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Thread: Vietnamese Martial arts

  1. #16
    Vo Co-Truyen (Vietnamese traditional Karate/Kung-Fu existing for more than 1000 years)
    Over 1000 years, I don't know why there aren't more schools in America?

    elbow strikes from Vietnamese kickboxing (considered the best elbow techniques).

    Wow I didn't know about this
    Go Surf!
    Train hard and work hard to gain mastery.
    Do not train and you gain nothing.
    Spread good karma!!! Because if you dont, you get hit by bad karma!!!
    Then you will step in dog crap!!!=)
    Karate's better!!!

  2. #17
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    My best bet would be that Vietnamese MA sucks ass.
    They would get slaughtered in full-contact tournaments in Thailand, Burma, etc.

  3. #18
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    Chen Zhen-
    What is your teddy bear doing? It looks like he's going to go blind, man.
    -Thos. Zinn

    "Children, never fuss or fret
    Nor let unreason'd tempers rise
    Your little hands were never meant
    To pluck out one anothers eyes"
    -McGuffey's Reader

    ďWe are at a crossroads. One path leads to despair and the other to total extinction. I pray I have the wisdom to choose wisely.Ē


    ستّة أيّام يا كلب

  4. #19
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  5. #20
    hahahaha
    Go Surf!
    Train hard and work hard to gain mastery.
    Do not train and you gain nothing.
    Spread good karma!!! Because if you dont, you get hit by bad karma!!!
    Then you will step in dog crap!!!=)
    Karate's better!!!

  6. #21
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    My best bet would be that Vietnamese MA sucks ass.
    The man who teaches at the school that I linked didn't suck anybody's arse when he was competing or at war. I admit, he does teach Thai-boxing as well. I can't speak for Vietnamese arts as a whole.
    Monkey vs. Robot

  7. #22
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    Originally posted by Stranger


    The man who teaches at the school that I linked didn't suck anybody's arse when he was competing or at war. I admit, he does teach Thai-boxing as well. I can't speak for Vietnamese arts as a whole.
    He kinda sucked that day he elbowed me in the nuts, quite frankly. My best friend used to attend that school. I went with him once. Once.



    From what little I've gathered from that school and a short-lived kung fu school here in Rockville, Vietnamese martial arts have heavy Thai and Chinese influences. The Spirit Mountain school that used to be here was Vietnamese kung fu. I can't remember the native name for it. And the World Martial Arts school in College Park made use of a lot of knees and elbows. But as Stranger mentioned, the school also claims to teach muay thai.


    Stuart B.
    When you assume, you make an ass out of... pretty much just you, really.

  8. #23
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    Yes Vietnam Does have martial arts of its own.
    1000 years of invasion by China surely helped that
    Nonetheless vietnamese got rid of chinese around 1500 (Le loi) and proved in a way their level.
    Usually, one can divide Vietnamese MA in 2 great classes:
    Thieu lam (shaolin) and Binh Dinh (center of viet nam).

    Thieu lam is the term that stands for all styles greatly influenced by CMA, the most seen are hong gia (hung gar), vinh xuan (wing chun), bach my phai (pak mei), duong long (tang lang), thieu lam, tai cuc (taiji) and others great chinese MA styles(like chow gar and hakka styles).
    Now most of these styles have a different flavor than actual CMA.
    One reason is that they kept the "old style" flavor.The other one is the mix with vietnamese techniques and adaptation to vietnamese body type (supposedly smaller than chinese).

    The other great family is binh dinh. Quite hard to see, the name derives from the regions those styles come from.
    Most of the time they are considered genuine Vietnamese martial arts, you can even read Anti chinese styles.
    They do use a lot of elbows and knees but it is very hard to synthetise the characteristics as most binh dinh styles are kept more or less secret (reserved to a village or a family) and some are very specialized (like one style only for the whip). The best entry door for binh dinh is the style sa long cuong that has been quite widespread. The style is well known for making tough fighters.

    Now on the general characteristics of Vietnamese MA you should find:
    quyen (taos)
    song luyen (2 person forms)
    bai vu khi ( weapons)
    vo tu do (free fighting)
    cam na (qinna)
    vat (wrestling)
    noi gong (nei gong) or ngai gong
    And of course all hand-leg-elbow and knees techniques....

    The most widespread vietnamese Style is Vovinam, a synthesis style (done in 1930 by nguyen loc).Usually the emphasis is placed on leg techniques but the style is quite complete.

    Sidenote:i currently practice lam son vo dao,after having practiced hau quyen (monkey)
    Last edited by conputer; 09-15-2003 at 08:03 AM.

  9. #24
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    For what its worth I have heard of two. Vovinam Viet Vo Dao and Qwan Ki Do.

    Qwan Ki Do from what I gather is very karate based in style with a heavy underpinning of Taoist philosophy. I also remeber reading that Vovinam has a heavy wrestling slant.

    Cheers,
    Regards

  10. #25
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    qwan ki do (qwan khi dao, it depends ) has indeed a deep karate flavor.Maybe the most karate-type of all vietnamese martial arts.
    Now, i've heard from some friends close to Pham Xuan Tong (founder of qwan ki do) that he taught a biased version of what he had learnt, and it makes sense since their way of moving is too karate to be vietnamese (some of their postures indicates that also).Now maybe Pham Xuan Tong teaches the real stuff to his very close pupils (traditionnal way after all) but don't consider qwan ki do to be representative of Vietnamese arts.

    About Vovinam, yes they do have a lot of "vat" (wrestling) , but like any traditionnal style, and it comes generally for the advanced.
    One of the advantages of Vovinam is the structure of the curriculum, very organized, rationalized.
    Nonetheless they're still very oriented towards high kicks(let's say too much for my likening )

  11. #26

    Exclamation Vinh Xuan in Ukraine / Russia

    Vietnamese Wing Chun - Vinh Xuan Quyen Phai
    Patriarch Huynh Ngoc An`s School:
    http://www.vietwingchun.com
    http://www.wingchun.name (Igor Astashev)
    Vinh Xuan Quyen Phai
    www.wingchun.name

  12. #27
    I know there was a bak hsing elder in vietnam that to my knowledge has passed away, does anyone know if he has any students there?

  13. #28
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    Nam has so many styles

    Here's another.

    Master of Kinh shares martial art with world
    (29-06-2008)
    by Khieu Thanh Ha

    If youíve never heard of Kinh, Viet Namís premier martial art, donít despair: A Vietnamese master from Hue is on a mission to educate the world.

    Thanks to master Truong Quang Kim, the martial art is gradually becoming known not only in its home town of Hue City, but also in France, the United States, Australia, and beyond. Nevertheless, he knows heíll walk a long road before transforming his dreams to reality.

    According to him, Kinh means citadel and was a unique martial arts used by soldiers in the imperial city during the Nguyen Dynasty (1802-1945). It was created by commander Nguyen Huu Canh under King Gia Longís illustrious reign.

    Kinh is one of the last two remaining traditional martial arts of Viet Nam besides Binh Dinh, and upon the collapse of feudalism, was disseminated to the masses.

    The martial art has been in Kimís family for about 200 years and Kim, the fifth generation and sole inheritor of Kinh martial arts, received orthodox training from his father, master Truong Thang.

    Spreading the art of Kinh

    Kimís plan to popularise the art was kicked off when he began to observe foreign martial arts. Realising they were not superior to Viet Namís, he began to circulate the world. Kim trained himself, while saving and borrowing money, then travelled half the globe to promote Viet Namís Kinh martial art.

    In 2000, Kim was invited to attend an international traditional martial arts festival in Paris. The first thing he saw at the competition house in Paris were boards which read: Karate, Taekwondo, and Shaolin. Though lifeless, they nevertheless stirred strange feelings in master Kim.

    "Vietnamese martial arts easily equal these, so why are they not as wide-spread?" he wondered.

    "Chinese martial arts are taught in Paris and the same can be done with Kinh," Kim thought, the boards still on his mind.

    The local government was willing to help Kim open a Kinh martial art class but he didnít have enough money. Determined to open a dojo in France at any cost, he sold every asset he owned and borrowed money from every source to open the first ever Vietnamese martial arts club outside Viet Nam, in Lyon several months later.

    To the 54-year-old, who is the master of the Kinh martial arts centre in Hue, it was very important to show the world the essence of Vietnamese fighting arts.

    His centre in Hue is famous not only among locals, but with foreigners; many have come, admired and trained with master Kim.

    "Unlike most other traditional martial arts, Kinh does not employ consecutive, lethal striking techniques. It was developed mainly for self defence," said Arie Pieter van Dujin, a martial artist who has been studying under Kim for several years.

    Dujin is one of about 20 foreigners training at Kimís centre. They will be important in helping promote the art upon their returns to their home countries.

    Most Kinh art centres around the world have been established in this manner, and Kim journeys to these centres twice a year, re-united with friends, training with the students, and updating them on skills and techniques as they advance.

    The martial art is now practised in ten countries including the United States, Australia, and Italy, and according to Kim, Norway is the next destination. Everywhere a club is opened, Kinh martial art is warmly welcomed by locals, which Kim says, gives him the energy to realise his dream.

    The Hueís masterís training regime is very hard which means students must be in good physical shape, have patience, and love it. Their training allows them respiratory and cardio-vascular work-outs, as they improve their fighting skills including proficiency of 18 different kinds of weapons.

    More Kinh

    Kim doesnít plan to stop. "Many countries in South America and Africa donít know about Vietnamese martial arts," he said, adding, "Itís a good way to disseminate our culture to the world. Kinh is taught in Vietnamese and anyone who wants to learn it will come to understand Vietnamese language, customs, habits and history," he went on to say.

    Kim is also focusing on spreading Kinh within Viet Namís borders. "The martial art is well known in central areas but many in the North and South donít have access to it," Kim said, adding, "I hope that in the near future I can open more centres so Vietnamese people across the country will understand, and be proud of their home-grown art-form."

    "I have signed contracts with different travel agencies who will add my centres as a destination in their tours," said Kim, "so after visiting Hueís other attractions, tourists come and admire our performances."

    The shows always receives excellent feedback from visitors, and Kim and his disciples were invited to perform at the 2008 Hue Festival which recently ended mid-June.

    A doctor and a father

    Kim, a renowned martial arts instructor recognised by the International Martial Arts Association, is also known as a doctor of oriental medicine, and runs a private health centre for local patients.

    Every disciple who studies Kinh is also asked to study oriental medicine, so as to be able to treat any injuries sustained in training or combat.

    At Kimís private practice, patients receive advice, check-ups, and prescriptions, all kept at a low cost as Kim runs it as a non-profit.

    Kim is also seen as a father-figure by 20 street children to whom he gives free Kinh classes at the An Tay Orphanage in Hue.

    "These underprivileged children have suffered such misery, the least I can do is give them hope in their lives," Kim said. ó VNS
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #29
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    Here a link to a Tiger style kung fu from Vietnam in Ottawa ,Canada

    http://www.shaolincentre.com/

    Steeeve

  15. #30
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    this land of martial arts is getting hotter

    I want to know more about the Miss Martial Lands pageant.

    Exploring the land of martial arts in festive time
    12:57' 29/07/2008 (GMT+7)

    VietNamNet Bridge Ė Local people in Binh Dinh Province are busier than ever this time as the festive air in this land of martial arts is getting hotter as the Tay Son-Binh Dinh Festival is only four days away.

    The artistic fountain on 28,600 square meters on Nguyen Tat Thanh Street where culinary and craft village exhibitions will take place in Tay Son Binh Dinh Festival.
    For the forthcoming festival, which runs until August 3, a series of artistic and architectural works such as Quang Trung Museum, Temple of Admiral Bui Thi Xuan, the Twin Tower park and an artistic fountain on 28,600 square meters on Nguyen Tat Thanh Street have been restored and constructed.

    A 180-page handbook on Binh Dinh's tourism in three languages of English, Chinese and Vietnamese and a 30-page manual in English and Vietnamese featuring 15 tourism destinations in Binh Dinh Province have also been published and hit bookstores countrywide and the tourism spots, hotels and travel agents, Binh Dinh newspaper reports.

    Main events will include Tay Son martial arts, King Quang Trung battle drum performance, Miss Martial Lands pageant, and a classical drama performance highlighting the distinctions of the province.

    There will be an incense and flower offering ritual at Tay Son sanctuary on August 1, and a drama with over 700 artists playing the roles of King Quang Trung and troops in the Tay Son uprising to remind visitors of a glorious time in Vietnam's history.

    Binh Dinh is a coastal province with a rich seafood reserves for delicious and nutritious dishes. Therefore, tourists wandering to the land during this festive time should also not forget tasting the specialties of this area such as Chim mia (sugarcane bird), Nem Cho Huyen (fermented pork of Huyen market), bun Song Than (Song Than rice vermicelli), and banh it la gai (sticky rice cake with coconut or green bean stuffing wrapped in pinnate leaf).

    As Tay Son is a sugarcane-growing area, sugarcane birds in big flocks often gather there and the locals catch the birds to make the special dish. The birds are roasted and should be used with Bau Da rice alcohol, a special drink from Bau Da Village of Binh Dinh Province.

    Nem Cho Huyen is also another must-try when coming to this land. The specialty comes from Vinh Thanh hamlet, Phuoc Loc Commune, Tuy Phuoc District, and making the specialty is a tradition passed from generations to generations.

    In this area, the fermented pork wrapped in guava and banana leaves is the popular finger food of the locals and it stands out from other nem in other areas for its not - so - tender, not - so - sweet flavor.

    Bun Song Than (rice vermicelli from the river of deity) is also another traditional specialty of this land. The rice vermicelli is made by locals of An Thai Village of An Nhon District in the province.

    It is said that the kings of the Nguyen Dynasty found this specialty so delicious that they summoned the craftspeople making this specialty to the former capital city in Hue to make the dish. However, without the water of the Kon river, which is also called the river of deity, the dish lost its special taste.

    Before leaving the province, tourists could buy some banh it la gai as a gift for their families and friends. This cake is made from sticky rice and sugar wrapped in pinnate leaves and stuffed with coconut or green bean. It is a rural and simple cake but it could not be left out in the special days of the locals such as Tet holiday, death anniversary or wedding.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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