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Thread: The Grandmaster

  1. #121
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    Crossed $5 mil domestic gross.

    It's down to 705 theaters now according to BOM.

    That's a funny review, PalmStriker. As an editor, I just gotta say - You really question a writer who misspells his title, especially now in the age of auto spell checks.
    The “Grand” Master: A Disenting View by Jon Nielson
    It's 'DisSenting'.

    I love this quote:
    The point I’m trying to make is that I don’t think the film was written to appeal to the serious martial artist.
    Talk about your martial myopia. Who writes a film like that? And where do those films go? Direct to DVD. Plus, just as some advice to any aspiring writers, never say something like "The point I’m trying to make..." If you can write, just make your point. Don't tell me you are 'trying' to make your point. If you cannot make your point, you probably should limit your writing to twitter. To quote Yoda, "Do or do not... there is no try."
    Gene Ching
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  2. #122
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    Officially submitted as an Oscar candidate

    We saw that coming

    Hong Kong sends Grandmaster to Oscars

    By Kevin Ma
    Mon, 23 September 2013, 15:15 PM (HKT)

    The Federation of Motion Film Producers of Hong Kong Ltd (香港電影製片家協會) has picked WONG Kar-wai 王家衛's The Grandmaster 一代宗師 as Hong Kong's representative at the Oscars.

    The China co-production was chosen over two other finalists: Herman YAU 邱禮濤's Ip Man: The Final Fight 葉問 終極一戰 and Dante LAM 林超賢's Unbeatable 激戰.

    The martial arts epic is the second Wong film to be chosen as Hong Kong's representative at the Academy Awards' Best Foreign Film race. The FPA sent In the Mood for Love 花樣年華 (2000) in 2000, but it did not make the list of finalists. Ang LEE 李安's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon 臥虎藏龍 (2000) earned Taiwan its first Best Foreign Film Oscar that year instead.

    According to the screening certificate from the Office for Film, Newspaper and Article Administration, a 104-minute cut was recently submitted to Hong Kong censors. It is likely the same as the US cut that The Weinstein Company recently released in North America.

    Several screenings of this cut were held earlier this month in Hong Kong. However, tickets for the screenings – held on weekday mornings – were gone minutes after being made available for sale. The FPA announcement did not mention which version of the film would be submitted to the Oscars.

    The Hong Kong theatrical release featured the initial 130-minute cut that was also released in Mainland China, Taiwan and Singapore. A 123-minute international cut premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival and was subsequently released in other territories, including France, Japan and South Korea.
    It's down to 473 U.S. theaters and $6+ mill gross according to BOM.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #123
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    A little more backstory on the Oscar bid

    Hong Kong kungfu drama to compete for Oscar
    Updated: 2013-09-23 21:48
    By Liu Wei (chinadaily.com.cn)

    Wong Kar-wai's kungfu drama The Grand Master has become Hong Kong's candidate to compete for the best foreign-language film at the 86th Academy Awards.
    The Hong Kong Federation of Motion Film Producers announced today that the film on Ip Man, the late Wing Chun master and mentor of Bruce Lee, will compete for the award, the winner of which will be announced on March 2, 2014.
    The Grand Master premiered in China on Jan 8 and grossed $49 million domestically.
    Taiwan has selected Soul, a thriller by art house director Chung Mong-hong, as its candidate.
    The mainland has not yet decided its submission. However, popular choices include Feng Xiaogang's movie Back to 1942 on a famine that killed 3 million people 71 years ago, Wang Quan'an's Apart Together about the reunion between a Taiwan veteran and his Shanghai wife, and Wang Jing's Feng Shui about a young mother's life struggles.
    The only Chinese film to win best foreign-language film at the Oscars was Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon in 2001. Zhang Yimou's martial arts epic Hero was nominated in 2003 but lost to the German film Nowhere in Africa.
    We didn't do too much with CTHD, but we ran a cover for Hero. We probably won't do a cover for this - too much of a gamble on the newsstands.
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  4. #124
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    11 Golden Horse nominations

    I've been so focused on the potential Oscar bid that I overlooked the Asian film awards.
    October 1, 2013, 9:11 PM
    Wong Kar-wai’s ‘The Grandmaster’ Leads Golden Horse Nominations
    By JENNY HSU


    The Weinstein Company/Associated Press
    Zhang Ziyi and Tony Leung in ‘The Grandmaster.’

    Hong Kong director Wong Kar-wai’s martial-arts drama “The Grandmaster” tops this year’s Golden Horse Awards nominations with 11 nods, including best feature film and best director.

    Tony Leung Chiu-wai was nominated for best actor for his portrayal of legendary wing chun kung-fu master Ip Man, while Zhang Ziyi picked up a best actress nomination for her role as Gong Er, a kung-fu expert and the daughter of another powerful martial-arts master. The nominations were announced Tuesday.

