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Thread: Best remedy for Swine Flu? H1N1

  1. #46
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    [QUOTE=taai gihk yahn;932444]actually, one "old guy" I studied w/for a brief time had a great way of dealing w/the shock of going in and out of air-conditioned buildings/subways in the summer: before you go in (or out), you take a deep breath of the air you are in; then you walk into the other temp, holding the breath as long as you can; then you exhale that breath all the way and hold it out as long as you can; only then do you take a breath of the different air - by then you are much more acclimated - works like a charm, I gotta tell you, especially in NYC subways in the summer QUOTE]

    I've been doing something like that most of my life, but with a variation: Where I live, there can easily be a hundred degree temperature difference between indoor and outdoor air. When you leave a heated building you take a breath, exhale slowly and gently "sip" small quantities of cold air to give your lungs and circulation time to adjust. You Canucks know what I'm talking about.

    jd
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    For it breeds great perfection, if the practise be harder then the use. Sir Francis Bacon

    the world has a surplus of self centered sh1twh0res, so anyone who extends compassion to a stranger with sincerity is alright in my book. also people who fondle road kill. those guys is ok too. GunnedDownAtrocity

  2. #47
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    a WSJ blog

    I drink a similar tea as a general detoxicant.
    * November 4, 2009, 3:49 AM ET
    Recipes from China’s Alternative Swine Flu Frontlines

    Until recently, China has been fairly sheltered from bad news associated with the H1N1 flu virus. But since early October, when the country reported its first H1N1 death, temperatures have dropped and H1N1 cases are reportedly rising steeply, so a corresponding increase in anxiety levels is inevitable.

    Amid such fears, the available science doesn’t always prevail.

    On the Internet, rumors that H1N1 could be caused by vaccines prompted a strongly worded refutation from the Ministry of Health, while flu fears at a Beijing university spurred school authorities to rid the campus of stray cats, despite a lack of evidence that the animals play a role in the spread of the H1N1 virus. (And to be sure, Chinese authorities don’t help when they add restrictions to imports of pork products, which the WHO says would not transmit the H1N1 virus via consumption).

    China has launched an ambitious H1N1 vaccination campaign and drug makers are operating at full capacity to produce vaccine doses. But even so, health officials say domestic vaccine makers will only be able to produce around 100 million vaccine doses by the end of March 2010,still a long way from the 390 million doses needed to inoculate targeted groups, such as military, medical personnel, students and the chronically ill.

    Against that backdrop, Chinese traditional medicine (TCM) offers some alternative measures for H1N1 prevention. An official with the department of medical administration in the National Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine referred us to the following TCM recipes (available in Chinese here). She noted that the recipes are only intended as a reference, since variations among regions and individuals must also be taken into account.

    Soup

    5 grams scallion, 30 grams daikon radish, 3 grams parsley. Add an appropriate amount of water, boil and drink.

    Salad

    30 to 60 grams fresh “fishy grass” (aka cordate houttuynia) (fresh whiteflower patrinia or purslane may be substituted), blanched and mixed with garlic juice and vinegar.

    Bean Porridge

    1. 30 grams each red beans, green beans and white hyacinth beans, cleaned and boiled with 500ml water.

    2. 30 grams each red peanuts, red beans and red dates, boiled with 500ml water. Add brown sugar to taste.

    Tea

    Three grams each green tea leaves, dried chrysanthemum flower and licorice steeped in boiling water. Three to five nasturtium flowers may be used as a substitute for the tea.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #48
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    I'm pulling up nearly 4000 related news stories on this

    I'm only posting the bigger ones...
    China launches new swine flu medicine that cures in 3 days
    © REUTERS/ Wolfgang Rattay
    10:5103/11/2009

    MOSCOW, November 3 (RIA Novosti) - Sales of a traditional Chinese medicine against swine flu, which its producer says is especially effective for children, have been launched in China, a local newspaper said on Tuesday.

    The China Daily quoted the deputy head of the Beijing traditional Chinese medicine bureau as saying that children with the flu should be cured with "No 2 Cold Medicine" within three days.

    "Some children will be cured with only one dose, while others might need two," Tu Zhitao said.

    The World Health Organization said it was not familiar with the traditional Chinese medicine recommended for children and could not comment, the paper said.

    Tamiflu and Relenza are so far the only two approved antiviral drugs that are available for treatment of the H1N1 virus.

    As the number of H1N1 cases reached 6,196 in Beijing as of Monday, 20 traditional Chinese medical hospitals opened 24-hour anti-H1N1 departments, the paper said.

    An unidentified bureau official said the traditional Chinese medicine is very effective and does not harm the stomach, unlike western medicines. "Chinese medicine does not have this side effect. This No 2 cold medicine is an upgrade of former anti-flu medicines," the paper quoted her as saying.

    Other experts said the medicine is basically the same as an ordinary Chinese anti-flu drug.

    Nearly 50,000 confirmed swine flu cases have been reported in China. Seven people have died of the disease and 118 are in critical condition.

