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Thread: Print publishing death watch

  1. #46
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    The Top 25

    We're way out of this league, but the numbers are interesting. I've done a little formatting on them for the table cut~&~paste.
    24 of Top 25 Magazines Show Newsstand-Sales Decreases in First Half
    Subscriptions and Total Circulation Figures Hold Steady

    by Nat Ives
    Published: August 31, 2009

    NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- Newsstand sales took their sharpest dive of the recession yet in the first half of the year, the semiannual report from the Audit Bureau of Circulations revealed today. Single-copy sales, hurt not just by the economy but also a temporary disruption at magazine wholesalers, fell 12.4% from a year earlier, following year-over-year declines of 11.1% in the second half of 2008 and 6.3% in the first half of 2008.

    Twenty-four of the top 25 newsstand sellers posted declines in the first half of 2009, according to the audit bureau, including top seller Cosmopolitan, down 7.8% from the first half of 2008. The lone gainer in the top 25 was Real Simple, which posted a 1.2% increase.

    Total paid and verified circulation, however, slipped just 1.2% as subscriptions held their ground, gaining 0.6%, and publishers reduced their use of verified copies, which are distributed free in public places such as doctors' offices, by 3.9%.

    Among big magazines (those that report paid and verified circulations over 100,000 copies), 10 of the top 25 posted top-line gains, including the biggest, AARP the Magazine, where overall paid circulation rose 2.8% to 24.6 million.

    The biggest top-line gainers included Global Traveler, up 48.3% to 106,654 copies; Off-Road Adventures, up 31.1% to 108,654; Women's Health, up 29.7% to 1.5 million; Hobby Farms, up 29.7% to 126,270; and Taste of Home Healthy Cooking, up 29.4% to 759,472.

    The newsstand damage had been anticipated for a first half whose chief bright spot was somber and temporary: special tributes and extra editions devoted to Michael Jackson.

    Top 25 U.S. consumer magazines by total paid and verified circulation

    PUBLICATION~6 MONTHS ENDING 6/30/09~6 MONTHS ENDING 6/30/08~% CHANGE

    AARP the Magazine~24,554,819~23,893,285~2.77%
    AARP Bulletin~24,305,715~24,248,164~0.24%
    Reader's Digest~8,158,652~8,445,916~-3.40%
    Better Homes and Gardens~7,634,197~7,651,178~-0.22%
    National Geographic~4,708,307~5,061,047~-6.97%
    Good Housekeeping~4,630,397~4,668,818~-0.82%
    Woman's Day~3,933,990~3,876,483~1.48%
    Family Circle~3,932,510~3,896,088~0.93%
    Ladies' Home Journal~3,842,791~3,844,222~-0.04%
    AAA Westways~3,831,215~3,820,529~0.28%
    People~3,615,858~3,803,217~-4.93%
    Game Informer Magazine~3,601,201~3,498,935~2.92%
    Time~3,372,240~3,389,166~-0.50%
    Prevention~3,312,624~3,331,080~-0.55%
    Taste of Home~3,302,601~3,198,029~3.27%
    Sports Illustrated~3,252,298~3,260,964~-0.27%
    TV Guide~2,934,969~3,274,187~-10.36%
    Cosmopolitan~2,907,436~2,937,861~-1.04%
    Southern Living~2,840,241~2,802,444~1.35%
    AAA Via~2,783,833~2,824,461~-1.44%
    Newsweek~2,646,613~2,737,450~-3.32%
    Maxim~2,537,130~2,535,884~0.05%
    AAA Going Places~2,521,974~2,547,092~-0.99%
    AAA Living~2,458,902~2,445,146~0.56%
    Playboy~2,453,266~2,700,653~-9.16%
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #47
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    another one bites the dust...

    ...make that another four.

    Conde Nast pulls plug on Gourmet magazine
    Andrew Vanacore, Associated Press
    Tuesday, October 6, 2009

    (10-06) 04:00 PDT NEW YORK -- Conde Nast Publications is closing Gourmet, the nation's oldest food magazine, and three other money-losing titles as the high-end publisher tries to weather a devastating advertising slump.

    In addition to Gourmet, which had a circulation of 980,000 last year, the publisher is closing Modern Bride, Elegant Bride and Cookie, a parenting magazine. Earlier in the year, it killed publication of Portfolio, a business magazine, and Domino, a lifestyle title.

    "We're all stunned, sad," Gourmet's editor, Ruth Reichl, wrote in a post on Twitter.

