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Thread: Qigong as Medicine

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  1. #1
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    Qigong as Medicine

    This is a long overdue thread that I hope will grow akin to the Tai Chi as Medicine thread.

    Some studies show practising qigong helps to fight against cancer
    By Channel NewsAsia's China Correspondent Glenda Chong | Posted: 12 October 2009 1519 hrs

    SHANGHAI: The stress of modern living had prompted many around the world to learn qigong. Recent joint studies from China and the United States also show that qigong can help cancer patients live longer.

    One community club in Shanghai is practising a form of qigong that has helped members recover from life-threatening illnesses over the past 20 years.

    Cancer survivor Qiu Jia Ming, 65, who suffered from pancreatic cancer years ago, said: "I was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer when I was 50 years old and the doctor told me I only had three months to live. But I've survived 14 years now."

    Another cancer survivor, Yin Xiao Ling, suffered from nasal malignant granulomatosis 22 years ago.

    "I'm 57 and have been practising qigong for 22 years. I was diagnosed with nasal malignant granulomatosis, a very rare cancer, and doctors said I only had six months to a year to live at the most.

    "So when I was discharged from hospital, I didn't go home. I went to join the Guolin Qigong Club. Doctors said it was a miracle that I survived beyond a year," said Yin.

    Even the head of the cancer rehabilitation club is convinced of the benefits of qigong against cancer. Yuan Zheng Ping was diagnosed with malignant lymphoma 28 years ago and after studying Guolin qigong in Beijing, he started the Shanghai Cancer Rehabilitation Club in 1989 to teach others like him.

    "It's not only a physical exercise, it is also a psychological practice of breathing using rhythmic exercises, thereby taking in a lot of oxygen. This is beneficial because it increases immunity and help fight the cancer.

    "We did a survey in 1993 with 1,500 cancer patients and discovered that after five years of practising Goulin qigong, there was about 85 per cent recovery rate. In 2003, we did another comprehensive study and found that out of 7,000 cancer sufferers, more than 60 per cent of them survived for more than five years," said Yuan.

    With such high success rate, there is now more attention paid to this form of exercise. Initial results from studies conducted by the University of Illinois and Shanghai University of Sports show that practising Cailin qigong can help cancer patients live longer and give them a better quality of life.

    Wang Changwei is the researcher behind a new study programme sponsored by the US-based National Cancer Institute. Her first phase of research centred on those who regularly practise qigong and it showed that this group of practitioners have a lower rate of cancer reoccurrence than others.

    She said: "From our current study, regardless of quality of life, exercise ability or health conditions, those who practised Guolin qigong are far better off than those who don't exercise qigong.

    "We did an 11-month observation and found that oxygen intake of those who practise Guolin qigong was higher and when they are at rest, the oxygen level is the same. This means that they inhale more oxygen during their practice. Their breathing method of inhaling twice and exhaling once helped to improve their oxygen intake."

    Even doctors who specialise in Western medicine believe there are benefits to practising qigong. But they said there may be other causes that are helping cancer patients recover from their illnesses.

    Gao Yong, a doctor at Shanghai East Hospital, said: "Qigong can help patients forget the pain of the disease. Also, the exercise is a team activity. Practitioners encourage and support each other. There is more confidence when they see others recover. I think this is the real benefit of qigong.

    "The study has only just started about two or three years ago. A large scale study is needed and should take about three to five years, or even longer, for a more detailed observation of the benefits."

    China sees about 2.2 million cancer cases yearly, with one in five dying from the disease.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #2
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    Great article!

    My only concern is that the layperson reading this will make the assumption that all they have to do is practice qigong and they will get better.
    No doubt qigong is excellent adjunct therapy but the article fails to mention the procedures previous to qigong therapy, whether it be excision, chemotherapy, medication in conjunction with additonal therapies.
    The degree/stage of cancer also figures prominently in the matter!

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by mawali View Post
    Great article!

