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Thread: the magic of mushrooms

  1. #91
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    continued from previous

    LP: What advice do you have for a young martial artist?

    KI: To begin with, researching any compound you are dealing with. I'm working on my book, Towards an Organic Singularity and in the first chapter, you learn how to grow your own. If you have the discipline to be able to break the learning curve on it and produce your own mushrooms, then you're well on your way to be able to deal with them. You don't have to worry about overharvesting [like ayahuasca or ibogaine] or getting them from someone else. You learn how to grow your own so you can get by using something considered a drug by the popular culture.

    Espcially with tryptamines, they're all in the same family and very close chemically. Psilocin is 4-HO-DMT. People say mushrooms aren't DMT but when it phosphorylates in your gut, it's DMT, an ingestible form to be utilized by your body and independent of all the other things you have to encounter.

    The thing about mushrooms is that you get one spore print or one cap from a cow paddy and you never have to buy another spore or mushroom again. You can perpetuate that into a lifetime of entheogenic use. If you want to explore with MAOIs or chocolate, blend it into smoothies, put them in brownies; put it on two pieces of bread with peanut butter, and if you get the proper dose, it's going to deliver.

    I'm not of the school of thought that mushrooms is a medicine and is for healing. Of course, it can heal, can give you smoking cessation, can help you with dying, but that's not the purpose of psilocybin. It's a tool for exploration for novel states of consciousness. You strap on your exploration suit and you're sitting on the deck of the Enterprise and ready to go boldly where no one has gone before. That's what its about and that what it's for.

    Because we're approaching a crucial point for human beings—we can engineer ourselves and make a machine that has the capability to be much more, of breaking into the human levels of knowledge of information. Either we have created our next level which will make us obsolete or we get to the point where we can merge with those machines and be part machine and part organic or take the enthogens and reach the DNA set code and become the next level of humans.

    Let's go in and see what we can do to become more then what we are now.

    LP: What advice do you have for crafting set and setting for these heroic doses?

    KI: The classics, a safe environment; I choose the bedroom for the deep hauls into the multiverse. Take all sharp objects out of the room. No candles, fire can be very seductive. You don't want to knock one over in a middle of session.

    You also want to be in a good safe mindset. You don't want to just have had a fight with your wife. You want to keep your mind as clear and focused on what you're trying to do as possible.

    The walks in the woods or the ocean is for the low dose. But for the high doses, for those type of things, you want a safe environment and the right type of mindset on your head.

    For the new folk, what I always say since I've been crowned the high-dose guy, is to start low and work up incrementally. It's not a race. It's not an ego trip to see who can do the most. It's a true journey to understand what this thing is as far as the human spirt or soul – where it's at and where it's going.

    LP: What challenging encounters have you seen?

    KI: One of the most challenging areas is the realization of the aloneness. The realization of the darkness, no light. The realization that those are constructs of the conciouness. Once you lose the primal consciousness and move into that primal darkness that's so dark it has no black to it. That's one of the hardest things.

    LP: Where has that journey taken you now as an activist and teacher?

    KI: I'm moving onto the lecture circuit to share that this is a valid area of exploration. They say, Well, he's a martial artist – what's he doing talking about drug things? I'm trying to help the greater community and the martial arts community and the entheogenic community and have them look at what they're doing and what they're trying to box these drugs into.

    LP: Do you get pushback from these communities for these unconventional views?

    KI: Some think I'm crazy. Some think I'm just a druggy. Some say, He thinks he has magic powers because of the drugs. But now I'm getting invited to conferences and people are watching my Youtube videos. At Breaking Convention 2013, there's a lot of luminaries there with maybe 500 or 1200 views, and I'm not saying this out of ego, but I have more than 10,000 [for the talk, "High-Dose (31 Grams) Psilocybin Mushrooms Ayahuasca DMT LSD Transdimensional Hyperspace"]. This guy that they stuck at 10am the morning after the big party still has the most views. People look at that and realized that they need him to come to our conference. All of this might sound kind of far-fetched, but people are listening.

    Lex Pelger is a writer, scientist and Shulginist. Read his work at lexpelger.com.
    Iyi needs to watch this:
    Gene Ching
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  2. #92
    Greetings,


    Thank you for bringing forth that interview. Gene. It proves that guy is full of chit. He completely bailed when questioned about how the mushies improved his martial abilities. And the interviewer just let it go by. If all he can do is talk about mushies and what is shown in the movies, then the mushies are a waste of time.