    “The Grandmaster” takes place in a turbulent and transitional period in China, from the late 1930s to the mid-1950s. Packed with artistic and theatrical fight scenes, the movie explores the intricate relationship between teachers and students against the backdrop of a changing China.


    Regis Duvignau/Reuters
    Anthony Chen of Singapore won the Camera d’Or award at the Cannes Film Festival in May.

    The Singaporean film “Ilo Ilo,” directed by newcomer Anthony Chen, received six nominations, including best feature, best new director, as well as best supporting actor and actress. Set during the Asian financial crisis in the 1990s, the film focuses on the lives of a Filipina domestic helper and a Singaporean family. It won the Camera d’Or for best first feature film at Cannes this year and is the first Singaporean film to be nominated in this category at the Golden Horse Awards.

    Rounding out the nominees for best feature film are Hong Kong director’s Johnnie To’s gangster movie “Drug War,” his first production for a mainland Chinese company; “A Touch of Sin” about the struggles of ordinary people in China from director Jia Zhang-ke, who won best screenplay for the film at Cannes; and the drama “Stray Dogs” from Malaysian-born Taiwan-based director Tsai Ming-liang, who, along with Messrs. To and Jia, is nominated for best director.

    Also nominated for best director is Chung Mong-hong of Taiwan for “Soul,” a dark psychological thriller about a quiet sushi chef who becomes a serial killer. “Soul” nabbed four other nominations, including best leading actor for veteran Chinese actor Jimmy Wang Yu.

    The Golden Horse Awards, now in its 50th year, are one of Asia’s most-prominent film events and focus specifically on Chinese-language movies. While the majority of the nominated films come from Taiwan, Hong Kong and mainland China, any Chinese-language film is eligible to enter. This year’s ceremony will be held in Taipei on Nov. 23, with Oscar-winning director Ang Lee heading the jury.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    We didn't do too much with CTHD, but we ran a cover for Hero. We probably won't do a cover for this - too much of a gamble on the newsstands.
    No way this gets an Oscar. The American cut is too messy and leaves out a lot of important information.
    He most honors my style who learns under it to destroy the teacher. -- Walt Whitman

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  6. #126
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    Honestly, I'm happy to see any martial arts film even mentioned at the Oscars

    It's China's submission for Foreign film, but it's still not quite a final nominee. That's the next step. Every country is submitting films to that category. I think it will get that far at least, mostly because Hollywood wants to give China face with the shifting market. Unfortunately, my foreign film eye seldom gets too far away from Asia, so I can't predict what politics might be driving the other international submissions. Regardless, it's great press for any foreign film to get that far. As for it winning, it depends upon what the other finalists are. We can have that discussion when we get there.

    Besides, it'll probably be the original Chinese cut that is submitted to the Academy.
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  7. #127
    watch scorsese remake it in a few years and add in explosions and win an oscar

    ugh

  8. #128
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    76 contenders

    Anyone here see any of these other than The Grandmaster?

    Oscar’s Final Foreign-Language List Includes a Few Surprises
    OCTOBER 7, 2013 | 11:10AM PT
    Saudi Arabia has first entry, Pakistan repped for first time in 50 years

    Tim Gray Awards Editor@timgray_variety

    Saudi Arabia and Moldova have their first entry; Pakistan is repped for the first time in 50 years; Montenegro is submitting for the first time as an independent country; and there are a record 76 films in the Academy’s official roster of foreign-language entries.

    The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences released its list Monday, after a review by the exec foreign-language committee. The roster had been expected to be unveiled Friday, as the panel convened that morning to review the submissions. The delay was a clue that some of the films required more investigation into their eligibility.

    The Acad allows each country to select its own submission and countries have been announcing their choices in the past weeks (Variety, Sept. 30). Even before the unveiling, some of the choices for the 86th Academy Awards raised questions.

    France submitted “Renoir,” causing many to wonder why “Blue Is the Warmest Color” was not chosen. In fact, “Blue” opened in France after the eligibility period (Oct. 1, 2012-Sept. 30, 2013), so it might be Gaul’s choice next year.

    India chose “The Good Road” instead of “The Lunchbox,” and Japan chose “The Great Passage” instead of “Like Father, Like Son.” Both choices were met with outrage, because the bypassed films had been seen and admired while the submitted films were generally unseen. The outrage was fueled by some online sites that like to handicap the eventual five nominees even before the countries have submitted.

    On this year’s list, many of the submissions have not been widely seen outside their country. But there are also ones that have been acclaimed on the fest circuit, and a few that have received commercial release in the U.S. That roster includes Chile’s “Gloria,” Denmark’s “The Hunt,” Hong Kong’s “The Grandmaster,” Iran’s “The Past,” Italy’s “The Great Beauty,” Netherlands’ “Borgman,” the Palestinian territories’ “Omar,” Poland’s “Walesa” and Saudi Arabia’s “Wadjda.”