    China was the first country to complete tests of a swine flu vaccine and started the vaccination campaign in September. The country plans to produce up to 360 million doses of the vaccine, and is set to allocate a total of $725 million on efforts to curb the disease.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #49
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    I've been drinking Airborne since before the flu season and all through it. It seems to help boost immune system. I also make sure I get plenty of fresh air, sunlight, rest/sleep, exercise, optimum nutrition, plenty of water, a good natural high potency multi-vitamin, and extra C.
    I also heard that moxibustion to stomach 36 during this time is also good. Correct me on the points if I am mistaken.
    "My Gung-Fu may not be Your Gung-Fu.
    Gwok-Si, Gwok-Faht"

    "I will not be part of the generation
    that killed Kung-Fu."

    ....step.

  5. #50
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    Anyone else having bird flu/SARS flashbacks?

    I traveled in China when SARS flu broke out and remember a similar rush of TCM curatives. TCM never really provided a real remedy, but I packed my Banlaigen. Well, I always pack some Banlaigen when I travel in Asia. That's good stuff.
    TCM may be another alternative in fight against H1N1
    By Channel NewsAsia's Hong Kong Correspondent Leslie Tang | Posted: 21 November 2009 0011 hrs

    HONG KONG: Hong Kong Chinese medicine practitioners are collaborating with a Macau university to test what they believe is another alternative to combating the H1N1 virus.

    If they are successful, the formula will be the first Chinese herbal prescription cure for H1N1.

    As temperatures drop, Hong Kong health officials are bracing themselves for a second wave of H1N1 to hit the city.

    Other than Tamiflu and flu jabs, Hong Kong R&D company Rorric Biotechnology believes it may be able to offer a less invasive cure to H1N1, using traditional Chinese medicine.

    Dr Chow Ching-fung, chairman of Rorric Biotechnology, said: "This formula is effective in two ways. First, it combats and eliminates the virus. Second, it boosts the immune system, helping the patient to become stronger."

    The formula is made up of 21 common Chinese herbs, such as honeysuckle and Bai Shu.

    "Traditional Chinese medicine has a long history of being proven to have fewer side effects as it uses herbal ingredients," Dr Chow added. "Western medicine contains a mixture of chemicals from the manufacturing process, so the risks are higher."

    Dr Chow said he had prescribed the formula, which is currently in powder form, to 100 patients suspected of contracting H1N1 and they have fully recovered.

    Moreover, tests at the Wu Han Institute of Virology have shown that the formula is not only effective against H1N1, but also other mutated forms of Influenza A.

    Rorric Biotechnology is now collaborating with the Macau University of Science and Technology to test the formula on 300 patients over four months.

    The first goal is to have the drug registered in Macau. If all goes well, the team hopes the drug's success will gain the support of authorities in Hong Kong to give it the green light.


    - CNA/so
    Gene Ching
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  6. #51
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    you won't see this potential remedy propagated any time soon...

  7. #52
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    Gene,

    Its Ban Lan Gen - although the package you have may have incorrectly romanized it as Banlaigen.

    Its quite a common remedy these days and a good preventative at the earliest hint of a cold.

    If you're looking for a good remedy for tourista when you're travelling - I recommend Po Chai Yuen (known as Bao Ji Wan in Mandarin).

  8. #53
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    Thanks for the herb wisdom, Chu Sifu.

    To clarify for those of us not so well traveled, turista refers to diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, etc. from eating or drinking in a foreign land. Often, these symptoms are caused by bacteria, viruses or protozoans in the food/water supply. The natives usually have much stronger resistance to these microorganisms from constant exposure since childhood. But we Westerners, with our weakened "cheeseburger and fries" digestion, are susceptible since our food supply in the States is relatively free from the likes of E.Coli, salmonella, etc (exceptions to the rule exist, of course!), therefore we never really built the resistance.

    Po Chai Yuen / Bao Ji Wan is an effective remedy for nearly all gastrointestinal complaints from indigestion to nausea to diarrhea. For a bad case of the runs, I'd probably dose with [I]Huang Lian Su[I], a tiny yellow pill used for dysentery, which is capable of performing small miracles.

    Beyond those remedies, my favorite for treating diarrhea is a Japanese remedy called Seirogan. This remedy is made with wood creosote as its base, and other powerful herbs to stop the symptoms and relieve discomfort. It smells so bad, though, that you can't touch the small, round and resinous pills, lest you smell like a foul creosote bush for the rest of the day

    Stock up on the Po Chai before your thanksgiving meal and you'll be fine!

    cheers,

    herb ox

  9. #54
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    You're right, chusauli

    I stand corrected. I didn't get that off the package. I got it out of my tattered memory. My bad.
    Gene Ching
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  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I got it out of my tattered memory.
    perhaps the memory isn't tattered and it's just the pathways around it that have become overgrown...

