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Thread: Busted TCM practitioners

  1. #61
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    enforcement blitz?

    15 raids = 9 busted women. What happened to those other 6? And did they just bust the women? Were there pimps?

    I really don't want to know. I'm just writing something because every post needs some text to post.

    Sunday, 30 April 2017 | MYT 1:50 PM
    Singapore minister concerned about reports of traditional Chinese medicine clinics offering sex


    Two women from a TCM outlet in Rangoon Road being taken away after a police raid.ST PHOTO: LIM SIN THAI.

    SINGAPORE: Minister of State for Health and Communications and Information Chee Hong Tat has expressed concern over recent reports of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinics being used as massage parlours sexual services.

    Chee was referring to an enforcement blitz conducted on TCM centres and unlicensed massage parlours by the police earlier this week, which resulted in the arrests of nine women.

    A total of 15 establishments in Little India, Bukit Batok, Clementi, MacPherson, Sennett Estate and Upper Paya Lebar were raided over three days.

    In some of the TCM centres, there were female masseuses instead of TCM practitioners. Some were found to be offering sex to their customers.

    In his Facebook post on Sunday (April 30), Mr Chee said TCM practitioners who allow their clinics to be used in this manner are tarnishing the reputation of the industry, as well as the standing of other practitioners and institutions.

    "The industry, professional board and government must take a united stand against these negative practices," he wrote.

    In January this year, The Straits Times reported that several TCM clinics also offered "special" massages - a term use to describe sexual services - to its customers.

    The clinics advertise themselves as TCM clinics with signboards outside the premises promoting treatments like tui na, cupping and acupuncture. – The Straits Times/Asia News Network
    Gene Ching
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  2. #62
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    Xiao arrested

    Chinese 'healer' arrested over death of diabetic Australian boy at 'slapping therapy' workshop
    BY ALEX LINDER IN NEWS ON MAY 4, 2017 8:15 PM



    Chinese "healer" Hongchi Xiao has been arrested in London at the request of Australian authorities over the 2015 death of a six-year-old diabetic boy who had been treated by Xiao at his workshop with his signature "slapping therapy."

    Back in April 2015, Hongchi Xiao held a week-long workshop in Sydney, costing 1,800 AUD (1,420 USD) to attend, in which he demonstrated various forms of alternative and traditional Chinese medicine, including a technique he invented himself known as "paidalajin" (拍打拉筋) which involves fasting along with stretching and slapping the body to the point of bruising. Xiao has claimed that his therapy has cured a number of various medical conditions including diabetes and hypertension.



    An Australian mother brought her diabetic child to the event. Afterward, the six-year-old boy was found unconscious inside a hotel room and later died. Police believe that Xiao encouraged the boy to stop taking his insulin and start fasting.
    Following a lengthy investigation, the boy's mother, father and grandmother were arrested in March and now face the charge of manslaughter for recklessly endangering the boy's life for subjecting him to Xiao's treatment, the Sydney Morning Herald reports. If convicted, the three could be sentenced to 25 years in prison.
    After being interviewed by the police, Xiao left the country and continued to make money by holding "self-healing" workshops around the globe. "This is purely an accident," he said about the death last year. "This has nothing to do with the workshop. This boy had a lot of diseases, more than we ever know."
    continued next post
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  3. #63
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    Continued from previous post



    However, on April 25th, Xiao was arrested by British police and now sits in a London jail. He will likely be extradited to Australia to face a manslaughter charge, but it's not quite so simple. Xiao has also been linked with the death of a diabetic British grandmother last October and British authorities may decide to prosecute him themselves.
    More on Xiao Hongchi here & here.
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  4. #64
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    Hongchi Xiao extradited

    Chinese 'slapping therapist' charged over six-year-old death and extradited from UK
    British Police is reportedly investigating him over the death of a 71-year-old woman
    Chloe Farand 2 days ago
    The Independent Online


    Hongchi Xiao was arrested at a London airport in April this year Hongchi Xiao/Facebook

    A Chinese "slapping therapist" has been charged with the manslaughter of a six-year-old diabetic boy.

