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Thread: Best remedy for Swine Flu? H1N1

  1. #61
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    Not to be confused with Da Ma...

    ... I remember drinking Ma Huang tea to alleviate allergy symptoms, not to get high.

    This guy I knew had brewed up a batch to take to a Dead show and was convinced he was going to have some ecstatic drug experience with it. He drank some and then was acting like he was in some deep trip. I just laughed at him. He also advocated putting Tiger Balm on your temples to get high. I told him that was much more effective on his *****.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #62
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    Interesting that Ma Huang would show up in a formula that treats wind-heat...I suppose in small doses it could one of a number of benefits...

    Im not sure why they would need to put so much research into this. As other posters have probably already stated, Yin Qiao San and Gan Mao Ling both do the job quite well for this sort of thing and there are stronger recipes than these for those who need it. I even keep Gan Mao Jie Du Chong Jie in extract form for my wife, since she wont drink decoctions...

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    ... advocated putting Tiger Balm on your temples to get high. I told him that was much more effective on his *****.
    I seem to have a vague recollection of something similar. Only it was to treat flatulence...

    ox

  4. #64
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    lol herb ox

    So, did it work?
    Gene Ching
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  5. #65
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    I just got over the flu

    It sucked. My kid was diagnosed with it and I got sick about a week later. It was like a hard flu but the body temp regulation came and went so there would be moments when I felt okay, then others when I would have a temperature or chills. There was a lot of respiratory issues and I was coughing for over two weeks.

    It cost me two weeks of kung fu practice and am looking very much forward to getting back into it tonight.
    Gene Ching
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  6. #66
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    ttt for 2018!

    Health officials 'very worried' as African swine fever spreads in Europe and Asia
    By Nina Avramova, CNN
    Updated 3:14 AM ET, Tue October 2, 2018


    Veterinarians inspect a dead boar during an African swine fever outbreak exercise in Germany in June.

    Story highlights
    China has culled tens of thousands of pigs in response to outbreaks this summer
    Wild boars and human behavior are believed to be the main causes of spread in Europe

    (CNN)Global health officials are preparing for African swine fever, which has been spreading in pigs across borders since 2014, reaching Western Europe last week.

    Humans are suspected to have caused the recent spread to Belgium, where eight cases were confirmed, as of September 25, according to the World Organisation for Animal Health.
    The most recent cases, however, were reported September 25 in a Chinese slaughterhouse in Hohhot, the capital of Inner Mongolia, according to the organization. There have been 29 outbreaks in China since the first case was reported August 3. China has culled nearly 40,000 pigs in response, according to the the organization's database.
    The virus reached China this summer and arrived in Western Europe for the first time in September in a separate simultaneous outbreak, leaving officials worried.
    As of Friday, Belgium had culled 4,000 domestic pigs from the Étalle region, according to the country's national federation of slaughterhouses, cutting plants and wholesalers for pork. Thirteen countries have banned some sort of pork imports from Belgium: Taiwan, South Korea, Serbia, Singapore, China, Belarus, Australia, Japan, Philippines, Mexico, Uruguay, Malaysia and India.
    "An outbreak of African swine fever is a very serious event," said Matthew Stone, the World Organisation for Animal Health's deputy director general for international standards and science. "The authorities of countries affected are under extraordinary pressure."
    Globally, more than 361,000 infected wild boars and domestic pigs have been reported to the organization, with more than 119,000 deaths in 2018.
    The disease is characterized by pigs developing hemorrhaging lesions on their skin and internal organs. All cases can result in death within 10 days of infection, according to the World Organisation for Animal Health.
    Financial consequences of an outbreak are substantial. Once the virus has been detected on a pig farm, the entire population must be culled.
    Pork exports make up 8.5% of the European Union's total agricultural industry and 62% of the bloc's total meat exports, according to a 2016 US Department of Agriculture report.

    Cross-border spread

    Eastern Europe has witnessed several outbreaks of the virus over the summer, with Romania most affected.
    The first case was reported in January near the Ukrainian border, and Romania has reported over 900 outbreaks since, mostly among backyard farm animals. Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Poland, Russia, Ukraine, Moldova and Romania have reported over 355,000 cases between them since 2014.
    African swine fever, which affects only wild boars, warthogs, bush pigs and domestic pigs, is endemic in sub-Saharan and West Africa and was first detected in Kenya in 1921. Scientists agree that there are no health risks to humans, according to the World Organisation for Animal Health.