    When he talks about the areas of Africa that use, he keeps it general. Looking African does not make you a sudden initiate with instant access to the secrets. People in this country have been hurt enough because of drugs. I hope they can see through this game that Iyi and others are putting forth.

    mickey
    Last edited by mickey; 10-23-2015 at 12:06 PM.

  3. #93
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    ttt 4 2016!

    Gene Ching
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  4. #94
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    Dude WTF was that all about!?!?

    I couldn't stop watching, though...

  5. #95
    mushroom shaped candy + decadent decaying culture

    25th generation inner door disciple of Chen Style Practical Wombat Method
    Officially certified by Ethiopian Orthodox patriarch Abune Mathias
    grandmaster instructor of Wombat Combat™®LLC Practical Wombat Method. international academy retreat

  6. #96
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    The King of Mushrooms

    Chinese villager finds the ‘king of mushrooms’
    PUBLISHED : Monday, 23 October, 2017, 12:53pm
    UPDATED : Monday, 23 October, 2017, 2:59pm
    Laurie Chen

    [IMG]https://cdn4.i-scmp.com/sites/default/files/styles/980x551/public/images/methode/2017/10/23/44c49084-b7be-11e7-affb-32c8d8b6484e_1280x720_145911.JPEG/IMG]

    The fungi, some of which are 83.5cm high, were found by a farmer foraging for mushrooms near a village in Tengchong in Yunnan province, Yn.yunnan.cn reported.
    “I’m 81 years old and have never seen such a big mushroom in my life,” the farmer was quoted as saying.
    Villagers hailed the find as the “king of mushrooms”, the report said.


    An expert says the huge fungi are edible. Photo: Yunnan.net

    The largest has a diameter of 40cm, leading villagers to call them “elephant foot”.
    Yang Zhuliang, a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Botany in Kunming, told the website the giant mushrooms were edible.
    The farmer has put a fence around the mushrooms to protect them from visitors taking selfies and to stop them from eating them.
    He also plans to preserve the fungi so more visitors can see them, the report said.
    How long will that keep?
    Gene Ching
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  7. #97
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    3 milligrams per day (or about five buttons)

    WHY MUSHROOMS MAY BE THE BEST FOOD TO HELP FIGHT AGING
    BY KASTALIA MEDRANO ON 11/9/17 AT 4:30 PM

    New research reveals that mushrooms are “without a doubt” the highest known single source of the antioxidants ergothioneine and glutathione, which are both associated with anti-aging properties.

    A team of researchers from Pennsylvania State University found that mushrooms are surprisingly full of both compounds, and that some of the 13 species they tested contained vastly higher levels than others. Common white button mushrooms, for instance, had low levels of the two antioxidants compared to some other mushrooms but still higher levels than your average non-mushroom food. The winner “by far” was the wild porcini mushroom, which is convenient since it’s also delicious. And even though some foods lose their health benefits when you cook them, the antioxidants in the mushrooms appear heat-stable and thus unaffected. The research was recently published in the journal Food Chemistry.

    "There's a theory—the free radical theory of aging—that's been around for a long time that says when we oxidize our food to produce energy there's a number of free radicals that are produced that are side products of that action and many of these are quite toxic," said Robert Beelman, professor emeritus of food science and director of the Penn State Center for Plant and Mushroom Products for Health, in a Penn State news release. "The body has mechanisms to control most of them, including ergothioneine and glutathione, but eventually enough accrue to cause damage, which has been associated with many of the diseases of aging, like cancer, coronary heart disease and Alzheimer's."


    Robert Beelman is professor emeritus of food science at Penn State and director of the Center for Plant and Mushroom Foods for Health.
    PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY/PATRICK MANSELL

    Antioxidants have been elevated to near-mythical status through the wellness movement, which can at times rely on junky science, but there’s solid research indicating they help us fight oxidative stress. Oxidative stress arises when our bodies turn food into fuel to produce the energy they need, but they can’t avoid also creating some free radicals in the process. Free radicals are simply oxygen atoms that have unpaired electrons. But as they zoom around your body looking for other single electrons to pair with they can do a lot of damage to your cells, which is why the term has become a buzzy one for scaring you into buying skincare products (sunscreen is still the business though, please wear it).