    Hongchi Xiao, who has been promoting the controversial practice of slapping skin to release toxins from patients has been extradited from the UK to Australia over the death of the boy in Sydney in 2015.

    The Australian Associated Press reports that the boy, who was a type-1 diabetic, died after he was found unconscious in a hotel in Hurstville, a suburb of southern Sidney.

    The six-year-old allegedly became unconscious after his parents took him to a self-healing conference conducted by the 53-year-old healer.

    Emergency services were called but they were unable to revive the young child.

    Mr Xiao was arrested at a London airport on 25 April this year and he agreed to return to Australia to face charges.

    He is due to appear at Sydney Central Local Court on Thursday and was denied bail in the meantime on the basis there would be no way to ensure he would not take part in further slapping workshops.

    The boy's father, mother and grandmother were also arrested earlier this year and charged with manslaughter. They were released on conditional bail.

    In June, a UK court was told Mr Xiao was also being investigated by British police over the death of a 71-year-old woman who had undergone slapping therapy.

    Mr Xiao has been promoting the paida lajin method, which sees patients being slapped or slapping themselves repeatedly.

    A video of a 2012 workshop in Malaysia led by Mr Xiao shows participants vigorously slapping parts of their body, particularly joints and the head, until their skin turns red or starts to look bruised.

    The method also includes stretching exercises and it is linked to a belief in Chinese traditional medicine that blood can be poisoned by toxins which need to be expelled.

    Mr Xiao has repeatedly talked about the "slapping therapy" in interviews and videos posted on the internet.

    According to the Sydney Morning Herald, in a 2014 radio interview with Australian broadcaster ABC he insisted he was not a "master".

    "I'm not a doctor, I'm not a healer. I just teach you a way. You learn and do it yourself," he said.

    More on Xiao Hongchi here, here & here.
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  5. #65
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    Deceptive goop

    When Gwyneth's Goopy Jade Eggs get Busted...

    Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop product claims 'deceptive,' watchdog group says
    By Dianne de Guzman, SFGATE Updated 8:08 pm, Wednesday, August 23, 2017


    Gwyneth Paltrow attends book signing at goop-in@Nordstrom at The Grove on June 8, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Goop has come under fire for a number of products the site sells, with a watchdog group criticizing various health claims in the site's product marketing. Photo: Phillip Faraone/Getty Images For Goop
    Photo: Phillip Faraone/Getty Images For Goop

    Gwyneth Paltrow-run lifestyle website Goop is being called out again for its wellness products, after a consumer watchdog group cited more than 50 instances in which the site offered "deceptive" health claims in marketing for its products.
    The group has filed a complaint with the California Food Drug and Medical Device Task Force to look into Goop's marketing practices.
    Truth in Advertising compiled a list of instances it felt Goop falsely claimed that its products (or third-party products) could "treat, cure, prevent, alleviate the symptoms" for a variety of health issues, from thyroid dysfunction and infertility to uterine prolapse and hormonal imbalance.
    "These [Goop-endorsed products] include crystal harmonics for infertility, rose flower essence tincture for depression, black rose bar for psoriasis, wearable stickers for anxiety, and vitamin D3 for cancer," TINA.org wrote in a blog post on its site Tuesday.
    "The problem is that the company does not possess the competent and reliable scientific evidence required by law to make such claims."
    The group fired off a letter to Paltrow and the Goop group about its findings, asking on Aug. 11 that the company modify how its content, in what TINA.org labelled as "illegal health claims." The group gave Goop a deadline of Aug. 18 to make changes to the product descriptions, before they took its issues with the site to the California Food Drug and Medical Device Task Force.
    At its preset deadline, the group felt that the changes Goop made were not enough and sent a letter to California regulators.
    In a statement to BuzzFeed News, a Goop representative said that "while we believe that TINA's description of our interactions is misleading and their claims unsubstantiated and unfounded, we will continue to evaluate our products and our content and make those improvements that we believe are reasonable and necessary in the interests of our community of users."
    The representative went on to say that the company felt it "responded promptly and in good faith to the initial outreach from representatives of TINA and hoped to engage with them to address their concerns. Unfortunately, they provided limited information and made threats under arbitrary deadlines which were not reasonable under the circumstances."
    Paltrow and Goop's health claims have come under fire for various products over the past few years, since its jump from a beauty newsletter to selling wellness products. Goop made past headlines for promoting $120 Body Vibes stickers that were allegedly made with "the same conductive carbon material NASA uses to line space suits," saying the stickers would "rebalance the energy frequency in our bodies." (NASA, in turn, refuted those claims, and a former chief scientist at NASA was quoted as saying, "Wow. What a load of B.S. this is.")
    Goop was also criticized for selling jade eggs, claiming that inserting the egg-shaped stones into a woman's vagina would balance hormones and improve the user's sex life. That information was disputed by San Francisco obstetrician-gynecologist Dr. Jennifer Gunter, who said that using the jade egg as directed could lead to bacterial vaginosis or potentially deadly toxic shock syndrome.
    The site also drew recent comparisons to radio show host Alex Jones's InfoWars and the two sites' shared love for selling wellness items with questionable health claims.
    Gene Ching
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  6. #66
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    Kong Tong Hong

    I wonder how rigorous the penalty is for similar practicing with out license cases for other licenses in Singapore.

    Jail for man who practised TCM without valid cert


    Kong Tong Hong, 58, was convicted of practising TCM without a valid certificate and sentenced to 12 weeks' jail by a district court.PHOTO: ST GRAPHICS

    PUBLISHED AUG 24, 2017, 5:00 AM SGT
    His patient had to undergo surgery after his 'needle' treatment caused her leg to swell
    K.C. VijayanSenior Law Correspondent

    An unregistered practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), whose treatment of a woman led to injury requiring surgery, was convicted of practising TCM without a valid certificate and sentenced to 12 weeks' jail by a district court.

    Kong Tong Hong, 58, was found guilty of four offences, said to have been committed between December 2013 and February 2014, under the Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners Act (TCMA), after a week-long trial last year .

    Stressing the need for deterrence, District Judge Siva Shanmugam said in decision grounds issued last week: "It is foreseeable that the rising demand for TCM services may encourage the proliferation of unqualified practitioners to enter the field and engage in the practice of TCM.

    "There is thus a compelling need to protect the public from exposure to unqualified TCM practitioners."

    Health Ministry prosecutor Karin Lai submitted a table of precedents which showed previous offenders under the Act had been fined up to $10,000 per charge.

    But those cases had not involved the use of acupuncture except for one and, unlike Kong's, did not involve victims who received treatment more than once.

    Madam Lim Lian Hoi started seeing Kong in December 2013 for pain and numbness in her leg until February the following year.

    On Feb 14, 2014, he applied a needle to her lower right leg, and placed a cup over the *****ed spot before using a device to "suck out the dirty blood", which was the standard procedure he used during her visits. Later, her leg swelled and she had to be admitted to hospital for surgery to drain the multiple abscesses in it.

    She said the swellings occurred after the acupuncture session by Kong and a doctor testified the injuries might have arisen from infection following the treatment.

    An expert witness testified that Kong's treatment of Madam Lim amounted to acupuncture, a prescribed practice under the TCMA.

    Kong, defended by lawyer Daniel Atticus Xu, argued that he did not hold himself out to be a TCM practitioner and claimed the procedure conducted on Madam Lim was not TCM "but rather a form of traditional or common therapy" meant to relieve pain.