    Veterinarians inspect a dead boar as part of a swine fever outbreak practice in Germany in June.

    The disease is transmitted among pigs by direct contact with infected animals, their carcasses and bodily fluids or by consuming contaminated meat, usually discarded by humans, according to Vytenis Andriukaitis, European Union commissioner for health and food safety. Any objects from infected zones, such as boot soles or tires, can also carry the virus as they may transfer sources like blood, tissues, secretions and excretions of dead or sick animals, according to the World Organisation for Animal Health.
    The virus first entered Eurasia in 2007g in Georgia via wild boar imported from Africa, said Andriukaitis, who chaired a meeting September 17 with Belgian ministers to discuss the handling of cases found in Belgium.
    "The first outbreak in Georgia in 2007 was a full disaster. It fully destroyed pork production and led to a broad contamination," he said. After Georgia, the virus spread to Russia, Moldova and Belarus and, in 2014, entered the European Union via Poland and the Baltic states.
    Now, the virus has reached Belgium, with ongoing outbreaks in Ukraine's Kiev region, resulting in the killing of 912 pigs. Nineteen new outbreaks were also recorded in Romania, mainly on backyard farms and national parks.
    The virus shows no sign of slowing.
    continued next post
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  7. #67
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    Continued from previous post

    Human spread

    Humans were the "most likely route of infection" for the boars in Belgium last week, believes Linda Dixon, researcher in genomics of African swine fever at the Pirbright Institute in the UK.
    Since the infected pigs were found in a forest area, more than 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) from any infected territories, she suspects that people consumed infected meat products and then left them in the forest where wild boars ate them.
    There are no risks associated with eating infected meat, Dixon said.
    In the rest of Europe the main factor for spread has been wild boar movements, illegal pig and pork meat trading and the movement of people and vehicles between countries, according to Andriukaitis.
    Climate change and "absolutely different weather conditions" have helped African swine fever spread, he said, explaining that the virus is a very heat- and cold-resistant one.

    Thousands infected in China

    China has also been hit hard.
    As of September 25, eight provinces were also reporting cases of African swine fever thousands of kilometers apart, with 2, 283 pigs infected. The country has seen 29 outbreaks, according to the World Organisation for Animal Health's database.
    China is one of the world's largest producers and consumers of pork products, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.
    Stone believes that the movement of live pigs or pig meat has been "instrumental in both initiation but also propagation" of the virus in China.
    Dirk Pfeiffer, chair professor at City University's College of Veterinary Medicine and Life Sciences in Hong Kong, believes that the wide geographical spread is due to the "extensive live pig trade network in China."
    "Food waste is being widely fed to domestic pigs, which if contaminated with the virus, will greatly facilitate spread."
    Where there is "significant illegal trade in live pigs, pork or food waste for feeding pigs," it becomes "virtually impossible" to find the source of the virus, Pfeiffer added.


    Medical workers participate in a swine fever prevention exercise in China in 2014.

    But investigations into how the virus was introduced are vital to prevent further spread.
    China is undertaking standard procedures such as a movement ban of pigs and pork products from affected to unaffected provinces and culling on at-risk farms. "Forward and backward" tracing is also ongoing to identify the source of the virus and which other areas could have undetected infections spreading. The feeding of pig swill (food waste) has also been banned, Pfeiffer said.
    However, given the size of the country and the number of outbreaks, Pfeffer believes there is a need for more trained veterinary staff who are familiar with the virus.
    Given the number of countries now affected, preparedness programs, such as awareness campaigns warning people not to bring meat products from infected areas, are ongoing in most countries, Dixon said.

    Schengen struggles

    "Europe is very worried about further spread," Dixon said, with the large number of wild boars that roam freely being a primary concern, aided by the Schengen zone that allows Europeans to travel between 26 countries without any border checks.
    Within the free movement zone, seven countries have reported outbreaks: Belgium, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic.
    Ways to keep wild boars from spreading the virus must include an understanding of the animal's movement, Stone said.
    In summer 2017, the Czech Republic managed an outbreak of the deadly virus in its wild boar population by early prevention methods like targeted hunting, increased biosecurity, awareness campaigns and training of local people.
    Other cases of African swine fever, like a 1980s outbreak in Spain, were also eliminated thanks to a reduction in free-range pig farming in the south of the country. But today's conditions make containing the virus harder.
    "Now, we have different circumstances because of the single market, free movement of goods, the Schengen area and the different legal environments," Andriukaitis said.
    Rest of Europe builds defense
    The European Union has laid out contingency plans for dealing with African swine fever, including hunting bans in affected areas, movement controls, surveillance, ensuring high levels of biosecurity in all pig holdings, fighting illegal trade in meat or pig products and raising awareness in farmers and the local population.
    In order to prevent spread of the virus to unaffected countries, Germany issued a decree allowing for hunting of wild boar populations during the entire year and has rehearsed response tactics in the case of an African swine fever outbreak. Denmark has approved plans for a fence along its border with Germany to stop wild boar movements between the countries as a precaution.
    Andriukaitis has "doubts" about using a fence between countries as a prevention strategy because it wouldn't stop movement by humans or vehicles, which can still transmit the virus.w
    The next hope is a vaccine.
    African swine fever is a highly contagious DNA virus, the UK's Department for Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs said.
    The European Union issued a research grant in 2018 for the development of an African swine fever vaccine in its Horizon 2020 program, the biggest EU research and innovation program.
    Now it's a fever, not the flu.
    Gene Ching
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  8. #68
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    Best remedy for Swine Flu? H1N1

    Stuffed pigs used in drill to instruct Hong Kong agricultural officials in how to cull sick animals in event of African swine fever outbreak
    Photos of the exercise, which were posted on health minister Sophia Chan’s Facebook page, proved to be a surprising social media hit
    PUBLISHED : Friday, 07 December, 2018, 8:31am
    UPDATED : Friday, 07 December, 2018, 12:52pm
    Ng Kang-chung



    Toys pigs, with a price tag of up to HK$700 (US$89) each, were enlisted to a drill this week to help train Hong Kong agricultural officials in how to kill sick animals in the event of African swine fever spreading across the border to Hong Kong farms.

    Whether it is a bargain or not is a matter of opinion, but taxpayers have been told the toy pigs will cost them a total of about HK$20,000.

    The surreal scenes of officials, in full protective gear, playing with the pink fluffy toy pigs – sending them to the cull one by one – quickly attracted the attention of the public after the pictures were posted on the official Facebook page of health minister Sophia Chan Siu-chee.

    The post, uploaded on Tuesday night, quickly became Chan’s most popular post in at least the past month, attracting over 43 comments and 156 “shares” in two days, compared with her usual Facebook posts that draw only a few comments.

    One comment read: “The pigs are so cute.” Another read: “Can I adopt one?” Some were not too amused though, questioning if it was a waste of taxpayers’ money to buy toy pigs.


    Agricultural officials conducting a swine fever culling drill using stuffed pigs. Photo: Facebook

    The Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department confirmed in a statement on Thursday that it had conducted a “drill” two days earlier “to strengthen the preparedness of [the department] in case of an outbreak of [African swine fever]” on local farms.

    The department did not elaborate on the mood of staff or the atmosphere during the training exercise, or who had first raised the idea of buying toy pigs for the drill, only saying that “more than 30 staff members, all of whom were from [the department], were involved in this drill”.

    “A total of 28 big prop pigs (around HK$700 each) and two small prop pigs (around HK$80 each) were used during the drill. Prop pigs have not been disposed of but are currently stored away for reuse,” the statement read.


    Marching the pigs to the cull. Photo: Facebook

    How useful using toy pigs in a pig culling drill is, is anybody’s guess. The department statement also noted: “In reality, the method to be adopted for pig culling is subject to various factors, including the environment of the farm concerned, the number of pigs within the farm, the health conditions and size of the pigs, etcetera, and international guidelines on the culling of animals.

    “Under objective conditions, [the department] will primarily make use of carbon dioxide for pig culling.”

    Chan said in her post that she was there to oversee the drill, including inspecting the method employed to kill pigs. She was also briefed by the officers on their plans for a possible outbreak of African swine fever in Hong Kong farms.


    Secretary for Food and Health Sophia Chan Siu-chee with health officials during this week’s swine fever drill. Photo: Facebook

    African swine fever is a highly contagious viral disease that infects pigs. It does not affect other animal species or humans.

    China reported its first outbreak in August in the north-eastern province of Liaoning. A total of 81 cases of the disease had been reported in 21 provincial regions as of December 3. Officials claimed the outbreaks were generally under control in China.

    In her Facebook post, Chan said the government would take “decisive action” to minimise the impact on local farms if African swine fever were to spread to Hong Kong.

    Additional reporting by Elizabeth Cheung
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  9. #69
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    Ominous

    DECEMBER 18, 2018 / 3:59 AM / UPDATED 4 HOURS AGO
    China agriculture ministry confirms new African swine fever outbreak in Chongqing
    1 MIN READ

    BEIJING, Dec 18 (Reuters) - A new outbreak of African swine fever has been confirmed on a small pig farm in southwest China’s city of Chongqing, the country’s agriculture ministry on Tuesday.

    The virus was detected on a farm with 23 pigs in Chongqing’s Bishan district, infecting eight animals and killing three, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said in a statement.

    China, home to the world’s biggest pig herd, has reported around 90 outbreaks of the highly contagious fever since August and earlier on Tuesday launched a campaign to crack down on illegal hog slaughtering to contain the spread. (Reporting by Tom Daly; editing by David Evans)

    THREADS
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    Bacon!!!!!!
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  10. #70
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    73,000 pigs

    This is really bad.

    JANUARY 2, 2019 / 3:21 AM / UPDATED 9 HOURS AGO
    African swine fever hits huge, foreign-invested Chinese farm
    4 MIN READ

    BEIJING (Reuters) - China reported an outbreak of deadly African swine fever on a huge pig farm part-owned by a Danish investment fund, showing the spread of the virus to modern industrial farms expected to have the best levels of disease prevention.


    A vendor prepares pork for sale at a market in Beijing, China December 26, 2018. Picture taken December 26, 2018. REUTERS/Jason Lee

    The outbreak occurred on a farm in Suihua city with 73,000 pigs in northeastern Heilongjiang province, owned by the Heilongjiang Asia-Europe Animal Husbandry Co Ltd, a company established in 2016.

    The farm’s herd included 15,000 breeding pigs, according to its website, and it was aiming to produce 385,000 pigs for slaughter a year. Some 4,686 pigs had been infected and 3,766 animals died, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said late on Wednesday. All animals on infected farms must be culled under current rules.

    The farm is the largest yet to be hit by the disease, which has infected almost 100 farms across China since August 2018, spreading faster than in any other country to date.

    More than 200,000 pigs on infected farms have been culled, according to a Reuters tally of official figures, while hundreds of thousands more in the vicinity have also been put down.

    China has the world’s largest hog herd and the rapid spread of African swine fever has roiled the country’s trade in pork, the nation’s most popular meat, disrupting supplies and pushing up prices in some areas.

    Neither Heilongjiang Asia-Europe Animal Husbandry nor its majority owner, state-owned Zhejiang Rural Development Group Co. Ltd, responded to calls for comment.

    Steffen Schiottz-Christensen, vice president for North Asia at Denmark state fund IFU, confirmed the outbreak but declined to comment further as he had yet to be fully briefed.

    IFU, which provides risk capital and advice for investment in developing countries, invested 28.4 million DKK ($4.32 million) in the farm in 2017, according to its website, although its shareholding has since been diluted, Schiottz-Christensen said.

    “The African swine fever situation is only getting worse. Small farms, big farms, slaughterhouses, feed - the whole production chain basically all got hit,” said Yao Guiling, an analyst with consultancy China-America Commodity Data Analytics.

    Beijing has banned feeding kitchen waste to pigs, and restricted transport of live pigs and products from infected areas.

    But the virus has now reached 23 provinces and municipalities across China. The disease is deadly to pigs but does not affect humans.

    “The policies are good, but the increasing outbreaks show that there might be some problem with execution at the local government level,” said Yao.

    China’s agriculture ministry also said on Wednesday that slaughterhouses will need to test their pork products for African swine fever before selling them to the market.

    Slaughterhouses must slaughter pigs from different origins separately, and can only sell the products if blood from the same batch of pigs tests negative for the virus.

    If the virus is detected, slaughterhouses must cull all pigs to be slaughtered and suspend operations for at least 48 hours, according to the regulation, which will go into effect from Feb. 1.