    This year’s roster includes some interesting twists, including submissions from English-lingo countries Australia, New Zealand and the U.K. This reflects the change in rules after Austria’s 2005 choice, Michael Haneke’s French-language “Cache,” was disqualified. After protests, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences the next year revoked the stipulation that a film needs to be in the country’s dominant language.

    Hard-and-fast requirements include the film’s opening date and one-week continuous engagement in the country of origin. Another strict rule is that the language be predominantly non-English.

    Other rules are more fluid, including the level of artistic contributions from the country. In an era of joint ventures, few films have clear-cut geographic boundaries, but the principal contributors should be from the country.

    Foreign-language committee chairman Mark Johnson told Variety, “We take great pride in being flexible; we want to include movies, not reject them. But if they’re ineligible, they’re ineligible.”

    One example was Israel’s 2007 “The Band’s Visit.” Though the film had many key Israeli contributors, the language was 65% English. (The story concerned Egyptians and Israelis, whose only common language was English.) So Israel was notified and then submitted “Beaufort,” which went on to earn an Oscar nom.

    Nominations will be announced Jan. 16, and awards presented March 2.

    Following is the official list of entries.

    Afghanistan, “Wajma – An Afghan Love Story,” Barmak Akram, director;

    Albania, “Agon,” Robert Budina, director;

    Argentina, “The German Doctor,” Lucía Puenzo, director;

    Australia, “The Rocket,” Kim Mordaunt, director;

    Austria, “The Wall,” Julian Pölsler, director;

    Azerbaijan, “Steppe Man,” Shamil Aliyev, director;

    Bangladesh, “Television,” Mostofa Sarwar Farooki, director;

    Belgium, “The Broken Circle Breakdown,” Felix van Groeningen, director;

    Bosnia and Herzegovina, “An Episode in the Life of an Iron Picker,” Danis Tanovic, director;

    Brazil, “Neighboring Sounds,” Kleber Mendonça Filho, director;

    Bulgaria, “The Color of the Chameleon,” Emil Hristov, director;

    Cambodia, “The Missing Picture,” Rithy Panh, director;

    Canada, “Gabrielle,” Louise Archambault, director;

    Chad, “GriGris,” Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, director;

    Chile, “Gloria,” Sebastián Lelio, director;

    China, “Back to 1942,” Feng Xiaogang, director;

    Colombia, “La Playa DC,” Juan Andrés Arango, director;

    Croatia, “Halima’s Path,” Arsen Anton Ostojic, director;

    Czech Republic, “The Don Juans,” Jiri Menzel, director;

    Denmark, “The Hunt,” Thomas Vinterberg, director;

    Dominican Republic, “Quien Manda?” Ronni Castillo, director;

    Ecuador, “The Porcelain Horse,” Javier Andrade, director;

    Egypt, “Winter of Discontent,” Ibrahim El Batout, director;

    Estonia, “Free Range,” Veiko Ounpuu, director;

    Finland, “Disciple,” Ulrika Bengts, director;

    France, “Renoir,” Gilles Bourdos, director;

    Georgia, “In Bloom,” Nana Ekvtimishvili and Simon Gross, directors;

    Germany, “Two Lives,” Georg Maas, director;

    Greece, “Boy Eating the Bird’s Food,” Ektoras Lygizos, director;

    Hong Kong, “The Grandmaster,” Wong Kar-wai, director;

    Hungary, “The Notebook,” Janos Szasz, director;

    Iceland, “Of Horses and Men,” Benedikt Erlingsson, director;

    India, “The Good Road,” Gyan Correa, director;

    Indonesia, “Sang Kiai,” Rako Prijanto, director;

    Iran, “The Past,” Asghar Farhadi, director;

    Israel, “Bethlehem,” Yuval Adler, director;

    Italy, “The Great Beauty,” Paolo Sorrentino, director;

    Japan, “The Great Passage,” Ishii Yuya, director;

    Kazakhstan, “Shal,” Yermek Tursunov, director;

    Latvia, “Mother, I Love You,” Janis Nords, director;

    Lebanon, “Blind Intersections,” Lara Saba, director;

    Lithuania, “Conversations on Serious Topics,” Giedre Beinoriute, director;

    Luxembourg, “Blind Spot,” Christophe Wagner, director;

    Mexico, “Heli,” Amat Escalante, director;

    Moldova, “All God’s Children,” Adrian Popovici, director;

    Montenegro, “Ace of Spades – Bad Destiny,” Drasko Djurovic, director;

    Morocco, “Horses of God,” Nabil Ayouch, director;

    Nepal, “Soongava: Dance of the Orchids,” Subarna Thapa, director;