    District Judge Shanmugam found, among other things, that Kong had provided inadequate answers in court and his claim of a "distinctive practice of common therapy" was an afterthought designed to answer the charges against him. Kong is out on bail pending appeal.

    A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 24, 2017, with the headline 'Jail for man who practised TCM without valid cert'
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  7. #67
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    Chow Yuen Pin & Chen Sui

    A two-fer.

    Having survived a traumatic pneumothorax, I can tell you they are no joke.

    I wonder how many martial arts masters might get fined for improper usage of 'professor'.

    TCM physician suspended, fined for giving acupuncture treatment at promotional event


    File photo of a patient undergoing acupuncture treatment. (Photo: AFP)

    12 Sep 2017 05:16PM (Updated: 12 Sep 2017 05:20PM)


    SINGAPORE: A Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) physician has been suspended for four months and fined S$5,000 over an acupuncture treatment he administered at a commercial promotion event.

    Chow Yuen Pin is the former medical director of Kin Teck Tong at Chinatown Point.

    On May 22, 2015, Chow administered the treatment to a woman during the event at her office, the Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board said in a media release on Tuesday (Sep 12).

    The woman subsequently lodged a complaint saying that she suffered from traumatic pneumothorax after the treatment.

    An inquiry was convened. No determination was made on whether the treatment had caused the pneumothorax, or collapsed lung, the TCM board said.

    However, the board found that Chow had administered the treatment "without due regard to the patient’s best interest, safety and well-being", it said.

    The event was "not an appropriate and proper setting to administer acupuncture treatment", the board said, adding that Chow did not adequately explain the risks of the treatment and the other available options to the woman.

    As such, he did not obtain "informed consent" from her before proceeding, the board said.

    Chow did not adequately assess her medical condition before he went ahead with the acupuncture treatment; nor did he keep proper records or document the process, the board added.

    For these breaches, Chow was suspended three months, fined S$3,000 and censured.

    Additionally, Chow breached the ethical code by allowing the promotional event, the board said. This included explicitly advertising the clinic’s services, and encouraging attendees to seek consultation at the clinic by giving them promotional treatment vouchers.

    For this, he was suspended for an additional month, fined another S$2,000 and censured.

    SEPARATE TCM PHYSICIAN FINED FOR USING "PROFESSOR" TITLE

    In an unrelated case, a TCM physician, Chen Sui of Science Arts Co at 150 MacPherson Road, was fined for improperly using the title "Professor".

    The husband of one of Chen's patients had lodged a complaint against Chen, on the consultation, diagnosis and treatment of his late wife by Chen in June 2014.

    The man also said that Chen had used the title of "Professor", the TCM board said.

    An inquiry was convened to investigate the complaint, and found no evidence of any causal link between Chen's conduct in rendering TCM treatment and the patient's condition when she was admitted to hospital.

    Chen’s TCM clinical evaluation, examination, diagnosis and treatment of the patient’s condition during the consultations were acceptable methods of TCM treatment for the patient, the board said.

    However, Chen should not have represented himself as having the title of "Professor", which was in breach of the TCM Practitioners Act, it said.

    In fact, the board had written to Chen earlier in June 2011 regarding the improper use of the title. "Chen was aware that he should not be using it," the board said.

    It also found that Chen failed to keep proper medical records of his patient - a charge he admitted to during the inquiry.

    Chen was fined S$1,000 and censured for improperly using the title "Professor" as well as for failing to keep proper medical records.
    Source: CNA/mz
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  8. #68
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    Busted for blood-letting

    I kinda think blood-letting deserves its own thread here on the TCM sub-forum. Maybe next time there's news about it...

    Singapore
    Traditional Chinese medicine doctor suspended, fined after carrying out 'blood-letting' therapy


    Annie Tiang TCM clinic. (Photo: Facebook / Annie Tiang TCM Pte Ltd)

    30 Nov 2017 07:57PM (Updated: 30 Nov 2017 08:00PM)

    SINGAPORE: A traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) physician was suspended and fined S$10,000 after one of his patients experienced chest pains and lost consciousness after "blood-letting" therapy.

    In a press release on Thursday (Nov 30), the Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board said Yap Kwok Ann Joseph of Annie Tiang TCM clinic at The Odeon Katong did not carry out "appropriate TCM inquiries" on his patient's medical history before proceeding with the "blood-letting" therapy on her throat area.

    His patient had had a surgical procedure for an ectopic pregnancy three weeks before the incident on Dec 6, 2015. She also suffered from blood deficiency, general fatigue and had had a cough for six months.

    She went to Yap's clinic for tuina massage and TCM treatment but was also given "blood-letting" treatment, after which she suffered chest pains, dizziness and lost consciousness.

    "The blood-letting therapy treatment was carried out by Yap on the complainant without due regard to the complainant's safety and well-being," said the board in its press release.

    In addition to not carrying out appropriate inquiries, Yap also did not inform the patient about the treatment options for her cough, the risks and complications of the blood-letting therapy, and did not get her informed consent, the board said.

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    "With regard to the complainant's recent surgical procedure for ectopic pregnancy as well as his diagnosis that the complainant was suffering from blood deficiency, Yap should not have carried out the blood-letting therapy treatment on the complainant," it added.

    Yap's registration as a TCM physician was suspended for six months with effect from Dec 1 this year.

    He was also fined S$10,000, censured, and made to provide an undertaking not to commit the same or similar offences in future.

    Source: CNA/nc
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  9. #69
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    Sherman Lai

    I'm not going to copy this to our Open Secret thread as tempting as it may be.

    Chinese medicine practitioner facing more sex charges involving patients: police
    The Canadian Press
    January 15, 2018
    1:40 PM EST
    Last Updated
    January 15, 2018
    1:40 PM EST

    GUELPH, Ont. — Police say a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner and acupuncturist charged last year in a sex assault investigation is facing six additional counts.

    Guelph, Ont., police say the 58-year-old man was first arrested on Oct. 18 and charged with one count of sexual assault against a former patient.

    He was arrested again on Nov. 29 and charged with two further counts of sexual assault, again involving complainants who were former patients.

    Police say Sherman Lai is charged with six more counts of sexual assault involving five more alleged victims, all of whom were former patients.

    Investigators say Lai’s practice, Centre of Integrative Natural Medicine, had been operating at various locations in Guelph for more than two decades and is currently located in Morriston, Ont.

    They also say patients who currently live or have lived within the Greater Toronto Area and beyond have been referred to him.
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  10. #70
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    Slightly OT

    Xie wasn't a 'TCM practitioner'. He was just hoping to run a scam.

    Chinese man’s giant human-shaped vegetable turns out to be a man-made fake
    Massive 12kg tuber found on a building site was thought to be a valuable root used in traditional medicine, but it was actually just a sweet potato
    PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 07 February, 2018, 3:10pm
    UPDATED : Wednesday, 07 February, 2018, 3:10pm
    Yujing Liu



    A Chinese man who discovered a huge human-shaped root vegetable, which some people thought might be a rare plant used in herbal medicine, described his find as a “treasure”, even though it turned out to be worthless.

    The man, identified only by his surname Xie, said he was amazed when he stumbled on the 80cm (2.6 feet) long tuber, which weighed in at a whopping 12kg (26.5 pounds), while he was working at a construction site in the southern city of Shenzhen, Chongqing News Channel reported on Monday.

    “I was so surprised. I had never seen anything like it before,” he said. “I think it’s a treasure.”

    Chinese firm raises eyebrows with US$25 million staff bonus … paid in cash


    Xie’s friends and neighbours convinced him he had found a giant he shou wu root, which might have been worth a fortune. Photo: Cq.qq.com

    When Xie was preparing to head home to Chongqing for the Lunar New Year holiday, he packed up the giant vegetable with the rest of things.