    "It's preliminary, but you can see that countries that have more ergothioneine in their diets, countries like France and Italy, also have lower incidences of neurodegenerative diseases, while people in countries like the United States, which has low amounts of ergothioneine in the diet, have a higher probability of diseases like Parkinson's Disease and Alzheimer's," Beelman continued in the news release. Beelman emphasizes that the research has not determined whether the link is only correlation—a connection but not proven as a cause.

    But the difference is striking, he notes: the average amount of the antioxidant seen in the diets in these countries is about 3 milligrams per day, or about five button mushrooms.
    Good to know. I luv mushrooms. Maybe not this much, but I still luv 'em.
    Gene Ching
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  8. #98
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    Lingzhi test

    Rapid test developed for traditional Chinese medicine



    Scientists in China have developed a simple, 10-minute test for authenticating traditional Chinese medicines (TCM), which are prone to adulteration and counterfeiting.

    The team from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University’s Food Safety and Technology Research Centre developed the test for some of the most commonly-used herbal ingredients in TCM, including Ganoderma (‘Lingzhi’ in Chinese), and Gastrodiae rhizoma (‘Tianma’) which are both listed in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia (ChP).

    At the moment, fingerprint chromatography is generally used to authenticate and differentiate Lingzhi and Tianma species as it can provide comprehensive chemical composition of a sample, but this is a labour-intensive and time-consuming method and takes several hours to complete.

    The new technique is based on direct ionization mass spectrometry (DI-MS) and is described in a paper published in the journal Analytica Chimica Acta. The PolyU team – led by Dr Yao Zhongping (pictured) – used DI-MS to detect the major active components of Lingzhi (ganoderic acids) and Tianma (gastrodin, parishin B/parishin C/and parishin).

    According to the paper it can rapidly distinguish between “easily confused” species and identify those known to lack the active factors thought to be responsible for their clinical benefits. It can also separate wild from cultivated samples and map them to a geographic location.

    That’s no mean feat, as there are approximately 80 Lingzhi species while only two of them, known as Chizhi and Zizhi, are described in ChP. Some other Lingzhi species which have similar appearances are commonly found to be confused with the official species. Meanwhile, Tianma is easily confused with two counterfeit species, namely Cacalia davidii (Franch.) Hand.-Mazz. and Canna edulis Ker.

    “The method developed by PolyU is simple, rapid, reproducible and can be easily adopted by researchers in relevant fields as no additional specialized device is required,” says the university in a statement.

    “It has the potential to be further expanded for analysis of other herbal medicines, for example, Heshouwu and Wuweizi, and therefore is expected to bring positive impact on the Chinese herbal medicine industry
    Bad mushrooms are bad. Buddha passed because of bad mushrooms.
    Gene Ching
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  9. #99
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    MJ MedTech, Inc.

    China Enters Magic Mushroom Industry – Wuhan, MJMedTech, and M2BIO
    POSTED ON APRIL 8, 2019 BY STAFF SCIENTIST



    On April 05, 2019, Wuhan General Group, Inc. announced that its subsidiary MJ MedTech, Inc. (MJ MedTech) has created a new division dedicated to exploring opportunities in the psychedelic medicine space.

    The new division, called “M2BIO” will be headed up by Wuhan’s CMO, Dr. Anna Morera Lorelta.
 According to Dr. Lorelta, psychedelic medicine is experiencing a remarkable revival in the wake of recent research studies and positive findings from great institutions, such as Johns Hopkins. Researchers are having great success in treating depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and certain addictions with psilocybin, one of the naturally occurring compounds contained in so-called “magic mushrooms”.

    According to Dr. Lorelta, ’’Psilocybin has become a very promising candidate for future treatments for anxiety and depression because it appears to disrupt the sorts of engrained brain activity patterns that are the hallmark of those diseases.” She explains:

    “Just like it took time for the regulators to get behind marijuana, we believe the same will happen with ‘magic mushrooms’ in due course.”

    MJ MedTech CEO, Jeff Robinson described the company’s strategy as follows:

    “We want to be far ahead of the curve and become pioneers in the market, collaborating with legislative bodies to help find better and healthier solutions.”

