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Thread: Is Southern Praying Mantis the same style as "phoenix eye fist" kung fu/Chukka?

  1. #1
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    Is Southern Praying Mantis the same style as "phoenix eye fist" kung fu/Chukka?

    I've heard of "phoenix eye fist" kung fu and I've heard of Southern praying mantis. Somewhere I read that Southern Praying mantis doesn't have any trademarks of actual Tang Lang, but is instead the same as "Phoenix eye fist kung fu". Can someone fill me in? Thanks...

    LTN

  2. #2
    Hi

    Been a few threads on that over the years I think, try search function and should bring up that info as well
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    Chuka = Chu Gar Southern Mantis, the one in Donn Draeger's book is a branch of Chu gar.
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    All I get is 2 responses? Maybe if I asked "Is Southern Praying mantis the same as Shaolin-Do", I'd get a reply...

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    To the best of my basic, somewhat casual understanding, yes it is a style in the Southern Praying Mantis group.

    I've always noticed that this Chukka seems somehow different, maybe a romanisation on Chow Gar / Chu Gar, which are more mainstream SPM, or maybe a romanisation of Hakka, referring to the race of people?

    I'm sure the chinese characters would clear that up to someone who could read them.

    Phoenix eye fist is common in that group of styles, family styles from southern China, many with Hakka roots.

    So, like you, I've noticed it seems to be presented a little differently, but I reckon it comes from the same stuff as SPM, more of less.

    That's about the best I can offer.
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    Somewhere I read that Southern Praying mantis doesn't have any trademarks of actual Tang Lang
    Its very efficient and from what I've experienced of northern mantis, it has little in common with it.

    As for the "actual" tang lang, neither is "actual", one came from the north, one from the south. They are what they are and I don't believe they have any common ancestry.
    Last edited by AdrianK; 11-11-2009 at 05:24 PM.

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    Jook lum mantis is probably the most "mantis" of all the SPM systems.
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    I really don't see Lum Wing-Fay's JL as being a mantis at all. There is much more snake-like movement in it. Chung Yel-Chung was called "The Poison Snake," the spear and staff are refferred to as the poison snake, the knives move like a serpent, they refer to their hands as snakes, and the mindset is that of a snake. The body coils and moves very snake-like. And the energy ripples like a snake.

    In one of the popular stories of its origin, it says that the style took the name Southern Mantis to hide its origins from the Ching.

    Let me add, that I have only been practicing JL for a few years. I am in no way an authority, and that this is my own opinion, based on my own personal findings and theory, However, I think if we dig a little deeper, more info about this little-known style will emerge.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenTigers View Post
    I really don't see Lum Wing-Fay's JL as being a mantis at all. There is much more snake-like movement in it. Chung Yel-Chung was called "The Poison Snake," the spear and staff are refferred to as the poison snake, the knives move like a serpent, they refer to their hands as snakes, and the mindset is that of a snake. The body coils and moves very snake-like. And the energy ripples like a snake.

    In one of the popular stories of its origin, it says that the style took the name Southern Mantis to hide its origins from the Ching.

    Let me add, that I have only been practicing JL for a few years. I am in no way an authority, and that this is my own opinion, based on my own personal findings and theory, However, I think if we dig a little deeper, more info about this little-known style will emerge.
    Just remember folks-ya heard it here first!
    You may have a point, I put mantis in "" because while it looks more "animalistic" than the other branches, Chow Gar for example, it certainly doesn't look northern mantis like.
    Snake eh?
    Or dragon perhaps...
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    ok--well let me clarify the original question. I'm talking about the "phoenix eye fist" style that you see in the book by Master Cheong Cheng Leong. Someone told me that "Southern Praying mantis" IS in fact the phoneix eye style since the founders of the style wanted to "hide it" from being displayed lest they be discovered by the Manchus and jailed or worse.

    Can anyone comment? Hope that clarifies...

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    It is not the exact system, but it shares many similar moves, and material. It was taken to that part of the world and it evolved as any arts does.

    Chuka, and the characters(Hanzi) used for it are the same as Chu Gar, The house of Chu.
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    Chu Family. Having read the book, it appears to be a collective of sil lum style and other specialized methods that form it's own style separate from the archetypal systems.
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    Grand Master Lam Sang's Kwong Sai Jook Lum Gee Tong Long Pai

    Grand Master Lam Sang's Kwong Sai Jook Lum Gee reflects the characteristics of the Praying Mantis. It contains the Mantis body which has a slight lean. The qualities of eating, spiting, sinking, and floating which come from the Mantis. Center line and defensive elbow positioning/movement. Sudden "shock" energy and movement.

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    I am not certain, but this looks to be southern mantis. The stance is too wide and the arms are wasting energy.
    Last edited by Lee Chiang Po; 12-23-2011 at 09:02 PM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Bagua View Post
    Chuka, and the characters(Hanzi) used for it are the same as Chu Gar, The house of Chu.

    Thanks Dale.
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