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Thread: Red Sonja: the ultimate Sword Hottie?

  1. #1

    Red Sonja: the ultimate Sword Hottie?

    Was tempted to post these images in the Sword hotties thread. Still I figure people will want the opportunity to comment on the Posters as well as next year's film.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Design Sifu View Post
    Was tempted to post these images in the Sword hotties thread. Still I figure people will want the opportunity to comment on the Posters as well as next year's film.

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    wow. im freaking excited.

    this and watchmen are gonna make 09 for me.
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  3. #3
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    Red Sonja. Ah yes.

    Time for a sword hottie flash back.



    Brigette had the physique for Red Sonja.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #4
    Brigitte Nielsen ahh yes...

    not quite a sword hottie here or here. But then again, She Hulk was never known for her swordplay.

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    I should know better than to challenge DS's comic fu...

    ...but I googled up this and just can't resist posting it.

    Gene Ching
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    ttt 4 2017!

    "Female Strong" - it's a thing now

    I wiki-ed the 2010 project. It says "Actress Rose McGowan was originally intended to portray Sonja in 2010's Red Sonja film, but these plans were squelched by injuries that permanently damaged the mobility and strength of her right arm" but the link to the original source for that has long expired. Either way, Rose has got to be our first Sword Hottie FAIL .

    The question is - who will play Red Sonja in this new film?

    Millennium To Produce Female-Strong ‘Red Sonja’ With Cinelou
    by Anita Busch
    November 4, 2017 8:28am


    Millennium

    EXCLUSIVE: Millennium Media will finance and produce a new version of Red Sonja and is looking to it as a new franchise for the company. The project will be produced by Millennium’s Avi Lerner and Joe Gatta alongside Cinelou’s Mark Canton and Courtney Solomon. They are fast-tracking this project and next will hire a writer.

    Red Sonja is based on a heroine created by Roy Thomas, editor at Marvel (in the 1970s). She has appeared in hundreds of comic books over the decades, which Dynamite Entertainment continues publishing today.


    Millennium Media

    “We have been waiting for the right time for this remake,” said Lerner, “and with the success of Wonder Woman, the audience has spoken. They want female heroes.”

    The film’s executive producers will be Millennium Films’ Boaz Davidson, John Thompson and Trevor Short. Christa Campbell and Lati Grobman of Campbell Grobman films also will executive produce with Scott Karol of Cinelou. Red Sonja’s rights holder Luke Lieberman also will be an exec producer.

    The first Red Sonja film in 1985 starred (and introduced) Brigitte Nielsen and Arnold Schwarzenegger. This version will be different, with fresh story ideas and characters.
    Gene Ching
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    Bryan Singer

    Given this film, this is as tragic as it is ironic.

    JANUARY 24, 2019 2:16pm PT by Tatiana Siegel
    Bryan Singer to Keep 'Red Sonja' Directing Gig Even After New Accusers Speak Out



    Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic
    Bryan Singer

    The director will get a fee of up to $10 million for the Millennium film.

    More than 24 hours after The Atlantic published a bombshell exposé about Bryan Singer and underage boys, Millennium Films has weighed in on the director’s fate with regards to its reboot of its film Red Sonja. Even after being accused by four men of having sex with them when they were younger than the age of consent, Singer is keeping his job.

    "I continue to be in development for Red Sonja and Bryan Singer continues to be attached," read a statement from producer Avi Lerner to The Hollywood Reporter.

    Lerner added, "The over $800 million Bohemian Rhapsody has grossed, making it the highest grossing drama in film history, is testament to his remarkable vision and acumen. I know the difference between agenda driven fake news and reality, and I am very comfortable with this decision. In America people are innocent until proven otherwise."

    It is a surprising development, given the severity of the claims and considering the number of Hollywood actors, producers and executives who have seen their careers evaporate after facing less damaging accusations. The journalists spent 12 months investigating the Bohemian Rhapsody director, beginning their piece — originally slated for Esquire — not long after Hollywood’s #MeToo movement was in full swing (the two reporters say their piece was killed by Hearst higher-ups).

    The journalists spoke to more than 50 sources, including four men who spoke about their relationship with the writer-director for the first time. One claimed that he had sex with Singer’s when he was 17. Another claimed that he and Singer had sex when he was 15. Both incidents are said to have happened in 1997 when Singer was in his early 30s.