    It was only when he got back to the southwestern megacity and chatted to his friends and neighbours that he began to think his find might be something special.

    The consensus was that it was the root of a Polygonum multiflorum plant, known as he shou wu in China and tuber fleeceflower in North America.

    In traditional Chinese medicine, the plant, which grows in the mountains of central and southern China, is regarded for its rejuvenating properties, with the roots used for everything from promoting fertility to restoring hair colour.

    Now you see it ... Chinese road vanishes overnight as thief digs up some fast cash

    Keen to find out more, Xie got in touch with his local television station and an investigation was launched.

    Members of the public interviewed on the Daily 360 show on Monday were in no doubt as to what he had unearthed.

    “It’s 100 per cent a he shou wu herb – look at its leaves,” said a man who claimed to be a farmer.

    A woman was more poetic in her description of the giant root.

    “It could have become an elf, but you dug it up before it had chance to run away,” she said.


    One woman suggested the giant root might have grown up to be an elf. Photo: Cq.qq.com

    Despite their collective certainty, a local scientist contacted by the television station had bad news for Xie and his optimistic entourage.

    “It’s a sweet potato,” said Yang Min, director of pharmaceutical preparations at Chongqing Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital.

    “When you see a root with such a regular shape, it has almost certainly been moulded into shape.”

    The giveaway was the discrepancy in the proportions of the root and leaves, he said.

    “This can’t be he shou wu, because they grow very slowly. The leaves are disproportionately thin compared with the root, which [to get to such a size] would have taken several decades to grow.”

    Although Xie’s vegetable did not cost him anything, Yang said there had been cases of people growing sweet potatoes in moulds and then selling them on to unsuspecting buyers.


    A scientist said the anthropomorphic root was a sweet potato that had probably been moulded into shape. Photo: Cq.qq.com

    In 2016, a man in central China’s Hubei province paid 8,000 yuan (US$1,270) for a human-shaped he shou wu root, which also turned out to be a sweet potato.

    While there is no evidence to support the belief that human-shaped plants are any more efficacious than their regular counterparts, in 2015, auction firm Artron Auction put an estimate of HK$200,000 (US$25,600) to HK$400,000 on an anthropomorphic root weighing just 297 grams (10.5 ounces).

    Despite coming so close to a possible fortune, Xie was phlegmatic about his new “friend”.

    “It probably took a long time to grow this big,” he said. “It looks like a human, and it’s wild.”
    That's a lot of scratch for a sweet potato.


    thread: Busted TCM practitioners
    thread: he shou wu
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  11. #71
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    Sherman Lai continued

    More on Sherman Lai here.

    Guelph police lay more sexual assault charges against acupuncturist
    by MARK DOUGLAS
    Posted Feb 12, 2018 1:07 pm EST


    570 News - Adam Haga

    A sexual assault investigation against a man who used to practice traditional Chinese medicine in Guelph has escalated: weapons-related charges have now been laid.

    Between the end of last October and mid-January this year, 58-year-old Sherman Lai had been charged with nine counts of sexual assault, involving alleged abuse against former patients.

    Guelph Police are saying today, new charges against Lai include four more counts of sexual assault — bringing the total to 13.

    But now he’s also been charged with ‘assault with a weapon,’ ‘possession of a weapon,’ and ‘uttering death threats.’

    Investigators say these charges also relate to former patients.

    Police say Lai operated the Centre of Integrative Natural Medicine on Surrey Street for over 20 years, before relocating to Morriston.
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  12. #72
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    Tan Qindong & Hongmao Wine

    This one is slightly off topic for our Busted TCM practitioners because it's a western doc being busted for slamming a Chinese health liquor tonic.

    Anyone familiar with Hongmao wine?

    Doctor arrested for describing Chinese medicinal tonic that was banned for false advertising as ‘poison’
    Medic placed under investigation after company that has been repeatedly censured for misleading claims complained to police
    PUBLISHED : Monday, 16 April, 2018, 5:55pm
    UPDATED : Monday, 16 April, 2018, 6:30pm
    Louise Moon



    A Chinese doctor is under investigation for describing as “poison” a “medicinal liquor” that has repeatedly been banned over false claims about its health benefits.

    On Sunday police in Inner Mongolia confirmed they had detained Tan Qindong after receiving a complaint from the Hongmao Wine company, Beijing Youth Daily reported.

    The police statement said the company had complained about a blog post that “maliciously discredited” the wine, which can be bought in some areas.

    In February, the company’s advertisements were banned in the neighbouring province of Shaanxi as part of a crackdown by the Bureau of Press, Publication, Broadcasting and Television on food fraud and false advertising, the report added.

    In 2016, the company was ordered by authorities in Korla, Xinjiang, to suspend sales of the product for exaggerating its benefits, according to an article on Sina.com.

    Three years earlier it was included on a blacklist of companies found guilty of false advertising issued by the food and drug administration in Zhejiang province.

    And in 2010, regulators in Hainan ruled that the company had misrepresented comments by experts and customers to exaggerate the benefits of its product.

    Tan, 39, was detained in January, but police only confirmed his arrest on Sunday.

    Police from Liangcheng county in Inner Mongolia began investigating the case on January 2, before detaining Tan eight days later.

    Beijing Youth Daily said the detention was because his comments had “damaged the reputation of the business”.

    Accountants hired by police to assess the company’s losses concluded that the defamation resulted in a direct loss of just under 1.3 million yuan (US$207,000) – a figure Tan’s lawyers contested, saying that more evidence was needed.

    On March 12 Tan submitted a petition to the Liangcheng county police stating his post was published to advise elderly people against believing Hongmao’s advertising.

    He accepted that his use of the word “poison” could be inappropriate, but insisted his post was factually correct.

    His case had been passed to China’s state organ for legal supervision for review, the report said.

    Tan’s article was published in December and said the liquor, which is popular with the elderly, contained 67 different Chinese herbal medicines, many of which were toxic.

    The doctor also highlighted a list of illnesses the wine claimed it could cure, including coronary heart disease and hardening of the arteries, and questioned the evidence behind the claims.

    China’s top court and prosecutor announced in 2013 that creators of online rumours viewed by more than 5,000 people or reposted more than 500 times would be charged with defamation.

    Many people have questioned Tan’s arrest including his wife, Liu Wei, who told the newspaper his blog post had received just over 2,000 hits.

    She was quoted as saying that she was surprised a post with that number of readers could result in detention.

    Hongmao wine is listed under the State Food and Drug Administration as a Chinese medicine. The company, which traces its origins back to 1739, could not be reached for comment.
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  13. #73
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    12 more charges for Lai

    Traditional Chinese medicine practitioner accused of sex assault
    Canadian Press
    More from Canadian Press
    Published: May 30, 2018
    Updated: May 30, 2018 1:45 PM EDT


    Guelph Police Service logo (Twitter)

    GUELPH — A practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine, accused last year of sexually assaulting several patients, now faces 12 new charges.

    The Guelph Police Service says Sherman Lai, who also performed acupuncture, lived and practised in Guelph, but patients who lived “in the Greater Toronto Area and beyond” were referred to him.

    He was charged with one count of sexual assault in October 2017. Then, between November 2017 and April 2018, the 58-year-old was charged with 16 more counts of sexual assault, two counts of assault with a weapon, two counts of possession of a weapon for a dangerous purpose, and two counts of uttering death threats.

    Police say Lai was charged on Tuesday with one additional count of sexual assault, six more counts of assault, one more count of assault with a weapon, three counts of uttering threats, and one count of forcible confinement.