    Netherlands, “Borgman,” Alex van Warmerdam, director;

    New Zealand, “White Lies,” Dana Rotberg, director;

    Norway, “I Am Yours,” Iram Haq, director;

    Pakistan, “Zinda Bhaag,” Meenu Gaur and Farjad Nabi, directors;

    Palestine, “Omar,” Hany Abu-Assad, director;

    Peru, “The Cleaner,” Adrian Saba, director;

    Philippines, “Transit,” Hannah Espia, director;

    Poland, “Walesa. Man of Hope,” Andrzej Wajda, director;

    Portugal, “Lines of Wellington,” Valeria Sarmiento, director;

    Romania, “Child’s Pose,” Calin Peter Netzer, director;

    Russia, “Stalingrad,” Fedor Bondarchuk, director;

    Saudi Arabia, “Wadjda,” Haifaa Al Mansour, director;

    Serbia, “Circles,” Srdan Golubovic, director;

    Singapore, “Ilo Ilo,” Anthony Chen, director;

    Slovak Republic, “My Dog Killer,” Mira Fornay, director;

    Slovenia, “Class Enemy,” Rok Bicek, director;

    South Africa, “Four Corners,” Ian Gabriel, director;

    South Korea, “Juvenile Offender,” Kang Yi-kwan, director;

    Spain, “15 Years Plus a Day,” Gracia Querejeta, director;

    Sweden, “Eat Sleep Die,” Gabriela Pichler, director;

    Switzerland, “More than Honey,” Markus Imhoof, director;

    Taiwan, “Soul,” Chung Mong-Hong, director;

    Thailand, “Countdown,” Nattawut Poonpiriya, director;

    Turkey, “The Butterfly’s Dream,” Yilmaz Erdogan, director;

    Ukraine, “Paradjanov,” Serge Avedikian and Olena Fetisova, directors;

    United Kingdom, “Metro Manila,” Sean Ellis, director;

    Uruguay, “Anina,” Alfredo Soderguit, director;

    Venezuela, “Breach in the Silence,” Luis Alejandro Rodríguez and Andrés Eduardo Rodríguez, directors.
    Gene Ching
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  9. #129
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    Back to 1942

    Ok, I'm reviewing this here because the only reason I watched it was due to it being China's entry for foreign film for the next Oscars.

    There is this genre of Chinese tragedies that starts from a horribly miserable place and then sinks down. I think China likes this sort of flick because it can be so hard, so for a purgative tragic experience, it's gotta be so utterly dismal, so hopeless, that viewers can say 'my life ain't that bad'. This is about the great famine that hit Henan in 1942. Millions of refugees march to Shaanxi in hopes of relief. SPOILER it's eat your pets, sell your daughters and wives to be sex slaves, eat only ground tree bark, miserable. END SPOILER Adrian Brody and Tim Robbins appear to give it that international flair. For the most part, both actors are stiff and underused - caucasians just don't fair well under Chinese direction, including that of Director Feng Xiaogang (Banquet, Aftershock). How Brody travels from the refugee march back to civilization to report is a mystery. There's a huge error in his pronunciation of the name 'Zhang' which he pronounces with a 'zh' sound, but that's an artifact of pinyin which wasn't established in 1942, so it should be a 'j' sound. It doesn't matter much as his character sort of fades out halfway through.

    Once you get past the dreary depressing dismal downers, there's some good ultravi. It opens with a good starving peasants fight, replete with farm instrument massacres. There are several CGI Japanese Zeroes strafing and bombing the refugee march that are gruesome spectacles. And there is a sword scene that cuts to the quick (pun intended).

    Not an enjoyable flick. In fact, it felt like work.

    As for which of the 76 films might actually win, even though I haven't seen it yet, I'm going with Saudi Arabia's Wadjda at this point because I'm hearing the most buzz on it. That could change as the Oscars get closer.
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  10. #130
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    Just got this press release from TWC

    STARZ DIGITAL MEDIA in association with ANCHOR BAY ENTERTAINMENT and THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY NOW OFFERING THE GRANDMASTER IN DIGITAL HD STARTING TODAY, NOVEMBER 15

    Wong Kar Wai’s latest film, THE GRANDMASTER, starring Tony Leung and Ziyi Zhang, will be available on Cable and Internet Video On-Demand starting November 26, 2013 and offered early in Digital HD starting today, November 15, 2013.

    Now on iTunes (http://bit.ly/iTunesGM), Amazon (http://amzn.to/1bB24CW), Vudu (http://bit.ly/VuduGM) and more!

