Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 115

Thread: Hardcore bone breaks in MMA matches

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    22,250
    Quote Originally Posted by SevenStar View Post
    I am trying to find a clip of a no pivot step. Here is discussion on it on bullshido:

    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/site...30078-p-4.html

    several of them were taught not to pivot also. It is also mentioned in there that bas rutten and cro cop are propoents of not pivoting. I was taught that by a dutch guy, so it kinda falls in line.

    EDIT: skimming over it, that is actually a decent thread - they talk about the cross being a common counter, about the arm swing and foot placement. I'm not registered on the site, so I can't see the vids and pics, but the discussion itself is good.
    The uselessness of BS aside, yes Bas does advocate the same thing and a few others too, yet the pivot is always there. no matter how slight, or you get a Shotokan Mawashi-geri and who wants that !!>!?!?!?!?!?

  2. #62
    here is one on martial arts planet:

    http://www.martialartsplanet.com/for...=17337&t=66840
    i'm nobody...i'm nobody. i'm a tramp, a bum, a hobo... a boxcar and a jug of wine... but i'm a straight razor if you get to close to me.

    -Charles Manson

    I will punch, kick, choke, throw or joint manipulate any nationality equally without predjudice.

    - Shonie Carter

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    22,250
    Quote Originally Posted by SevenStar View Post
    here is one on martial arts planet:

    http://www.martialartsplanet.com/for...=17337&t=66840
    No need, I know what you are refering too, seen Bas do it in person and in his Big DVD of Combat.
    Not my personal fav whay of doing it, but I was taught the round house from ITF and learned the MT round from Chai and one of his student.

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    The uselessness of BS aside, yes Bas does advocate the same thing and a few others too, yet the pivot is always there. no matter how slight, or you get a Shotokan Mawashi-geri and who wants that !!>!?!?!?!?!?
    I am not opposed to the mawashi geri, actually. One of the hardest roundhouse kicks I have felt was from a little japanese guy from kumamoto.

    And actually, since we are kinda on that topic now, I have seen thai boxers advocate chambering as well.
    i'm nobody...i'm nobody. i'm a tramp, a bum, a hobo... a boxcar and a jug of wine... but i'm a straight razor if you get to close to me.

    -Charles Manson

    I will punch, kick, choke, throw or joint manipulate any nationality equally without predjudice.

    - Shonie Carter

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    22,250
    Quote Originally Posted by SevenStar View Post
    I am not opposed to the mawashi geri, actually. One of the hardest roundhouse kicks I have felt was from a little japanese guy from kumamoto.

    And actually, since we are kinda on that topic now, I have seen thai boxers advocate chambering as well.
    I am kyokushin, we do a chambered round (thai) kick, so....

  6. #66
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    Posts
    202
    Quote Originally Posted by SevenStar View Post
    you always step with a thai kick. The reason is that a common counter to that kick is a straight right. if you are stepping offline as you kick, there is a greater chance that the kick will miss. consequently, you are taught to step and kick. Even though different teachers have told me to pivot or not pivot, all of them have advocated the initial step.
    I'm assuming you mean that by stepping out for the kick, "there is a greater chance that the straight right punch will miss" (i.e. not the kick). This is what we are taught also. When training the leg kick with the aforementioned suitcase pad, we usually simulate this by having the person holding the pad pretend to throw a right while the other kicks, to make sure that they step outside far enough.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    Posts
    202
    Quote Originally Posted by Becca View Post
    He didn't say he doesn't TURN into the kick. He just steps into it rather than piviting into it. Both very good techniques. As has been stated, the difference is in preference, either personal or stylistic. I step into them if I need to close the gap and pivit if I'm already nice and close.
    Agreed, I followed what SevenStar said when he described that, thanks. In Northern Shaolin we were always told to turn the foot out prior to the kick, so that it would be positioned correctly and so that the supporting foot would be rooted to the ground (with the heel planted firmly on the ground). That's why it took me so long to get used to pivoting on the ball of my foot in Muay Thai. Now that I'm used to it, I find that it works much better for my particular body mechanics.

  8. #68
    .....
    Quote Originally Posted by boshea View Post
    I'm assuming you mean that by stepping out for the kick, "there is a greater chance that the straight right punch will miss" (i.e. not the kick). This is what we are taught also. When training the leg kick with the aforementioned suitcase pad, we usually simulate this by having the person holding the pad pretend to throw a right while the other kicks, to make sure that they step outside far enough.
    oops...
    i'm nobody...i'm nobody. i'm a tramp, a bum, a hobo... a boxcar and a jug of wine... but i'm a straight razor if you get to close to me.