    MJ MedTech’s new division, M2BIO aims to develop new therapies that will help patients who suffer from mental illness and ease the burden on healthcare systems globally. Accordingly, M2BIO will be exploring additional indications for psilocybin, with the goal of bringing new therapies to market in the years to come.

    Although the psilocybin industry is in its early stages, all signs point to rapid growth in the space. Recently COMPASS Pathways and CaaMTech have reported significant progress in commercial psilocybin related research and development. In the United States, Oregon, Iowa, Colorado (Denver), California, and Vermont have made steps towards legalizing or decriminalizing psilocybin.

    Wuhan General Group (China), Inc.

    Wuhan General Group (China), Inc. through its wholly-owned subsidiary MJ MedTech is a nutraceutical biotechnology company that owns, develops and commercializes a range of cannabis products, specifically CBD-based products. See Analogy Between Cannabis and Magic Mushrooms. According to Wuhan,” our mission is to advance CBD-based medicine to the forefront by deploying best practice science and medicine, clinical research and emerging technologies.”
    No culture knows mushrooms like China.
    Gene Ching
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  10. #100
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    fungasm

    This Hawaiian Mushroom Makes Women Orgasm Just By Smelling It

    Sean Fahmy
    Oct 9, 2015
    I have good news and bad news. Let's start with the good news:

    Scientists have discovered an orange mushroom in recent Hawaiian lava flows that can induce instantaneous orgasms in women just from the odor it gives off. That's right, fellas. You can get your girl to bust nuts all over the place just by having her sniff this thing.

    This orgasm triggered by fungus, or "fungasm," is due in part from hormones in the mushroom that are close in similarity to the same ones picked up by our own neurotransmitters. Basically, the smell of this shroom makes the female body think it's having sex. Imagine walking into a sorority house with your pockets filled with these mushrooms.


    Mushroom Stock Photo

    Take your time, I'll wait. Really let your mind paint that picture, and enjoy it while you can. Because here comes the bad news:

    The orange mushroom smells orgasmic to women and literally caused nearly half of the volunteers for the study to climax. Unfortunately, it smells like week old horse **** to men. In the International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, the discoverers of the orange fungus, John C. Holliday and Noah Soule, concluded that all the male test subjects were repulsed by the fetid smell.

    So if you're bad in bed and need a little bit of help, go find these mushrooms and hide a bunch of them under your bed. Then grab a clothes pin for yourself. Thank me later.
    You'd think this could be extracted and distilled...
    Gene Ching
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  11. #101
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    glow shrooms

    New species of glowing mushroom found growing on dead bamboo in India
    Glowing is always in fashion.
    Alexandru Micu by Alexandru Micu November 23, 2020 in Biology, News, Science

    A new species of mushroom has been discovered in the Assam province, northeastern India. It glows.


    Image credits Karunarathna, Mortimer, Tibpromma, Dutta, et al., (2020), Phytotaxa.
    A team of researchers from India and China reports on two weeks of fieldwork in the Assam region, during which they spotted several new species of mushrooms. The most exciting of these is a species that locals describe as “electric mushrooms” that lives on dead bamboo. The species, christened Roridomyces phyllostachydis is bioluminescent — it produces its own light.

    Glow up
    “The members of the genus Roridomyces are very fragile and they love moist and humid conditions,” explained Samantha Karunarathna, senior mycologist at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and lead author of the report.

    “In general, bioluminescent mushrooms seem to have co-evolved together with some specific insects as these mushrooms attract insects to disperse their spores.”

    The species may be new to science, but locals have known about (and used) it for quite a while now. They’ve been employing bamboo sticks with these glowing mushrooms growing on them as natural torches at night, for example.

    It only grows on dead bamboo, the team explains, although it’s not immediately apparent why. It may be the case that the bamboo substrate offers special conditions or resources that the fungus prefers, according to Karunarathna, but until the issue is researched more thoroughly, we can’t know for sure. This is the first species of the genus Roridomyces to be discovered in India, the team adds.

    The team recovered samples of the mushrooms, dried them, and then performed a genetic analysis to understand where it fits on the tree of life. Both morphological features and its genetic heritage support its position as a new species in the genus Roridomyces. Currently, 12 other species are known in this genus, and five of them are also bioluminescent. The team named the species phyllostachydis after the genus of the host bamboo tree (Phyllostachys) from which it was collected.