    from a mycological point of reference, the mushroom ganoderma lucidum, or ling chih, is highly prized - called the "mushroom of immortality" by the ancient chinese... supposedly it has gathered it's reputation thru the ability to strengthen ones immune system to above optimal levels. it is said that the most potent speciemens are the rare ones that are stalked, rather than shelved like other polypores, and naturally dried out standing... i found two of these in the florida woodland areas. a piece the size of your pinky tip, powdered, and drunk as a hot tea is the recommended dose. mushrooms in general are one of the least known and understood organisms on the planet - ultimately they are one of natures way of providing medicine to us... just minute amounts of any mushroom will change your biological and molecular structure. most mushrooms used for medicines do not require continued doses, one or two is usually enough to add an adequate amount of new molecular compounds to your body... respect is required though, some mushrooms can kill simply by consuming a small mouse nibble, others can rip your reality and perception of things to shreads, others are highly prized for their medicnal properties, others are highly prized for their taste, yet all mushrooms bring to us something we wouldn't normally put into our bodies... the more rare the mushroom, the more profound the effect it will have on you.
    Last edited by uki; 11-26-2009 at 03:16 AM.

  11. #56
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    Right... the lingzhi mushroom is a highly revered tonic, recently subject to multi-level-marketing schemes mixed with coffee and other substances. In general, it's really good stuff!

    However, don't start taking it AFTER you have contracted the flu. Start now, while you're healthy, and it'll decrease your likelyhood of contracting the flu, perhaps.

    According to TCM theory, tonics are to be avoided (with some exceptions) when a person has a cold or the flu, as tonifying will only make the response to the invading pathogen more severe, thus worsening the symptoms. The term "trap the robber" comes to mind... as if a burglar was inside your home wreaking havoc. Most would not want to trap the burglar in the house, but instead would open the doors to let the burglar out (obviously not taking into consideration the martially oriented audience here on this forum). Taking a tonic while sick is like closing the doors on the robber, when instead, treatment to "release the exterior" is more appropriate, essentially venting the pathogenic factor (i.e. letting the robber escape).

    in health,

    herb ox

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by herb ox View Post
    According to TCM theory, tonics are to be avoided (with some exceptions) when a person has a cold or the flu, as tonifying will only make the response to the invading pathogen more severe, thus worsening the symptoms. The term "trap the robber" comes to mind... as if a burglar was inside your home wreaking havoc. Most would not want to trap the burglar in the house, but instead would open the doors to let the burglar out (obviously not taking into consideration the martially oriented audience here on this forum). Taking a tonic while sick is like closing the doors on the robber, when instead, treatment to "release the exterior" is more appropriate, essentially venting the pathogenic factor (i.e. letting the robber escape).
    this of course is just a theory - not everyone follows the same train of thought. by locking the robber inside and you can then dismantle the threat piece by piece to ensure that it doesn't contaminate the rest of the community.

  13. #58
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    poor gas on your junk and light it... you'll completely forget about the pig Flu all together...
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i had an old taichi lady talk smack behind my back. i mean comon man, come on. if it was 200 years ago,, mebbe i wouldve smacked her and took all her monehs.
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i am manly and strong. do not insult me cracker.

  14. #59
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    From the WSJ

    Good ol' Ma Huang. I knew some nutbags back in the day who used it 'recreationally'
    * December 17, 2009, 7:58 AM ET
    Old Formulas to Treat a New Flu

    Can traditional Chinese medicine beat swine flu?

    Some Beijing medical officials think so, at least for mild cases of the disease. On Thursday, Chinese medicine officials announced that a traditional formula called Jin Hua Qing Gan” (金花清感) has been designated as the world’s first “optimized effective agent” for alleviating the symptoms of the H1N1 virus.

    “The clinical study showed that Jin Hua Qing Gan can shorten the duration of fever, alleviate respiratory tract symptoms like sore throat, coughing etc.,” said Zhao Jing, director of the Beijing Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine at the press conference where the finders were announced.

    Currently, however, it’s unclear if Jin Hua Qing Gan would directly replace other Western medicines to treat H1N1, especially in serious cases. “This is indeed an issue, as the target of our research are all H1N1 patients with slight symptoms”, said Wang Chen, President of Chaoyang Hospital.

    The formula was developed and tested at several Western and traditional medical institutes in Beijing over the past six months. It is based on two major components, both of which have been used for centuries to treat fevers. One is Ma Xing Shi Gan(麻杏石甘汤), which has been used in China for more than 2,000 years, and Yin Qiao San (powder of lonicera and forsythia — 银翘散), which has been used for over 200 years to reduce fever.

    The researchers said no adverse reactions have been found so far in patients who took the formula from the 28 traditional hospitals in Beijing that have been using it. A course of treatment costs about 80 yuan ($11.72).

    In the future, Zhao said the new formula will have to go through an approval process. A license could be granted in January and the formula could come on the market in Beijing then.

    It’s not clear if the formula can be exported. Ma Xing Shi Gan Formula contains Ma Huang, (herba ephedrae). Although this herb is widely used to treat asthma in China, it was sold in the U.S. as a weight-loss product in dosages far higher than commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine. After several highly publicized deaths, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned it in 2004.

    – Sue Feng and Ian Johnson
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Good ol' Ma Huang. I knew some nutbags back in the day who used it 'recreationally'
    Yeah...uh...I need to fight of H1N1 too...any clue where I can sco...er...acquire some ma huang...

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