    NEW YORK, NY – Starz Digital Media, the digital distribution unit of Starz, in association with Anchor Bay Entertainment and The Weinstein Company announced today that THE GRANDMASTER, from writer and director Wong Kar Wai (HAPPY TOGETHER, IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE and MY BLUEBERRY NIGHTS), will be available for Cable and Internet Video On-Demand starting November 26, 2013, and it will now be offered early in Digital HD starting today, November 15, 2013. Additionally, the street date for the THE GRANDMASTER DVD & Blu-Ray has been moved off of the November 26 date.

    Consumers can purchase the Digital HD version on all major digital retailers including iTunes, Amazon, Vudu, Xbox, Target Ticket, and Cinemanow. THE GRANDMASTER will also be available starting November 26, 2013 on Comcast, Time Warner Cable, DirecTV, Verizon, AT&T, Charter, Cox, and other Video On-Demand and Pay-Per-View services.

    From acclaimed director/writer Wong Kar Wai comes an epic tale inspired by the life of the warrior hero who taught Bruce Lee. Asian superstar Tony Leung (IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE) portrays legendary Kung Fu master Ip Man, who survived the turmoil of 1930s China to change the world of martial arts forever. Ziyi Zhang (CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON) and Chang Chen (RED CLIFF) co-star in this visually stunning saga of love, honor and vengeance, featuring breathtaking action choreography by Yuen Wo Ping (THE MATRIX, KILL BILL). Presented by Martin Scorsese, THE GRANDMASTER was recently selected as Hong Kong's submission in the best foreign language film category at the 86th Academy Awards®.

    Learn more about THE GRANDMASTER at: www.thegrandmasterfilm.com.

    ABOUT THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY
    The Weinstein Company (TWC) is a multimedia production and distribution company launched in October 2005 by Bob and Harvey Weinstein, the brothers who founded Miramax Films in 1979. TWC also encompasses Dimension Films, the genre label founded in 1993 by Bob Weinstein, which has released such popular franchises as SCREAM, SPY KIDS and SCARY MOVIE. Together TWC and Dimension Films have released a broad range of mainstream, genre and specialty films that have been commercial and critical successes. TWC releases took home eight 2012 Academy Awards®, the most wins in the studio’s history. The tally included Best Picture for Michel Hazanavicius’s THE ARTIST and Best Documentary Feature for TJ Martin and Dan Lindsay’s UNDEFEATED. THE ARTIST brought TWC its second consecutive Best Picture statuette following the 2011 win for Tom Hooper’s THE KING’S SPEECH.

    Since 2005, TWC and Dimension Films have released such films as GRINDHOUSE; 1408; I’M NOT THERE; THE GREAT DEBATERS; VICKY CRISTINA BARCELONA; THE READER; THE ROAD; HALLOWEEN; THE PAT TILLMAN STORY; PIRANHA 3D; INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS; A SINGLE MAN; BLUE VALENTINE; THE COMPANY MEN; MIRAL; SCRE4M; SUBMARINE; DIRTY GIRL; APOLLO 18; OUR IDIOT BROTHER; I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT; SARAH’S KEY; SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD IN 4D; MY WEEK WITH MARILYN; THE IRON LADY; W.E.; CORIOLANUS; UNDEFEATED; THE ARTIST; BULLY; THE INTOUCHABLES; LAWLESS; KILLING THEM SOFTLY; THE MASTER; SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK; DJANGO UNCHAINED; QUARTET; ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH; DARK SKIES; THE SAPPHIRES; SCARY MOVIE 5; and KON-TIKI. Currently in release are UNFINISHED SONG and FRUITVALE STATION, LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER, THE GRANDMASTER and SALINGER. Upcoming releases include MANDELA: LONG WALK TO FREEDOM and AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY.

    TWC is active in television production, led by former Miramax Films President of Production Meryl Poster. TWC is the studio behind such hit television series as the Emmy® nominated and Peabody Award winning reality series PROJECT RUNWAY and its spin-off series PROJECT RUNWAY ALL STARS and PROJECT ACCESSORY; the VH1 reality series MOB WIVES and its spin-off series MOB WIVES CHICAGO and BIG ANG; and the critically acclaimed scripted HBO comedy/crime series THE NO. 1 LADIES' DETECTIVE AGENCY which also received a Peabody Award. The company is in production on the upcoming TLC series WELCOME TO MYRTLE MANOR, the A&E series RODEO QUEENS, and the Lifetime reality competition show SUPERMARKET SUPERSTAR hosted by Stacy Keibler. Among TWC’s other projects in development for television are the martial-arts epic MARCO POLO for Starz, an untitled private eye procedural for FX, and THE NANNY DIARIES developed by ABC with a pilot by Amy Sherman Palladino.