    Consultants from McKinsey & Co. have been helping the publisher, known for elegant publications and high costs, identify ways to cut its expenses. Despite Gourmet's large audience, the magazine has suffered one of the worst ad declines of any popular title. Its ad pages were down 50 percent in the second quarter from the year before, according to the Publishers Information Bureau.

    Conde Nast, run by billionaire S.I. Newhouse Jr., publishes such magazines as Vogue, the New Yorker and Wired and is a unit of privately held Advance Publications Inc. The company's remaining 19 magazines also include one on food, Bon Appetit, which has a larger circulation than Gourmet, at 1.4 million. Bon Appetit's decline in ad pages in the second quarter was only slightly less steep, at 40 percent.

    Conde Nast spokeswoman Maurie Perl said the roughly 180 employees of Gourmet, Cookie, Modern Bride and Elegant Bride will leave the company with severance packages this week.

    Gourmet, revered by many culinary aficionados, was launched in 1941 by Earle R. MacAusland as "the magazine of good living." It was known for more than just recipes: It dived into extended discourse about travel, wine and food, such as the 2004 piece in which David Foster Wallace argued against the practice of boiling lobsters to death.

    Now, Conde Nast said, Gourmet's brand will live on in books and TV programming. It also plans to continue publishing Gourmet recipes on Epicurious.com.

    Magazine consultant Martin Walker said closing Gourmet makes financial sense because Bon Appetit should be able to pick up many of the magazine's subscribers and advertisers. Many advertisers were trending toward food titles with a more affordable sensibility anyway, he said.

    As Modern Bride and Elegant Bride close, a third Conde Nast magazine, Brides, will increase its frequency to monthly instead of every two months.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #48
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    Print is an awesome form of media.

    obviously! it's been around this long!

    In our lifetimes, it will always be serviceable.

    People will always want to hold a book, a magazine or some other form of reading material.

    Newspapers? Not so much. Running huge presses and huge distribution hubs to service a daily newspaper is a bit much in the day and age of digital. TV started to kill that quite a while ago and the internet and more tv and radio is killing that off, but people still like to take a dump and read the paper. lol Or, have a coffee. anyway...

    If smaller print centers were set up on a network that would make distribution completely local, with a lot less waste will be the next step in the industry. Or partnerships B2B style that will see advertising covering distribution fees in localized regions using sub contracted print shops.

    Final point, in our lifetimes, print will be around and as you are now a niche to begin with, you only need to maintain the quality of content to compete.

    You got the web part covered.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  4. #49
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    Thumbs up

    good point David,

    I recently traveled by plane from Sacramento to Oregon. There are many magazines for sale with a big selection to choose from at the airports going both ways. I spent some time watching and they sell well. Fewer newpapers are being offered but they sell.

    I agree with David, magazines are here to stay.Some will fall but in time they might be back.
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  5. #50
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    The body count

    2009 (so far) +259-383 = -124
    2008 +335-525 = -190
    Mag Bag: 383 Magazines Closed Jan-Oct.
    by Erik Sass, Thursday, October 15, 2009, 3:11 PM

    A total of 383 magazines have closed in the first nine months of 2009, compared with just 259 new titles launching. This continues the trend of the last couple of years, when more magazines closed than launched, according to MediaFinder.com, a property of Oxbridge Communications. Conversely, the number of closures in 2009 was smaller than 2008, when 525 titles closed and 335 titles launched.

    However, the casualty list in 2009 included considerably more major titles than 2008 -- and the year isn't even over.

    Big titles that met their demise this year include Gourmet, announced in October; Cookie, in October; Southern Accents, in August; Vibe, Nickelodeon in June; Portfolio, Blender, Best Life Travel & Leisure Golf, and Figure in March; Hallmark Magazine in February, Domino, Teen, Wondertime, Country Home in January.

    The categories that saw the most closures included regional interest, where 31 magazines folded; business, 14; and lifestyle, 13. On the positive side, several categories saw a number of new launches, including -- ironically -- regional interest, with 15 new magazines, including Maine Magazine and The 45th, focusing on northern Michigan. The food category saw 14 new launches, including Edible Queens. Health and fitness saw 13 new launches, and the home category also got 13 new titles.

    Mediafinder.com also noted that 64 publications gave print editions the ax, but maintained an online presence. Still, the ratio of magazines migrating to Web publication versus magazines shuttering completely is smaller. This suggests that online-only status isn't a viable business model for most print publishers.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #51
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    Thumbs up

    Health and fitness saw 13 new publications, a good sign. The world is " shaking the fleas" off it's back. The depression - recession is having profound results as we pounder through this mess. When " the fat lady sings" Tai Chi Kung Fu will be a winner.
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  7. #52
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    Cut $100 million

    I can't even fathom these kinds of numbers in publishing...
    October 29, 2009, 5:22 pm
    Time Inc. to Cut $100 Million; Extensive Layoffs Are Expected
    By Stephanie Clifford

    Signaling that worse times are ahead for magazines, Time Inc. is expected to announce next week that it will cut $100 million from costs, including another big round of layoffs.

    The timing is coordinated with the third-quarter earnings announcement from its parent company, Time Warner, sources said. That is scheduled for Wednesday morning.

    Time Inc., the publisher of magazines like Time, Fortune, and People, has already cut costs drastically: a year ago, it announced it was dismissing 6 percent of its work force, or about 600 people.

    But that was apparently not enough to make up for revenue declines. The $100 million in costs is expected to come largely from layoffs, said sources, who asked to remain anonymous as they were not authorized to discuss the matter.

    Michael Nathanson, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein & Company, said that he expected third-quarter revenue at Time Inc. would fall about 19 percent, to $900 million.

    “For the year, we’re at about $3.7 billion, and this company had done almost $5 billion as late as 2007,” Mr. Nathanson said.

    Since 2004, Time Inc. has cut about $800 million in costs, Mr. Nathanson said.

    Over all, Mr. Nathanson said, he expects Time Warner to post earnings of 54 cents a share, well up from the 30 cents a share it posted in the third quarter of 2008.

    Time Inc. has been cutting costs over the last several years. Since 2007, it has shut down magazines including Business 2.0, Cottage Living, Southern Accents and Life, which it had revived as a newspaper supplement. Last week, Fortune announced that it would no longer be published every other week, and would drop its frequency to 18 issues a year, from 25. A stricter expense-account policy has been in place for some time, and some magazines have decreased the weight of the paper they use.

    A number of Time Inc. employees are covered by a union contract, which mandates severance in case of layoffs. Employees of Time, Sports Illustrated, People, Money, Fortune and Fortune Small Business are covered by agreements with the Newspaper Guild of America, said Bob Townsend, local representative for the guild.

    Covered employees at those magazines are eligible for severance packages in a layoff, of two weeks’ pay for every year of employment, with a cap of 52 weeks’ pay. Longtime employees get a bonus, with 20-year veterans getting an additional eight weeks’ pay, and 25-year employees an additional 10.

    Mr. Townsend said that the Guild was usually notified in advance of layoffs, but it had not heard anything yet. “We have not been told there are going to be any layoffs next week,” Mr. Townsend said.

    Dawn Bridges, a Time Inc. spokeswoman, declined to comment.

    The layoffs and cost-cutting follow moves at competitors. Forbes is in the midst of dismissing about 40 to 60 of its editorial staff, and most Condé Nast magazines are reducing their budgets by about 25 percent, which has included handfuls of layoffs at many of its magazines.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #53
    Mediafinder.com also noted that 64 publications gave print editions the ax, but maintained an online presence. Still, the ratio of magazines migrating to Web publication versus magazines shuttering completely is smaller. This suggests that online-only status isn't a viable business model for most print publishers.
    The problem is that it's really hard to monetize your internet offerings. I know I'd like to find a good way with the media company I manage http:www.JTV.tv, but the money just doesn't seem to be there. The sad trend is that Advertisers pay only a fraction of what they'd pay on the hard copy and people don't seem to be interested in paying for online content that they used to have to subscribe to in order to receive.

    I wish I had the answer because I think it's sad that we're losing all of our newspapers and magazines.

  9. #54
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    pay for computer work

    Quote Originally Posted by MightyB View Post
    The problem is that it's really hard to monetize your internet offerings. I know I'd like to find a good way with the media company I manage http:www.JTV.tv, but the money just doesn't seem to be there. The sad trend is that Advertisers pay only a fraction of what they'd pay on the hard copy and people don't seem to be interested in paying for online content that they used to have to subscribe to in order to receive.

    I wish I had the answer because I think it's sad that we're losing all of our newspapers and magazines.
    Ahhhhh welllll...... my son assembled one of those first 4K kits in the 70's and always wanted to be a programmer. He got a degree as an architect with CAD, and spent decades building up computers for folks - and websites - and writing for programmers - and couldn't make a living at it ever. After turning 40, he's finally got a good job - but in a plant where his CAD background is good and his ability to program is very beneficial. However, the plant makes products, not software or computers......

    He spent at least 20 years trying to get folks to pay him good money for programming and/or computer work , and it never happened for him.

    The key issue is... everyone he worked for had this same problem, no one wants to pay much - or anything - for computer related stuff.....

    At my age, I will always want something in print over reading it on a screen. If something is important enough to read that I'll pay something for it, I'll download the pdf and print it off and then read it at leisure. To me, stuff on the screen is work, and at 5 it's shut off, or sooner.

    Younger folks - 40 and under - will stay up all night reading a screen - every nite - but they will be less likely to pay for stuff then we are. Rightly or wrongly, the world has come to accept computer stuff as a given, like water or air, necessary to life but free or close to it.... for better or worse, Wii and the other game producers have established the value of computer stuff at their level.....

    just my 2 cents worth....
    .... Skip

  10. #55
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    We will not doubt get both.

    Visit the past in order to discover something new.

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  11. #56
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    Thumbs up hope



    Many poeple will never give up print, there will always be the need.
    Visit the past in order to discover something new.

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  12. #57
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    Hail and Farewell

    Quote Originally Posted by SIFU RON View Post


    Many poeple will never give up print, there will always be the need.
    Got my copy of "Fortune Small Business" today - we all own a small business don't we? - the Editor's Letter says:

    "Like the entrepreneurs we write about, this magazine is subject to the iron laws of capitalism. In a harsh advertising climate it has become increasingly difficult for our corporate parent, Time Inc., to publish "Fortune Small Business" profitably. So after 10 years of covering global entrepreneurship in all its forms (CMA shools???) "FSB" will cease publication with the current issue."

    Who woulda thought Time, Inc. would have a problem carrying a little pub along???

    I guess you're lucky to have an online store Gene... you're the future.. Time, Inc.'s the past...
    .... Skip

  13. #58
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    Some related trends in today's news...

    ...you know, Skip J., one of my biggest fears now is having to write a Publisher's Corner like that Editor's note. If I could just get half of the forum to subscribe, we'd be in great shape.

    New round of cutbacks coming at Gannett newspapers
    By ANDREW VANACORE, AP Business Writer
    Tuesday, December 1, 2009
    (12-01) 16:53 PST New York (AP) --

    Newspaper publisher Gannett Co. imposed a new round of cutbacks Tuesday, with USA Today reducing its newsroom staff by 5 percent, as the industry continues to suffer through an extended advertising slump.

    Along with 26 newsroom jobs at USA Today, 11 positions will be cut at USA Weekend magazine, a weekly insert in other newspapers. And nonunion workers at other Gannett newspapers will have to take more unpaid furloughs, after already taking forced time off this year.

    USA Today, which sells many of its copies in hotels and airports, has been hit especially hard by the advertising slump and a falloff in travel, which knocked it out of the No. 1 position in U.S. newspaper circulation.

    The Wall Street Journal has grabbed that spot, although that includes online subscriptions, as it is one of the few major newspapers that charges Web readers. USA Today still has the top print circulation.

    Gannett shares rose 12 cents, 1.2 percent, to close Tuesday at $10.01.

    Other media companies have been shedding workers as well. The New York Times, The Associated Press and Time Inc. have announced job cuts in recent weeks.

    "While advertising is showing some signs of picking up, the economic outlook for 2010 remains weak and the decline in travel has contributed to a recent drop in circulation," USA Today's executive editor, John Hillkirk, told employees in a memo.

    Hillkirk said the laid-off employees would get severance pay equal to the difference between their salaries and what they can get from state unemployment benefits. He said the severance would come for one week for each year worked at the company.

    USA Weekend is cutting seven positions immediately and four more in March, according to a staff memo from Marcia Bullard, the magazine's president. Its remaining staff is being combined with that of USA Today.

    Bob ****ey, who heads Gannett's U.S. community publishing unit, told employees at the division's 82 newspapers that nonunion workers will have to take one unpaid week off during the first quarter of next year, amounting to about a 2 percent cut in pay. He said the company is asking union representatives to support furloughs as well. Corporate employees at Gannett are also taking the furlough, he said.

    Gannett, which is based in McLean, Va., and also owns 23 television stations, eliminated 10 percent of its jobs in 2008. It also cut 3 percent, or 1,400 positions, last summer.
    Jack London Square's Barnes & Noble to close
    Robert Selna, Chronicle Staff Writer
    Wednesday, December 2, 2009

    The Barnes & Noble bookstore, a longtime tenant at the center of Oakland's Jack London Square, is scheduled to close down early next year due to declining sales.

    The national bookseller's 17-year lease at the waterfront locale is set to expire Jan. 31 and is not expected to be renewed.

    Barnes & Noble representative David Deason said in a statement that the store saw sales drop during the past few years and had "reached a point where it can no longer be operated in a viable fashion."

    Last week, the New York company posted a larger second-quarter loss than the same period in 2008, totaling $24 million (43 cents per share). Large and small traditional bookstores have suffered due to online competition and the poor economy.

    The store's departure creates a notable vacancy at Jack London Square as the building's owner, Ellis Partners, works to fill newly developed space nearby as part of a broader effort to recast the area.

    The centerpiece of that plan is the new 70,000-square-foot Jack London Market, which sits below four floors of office space. The economy has delayed the scheduled opening of the market from spring or summer of this year to mid-2010. The office space currently is empty.

    "The departure (of Barnes & Noble) provides us with an opportunity to further our vision for the new Jack London Square," Ellis Partners said in a statement. "We are already in talks with a number of possible tenants whose businesses directly align with Jack London Square's identity as a bustling dining and entertainment district."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #59
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    guys like me

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    ...you know, Skip J., one of my biggest fears now is having to write a Publisher's Corner like that Editor's note. If I could just get half of the forum to subscribe, we'd be in great shape.
    Hey Gene;

    There's about 100,000 guys like me in this country - 50 or older, mostly 60 or older that take tai chi in a senior center class once per week; along with about two million women. Us old guys like to read print and have an interest in the CMA aspects of tai chi.

    If you could find a way to get tai chi instructors to hand out one free magazine to new students, most men would take one home to read it, and some would subscribe.... Men under 50 get their CMA info off the web for free, which you know better than me... At least you do have the online-store....
    .... Skip

  15. #60
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    another one bites the dust

    I hear what your saying Skip J., and we have explored that. There are two major confounding elements here. #1. Most all tai chi is taught independently, so seeking out each individual school is a daunting task. It's not like there's a national governing body such as in sports like tennis, golf or gymnastics. So it's hard to target teachers so. #2. And this is an odd one, there's a certain stigma of our title 'kung fu' within the tai chi community. I know that sounds really odd since tai chi is a form of kung fu. However we ran into this prejudice when we tried marketing more heavily to the new age readership. New agers (and here I'm clumping tai chi hippies into that demographic, despite my general distaste for the term) don't seem to want to associate with the implied B-movie violence of kung fu. The same seems to hold true for the elderly community. It's very strange, but a clear obstacle in us reaching that demographic.

    Editor & Publisher and Kirkus Reviews Close
    By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA
    Published: December 10, 2009

    Abandoning some of the best known names in trade publishing, the Nielsen Company said Thursday that it would shut down Editor & Publisher and Kirkus Reviews, and sell a stable of other publications, including Billboard and The Hollywood Reporter, to a newly formed media company.

    Nielsen’s plans to sell had been reported for months, but the news that E&P and Kirkus would close at the end of the year was a surprise. The company declined to discuss their financial performance, but executives said they had fought declining advertising and circulation, much like the newspaper and book industries they cover.

    A new company, e5 Global Media, bought Adweek, Mediaweek, Brandweek, Film Journal International, Backstage, The Hollywood Reporter and Billboard from Nielsen, with rights to the Clio Awards and Film Expo trade shows. The price was not disclosed, but published reports have put it at $70 million or more.

    E5 is a joint venture of Pluribus Capital Management, a private equity fund, and Guggenheim Partners, a financial services firm. The chairman of e5 is James Finkelstein, a principal of Pluribus, who also runs News Communications, publisher of the Who’s Who directories and The Hill, a Capitol Hill newspaper. Lachlan Murdoch, a son of Rupert Murdoch who once was in talks to join the buying group, was not involved in the deal.

    Nielsen is not abandoning trade publishing. It will retain several publications, including Contract Magazine and Progressive Grocer.

    Also on Thursday, Jonah Bloom, the top editor of Adweek’s rival, Advertising Age, left to join a blog publisher, Breaking Media. Advertising Age named Abbey Klaassen executive editor.

    For generations, Editor & Publisher, though not well known to the public, has been a leading source of newspaper industry news and job listings. It grew out of several publications, the oldest dating to 1884.

    “In a world full of people pronouncing and posturing and declaring about the media, E&P just kept doing good old-fashioned reporting about what was actually happening,” said Geneva Overholser, director of the School of Journalism at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

    Greg Mitchell, editor of Editor & Publisher, said the 10 staff members “got an e-mail last night that there would be a meeting today,” and expected to hear that the magazine had been sold or would go online only. Mr. Mitchell said that when they were told that it would close, “people were shocked and disappointed and a little angry about it.”

    He added, “We’re halfway through our January issue, and we haven’t gotten word whether that’s going forward or not.”

    Kirkus, a biweekly founded in 1933, annually published thousands of reviews of new books, a valuable source of promotional material for publishers and authors. Calls to top Kirkus editors were not returned.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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