    One of the accusers said that Singer and a network of friends had people who brought them boys. "If you weren’t young and cute enough to be their boy, you could still ingratiate yourself by bringing boys to them," he is quoted as saying.

    Victor Valdovinos — the only subject to use his name — told The Atlantic that he was a 13-year-old extra on the set of Apt Pupil when Singer — then in his 30s — sexually assaulted him. That film sparked a series of lawsuits by underage extras who were forced to disrobe entirely for a shower scene.

    In December 2017, Singer was accused of rape by Cesar Sanchez-Guzman, who said in a lawsuit that Singer raped him while aboard a yacht in Seattle in 2003 when he was 17. Singer has denied Sanchez-Guzman's allegations. Perhaps prophetically, Sanchez-Guzman told the magazine that "the industry will brush things under the rug and pretend nothing happened.

    Even with the allegations of rape, Singer was an erratic presence on set. He was fired near the end of production of Bohemian Rhapsody in December 2017, days before Sanchez-Guzman filed suit. Executives at 20th Century Fox made the move largely due to Singr’s unexplained absences from set. He was replaced by Eddie the Eagle director Dexter Fletcher, but he was still credited as sole director of the film due to DGA rules.

    Still, Millennium hired Singer to direct its reboot of a female-empowered Red Sonja that is expected to begin shooting in Bulgaria in the spring. Even more shocking, the studio was willing to pay Singer his full quote of $10 million if certain box-office milestones were met. Those negotiating came out in Singer’s favor despite the fact that he had no agent after being dropped by WME.

    At the time, Millennium execs said privately that they were willing to take the chance given the prerelease buzz on Bohemian Rhapsody, which has proved to be a huge hit, with $800 million to date worldwide at the box office. The film landed five Academy Award nominations this week, including best picture.

    In the immediate aftermath of The Atlantic article, Singer released the following statement saying the story "rehashes claims from bogus lawsuits."

    "The last time I posted about this subject, Esquire magazine was preparing to publish an article written by a ****phobic journalist who has a bizarre obsession with me dating back to 1997. After careful fact-checking and, in consideration of the lack of credible sources, Esquire chose not to publish this piece of vendetta journalism," Singer stated.

    Singer added, "That didn’t stop this writer from selling it to The Atlantic. It’s sad that The Atlantic would stoop to this low standard of journalistic integrity. Again, I am forced to reiterate that this story rehashes claims from bogus lawsuits filed by a disreputable cast of individuals willing to lie for money or attention. And it is no surprise that, with Bohemian Rhapsody being an award-winning hit, this ****phobic smear piece has been conveniently timed to take advantage of its success."
    THREADS
    Red Sonja
    #metoo
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  8. #8
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    Brigitte

    MARCH 12, 2019 6:15am PT by Simon Abrams
    Brigitte Nielsen on 'Red Sonja' and Hopes for a Female-Directed Remake


    Courtesy of Valentina Socci
    Brigitte Nielsen

    The 1985 comic book adaptation has a new version on hold following allegations against director Bryan Singer, which has the film's original star wondering, "Why don’t they go with a great female director?"
    To her fans, Danish model turned actress Brigitte Nielsen is still a Viking queen.

    Nielsen was introduced to audiences as the revenge-driven title character in Red Sonja, the 1985 swords-and-sorcery comic book adaptation. She’s also known for playing Ludmilla Drago, a bloodthirsty USSR athlete and trophy wife, in both Rocky IV and Creed II. Nielsen’s real-life romantic life (she was married to Sylvester Stallone from 1985 to 1987) have made her the target of ugly, often misogynistic criticism. But at 55, Nielsen’s a new mother again, and eager to continue throwing punches…but only when necessary.

    The Hollywood Reporter spoke to Nielsen last week about her role in Creed II (now on VOD and Blu-ray), her modeling career, and her feelings about the allegations of sexual abuse that were brought against Bryan Singer, who has not been removed as director of the Millennium Films' upcoming Red Sonja remake, though the project has been put on hold following new allegations in an exposé The Atlantic published in January.

    "I hope Red Sonja is going to eventually move on. But why don’t they go with a great female director? Like Susanne Bier, a great Danish director? That would be fantastic," Nielsen tells THR. "And she would put me in Red Sonja because I need to be in there! Or you could do Patty Jenkins! She’s an incredible director! This is a huge female character and I can see a fantastic female director."

    I read that when you were 13 years old, you were 5 foot 11, 90 pounds, and had an overbite. Is it fair to say that your height sort of forced you to develop a thicker skin?

    I was so bullied in school; I feel for all the kids today, whether they’re short, tall, fat or thin. In my case, I was super-tall — taller than my teachers — and so thin that I looked like someone who had been in a concentration camp. It was terrible. Unfortunately, they had to take out six of my teeth to make space for the others. And I came out with an enormous overbite. I had silver on the top and bottom of my mouth and plastic pieces inside and underneath. I was the grossest thing kids could see when it was lunchtime, and I had to take out all my things to eat my home-made Danish sandwich!

    But anyway, back to height – yes, that was really hard. I don’t wish that on anyone, and I always say that in my next life, I’m going to be 5 foot 8, OK? [Laughs] Not 6-feet-and-a-half! What made me stand up straight, when I was 16, was: I was seen, in Copenhagen, by a model agent who spotted me and crossed the shop to talk to me. I couldn’t believe it, but that job made me stand up straighter. It gave me some firm confidence. But of course, having been bullied for 10 years, in your young years…that never really leaves you.

    Your modeling work seems to be a big influence on your early work as an actress. When you worked with photographers like Helmut Newton, you were pretty young, late teens, early 20s. So you kind of had to manage not just what your audience and collaborators expected of you, but what you wanted from modeling. How did you manage all of that?

    I started modeling at the age of 16, from Hamburg to Paris, Paris to Milan, Milan to New York. And I remember: I started out with shoulder-length hair. Jean-Louis David, the famous hairdresser in Paris, hurt my hair, and it fell out. So I ended up with a shaved head. That started the early trend of short hair, and that’s when I got my first big campaign from a stylist who’s no longer around, with a photographer in New York.

    ...When I was 20-and-a-half, I was pretty fed up; I remember saying to my modeling booker, David Brown — an Australian guy, lovely guy — “I’m going back to Denmark. I no longer want to be a model...." I think I went into things without thinking about them. I had just given birth and that’s when my life changed because that’s when [producer] Dino De Laurentiis saw a picture of me and said, “Wow, she’d be amazing as Red Sonja.” Actually, when I got the phone call from this producer who wanted to meet me, I was still breastfeeding at home. It was a crazy time in my life.

    You were pregnant with your new daughter when you did Creed II. There’s a scene in that movie where Ludmila walks away from the ring after Viktor Drago is knocked down twice. What was filming that scene like for you?

    It actually helped me a lot, having four grown-up boys and having been through a divorce when my youngest boy was eight. I had a 10-year-old, a 14-year-old and an 18-year-old.... I was making that choice to leave again — it was a hell physically and emotionally because Ludmilla was in me. Of course it was tough, but it was overwhelming and it was purifying at the same time. I don't know why, but it’s so magical to be pregnant. I had so much inner energy, and thank god again that I’m almost 6 foot 1 tall, because I was seven-and-a-half months pregnant and you couldn’t tell. I could still get away with it. But that was because of my height; had I been 5 foot 2, it would show in a different way, obviously. But it was amazing, and very emotional.

    The most striking thing about your role in Creed II is it’s 30 years later. In Rocky IV, the way Ludmilla and Ivan Drago interact…he’s like a reluctant, brainwashed kind of pawn of the USSR while your character is somehow even more bloodthirsty, like the way she’s smiling when Apollo Creed is basically getting murdered. What’s going into that performance? Where is it coming from?

    That’s what the Americans thought of the Russians in the '80s: that they are cruel murderers out to get upstanding Americans. And for Ludmila, from her private point of view, her husband, she was driving him to gain popularity for Russia, for her own well-being. She had him go through everything, and that’s the reason why she left him going back to Creed II, because she brought back a loser who had invested in her. That’s why she’s sorry she couldn’t be a whole part of that.

    Rocky IV is obviously the most prominent of your collaborations with Stallone. But there’s another film of his that you co-starred in, Cobra. In that movie, you’ve got a fairly atypical role: you’re basically just the girlfriend, and you have to be rescued by the tough guy. I’ve always read that the direction on that movie was really chaotic. Some people even said that director George Cosmatos was basically out-directed by Stallone.

    Which is true! But you have to remember having Sylvester Stallone, who has always written just about everything that he does: he is a great writer and director. He always hires very clever, great directors, but he has a hard time sitting in his acting chair, you know? He always wants to sit in both chairs, which you have to keep in mind. Other directors have their own egos and their own jobs to do. So yes, it was very chaotic. But at the time, I was so young and green. I was just an actress dating Stallone! I wasn’t even allowed to have an opinion! I was thinking in my own little Viking head, but it was never to be discussed or anything like that. But yes, it was very chaotic! He had other issues on other movies with other director either being fired or not really directing when they were on set. But he does his own job, you know?


    Photofest
    Cobra

    Like Cobra, the 1988 Bye Bye Baby is a gear shift of a role. It’s not your typical role, and there’s a real sensitivity in your performance, which is kind of shocking given the aggressive tone of the rest of that film. You’re in just a handful of scenes, but the energy of the movie picks up whenever you are on screen. Was that a rewarding role for you?

    With Cobra and Bye Bye Baby, I have always been grateful that someone sees a sensitivity in me to do certain roles, because I never get to see those roles. I am never approached for them because I’m limited by my physical appearance. Which is too bad, because in movies you could make a 15-year-old look like a 90-year-old if you really want. I mean, there are so many things that live in you if you have it. And I certainly do. That’s why I’ve always said my real name is “Gitte.” That is a Danish name, and it speaks to the sensitive woman that I am. Then there is “Brigitte Nielsen,” who is outspoken, at times aggressive, wears a miniskirt, can handle any sword or any gun, and do any kind of thing. It’s that wonderful balance of two people that I basically am.

    But for my work, there are very, very few times that anyone wants to hire “Gitte,” the girl I really am. “Brigitte Nielsen” is someone I became when I was hired to do Red Sonja. So I don't think I have ever spoken in an interview – and I’ve done them for 40 years – who has recognized me for that. I’m really blown away. So yes, it was very nice for me and I wish it would happen more often, but I know it won’t. I enjoyed that and thought, “My god, I can’t believe that’s here.” And I’m actually a very, very good billiards player. I actually beat this Italian champion. It was a very interesting role. Jason Connery was very sweet and Carol Alt is a very, very nice woman. We had a good time. It was a rushed shoot, but a great character.
    continued next post
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    Continued from previous post


    Photofest
    Red Sonja

    Let’s talk a little about the original Red Sonja. What did that role mean to you at the time?

    I think it was teaching about how war and love go hand in hand. In my entire life growing up I was scared, but I was so eager, to love. I was not frightened by love so much. So Red Sonja was very much a part of who I was. And then of course, the excitement of looking like what I call in my inner dreams because I’m Danish, a Viking, even though she wouldn’t be there, it just spoke to me. And it excited me to be embracing Red Sonja. I was very emotional and also very nervous, which is a very good thing I think when you’re acting, because you’re eager to learn more and to be very, very, very good. It was my first movie, and a lot of things were requested of me, and I had to learn things very, very fast because the last thing I had ever thought to do with my life was to become an actress. It had never been on my wishlist, but neither was modeling because I was too tall. I thought I was going to own a bakery, or work in a library, something like that.

    …We shot for seven months. It was a very, very long shoot, long hours. I worked so hard and so fast during those seven months. It was the fastest I’ve ever grown, and I was kind of ready with my young baby son to take on life, big time. And that’s exactly what I did when I finished Red Sonja and I went to New York and the whole Sylvester saga starts.

    But Red Sonja was amazing. When I look back on it, on director Richard Fleischer having one camera with a fish monster…I still think it was not that great. But Arnold Schwarzenegger was amazing; he still is. And Richard Fleischer was a sweetheart. He is another one who is not around anymore. Wow. Isn’t it crazy how life goes on? Anyway, Red Sonja is an incredible character and I’m so…I want to be like the mother for whoever’s going to be the next Red Sonja, if they ever get it off the ground with all the difficulties they are having.

    How do you feel about the fact that Millennium still hasn’t taken Bryan Singer off of the upcoming Red Sonja movie?

    You know what? I don't know if he’s taken off or if he’s not. You tell me he has not?

    The movie is off of their production slate, but that doesn’t mean he’s not attached to it anymore.

    I don’t know what’s going on with Red Sonja because we’ve heard about a remake for years now. I personally think that Singer is a great director. I also think every allegation should be investigated; there should be justice. I think people too often are jumping to conclusions before they know where they stand. But of course, if someone is found guilty on the right evidence, yes, you should be taken away whether you are a director, a banker, whatever you are. And you need to be punished for something if you’ve done something terribly wrong.

