  5. #110
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Norfair
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    9,103
    Lots of lower back pain is caused by hunching forward all day in a computer chair. it causes the arch to round.

    I don't know how stretching forward is going to fix that, because that's bending the back in the same way.

    Wrestlers bridges or some other arching exercise should be more effective, and doubly so if used as a preventative.

    Deadlifts are probably pretty helpful, too, especially as a preventative.

    Make sure you learn the correct form.

    While we're on the subject, do any of you guys have lumbar support in your chairs? I've heard mixed reviews about whether or not it's actually helpful.
    "If you like metal you're my friend" -- Manowar

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  6. #111
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    888
    For lower back pain I did a lot of abdominal strength exercises. Not just sit ups but for an example: lay on an incline bench with your feet at the top, grab 25 or 45 lb weight and lay it on your chest and do sets of 10 sit ups.

    Also I got an Inversion chair and it worked wonders. Everyday lay upside down for 3-5 minutes. The one I have is similar to this one:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXwA3...eature=related

    Inversion theropy good for many ailments: back pain, muscle pain, shouders, neck etc etc. It even can help you grow if you are vertically challenged like me, I think I grw about 1/4 of an inch on that thing!

    ginosifu

  7. #112
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Texas
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    1,519
    Lower back pain is usually due to inactivity, but that is what allows it to occur. There are other things, passive activities, that cause it too. In the old days when women were working in lots of different fields for the war effort, they were taught to place a foot up on an object off the floor. It would take the pressure off the spine somewhat. Just standing in one place for a little while will stiffen the lower back and cause muscle spasms. Being a bit over weight with a spare tire can also add pressure. I have a couple of tinse units that are used to work muscles inside casts as well as sore muscles, and I will use it on my back. It makes the gillions of tiny spine muscles to flex and exercise, taking the soreness and spasms away. When I was young I did lots of calisthenics. sp?? I did not do the regular sit ups, but would place my hands on my hips and dip and turn while working these back muscles. It would also stretch them somewhat. It kept my back in really limber shape and trouble free. Today they teach that you raise the legs or cross your arms over the chest and raise up slightly with the upper body. This does not really exercise these little muscles. Great for the abbs, but not for the back. I don't think heavy lifting is going to be good for it either. You just need to do these waist exercises a couple times a day, and maybe even take breaks during the work day to do it. Just gentle stretching and exercise works wonders.
    Jackie Lee

  8. #113
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Greenville, SC
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    292
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveLau View Post
    I suppose most people whose main occupation is a desk job will have lower back pain after age 25. The major causes of such injury are over-use and poor posture. Yep, I have that too. And the causes are the same. Now I am over age 50. Over the years, I have tried various treatments to improve or cure the pain. Lately, the situation is not bad, but it is nowhere near a full recovery. I have been stretching my lower back daily for the last twelve months using different exercises. In the last seven days, I tried a new method after some research done.

    Daily - one 30 seconds forward bend stretching; one 60 seconds inversion.


    After 4 days, something like magic has happened. I found that the pain has gone down substantially as if it was not there any more. It is IMHO that inversion is the key treatment that makes a big difference. Probably, I will do it once per week as a health maintenance exercise.



    KC
    Hong Kong

    You may find this helpful:

    Prehab: Fix it BEFORE it Breaks! (lower back)

    I wrote it a while back.

    I've suffered with low back pain myself and the techniques outlined in the article have helped me.

    Train Hard,
    Josh Skinner

  9. #114
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    UK
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    Back pain is rarely due to the back itself but usually the effects of tight hip flexors, tight psoas, inability to fire the glutes weak core endurance etc

    Best advice is go see a pro, someone with medical experience because self diagnose can often do more harm than good (he says sat here with injured and broke of body)

    Having said that a proper dynamic warm up with good activation exercises, and some static stretching and foam/tennis ball rolling is never a bad thing

  10. #115
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Hong Kong
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    Yep, I agree that tight flexors and tight psoas are the usual causes of lower back pain. That is why I gave the corresponding stretch treatment a try. The other treatments like arching our lower back help but do not result in full rehabilitation simply because they are not right on target of the root cause. Why these muscles got tightened, and thus shortened is easy to understand - we do not stretch them much in our daily activities. As I recall that a friend of mine asked me when we were in our late twenties, "do you have lower back pain?". And I replied "yes". He had it too. We have been doing desk bound job most of our working life. Other causes like poor posture will add to the problem. These tightened muscles will then pull our lower vertebate towards the front, thus make the vertebate not in its natural curve. So eventually, we feel pain in our lower back.


    P.S. At the moment of writing this post, I have been doing the stretch daily for a month already. The pain has not returned.



    Regards,

    KC
    Hong Kong
    Last edited by SteveLau; 11-14-2011 at 05:01 PM.

  11. #116
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Posts
    1,392

    Pulled my lower back

    Was doing deadlift with light weight today. I just dropped the weight after a stall by 30lbs. The weight is nothing I haven't lifted easily before.

    Rep number 3 of my last workset I felt the right lower back "pull", for lack of a better term.

    Pain isn't severe, just annoying. Sucks bending over, but seems to be better if I keep it stretched.
    It is better to have less thunder in the mouth and more lightning in the hand. - Apache Proverb

  12. #117
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
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    Proper warm up is crucial in the DL and sometimes we just lift too soon.
    Never hurt myself with a heavy weight BUT have hurt with lighter weights, freaky ain't it?
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  13. #118
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    Jun 2005
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    NW Arkansas
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    Yeah, i'm pretty sure I wasn't warmed up well enough.

    I'm lucky it wasn't a lot worse. I'll take it as a reminder to do more mobility work and to warm up a little better.
    It is better to have less thunder in the mouth and more lightning in the hand. - Apache Proverb

  14. #119
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    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesC View Post
    Yeah, i'm pretty sure I wasn't warmed up well enough.

    I'm lucky it wasn't a lot worse. I'll take it as a reminder to do more mobility work and to warm up a little better.
    Can I ask what rep range you were doing and where the injury happened?
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  15. #120
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    UK
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    Just a thought a lot of powerlifters who deadlift on a weekly basis will deadlift after some form of exercise, normally squatting, heck some deadlift at the end of a session where they also squatted AND benched, I personally donít know many that deadlift as a first exercise on a consistent basis

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