    ABOUT ANCHOR BAY ENTERTAINMENT
    Anchor Bay Entertainment is a leading home entertainment company. Anchor Bay acquires and distributes feature films, original television programming including STARZ Original series, children's entertainment, anime (Manga Entertainment), fitness (Anchor Bay Fitness), sports, and other filmed entertainment on DVD and Blu-ray™ formats. The company has long term distribution agreements in place for select programming with AMC Networks, RADiUS, and The Weinstein Company. Headquartered in Beverly Hills, CA, Anchor Bay Entertainment has offices in Troy, MI, as well as, Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia. Anchor Bay Entertainment www.anchorbayentertainment.com is a Starz (NASDAQ: STRZA, STRZB) business, www.starz.com.

    ABOUT STARZ DIGITAL MEDIA
    Starz Digital Media is a leading distributor of digital and on-demand content. Starz Digital Media distributes original programming content (Starz and AMC), feature films (The Weinstein Company, Anchor Bay Films), anime (Manga Entertainment) and other filmed entertainment utilizing various business models including download-to-own/electronic sell-through, video-on-demand, pay-per-view, subscription video-on-demand and ad-supported streaming. Starz Digital Media also programs and supports numerous ad-supported broadband channels and develops games, applications and other related content from many of its properties for distribution worldwide. Starz Digital Media is a Starz (NASDAQ: STRZA, STRZB) business, www.starz.com.
    As this is from TWC, I'm sure it's the U.S. cut.
    Gene Ching
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  11. #131
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    I heard something interesting in regard to this movie's story line the other day....

    Apparently the story line was used from Ziranmen Master Du Xin Wu.

    Obviously the movie is about Ip Man - but they often do this stuff in movie world.

    I dont know either way, but it came from my master, his friend Master Han Yan Wu http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2oCMDO9D1AM trained the lead lady for the flick - cant think of her name off the top of my head.

    Anyway who knows - wondered if anyone could throw some thoughts in...

  12. #132
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    WKW interview

    Wong Kar Wai On China’s Growth, Kung Fu, Oscar Contenders & Bruce Lee
    By DOMINIC PATTEN | Saturday December 14, 2013 @ 10:00am

    As one of the maestros of modern cinema, Wong Kar Wai’s return to the martial arts genre this year after two decades was — as you would expect from the director of Chungking Express and In The Mood For Love – a sight to behold. His first new film since his 2007 English-language debut My Blueberry Nights, The Grandmaster takes viewers to 1930s China and inside the life and legacy of Ip Man, the kung fu teacher who, among other things, was Bruce Lee’s trainer. Distributed stateside by The Weinstein Company with a supportive Martin Scorsese Presents in the title, Grandmaster, which is now also available on VOD and Digital HD downloads, has made nearly $6.6 million domestically since it came out in late August. With a worldwide total of $64 million so far, it has become the most "The Grandmaster" New York Screening - Arrivalssuccessful picture of Wong’s 25-year directorial career. This year, working with leading man Tony Leung for a seventh time, the director is also aiming for a Best Foreign Language Film Oscar with the epic as the official submission from Hong Kong. Amazingly, this is only the second time one of Wong’s films has been submitted for the Academy Awards; In The Mood For Love was HK’s entry in 2000 though it did not receive a nomination. Before the Academy’s shortlist for the foreign language category is announced next week, Grandmaster has the Asia-Pacific Film Festival awards tomorrow. Coming off winning the Audience Award and several other prizes at the 50th Golden Horse Awards last month, the film leads the Asia-Pacific awards with nine noms including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor and Actress. I had no idea if Wong was wearing his trademark shades when he spoke to me from Shanghai earlier this week but his eyes were clearly on the prize.

    GRANDMASTER 2DEADLINE: The Grandmaster is the first martial arts film you’ve made since 1994′s Ashes of Time. A lot has changed in the techniques and technology in filmmaking since then. What was different for you?
    WONG: First of all, I remember Ashes In Time was our first co-production with a Chinese Studio. At that point we were one of the first productions that shot in China. The industry then, compared to today, was a lot different. In those days, all the equipment and also the technicians and the industry was not that mature, so we had to ship everything in. But after like almost 20 years we shot again in China with The Grandmaster and it’s different world now. First of all, the industry and support in China has really matured because there are so many productions there. At the same time, there’s been a lot of changes in the market, which I think also has enabled productions like The Grandmaster to happen and to be possible to shoot in China.

    DEADLINE: China is becoming Hollywood’s hottest new market and one in which there’s almost daily expansion. How do you think the rise of American films in China is changing cinema in China?
    WONG: Well, when you look at the films that are produced in China in the last 10 years, you can see a huge difference. After the Revolution in ’49, all the films were propaganda. They serviced the government and carried the message that the government wants to relay to the people. But I think in the last 10 years because the film market is opening and there’s an expansion of all the cinemas in China, it’s now a lot like Hollywood productions. It seems like the filmmakers and the industry are more market-driven. For me as a filmmaker, I think the only change is that its provided much bigger options. It’s like a larger playground for filmmakers like me to explore some topics which 10 years ago were impossible to imagine.