    As for Singer’s situation: we will see what’s going to happen. I hope Red Sonja is going to eventually move on. But why don’t they go with a great female director? Like Susanne Bier, a great Danish director? That would be fantastic! And she would put me in Red Sonja because I need to be in there! Or you could do Patty Jenkins! She’s an incredible director! This is a huge female character and I can see a fantastic female director. Let me have my first project as a director! I’ll do it! (Laughs) I’m kidding. But a female director wouldn’t be a bad idea if Singer is eventually off the project for whatever is going to happen. I’m not one to say.

    I mean, of course, we all know it would be a remake more than a sequel, but it’s not an easy task. It really is not an easy task to bring Red Sonja back … but she needs to be around. She’s amazing and she’s beautiful and clever and she’s all of the things that true gorgeous women are!

    I just want to put a word out: we talked about with Steven Caple, our director of Creed II about the Dragos, because he’s so into the Dragos. And I just want to say that if they create another great movie franchise, the Drago saga has to be next!
    She still looks like she can kick ass.
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  10. #10
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    Jill Soloway

    So happy this is back on track.

    ‘Transparent’ Creator Jill Soloway To Write & Direct ‘Red Sonja’
    By Mike Fleming Jr
    Co-Editor-in-Chief, Film
    @DeadlineMike


    Jesse Chamberlain Marble

    EXCLUSIVE: Millennium Films has set Transparent creator Jill Soloway to write and direct Red Sonja, a film that went back to the drawing board earlier this year after Bryan Singer was dropped as director. Soloway is coming in with a bold new take, and gives the film much better optics that already has studios approaching Millennium. Soloway’s Topple Productions partner Andrea Sperling is also coming aboard as a producer.


    Marvel Comics

    “I can’t wait to bring Red Sonja’s epic world to life,” Soloway told Deadline. “Exploring this powerful mythology and evolving what it means to be a heroine is an artistic dream come true.”

    It is the first deal for Soloway since directing The Transparent Movie Musicale Finale that this fall will wrap Soloway’s groundbreaking Amazon series creation. Casting will start anew for an actress to play Red Sonja, who originated as a comic book heroine in the 1970s and has appeared in hundreds of comics over the decades, with Dynamite Entertainment still publishing them today. It will be the second film treatment for the character following the 1985 actioner that starred Brigitte Nielsen and Arnold Schwarzenegger.

    Millennium Media will finance, and Millennium Films will produce with Topple Campbell/Grobman Films and Cinelou Films, with rights holder Luke Lieberman exec producer.

    Soloway might be new to event-sized action movies, but the writer-director has been a pioneer ushering in inclusion with the celebrated Amazon series Transparent, directing 17 episodes and the finale in the process. Soloway co-wrote with sister Faith Soloway (who wrote the music) The Transparent Movie Musicale Finale for Amazon Prime Video. It is described as a two-hour love letter to the Pfefferman family, framed around the death of Maura (played in the series by Jeffrey Tambor), with 10 original songs playing out in the buildup to Maura’s funeral.

    Topple is ramping up its movie efforts and since Red Sonja has to be scripted, cast and prepped, it is likely Soloway will direct something before it.

    Millennium has been trying to revive Red Sonja for at least a decade, coming closest with a version where Robert Rodriguez was going to direct Rose McGowan in the role. The project came back around after the success of Wonder Woman demonstrated the potential for female-driven superhero films. While Millennium’s action and genre slates have had mostly men at the helm, the company has made an emphasis on become more inclusive in hiring filmmakers. It recently set Tanya Wexler to direct Kate Beckinsale in the action thriller Jolt.

    Singer was set as Red Sonja director last year, even after being fired from Bohemian Rhapsody two weeks before wrapping, for repeated absences. The movie was at the time asserting itself in the Oscar Best Picture race with a box office run that ended with an astounding $903 million worldwide, and Singer also had an enviable superhero track record with X-Men. But Singer was dropped after the publication of an article in The Atlantic that leveled tawdry allegations of sexual assault and misconduct against the director. Despite Singer’s denials, distributors wanted no part of it, and it would have been a challenge to find an actress to play the character who, in the comic mythology, is out to avenge her family, with sexual assault a part of that tapestry.

    Soloway is repped by UTA, Jackoway Austen Tyerman and ID.
    Gene Ching
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  11. #11
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    Tasha Huo

    I know Tasha. We worked together on The Adept.