    Police are asking anyone with information to call 519-824-1212 ext. 7518 or Crime Stoppers.
    Sherman Lai previous post #1 & #2
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  14. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
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    Thomas Flach

    Owner of acupuncture business is arrested on a charge of sexual battery
    May 24, 2018


    Thomas Flach was arrested on a charge of sexual battery by a medical professional. (Contributed photo by San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department)
    Miller, Jodi

    The owner of an acupuncture business was arrested on a charge of sexual battery by a medical professional, according to the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department.

    On May 21, a 51-year-old woman went to the Twin Peaks Station to report alleged unwanted sexual contact during a medical procedure at Arrowhead Acupuncture, which is located in Lake Arrowhead.

    An investigation revealed that Thomas Flach, the 39-year-old owner of Arrowhead Acupuncture, had allegedly sexually assaulted the victim while she was lying face down on an examination table.

    The victim was unaware of his intention before the unwanted sexual contact, the Sheriff's Department said. Flach offered to provide “sexual relief” to the victim during the acupuncture treatment, the Sheriff's Department said.

    On May 22, detectives corroborated the victim’s account of the assault and Flach was arrested and booked into the Central Detention Center in San Bernardino. He was released from custody after posting $50,000 bail.

    The case will be submitted to the San Bernardino County District Attorney’s Office for review.

    Flach has numerous clients under his care at Arrowhead Acupuncture. Detectives believe there may be additional persons who were sexually assaulted by Flach. Persons with information are urged to contact Deputy Jonathan Cavender at the Twin Peaks Station at (909) 336-0600 or WeTip at 1-800-78-CRIME.
    “sexual relief”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  15. #75
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    Dec 1969
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    Fong Ming-wan

    Hong Kong woman jailed for three months after being caught practising Chinese medicine illegally for second time
    Fong Ming-wan, 46, was arrested after treating undercover police officer in sting operation
    PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 27 June, 2018, 2:13pm
    UPDATED : Wednesday, 27 June, 2018, 10:27pm



    Chris Lau

    A woman who failed to learn her lesson after being caught red-handed practising traditional Chinese medicine without a licence was jailed for three months on Wednesday after being arrested for a second time.

    Fong Ming-wan, 46, was caught in a sting operation on February 8, just two months after she was slapped with a suspended two-month jail term in an earlier brush with the law.

    On Wednesday, the Kowloon City Court found her guilty of practising without a registration, contrary to the city’s Chinese Medicine Ordinance, for the February offence, and sentenced her to two months in jail.

    Noting that Fong was not a first-time offender, Deputy Magistrate Leung Lai-yin ordered her to serve her suspended sentence, half of which would run consecutively with the present term. He sentenced her to a total of three months in jail.

    “You obviously did not cherish the opportunity [granted by the previous court],” Leung said, highlighting the short time between the present offence and the last trial, when Fong was warned not to reoffend.

    “It was exactly the same as last time,” he added.

    The trial had begun after Fong denied the charge earlier this month. The court heard that she had applied Chinese medicinal ointment and liquid containing ginger while massaging a client in a “health preservation centre” in Hung Hom on February 8.

    Unknown to Fong, the “client”, who had complained of soreness in the knee, was an undercover police officer. She was later arrested.

    Defence counsel James Cheng Chung-ching earlier argued that massages could come in many forms, not only in the practice of Chinese medicine.

    Rejecting the suggestion, the magistrate ruled that the substance Fong used contained Chinese medicine and that the massage session involved theories relating to the discipline. Fong had also tried to examine the officer the way a Chinese medicine practitioner would, Lai said.

    In December last year, Fong was given a two-month suspended sentence for the same offence, involving a similar treatment. She had massaged a client’s elbow with a Chinese medicinal substance.

    In mitigation, Cheng portrayed Fong as a hard-working person who had enrolled in various courses to improve her life. Her conviction was caused by her stupidity, he said.

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: Dose of jail for illegal medical treatment
    Aren't most convictions caused by stupidity? You never hear of a conviction caused by the perp's intelligence.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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