    DEADLINE: With its history, its action and its return to the Chinese language, Grandmaster is a very different film from your last movie, the English-language drama My Blueberry Nights. Was your decision to make this film in some part a reaction to the critical response that My Blueberry Nights received?
    WONG: No, that’s not true. I think when you look at My Blueberry Nights it cannot be called a Hollywood film. It is basically a Hong Kong film shot in the United States with all this talent from America. And it was a really good experience for me. With Grandmaster, I wanted to make a commercial and colorful film that really has a message about a world that I’m interested in. But I’m not just going to make a big movie — this is a story about one of the golden periods of the development of martial arts in China. To make a film like The Grandmaster I know I’m not going to make just a standard kung-fu film, it’s not going to be just tricks or like wire works. So I spent seven years on the road interviewing different schools and a lot of real grandmasters from Chinese martial arts. I went to so many practices and so many demonstrations and learned. To be a grandmaster you also need to have sense of the legacies, the generosities and the sharing of your techniques with the future generations. They are supposed to be the keeper and pass on the skill. That’s so important. As a filmmaker, when we were talking with all these grandmasters and watching these demonstrations you realize it’s not going to be like 15-minutes non-stop fighting because normally if you are that good, normally it’s like one punch and one kick — it’s so fast. So it’s very hard to play that on screen so we have to analyze the work. In fact, even though it is a very simple move but when you analyze it, it is about the balance of the body because it is the footwork and the details. I told my DP that I wanted to make this film as classic as possible. Because, for this film, I want to have the audience focus on what’s happening on screen instead of the technique. I’m really happy now, because with this film we can bring awareness to people, especially the younger generation in China, and they can revisit what exactly traditional Chinese martial arts are.

    DEADLINE: Part of that is that Grandmaster has been a massive success in China. In fact it’s become the biggest box office hit of your career. Were you surprised with that?
    WONG: I’m surprised, but happy because the thing is the people that react to this film is mainly the young audience. They haven’t seen a film like this before.

    DEADLINE: Do you feel like a younger audience is discovering your work now because of Grandmaster?
    WONG: Well, it’s not about my work it’s about this world. However, I do think for them this is a surprise because they don’t expect me to go that deep and to really tell the story. It’s not about today but it’s about a time which still means a lot today.

    DEADLINE: There are 3 different versions of Grandmaster: the Chinese domestic version which is 130 minutes; the 123-minute version that debuted at Berlin earlier this year; and the 108-minute version that was released here in the States in August. What distinguishes each version for you?WKW on Grandmaster set
    WONG: I don’t think it’s so different for me but each version is for its audience. I think that though American audiences have a long history of Chinese kung fu films, I wanted a version that speaks to them. So instead of just cutting scenes and making it shorter, I use the captions and voice-overs to tell something about the background story and I can focus more on telling the story about this martial artist.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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    continued from previous post

    DEADLINE: Having said that, how do you think that the film has resonated with North American audiences?
    WONG: I’m surprised because the reactions have been extremely good and it also makes me very happy because I think to make a film, especially a film like The Grandmaster, I want it to speak to as many audiences as possible. One of the reasons I wanted to make this film at this point is because I think in the last 20 years you can see the growth in China. You can also feel that the life has been running so fast and I thought it was time to revisit some of heritage and to see what exactly is the value, the core value of our culture.

    DEADLINE: You’ve have made one English-language film with My Blueberry Nights back in 2007. Could we see you making another English-language film in the future?
    WONG: It’s possible, why not? I’ve always wanted to make a film about the Tong Wars, the rioting and the crime factions in San Francisco’s Chinatown in the early part of the last century.

    DEADLINE: This weekend could be an important one for The Grandmaster with its nine nominations in the Asia Pacific Film Festival. It has the most of any film this year including for Best Picture and Best Director. So coming off the Golden Horse Awards a few weeks ago, what do you think you’re chances are at the Asia Pacific?
    WONG: I think we have a pretty good chance, I think this year I am very happy to see that there are so many great films from Korea, from Japan and from Taiwan, I think it’s good competition and it shows that this year in Asia there is very strong films happening, which is a good sign.

    DEADLINE: What are some of the films out there that you think will be strong Oscar contenders this year?
    WONG: I have seen Gravity, which I liked, and I also liked the Woody Allen film Blue Jasmine. I heard good things about American Hustle and also the Steve McQueen film 12 Years A Slave, which I haven’t seen yet. I think there’s really strong contenders this year. I think, especially now, with the season of all these awards and nominations, it’s also a very important time for The Grandmaster. Not for the film itself but because of the message the film carries. I really want to have this film be seen by as much people as possible and to be aware of the traditional martial arts in China. I hope this art form and this part of culture will get the attention that they deserve.