    My only concern is that the layperson reading this will make the assumption that all they have to do is practice qigong and they will get better.
    No doubt qigong is excellent adjunct therapy but the article fails to mention the procedures previous to qigong therapy, whether it be excision, chemotherapy, medication in conjunction with additonal therapies.
    The degree/stage of cancer also figures prominently in the matter!
    I do echo your concerns. Qigong is not a cure for cancer, it is a way to make your body stronger to help you fight the medical conditions. If you start doing it too late - say at the advance stage of cancer, it may not be as effective. Even then, I have seen people healed with the use of qigong. In these cases, the healing results not only from the control of chi, that also the mental strengths brought forth by the focus of mind and the determination to overcome the medical conditions.

  4. #4
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    For breast cancer awareness month

    FYI, Tiger Claw is supporting Breast Cancer Awareness month this October too.
    Breast cancer survivor credits holistic practice
    By Terry Morris, Staff Writer Updated 6:52 PM Thursday, October 22, 2009

    October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. This article is part of our month-long focus on breast cancer. To learn more or find ways to help, go to our Pink Edition Page.

    KETTERING — Jan Lively went from being “one of the lucky ones” to someone facing probable death.

    “The doctor said there was no cure. I was going to die,” she said.

    She “refused to accept that,” a response to crisis she believes would be far more likely now than it was then, based on her mindset.

    “I felt that 42 was too young. I also felt I had not lived a truly memorable life. I hadn’t lived my life’s purpose,” she said.

    Aware that cancer could recur, she has discovered her purpose and is convinced it helped save her.

    It is Qigong (pronounced chee-gung or chee-gong), a holistic exercise that originated thousands of years ago in China. She’s a trained instructor and practices up to three hours a day.

    The Kettering resident and former executive director of major gifts in the department of development at the University of Dayton is also a founder of the Noble Circle Project, “a community of women thriving beyond cancer" (www.noblecircle.org).

    She was diagnosed with Stage 2 breast cancer in 1998, just 18 months after a previous checkup found nothing.

    Treatment including chemotherapy brought a remission that proved to be short-lived. The disease reappeared with Stage 4 virulence in her liver and spine just 18 months later, in January of 2001.

    Metastatic cancer is often incurable.

    “I thought I had months,” said Lively, 57, who had recently returned from a hiking and climbing expedition in Colorado when she sat down to share her experiences.

    The Iowa native “was scared out of my mind” following her original diagnosis. “I couldn’t sleep. I was terrified about the possibility of death, losing a breast, or both,” she said.

    She was angry at her nurses and doctors, humiliated by what was being done to her body and she was lonely. She was a divorced parent without a significant other.

    “Medicine treats your body. But what about you?” she said.

    She had always been active. She was a runner. There was no history of breast cancer in her family. After the cancer returned, in her internal organs, she couldn’t even bend over and touch her toes while sitting. She felt helpless.

    A friend who had taken a class passed on a book about qigong, believed to combine the power of the mind with postures and movements of the body to create an internal energy known as Qi. She decided to try it.

    Sessions need to be daily, but require only 20 minutes, no financial commitment, specialized clothing or equipment.

    “I thought if once was good, twice would be better. I did it twice a day,” Lively said.

    Coincidence or not, she quickly started feeling better. Eight weeks after she started, her tumors had shrunk by half. She was eating regularly and her strength was returning. “By the end of April, I was jogging again,” she said.

    “I am sure the chemo helped, but it was clear to me the Qigong was working well with the medical treatment. I kept doing it. I wanted to learn more. I wanted to teach others.”

    She had tried counseling and said "the therapist was helpful." She attended a breast cancer support group, but only for two meetings. “I didn’t want to keep talking to other people about cancer.”

    She improved her diet, changed positions at UD to reduce stress and even tried internet dating. She left UD in 2002.

    Nothing clicked the way qigong did.

    Lively is convinced that its power “is truly in the mind. You heal yourself. Qigong is about strengthening the mind and heart through focus of intention. You tell yourself to believe it. Our thoughts, minds, emotions and bodies are all energy systems,” she said.

    “I believe in science, too, but I don’t think I would be alive today if I hadn’t found qigong,” she said. “It’s a blueprint for the body.”

    She has traveled to China five times to study with the masters. She has taught for seven years and worked with 500 students.

    She has met just as many skeptics.