    'Tomb Raider' Showrunner Tasha Huo to Write 'Red Sonja' With Joey Soloway for Millennium (Exclusive)
    FEBRUARY 26, 2021 12:48PM by Alex Ritman

    Courtesy of Illiana Garcia
    Millennium are launching pre-sales at the EFM on their long-gestating fantasy project.
    Red Sonja has a new writer.

    Tasha Huo, the rising screenwriter who is showrunning and executive producing the upcoming animated Tomb Raider series for Netflix and Legendary, has been tapped to write the long-gestating fantasy reboot with director Joey Soloway. Millennium will be pre-selling the film at next week's EFM.

    The fantasy project — based on the sword and sorcery comic book by Dynamite Entertainment — appears now to be very much back on track for Millennium, where it has been in the works for a decade. Soloway (Transparent) was announced as writer and director in 2019, taking over from Bryan Singer who was dropped following an investigative report into the filmmaker in The Atlantic.

    Casting on the film is set to begin immediately.

    "I have loved Red Sonja forever and I feel so honored to help shepherd her story and start this cinematic journey. There could not be a greater moment in our world for Red Sonja's ways of wielding power and her connection with nature and our planet," said Soloway. "She is an ancient heroine with an epic calling, and translating that to the screen is a dream come true for me as a filmmaker. I can't wait to collaborate with Tasha on this vision."

    Added Millennium co-president Jonathan Younger: "We’re very excited to be bringing Red Sonja to the market and the world. This has been a long time coming. Having Joey Soloway at the helm of this feminist icon franchise is the perfect recipe for a magical adventure, which is exactly what the world needs today."

    Mark Canton (300, Power) and Courtney Solomon (After) produce alongside Christa Campbell and Lati Grobman on behalf of Campbell Grobman Films and Andrea Sperling on behalf of Topple, while for Millennium Yariv Lerner, Jeffrey Greenstein, Yunger, Les Weldon, Joe Gatta, and Tanner Mobley produce.

    Avi Lerner, Boaz Davidson, and Trevor Short exec producer for Millennium, together with Dorothy Canton and Luke Lieberman. Luke Lieberman on behalf of Red Sonja LLC, Nick Barrucci on behalf of Dynamite Entertainment, and Dorothy Canton are also executive producers.

    Huo, who also wrote for Netflix's The Witcher: Blood Origin reboot, is repped by The Gersch Agency.


    ALEX RITMAN
    alex.ritman@thr.com
    @alexritman
    Gene Ching
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  12. #12
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    RIP Frank Thorne

    Frank Thorne, Legendary Red Sonja Artist, Dies at 90
    Legendary comic book artist Frank Thorne, best known for his work on Marvel's Red Sonja, has passed away at the age of 90 alongside his wife, Marilyn.

    BY NOAH DOMINGUEZ
    PUBLISHED 1 DAYS AGO



    Frank Thorne, the legendary comic book artist perhaps best known for his work on Marvel Comics' Red Sonja, passed away the same day as his wife, Marilyn. He was 90 years old.

    Numerous industry professionals relayed news of Thorne's passing on Facebook, including comic book writer Paul Levitz. "Bidding farewell to Frank Thorne, an artist who progressively developed his style into a more and more personal expression. I had the pleasure of working with Frank in his later DC days, when he did some magnificent work for the mystery titles, and stepped in to pencil for Jim Aparo on The Spectre, matching his storytelling approach carefully to Jim's," Levitz wrote.

    "But Frank had the best time of his career on Marvel's Red Sonja, who he made both powerful and sexy," he continued. "He was probably the first working mainstream [artist] to revel in [cosplay], becoming the Wizard who acted with Wendy Pini's Sonja at show after show. A man of talent, charm and great wit. Good journey onward, Frank, you will be long remembered." Additionally, a post from fellow artist Chuck Patton explains that Thorne's wife, Marilyn, passed away as well -- seemingly a few hours after him. That being said, the causes of death are not available at this time.

    Born on June 16, 1930, Thorne began his comic book career in 1948, penciling romance titles for the now-defunct Standard Comics. He went on to work on a number of newspaper strips and comic books, including Perry Mason, Flash Gordon and The Green Hornet. Starting with 1976's Marvel Feature #2, Thorne started drawing Red Sonja, a character created by Roy Thomas and Barry Smith for Marvel Comics' Conan the Barbarian series (who was also partially based on Robert E. Howard's characters Red Sonya and Dark Agnes). He succeeded Dick Giordano, who drew the character in Marvel Feature #1.