    DEADLINE: The Grandmaster looks like a film that could so easily become a sequel. Do you have plans for that? Or what are your plans for your next film?
    WONG: I don’t know. I’m still stuck in 1936 and I’m really amazed by this journey and I have a very fond memory of this journey, so I don’t have any plans at this point on other project yet. I’m enjoying this moment.

    DEADLINE: You know many people would love to see you take the story further to including the story of Bruce Lee.
    WONG: Yeah, it’s possible. It’s possible but I need some rest now (laughing).
    WKW tackling Bruce...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  14. #134
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    Well, that changed...

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    As for which of the 76 films might actually win, even though I haven't seen it yet, I'm going with Saudi Arabia's Wadjda at this point because I'm hearing the most buzz on it. That could change as the Oscars get closer.


    Looking at the short list, Grandmaster now has a decent chance.

    OSCARS: Nine Films On Foreign Language Shortlist; ‘The Past’, ‘Wadjda’ Miss Cut
    By NANCY TARTAGLIONE, International Editor | Friday, 20 December 2013 17:55

    oscarLast weekend, I profiled 15 films that had a lot of heat ahead of the Foreign Language Oscar shortlist unveiling today. Of those 15 (plus a handful of wildcards), seven have ended up among the Academy’s nine selections that will move on to the second round of voting. As with many of the Oscar categories this year, this was a field jam-packed with strong contenders and the ultimate shortlist reflects that. Among the films that were roundly expected to make the cut, Paolo Sorrentino’s The Great Beauty out of Italy, and Thomas Vinterberg’s The Hunt from Denmark, are both in. But in one of the biggest surprises, 2011 Foreign Language Oscar winner Asghar Farhadi did not make the cut with this year’s The Past. That film, as with the other two above, has a Golden Globe nomination, and it won the Best Actress prize for Bérénice Bejo this year in Cannes. Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia did not benefit from beginner’s luck. The first entry from the kingdom, the roundly lauded Wadjda, is not on the list. Both of those films are with Sony Pictures Classics which had last year’s winner, Amour. Another shocking omission is Gloria, Sebastien Lelio’s Chilean feature about a 58-year-old divorcée looking for love. That had received tons of advance buzz. Of the other pics chosen to advance by the Academy, Wong Kar Wai’s The Grandmaster probably has the highest profile, and is the most profitable of the bunch, and Belgium’s Broken Circle Breakdown was a prize winner in Berlin, Tribeca and at the recent European Film Awards.

    The Academy’s shortlist was whittled down from a record 76 entries. The next heat will see an uber-committee of 30 high-profile members choose the ultimate five nominees after viewing the finalists over the weekend of January 10-12. They will be unveiled with the rest of the nominees on January 16th. Here are the titles that advanced to the next stage:

    Belgium, The Broken Circle Breakdown, Felix van Groeningen
    Bosnia and Herzegovina, An Episode in the Life of an Iron Picker, Danis Tanovic
    Cambodia, The Missing Picture, Rithy Panh
    Denmark, The Hunt, Thomas Vinterberg
    Germany, Two Lives, Georg Maas
    Hong Kong, The Grandmaster, Wong Kar-wai
    Hungary, The Notebook, Janos Szasz
    Italy, The Great Beauty, Paolo Sorrentino
    Palestine, Omar, Hany Abu-Assad
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  15. #135
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    JKFC awards

    THE GRANDMASTER, DRUG WAR Top HK Film Critics Awards
    James Marsh, Asian Editor


    Wong Kar Wai's The Grandmaster has been named Best Film by the Hong Kong Film Critics Society, while its female star Zhang Ziyi was voted Best Actress. Johnnie To's Drug War won the Best Director and Best Screenplay awards, and Nick Cheung was named Best Actor for Dante Lam's Unbeatable.

    Here's the full list of winners:

    Best Film - The Grandmaster (dir. Wong Kar Wai)

    Best Director - Johnnie To - Drug War

    Best Actor - Nick Cheung - Unbeatable

    Best Actress - Zhang Ziyi - The Grandmaster

    Best Screenplay - Wai Ka Fai , Yau Nai Hoi , Chen Weibin , Yu Xi - Drug War

    In addition to Wong Kar Wai's The Grandmaster, the HKFCS presented a short list of 6 Hong Kong films from the 49 released last year, to which they give their recommendation. They are:

    Drug War (dir. Johnnie To)

    Unbeatable (dir. Dante Lam)

    Ip Man - The Final Fight (dir. Herman Yau)

    The Way We Dance (dir. Adam Wong)

    Blind Detective (dir. Johnnie To)

    Rigor Mortis (dir. Juno Mak)

    NYT has been running a full-page ad saying this is back for a limited release. It's the Oscar push.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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