    “My own son (who works in the pharmaceutical industry) doesn’t believe it. He says, ‘Show me the science,’ ” Lively said. But her doctor often recommends her classes to other cancer patients.

    “When it comes to cancer, fear is the biggest killer,” she said. “The mind and body are very powerful. I try to be a positive thinker. But it’s one thing to put on a happy face and another to truly believe something. I believe this."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #5
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    better to trust in the wavelengths from the stars and sun rather than those simulated in a hospital building... mind is the path.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by uki View Post
    better to trust in the wavelengths from the stars and sun rather than those simulated in a hospital building... mind is the path.
    No path, no mind, only Is.

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    or....

    Quote Originally Posted by Nexus View Post
    No path, no mind, only Is.
    or.... one track mind??????
    .... Skip

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skip J. View Post
    or.... one track mind??????

    Yes, that's right

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Skip J. View Post
    or.... one track mind??????


    mind and thoughts got nothing wrong as soon as one is not unknowingly trap by them.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Nexus View Post
    No path, no mind, only Is.
    No mind, no path, no IS!

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott R. Brown View Post
    No mind, no path, no IS!

    Dead as a ROCK or Dry Wood. How can that be the way?

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Nexus View Post
    No path, no mind, only Is.

    Dead water cant have any dragon.

  13. #13

    qigong for long term improvement

    I am a believer of qigong, and have been practicing it for years. I've also seen how the exercise has helped people with serious illness like cancer. It is, however, a supplement so you should not expect to see miracles. The better way is to do the exercise and seek medical advice as and when necessary. If you are patience and allow it time, it works.

  14. #14
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    So what happened to the "Qigong as Medicine" thread?

    So, I for some reason this sub-forum is some kind of botched with threads appearing in one screen and not in another. But I'll be ****ed if my long ass response goes un-completed because of something with a thread disappearing.

    So if that thread gets recovered, or uncovered, or discovered, or whatever, please merge this with that thread. In the meantime...

    Gene posted this article.

    http://link.springer.com/article/10....764-013-0315-5

    And my response, with his quote, to discuss said article.

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    As always, I'm curious what form of qigong, but this is just the abstract so that detail might be within the full report.
    There are a lot of red flags with this study.
    For starters, its strange that I can't access it. Well not that in of itself. But I can access this journal through my university account, and its not listed in the journal that its supposed to be in. Not necessarily anything, just weird.

    1) No blinding was used at all (and for the record, I don't think they could in this study), at least not for the patients. Patients doing qigong knew they were doing qigong and patients doing regular stretching knew they were doing regular stretching. For some reason they blinded the statisticians. Not sure why that is, I've never seen that in any of the other literature I've read. I don't particularly see what point it would accomplish if you aren't blinding the test subjects. The statisticians are just crunching numbers for people who can't do it themselves.
    2) Statistics are a mess. They report p-values, which is nice, but they don't tell me what test they performed. I'm assuming a t-test because they are comparing treatments which should give them sample means and deviations. However, since they don't actually provide the test statistic, nor the degree of freedom, I can't actually say. What they do provide is a confidence interval, which could come from any number of tests. Which also tells me they have a freggin test stat of some sort but fail to provide for whatever reason. More on this later.
    3) I see no control. They say its a parallel group randomized control trial. Nice, but what is the control? I'm assuming that its a paired test, meaning the subject is its own control via a before/after paired assessment. But since that would also require a paired statistical test, which as I mention isn't divulged, I can't say for certain. Or the control for the qigong group could be the stretching group. This isn't uncommon if you are trying to say that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment. But you still need to test against placebo. And you still need to control for individual variation (ie. a paired test).

    About the stats; so the author gives a p-value for a test comparing feasibility and a test comparing fatigue levels reported. Its important to note exactly what it is they are trying to analyze. Only one part actually pertains to the qigong (the fatigue test). This is based on some clinical guideline I'm not familiar with. Feasibility, as the author describes it, is simply class attendance and retention rate. So, class retention/attendance and change in fatigue/distress.