    Image credits Karunarathna, Mortimer, Tibpromma, Dutta, et al., (2020), Phytotaxa.
    During the day, they look pretty unassuming. However, at night they glow with a clear, green light — but only from its stripes and mycelia (which are a rough equivalent to roots) that are burrowing into the bamboo. The mushrooms’ brown caps do not emit light at all.

    So why does it glow? Bioluminescence is most commonly seen in ocean environments than on dry land, although fireflies are iconic examples of the latter. Its typically used to attract attention, either for hunting or to coax insects into visiting a plant and spreading its pollen or seeds around. Of about 120,000 described fungus species, around 100 are known to be bioluminescent; only a handful of these are native to India. This is likely due to the fact that there aren’t enough trained specialists to go out and look for new species and document those that have already been discovered, Karunarathna argues.

    Bioluminescent fungi commonly grow on decaying wood and are able to feed on the lignin in plant debris (lignin is a structural component in the walls of plant cells, which gives them their stiffness). The largest genus of bioluminescent fungi we know of is the Mycena (bonnet mushrooms), and genetic studies of Mycena suggest that this trait evolved around 160 million years ago.

    The paper “Roridomyces phyllostachydis (Agaricales, Mycenaceae), a new bioluminescent fungus from Northeast India” has been published in the journal Phytotaxa.
    threads
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    bamboo
    Gene Ching
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  12. #102
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    Shootin shrooms

    A man injected himself with 'magic' mushrooms and the fungi grew in his blood, which put him into organ failure
    Julia Naftulin Jan 12, 2021, 3:05 PM


    Psychedelic mushrooms in a grow room at the Procare farm in Hazerswoude, Netherlands, in 2007. PETER DEJONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    A 30-year-old man with bipolar disorder injected himself with "magic" mushrooms, which contain the psychedelic drug psilocybin, in a failed attempt at a trip.

    Psychedelic mushrooms are meant to be eaten or drunk, not injected.

    The mushrooms grew in the man's bloodstream and caused his body to go into organ failure. He is being treated with long-term use of antifungals and antibiotics.

    A man experienced organ failure after turning psychedelic mushrooms into tea that he then injected into his veins.

    According to a case report out this week in the Journal of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry, the 30-year-old man's family brought him to a Nebraska emergency room after they noticed he seemed confused.

    The man had bipolar disorder type 1, the doctors who wrote the case study learned, and he hadn't been taking his medications, so had been going through manic and depressive episodes. During recent episodes related to his bipolar disorder, he'd researched how he could decrease his opioid use at home, his family said.

    That's when he read about the potential for psilocybin, the drug found in psychedelic mushrooms — aka magic mushrooms — for treating symptoms of depression and anxiety.

    Indeed, a mounting body of research suggests psilocybin could be a treatment for people with differing magnitudes and durations of depression who haven't had success with traditional antidepressants.

    Previously, researchers at Johns Hopkins and New York University conducted multiple small studies of cancer patients who experienced anxiety and depression as a result of their diagnoses. After being given psilocybin, the majority of patients reported an improvement in these symptoms immediately after treatment and over time.

    The drug is not to be injected, however, which this man learned from a three-week stint in the hospital.


    Doctors found mushrooms growing in the man's bloodstream

    When people want to trip on psychedelic mushrooms, they consume them as-is or in the form of a powder put into a capsule or tea that is then swallowed.

    But the man in the case study boiled the mushrooms in water, filtered the liquid through a cotton swab, and then injected the substance into his bloodstream.

    A couple of days later, he started to become overly tired, vomited blood, and developed jaundice, diarrhea, and nausea. His family found him soon after and took him to the hospital.

    When the doctors met the man, he couldn't give coherent interview answers, and after tests they found he had a liver injury, his kidneys weren't functioning properly, and he'd started to go into organ failure.

    A blood sample revealed something even more shocking: The mushrooms, which thrive in dark places, had begun to grow in the man's bloodstream, causing the aforementioned health issues. He needed to be put on a ventilator to breath and had his blood filtered for toxins, the case report said.

    Doctors kept the man in the hospital for 22 days and gave him two antibiotics and one antifungal treatment, which he was prescribed to continue taking for the long term after he left the hospital.
    Extreme case of faulty logic
    Gene Ching
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