    (For a graphic on 'Swine fever in China' click tmsnrt.rs/2QMhmzL)

    Reporting by Hallie Gu and Dominique Patton; editing by David Evans and Richard Pullin
    THREADS
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  11. #71
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    Pricey pork

    UPDATE 1-CHINA URGES PIG FARMS TO RESTOCK AMID WORRIES OVER PORK SUPPLY, SWINE FEVER
    1/15/2019
    * China pork prices "very likely" to rise in H2 -govt official

    * But does not expect them to climb in run up to Lunar New Year

    * Wants pig farmers to restock quickly

    * China battling African swine fever, has culled 900,000 pigs (Recasts; adds comment, detail)

    BEIJING, Jan 16 (Reuters) - China's pig farmers should quickly replenish their herds, a government official said, as the world's biggest pork producer looks to curb price rises for the meat expected to bite later this year in the wake of African swine fever outbreaks.

    Pork prices in China are "very likely" to rise in the second-half of 2019 as the number of pigs has been falling, Tang Ke at the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said on Wednesday.

    "We recommend most farmers adjust their production and increase replenishment in a timely manner," said Tang, even as they carry out steps to prevent and control African swine fever.

    The comments come as China battles the world's fastest spreading epidemic of African swine fever, which has now reached 24 of its provinces and led to the culling of more than 900,000 pigs. The disease is deadly to hogs, but does not affect people.

    The outbreaks have not yet hit national pork prices and supplies are currently "sufficient", said Tang, who expected no major volatility ahead of the Lunar New Year holiday beginning in early February when the meat is widely consumed.

    However, measures implemented to control the spread of the disease have kept live pig prices in some parts of the country at loss-making levels, leading to liquidation by small farmers and slow restocking.

    National pig stocks in December were almost 5 percent lower than the previous year's level, said Tang, while numbers of breeding sows were down by more than 8 percent. He did not give total numbers for the herd size.

    "For three consecutive months the drop was more than the 5 percent warning level, meaning that in the second-half of this year, the number of live pigs to reach the market will be lower and the likelihood of pig prices rising is very big," he said.

    The ministry would work to ensure production and supplies by smoothing the transport of pigs and making sure animals can be sold, he added.

    The average weight of pigs in the country was at a record of around 124 kg (273 lb) in December, said Tang, indicating difficulty in selling pigs in key producing regions.

    CONSUMER CONCERNS

    For now, live pig prices are still low, and may even be slightly weaker in the run up to the Lunar New Year, Tang also said.

    The average price of live pigs in the second week of January was 13.65 yuan ($2.02) per kg, down 1.6 percent from the previous week, and has dropped for four consecutive weeks, he added.

    Pork prices have also declined in the last week by 0.9 percent to 23.55 yuan per kg, and are down almost 8 percent versus last year.

    "The volumes of pork traded at monitored farmers' markets has dropped by 14.4 percent, consumer demand is weakening," Tang said. ($1 = 6.7684 Chinese yuan renminbi) (Reporting by Dominique Patton; Editing by Joseph Radford)
    THREADS
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  12. #72
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    It's back...

    Actually it never really went away.


    HEALTH NEWS JUNE 29, 2020 / 8:06 PM / UPDATED A DAY AGO
    China study warns of possible new 'pandemic virus' from pigs
    David Stanway
    3 MIN READ

    SHANGHAI (Reuters) - A new flu virus found in Chinese pigs has become more infectious to humans and needs to be watched closely in case it becomes a potential “pandemic virus”, a study said, although experts said there is no imminent threat.

    A team of Chinese researchers looked at influenza viruses found in pigs from 2011 to 2018 and found a “G4” strain of H1N1 that has “all the essential hallmarks of a candidate pandemic virus”, according to the paper, published by the U.S. journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

    Pig farm workers also showed elevated levels of the virus in their blood, the authors said, adding that “close monitoring in human populations, especially the workers in the swine industry, should be urgently implemented”.

    The study highlights the risks of viruses crossing the species barrier into humans, especially in densely populated regions in China, where millions live close to farms, breeding facilities, slaughterhouses and wet markets.

    The current coronavirus sweeping the world is believed to have originated in horseshoe bats in southwest China and could have spread to humans via a seafood market in the central city of Wuhan, where the virus was first identified.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) will read the Chinese study carefully, spokesman Christian Lindmeier told a Geneva briefing on Tuesday, saying it was important to collaborate on findings and keep tabs on animal populations.

    “It also highlights we cannot let our guard down on influenza and need to be vigilant and continue surveillance even in the coronavirus pandemic,” he added.

    Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told a daily news conference on Tuesday that China was closely following developments. “We will take all necessary measures to prevent the spread and outbreak of any virus,” he said.

    The study said pigs were considered important “mixing vessels” for the generation of pandemic influenza viruses and called for “systematic surveillance” of the problem.

    China took action against an outbreak of avian H1N1 in 2009, restricting incoming flights from affected countries and putting tens of thousands of people into quarantine.

    The new virus identified in the study is a recombination of the 2009 H1N1 variant and a once prevalent strain found in pigs.

    But while it is capable of infecting humans, there is no imminent risk of a new pandemic, said Carl Bergstrom, a biologist at the University of Washington.

    “There’s no evidence that G4 is circulating in humans, despite five years of extensive exposure,” he said on Twitter. “That’s the key context to keep in mind.”

    More than 10.3 million people have been reported to be infected by the novel coronavirus globally and 504,269​ have died, according to a Reuters tally.
    Gene Ching
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  13. #73
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    herb ox ftw

    Quote Originally Posted by herb ox View Post
    Thus far, I've heard a few differing approaches to managing the H1N1 pandemic. Outside of isolating yourself, washing hands frequently and avoiding touching your face, etc., the two herbal remedies I see everyone stocking up on are:

    Jade Screen Formula (Yu Ping Feng San) - known to 'tighten the pores' to prevent the entry of exterior pathogens, this formula boosts the body's immunity to prevent catching colds. A delightfully simple formula comprised of: Huang Qi, Fang Feng, Bai Zhu. In summary, it raises the qi, eliminates wind and dries dampness. This is more of a constitutional formula, i.e. addressing deficiency in one's constitution.

    The other formula taken by my teachers from China is Gan Mao Ling, a common cold remedy. This is more of a modern empirically derived formula that contains Ban Lan Gen (radix isatis), which has been shown to have antiviral effects in the laboratory. This is a "wen bing" or warm febrile disease formula specifically designed to combat strong flu-like influences.

    This in mind, my current favorite is Ganmao Tuire Chongi, a granulated formula containing ban lan gen and da qing ye (both from the same plant) in addition to herbs to direct the actions to the lungs and respiratory system. It is usually found in a yellow or green box at the herbalist's shop, and only costs a few (under 10) bucks. I used this formula with great success last time I got sick, and beat back the cold in 3 days with no lingering phlegm, cough etc. My friends, by comparison, had the same cold and it lasted about 15 days untreated.

    how do you prevent colds and flu? How do you battle 'em once you got one?

    in health,

    herb ox
    Posted over a decade ago. Some day "isolating yourself, washing hands frequently and avoiding touching your face" will sink in.
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  14. #74
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    Remember swine flu?

    BUSINESS NEWS AUGUST 3, 2020 / 10:36 PM / UPDATED 12 HOURS AGO
    China's hog futures set to make debut, but faces big challenges
    Emily Chow
    6 MIN READ

    SHANGHAI (Reuters) - China’s long-awaited live hog futures contract is almost ready, offering a vital hedging tool for the world’s largest pork industry, which has been roiled by an African swine fever outbreak that devastated herds and sent pork prices soaring.


    FILE PHOTO: An employee works next to signs showing pork prices at a market in Beijing, China December 8, 2019. REUTERS/Jason Lee/File Photo

    The country’s first live-animal physical-delivery contract has been planned for a decade, and is expected to be popular with domestic traders on the Dalian Commodity Exchange (DCE).

    But complex delivery logistics, tight quality-control standards, a local lack of experience with futures contracts and a retail trading community that has wildly distorted other markets will be key challenges.

    China typically slaughters about 700 million pigs annually and produces more than 50 million tonnes of pork – about half of global output. Hog and pork producers have traditionally relied on contracts that define volume and delivery requirements, but have little control over or insight into costs, especially in future months.

    (GRAPHIC - China pork output vs world production: here)

    Reuters Graphic

    That lack of cost control was made clear by the country’s widespread outbreaks of African swine fever, which since 2018 have nearly halved the pig herd and disrupted hog and pork supplies throughout the country.

    Producers are now rebuilding the herd, which stands at 339.96 million head as of end-June, but average pork prices remain near record highs, making the launch of a transparent pricing and hedging tool a welcome development.
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    Gene Ching
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    Author of Shaolin Trips
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