    The author reports p-values for retention (p=0.48), attendance (0.04), and improvement in reported fatigue (p=0.02) and distress (p<0.05). Here's the problem. The trial is on 40 patients. Their power analysis said they need at least 24 to determine a difference of 7.5. So they're good there. But, retention did not significantly differ. That is technically what you'd want if you were testing efficacy (ie a better improvement in fatigue and distress). But, they list that the qigong group had 80% retention while the stretching group 65% retention. So, if a 15% difference in retention is not statistically significant, now I'm questioning balance in their design. How do I know that say, 20 were in each group? That's important because one, it may screw the whole element of detection, but at very least balance dictates what statistics they will use. Which again, isn't outlined in the 2 pages we can view. That of itself makes me question all the other results. But moving on..

    So attendance is determined to be significantly different, favoring the qigong group. Cool, that would be a good finding. Patient participation is important in a beneficial outcome. BUT, it wasn't blinded. We see infinite examples of the mentality in this country with people having unrealistic bias in favor of TCM simply because they feel western med has failed them. In a subjective study, this kills it all. But even more than that. The study says that friends and family were encouraged to participate with the patient in the classes. Ok, so now you've just confounded your study. Its no longer just about the patient, it may say nothing any longer about whether people like qigong more. It may simply be a matter of which group on average had a more willing support structure. You just killed your feasibility measure. So the tests of retention and attendance are garbage.

    If the attendance is shown to be less in the stretching group, which it was, you can now also say nothing of efficacy. Her stats say that qigong improved reported fatigue and distress to a better degree that stretching (I say that loosely not knowing what tests she did). But my response, no shit. You had a 15% loss in retention and a statistically significant difference in attendance rate. Of course the one that gets attended to will produce better results. This is why in proper research programs, you are required to consult a statistician as part of your thesis defense. I have a freggin statistician on my committee, and I can do stats, for this very reason. To cover my ass. Ultimately, I find it interesting that the researcher would create a study with two conflicting measures. If attendance and retention are not the same, you can't say that qigong has efficacy in this design. If attendance and retention are the same, you can't make say that qigong is more feasible than standard protocols already in place. Maybe that wasn't the point, but typically if you are going to do a study, you are trying to show something of value. That seemed to be the point in her statement of significance, that she thought we could do better.

    Now, I realize this is a pilot study. Even more, I realize this is a study by a graduate student in a non research based program. So this is some canned trial she had to do as part of her social psychology degree, which may be a M.A. I doubt its a MS without thesis research. But given that I'm also a grad student, I have no sympathy in ripping apart her design, especially when mine are held to a much higher standard. It aggravates me that this is even published.

    This is an exact example of why TCM researchers need to start taking legitimate degrees before going into integrative med. Or at the very least, these schools of integrated med need to start adjuncting legitimate statisticians and have them teach a course, or three. I have yet to see a one that held to proper research design. I mean, I took classes on research design as an undergrad, I expect a graduate student to do better than this.

    Anyways, this is what I got from just 2 pages of the paper. At this point, I don't see what difference knowing which qigong she used in the study will make.

    And now I'm admittedly being nit-picky, by why the f did she have faculty from the dept of theater on her list of co-authors? And that's actually kind of important. Because the only thing I can think that an actor/actress would add to this study is if that person were one of the treatment administrators. And since I'm guessing they tested against a standard stretch protocol, and there is a physical therapist also listed, I'm going to assume that the theater person was doing the qigong. Yeah...that's interesting...

    Did you know that a study by a Harvard professor was recently published in a major journal with no less than 9 fatal experimental flaws in his design? I say this as to not come off as bashing a TCM publication. I wish they would do a decent trial. I want to see true, well thought design with some interesting results. I really do. But from this, the most we can say is that some sort of exercise aids fatigue and lowers stress. Awesome, now tell me something new.
    Last edited by SoCo KungFu; 12-19-2013 at 06:19 PM.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by SoCo KungFu View Post
    So, I for some reason this sub-forum is some kind of botched with threads appearing in one screen and not in another. But I'll be ****ed if my long ass response goes un-completed because of something with a thread disappearing.

    So if that thread gets recovered, or uncovered, or discovered, or whatever, please merge this with that thread. In the meantime...
    It's still here

    http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/...ng-as-Medicine

    you have to adjust your settings too see topics from "the beginning" instead of "this month" which is the default.

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