    Thorne went on to draw Red Sonja throughout most of her first eponymous solo series at Marvel, which ran for a total of 15 issues from January 1977 to May 1979. The artist then went on to create several erotic fantasy comics, writing and illustrating "Moonshine McJugs" for Playboy, "Lann" for Heavy Metal and "Danger Rangerette" for National Lampoon. He also created the miniseries Ribit for Comico, as well as a number of graphic novels for Fantagraphics Books, including Ghita of Alizarr, The Iron Devil and The Devil's Angel. Thorne's work earned him multiple honors, including a National Cartoonists Society award in 1963, a San Diego Inkpot Award in 1978 and a Playboy editorial award.



    About The Author

    Noah Dominguez (1915 Articles Published)
    Noah E. Dominguez is a jr. news editor at Comic Book Resources who joined the site as a writer in the summer of 2018. He has also written for sites like WhatCulture and Gaming Access Weekly (formerly Gamer Assault Weekly), and holds a degree in mass communication.
    Passed alongside his wife.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
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    Hannah John-Kamen


    ‘Red Sonja’: Hannah John-Kamen to Star in Millennium’s Sword and Sorcery Feature (Exclusive)

    Joey Soloway is directing the project and co-wrote the script with Tasha Huo, the showrunner of the upcoming 'Tomb Raider' animated series.

    BY BORYS KIT

    MAY 5, 2021 10:31AM

    Hannah John-Kamen and Red Sonja
    DAVE J HOGAN/GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF DYNAMITE ENTERTAINMENT


    By Crom, the actress to wield the savage sword of Red Sonja has been found.

    Hannah John-Kamen, who starred as a villain in Ant-Man and the Wasp and was a lead in series Brave New World, will star in Millennium’s long-gestating sword and sorcery feature.

    Joey Soloway is directing the project and co-wrote the script with Tasha Huo, the screenwriter who is showrunning and executive producing the upcoming animated Tomb Raider series for Netflix and Legendary.

    “Hannah is a very talented actress who we’ve been following for years and she IS Red Sonja,” said Soloway in a statement. “Her range, sensibilities and strength are all qualities we have been looking for and we couldn’t be more excited to embark on this journey together.”

    Sonya was created by Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith for Marvel Comics’ Conan the Barbarian comic in the early 1970s and was an amalgam of several characters from Conan creator Robert E. Howard. The character, fiery and strong enough to go toe-to-toe with Conan while refusing his advances, proved popular enough to get her own book, continuing to this day even as the Howard and Conan licenses have moved through several companies. Millennium is saying their movie is based on the comic published by Dynamite Entertainment.

    When the project was shopped at the European Film Market earlier this year, Soloway noted, “There could not be a greater moment in our world for Red Sonja’s ways of wielding power and her connection with nature and our planet.” Soloway also noted that Sonja is “an ancient heroine with an epic calling.”

    Mark Canton (300) and Courtney Solomon (After) are producing alongside Christa Campbell and Lati Grobman of Campbell Grobman Films. Topple’s Andrea Sperling and Millennium’ Yariv Lerner, Jeffrey Greenstein, Yunger, Les Weldon, Joe Gatta, and Tanner Mobley are also producing.

    Millennium’s Avi Lerner, Boaz Davidson, and Trevor Short are exec producing along with Luke Lieberman on behalf of Red Sonja LLC, and Nick Barrucci of Dynamite Entertainment. Dorothy Canton is also an executive producer.

    The move is a big opportunity for John-Kamen, who has appeared in the Netflix series The Stranger, Steven Spielberg’s Ready Player One, and Tomb Raider with Alicia Vikander but will now find herself toplining an ambitious feature and portraying a recognizable pop culture figure

    The actress, who has garnered acclaim for her work across television, film and stage, recently wrapped production on Resident Evil: Welcome to Racoon City.

    She is repped by Paradigm, Scott Marshall Partners and Luber Roklin
    I guess I need to watch Ant-Man again. I don't remember the villainess.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Mich.
    Posts
    342
    She played "Ghost" in Ant Man and the Wasp (the 2nd film).

    She had the suit that could turn invisible/go in and out of dimensions.
    "God gave you a brain, and it annoys Him greatly when you choose not to use it."

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