    -Charles Manson

    I will punch, kick, choke, throw or joint manipulate any nationality equally without predjudice.

    - Shonie Carter

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    22,250
    Just went over the Bas rutten dvd and some other one's I have in regards to the round kick "without" the pivot.
    I put without in quotations because they ALL pivot ( some more than others), the difference is wither the pivot as the kick or as the step to the angle.

    Lets say we have our left foot forward and will round kick with out right leg, typically you will either pivot on the left foot ( typically the ball of the foot) or you will step to the side on an angle and turn the support foot while stepping ( still a "pivot").

    If your toes (supporting leg) are pointing towards your opponent, unless after the kick they STILL are pointing that way, you have "pivoted".

    Wither you do it on the ball of your foot or in the "air" as you step, it still gets turned away from your target.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Behind you!
    Posts
    6,163
    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Freak accidents happen, no way to prepare for them.

    Not really applicable to this thread though...
    I disagree. The thread was originally debating the sense of throwing shin kicks over other roundhouse kicks due to their likelihood to break the throwers' legs.

    My point was just that these are mostly freak accidents, and so it is not a reflection on shin kicking. However, the chance of this kind of freak accident occurring will be increased by bad training practice in throwing this (or many other kinds of kicks) in training. This woman is a pro-fighter and had obviously thrown thousands of kicks, yet her leg was obviously weakened in some way (if you watch the vid, she doesn't take that much stress in the fall) - quite probably a hairline fracture.

    I commented that this may be a common problem earlier, which nobody commented further on, instead turning the discussion to the right way to throw these kicks - which is of course valid and useful.

    Whatever... I don't believe I just typed all that **** to justify one post in passing!

    Back to your discussion then, chaps...
    its safe to say that I train some martial arts. Im not that good really, but most people really suck, so I feel ok about that - Sunfist

    Sometime blog on training esp in Japan

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    22,250
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Punch View Post
    I disagree. The thread was originally debating the sense of throwing shin kicks over other roundhouse kicks due to their likelihood to break the throwers' legs.

    My point was just that these are mostly freak accidents, and so it is not a reflection on shin kicking. However, the chance of this kind of freak accident occurring will be increased by bad training practice in throwing this (or many other kinds of kicks) in training. This woman is a pro-fighter and had obviously thrown thousands of kicks, yet her leg was obviously weakened in some way (if you watch the vid, she doesn't take that much stress in the fall) - quite probably a hairline fracture.

    I commented that this may be a common problem earlier, which nobody commented further on, instead turning the discussion to the right way to throw these kicks - which is of course valid and useful.

    Whatever... I don't believe I just typed all that **** to justify one post in passing!

    Back to your discussion then, chaps...
    I think her leg break came from "shear" stress factors, not impact.

    Bone conditioning is a "mix bag", it really hard to tell if you are conditoning the bone or desensitizing it.
    I would assume that there is some increase in density of the shin bone when its conditioned properly, problem is, that doesn't change the "weak spot" of the shin bone structure.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    36th Chamber
    Posts
    12,419

    Hardcore bone breaks in MMA matches

    He most honors my style who learns under it to destroy the teacher. -- Walt Whitman

    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson View Post
    As a mod, I don't have to explain myself to you.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    22,250
    That's gonna leave a mark !
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  14. #74
    It hurts just looking at it...

    Anyway, I'm new to kung fu and something like that scares the crap out of me. It there a stronger part of your leg to deliver a kick with so that you don't break it when you kick someone with strong shins?

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    22,250
    Quote Originally Posted by solidtux View Post
    It hurts just looking at it...

    Anyway, I'm new to kung fu and something like that scares the crap out of me. It there a stronger part of your leg to deliver a kick with so that you don't break it when you kick someone with strong shins?
    Typically, you wanna kick IN at a 90 deg or DOWN, never up, the reason being that kicking up makes you hit with the flat of the shin and not the edge and the blocker will be blocking with the edge.
    You wanna turn your body over and slightly down when you low kick to make sure your kick/shin comes over and down.
    Keeping your body upright makes it harder to turn over your shin and you end up hitting with the flat.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •