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Thread: Give it up to the elderly!!!!!

  1. #76
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    More on Jeanne Calment



    SCIENCE
    HOW WE KNOW THE OLDEST PERSON WHO EVER LIVED WASN’T FAKING HER AGE

    A researcher claims that identity theft was at play in the case of Jeanne Calment, the world’s oldest person, but experts say that evidence is weak.
    By Angela Chen@chengela Jan 9, 2019, 12:47pm EST
    Illustration by Alex Castro

    What if Jeanne Calment, the oldest person who ever lived, lied about her age? What if she wasn’t an astounding 122 years old when she died, but a lowly 99 because she wasn’t even Jeanne Calment?
    Such is the theory of Russian mathematician Nikolay Zak, and it has everything: world records, statistics-defying long life, identity theft, tax evasion, and researchers duking it out with each other. In a paper posted to the research-sharing site ResearchGate, Zak claims that Calment actually died at age 59 in 1934, at which point her daughter Yvonne assumed her mother’s identity to avoid paying inheritance taxes. That would have meant that “Jeanne” was not even a century old when she died in 1997.

    If true, the Calment story would be a truly spectacular case of fraud; even just the theory has captured international attention. And the same month that Zak released his findings, the journal PLOS Biology published a paper arguing that some exciting conclusions from aging research are caused by statistical error (from bad data if not outright fraud). So how do we know that Calment didn’t lie about her age? How do we know for sure how old anyone is?

    The Calment controversy has demographers and non-demographers making different claims. It’s also a case of establishment science versus a less-supported but more titillating hypothesis. Though there continues to be back-and-forth, experts say that, most likely, Jeanne Calment is who she said she was: a woman from the southern French town of Arles who met van Gogh, rode a bike until she was 100, and smoked two cigarettes a day until a few years before she died at 122.

    Humans want to know how to live forever — or at least for a little while longer. That’s why people click on headlines about chocolate being the secret to a 102-year-old woman’s longevity even while knowing that, come on, chocolate is not the secret. Spurious connections aside, the past century has seen a big increase in the frequency of really old people surviving, and scientists are still debating the limits of the human lifespan.

    “THE PROBABILITY IS EXTREMELY LOW, BUT EXTREMELY LOW PROBABILITY AND IMPOSSIBLE ARE TWO DIFFERENT WORDS.”

    Being able to accurately predict how many people will live to very old age is a “really important societal question,” says Daniel Promislow, a gerontologist at the University of Washington who was not involved with either of the recent papers. For example, an accurate understanding of these numbers will affect how much social support we’re going to need for the elderly, and that research would not be very useful if all of these 115-year-olds were actually much younger.

    This is exactly what could be happening, says Saul Newman. Newman, a postdoctoral fellow at Australian National University who studies wheat genomics using machine learning, wrote the recent PLOS Biology paper casting doubt on longevity claims. Fraud or bad intentions aren’t necessary. Discrepancies could be as simple as a misrecorded birthdate, especially given that today’s supercentenarians (or people over 110 years old) were born in a time with lower literacy rates and less detailed record-keeping. And because there are so few supercentenarians to begin with, you only need tiny mistakes to throw off calculations and create dramatic statistical results.

    Newman says statistical errors undermine the findings of two high-profile (and dueling) papers on the lifespan debate. One, published in Nature in 2016, suggests a maximum lifespan for humans of around 115. The other, published in Science in 2018, claims there might not be such a maximum. As a general rule, the longer we live, the more likely we are to die. The Science paper — which studied 4,000 Italians over the age of 105 — claims that after that age, the chances of dying actually level off, creating a so-called mortality plateau. The possibility of bad data means both of these papers are statistically flawed, Newman says, adding, “For 20 years, scientists have been fighting over an error distribution.”

    Yet Kenneth Wachter, a demographer at UC Berkeley and co-author on the Science study, argues that Newman’s critiques are based on a hypothetical model and don’t take into account the actual data the team used. “We have birth certificates matched to age reports and death certificates,” Wachter says. “He has a theoretical exercise, but it’s not one that applies to our data.”

    That’s not good enough, Newman replies. “That’s based on the idea that official documentation can never be wrong, and we know that’s not true. How many times are you in the DMV and they’ve made an error?”

    So who’s correct?

    These ideas aren’t entirely contradictory, says Dmitri A. Jdanov, a mathematician at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research who specializes in data collection and processing for the International Database on Longevity. The issue that Newman raises is real, but it’s not new. Demographers have long known that misreporting can create a lot of errors that throw off analyses. Books such as Validation of Exceptional Longevity, Exceptional Longevity: From Prehistory to the Present and Supercentenarians all deal with this methodological question. According to Jdanov, massive errors do exist in population data, but such errors are far, far less likely in the very carefully checked data about supercentenarians.
    continued next post
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  2. #77
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    Continued from previous post


    “FROM A SCIENTIFIC PERSPECTIVE, WHETHER JEANNE CALMENT LIVED TO 122 OR 110 OR 112, WE’RE TALKING ABOUT EXTREME OUTLIERS FROM THE CURVE.”

    Demographers at the International Database of Longevity start by requesting data from a national statistical office about all people in the country who died at, say, age 110 and older. (It’s hard to get information about people who are still alive because of privacy laws.) Then, they take every case and send messages to the person’s birthplace, get the original birth certificate and baptism record, census records, and more. “They track this person throughout their whole life,” says Jdanov. “All official documents, marriage certificates, birth certificates of children. It’s a huge amount of work with archives, and it certainly needs a lot of resources.” There is a chance that a birth certificate can be wrong, but the chance that every single piece of archival information throughout someone’s life is wrong is much lower.


    As Wachter says, mistakes are possible — no one will ever claim that these methods are infallible — but the rates of error that Newman suggests are unlikely given how carefully a lot of this data is validated. Demographers are aware of the statistical issues surrounding claims of old age, and they try to take every precaution possible to avoid it.

    All of which brings us back to Calment. Some scientists have lauded Zak’s imposter theory, but Jdanov is skeptical. Zak’s paper hasn’t been accepted for publication in a journal, “and I am almost sure that it will not pass any real scientific review,” he says. It’s not even the first time people have suspected Jeanne Calment of not being Jeanne Calment.

    Zak’s arguments aren’t persuasive, Jdanov says. For example, Zak begins the paper by claiming the probability that she’d be able to reach this age is very low. “Well yes,” says Jdanov. “That’s right, the probability is extremely low, but extremely low probability and impossible are two different words.”

    Other arguments are based on tiny inconsistencies. One piece of evidence is that a Facebook poll of 224 people reported that Calment didn’t look that old. In another instance, as the National Post pointed out, the fact that Calment “hated socialists” is used as an example of motive for identity theft and tax evasion. Most plausibly, Calment destroyed many of her personal papers. Still, speaking to Reuters, Zak, who is not a demographer, said that he has lots of small pieces of evidence but not “cast-iron proof.”

    Meanwhile, French gerontologist Jean-Marie Robine worked extensively with Calment to catch potential inconsistencies, even asking and verifying details like the name of housekeepers in her building. Not just her family, but the entire city of Arles would have needed to keep the conspiracy going. “Can you imagine how many people would have lied? Overnight, Fernand Calment [Jeanne’s husband] would have passed his daughter for his wife and everyone would have kept silent?” Robine told Le Parisien. “It is staggering. All of this is incredibly shaky and rests on nothing.”

    Jdanov sums his position up elegantly: “I see on the one hand a very prominent researcher who did a lot of work over the case, and from the other side, I see a guy whose first argument is that the probability is very low, the second argument is mostly about photos, and he also wrote that he’s not a professional in this area.”

    Newman isn’t convinced and argues that we need to move away from using documents at all. “What we need is a way of biologically measuring how old someone is,” he says, “something that can’t be forged, that can’t be accidentally swapped or taken over by a sibling.”

    A biological method of age verification doesn’t really exist yet, says Craig Atwood, a gerontologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. When it comes to identity theft, you could do whole-genome sequencing of someone at birth and at death. If that data matched perfectly, it would at least show that the two were the same person. With this method, you’d basically have to start sequencing babies now.

    The way Atwood sees it, the fraud theories might be intriguing, but such cases don’t have much effect when it comes to our hope of living longer. “From a scientific perspective, whether Jeanne Calment lived to 122 or 110 or 112, we’re talking about extreme outliers from the curve,” he says. That’s not quite relevant to understanding what makes the body age and how to change or delay that process. “It’s so far away from the biological underpinnings of what’s driving the aging process,” he says. “I just don’t know that it’s going to help us get to where we need to go in terms of researching longevity.”
    Intriguing. Now I get why this is so controversial.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #78
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    Lois Wooten

    'I ate a lot of Kentucky Fried Chicken and Twinkies': Woman celebrates 105th birthday
    HTV National Desk Published 11:55 am PDT, Thursday, May 2, 2019



    An Oklahoma woman is getting the birthday celebration she deserves.

    Lois Wooten, of Del City, turns 105 on Sunday. She received a proclamation Wednesday at the Oklahoma State Capitol.

    Wooten still lives by herself, sends homemade birthday cards and loves to text on her iPhone. She roared through the roaring '20s, learned to drive on a model T and has lived in Del City since 1950.

    Wooten was honored by the state House of Representatives days ahead of her 105th birthday.

    "I ate a lot of Kentucky Fried Chicken and Twinkies," Wooten said.

    Wooten drove until she was 98.

    "I don't like to cook much. I eat a lot of frozen dinners. But who cares?" Wooten said.

    For someone who spent the vast majority of her life without a computer, Wooten now loves technology, including her iPhone.

    Wooten spent 20 years as the cafeteria manager at Kerr Junior High. Her late husband was a firefighter at Tinker Air Force Base.
    THREADS
    Give it up to the elderly!!!!!
    the Kentucky Fried Thread
    Gene Ching
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  4. #79
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    Grandmaster Chu Chong 103 year old (Pao Fa Lien Wing Chun) / 朱忠老師父 / 103歲大師 (刨花蓮詠春)



    THREADS
    [URL="http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?67431-Video-of-Pao-Fa-Lien-Wing-Chun-GM-Chu-Chong"]GM Chu Chong/URL]
    Give it up to the elderly!!!!!
    Gene Ching
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  5. #80
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    Lim Jong So - slightly OT

    Not martial arts, but daaaaaaaaamnn.

    This 75-Year-Old Grandmother Won Award At Bodybuilding Contest With Her Killer Body
    She urges everyone to chase after their dreams, regardless of age.
    June 16th, 2019



    A 75-year old grandmother has been receiving the spotlight for having won 2nd place in a bodybuilding competition.



    Lim Jong So was born in 1944 and despite her elderly age of 75 years, she began exercising for health purposes.

    I like exercising so I did aerobics for 35 years but I got stenosis. I wasn’t able to walk with my right leg and as a part of treatment, I began going to the gym in May of last year.

    ㅡ Lim Jong So

    Eventually, with regular exercise and consistent efforts, Lim Jong So managed to with the 2nd place in a bodybuilding contest, competing against women in their late 30’s and above because there was no category for the elderly.

    Grandmother Lim Jong So explained that whatever you do, you must take it on with confidence and with desperation.

    She concluded by encouraging everyone to chase after their dreams, regardless of age.



    Everyone has dreams. But if you give up on those dreams because of old age, life becomes too meaningless. If you challenge yourself to your dreams even after aging, I believe you will be able to have a great life in your remaining time.

    ㅡ Lim Jong So
    Gene Ching
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  6. #81
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    Ethel Allen

    Woman credits good genes and Tai chi for longevity on her 100th birthday
    by Kassandra Gutierrez Friday, November 1st 2019



    Ethel Allen turned 100 on November 1, 2019. (SBG)

    SPRINGFIELD, Ore. - Ethel Allen turned 100 on November 1, 2019.

    She says she doesn’t know how to feel about achieving a triple-digit age but says, “I will survive.”

    Family visited her from Nashville, Tenn., for the milestone birthday.

    “I wouldn’t miss it for the world," her granddaughter Holly said Friday.

    Ethel credits her good genes for her longevity: Her mother lived until 84 and her father until 95.

    But she says Tai chi and her healthy lifestyle have also helped.

    Ethel has been doing Tai chi for about 20 years, the last 15 years of those at Sacred Hearth Medical Center at RiverBend.

    She also gets a daily phone call from a friend at 9:30 every morning and one from her son-in-law at 8:30 every evening just to make sure she is OK.
    THREADS
    Give it up to the elderly!!!!!
    Taijiquan's health (or longevity) benefits overrated?
    Gene Ching
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  7. #82
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    Thanks Dick!

    Stoneham Couple Benefits From Healthy Aging Tai Chi Program
    Stoneham Couple Credits Healthy Aging Program Tai Chi—And Dick Van Dyke—For Improving Their Mobility
    By Mystic Valley Elder Services, Neighbor
    Nov 25, 2019 4:11 pm ET


    Dick Van Dyke is the reason Eddie Di Muzzio can now lift one leg off the floor. Just a year ago, he couldn't imagine balancing himself without holding onto a chair.

    Eddie and his wife, Pauline, were watching a television program hosted by the actor/comedian Dick Van Dyke. Van Dyke, who is 93 years old and an advocate of a healthy aging lifestyle, was promoting the Tai Cheng program, a form of Tai Chi, particularly geared toward older adults. He credited Tai Chi for improving his mobility. Van Dyke's program convinced Eddie and Pauline to give Tai Chi a try to help improve their coordination and balance, which had been a problem for them for years.

    As Stoneham residents, the couple signed up for a Dr. Paul Lam's Tai Chi for Health course at the Stoneham Senior Center. The course is offered through Mystic Valley Elder Services as part of its Healthy Aging Program. It consists of a free eight-week, one-hour class on learning the basics of Tai Chi. The couple was hooked and have been taking classes for more than a year.

    Prior to taking the Tai Chi classes, Eddie could hardly stand. He had pain and stiffness throughout his legs and suffered from light neuropathy in his foot. And when he did stand, his balance was off. Pauline shared the same problem, her coordination while walking was poor. Eddie, at nearly 88 years old, and Pauline, being 84, just accepted it as a burden of getting old.

    Eddie and Pauline are currently taking their third Healthy Aging Program Tai Chi course, this one at the Milano Family Senior Center in Melrose. Because the Tai Chi courses are so popular, the class was filled at the Stoneham location. But that did not stop them from taking classes.

    "We really enjoy the class and the company," says Eddie. "Many of the same people take the classes so we get to know one another. There is only one other male in the class, so we hang out together."

    Eddie admits that it took him a while to learn the steps and get acclimated to the moves. But as he learned when he began to play the piano back in the day, it is all about practice. He is beginning to master the movements and can feel the difference in his legs with more flexibility and less pain. Pauline can see a major difference in her walking; her coordination is much better than it was a year ago.

    Another reason the couple continues to take the course is because of their class leader, Susan Becker. "Susan is a people person," says Pauline. "She is very personable and a great leader. She explains the process making sure all of us understand it and will work with you until you have the movement down."

    Both agree that having Susan lead their class really adds to the sessions. "She's an excellent teacher," says Eddie. "She goes over the actions until we have retained what we have learned."

    Coincidently, Susan recently won the Kate Lorig Healthy Living Innovation Award, which is given by the Healthy Living Center of Excellence annually to recognize the innovative efforts of individuals or organizations for their creative thinking, commitment, and implementation of ideas that improve the quality of life for older adults through healthy aging programs.

    For more information on Mystic Valley Elder Services' Healthy Aging Programs, please contact Donna Covelle, Healthy Aging Program Coordinator, at (781) 388-4867 or dcovelle@mves.org.
    THREADS
    Tai Cheng
    Elderly
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  8. #83
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    Mary Kawakami ar 106

    106-year-old in Salt Lake City still feisty, sharp in daily exercise routine

    At age 106, Mary Kawakami of Salt Lake City stays sharp and feisty with a daily exercise routine designed by her 75-year-old son.

    By ABC7.com staff
    Tuesday, December 10, 2019 4:24PM
    SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (KABC) -- So what's your excuse?

    You may need to find a new reason to skip exercising after watching a feisty 106-year-old perform her workout routine with her 75-year-old son.

    Mary Kawakami is a workout diva, starting every day with a routine designed by her son Paul.

    He's helped her out for more than 20 years.

    They absolutely adore each other and their workout is like a comedy routine.

    "The reason why she lived so long is she's mean," Paul jokes.

    Mary embraces her centenarian status.

    "How old am I? 1-0-6. Will be 107 in two weeks. Basically I am old!" she says.

    And she's not slowing down. Her lungs are still strong and her heart rate is excellent.

    And Paul - who is a Tai Chi instructor - says his mom is the best. Whatever he comes up with she is willing to try.

    THREADS
    Give it up to the elderly!!!!!
    Taijiquan's health (or longevity) benefits overrated?
    Gene Ching
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  9. #84
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    Hope

    Coronavirus-infected centenarian discharged from hospital after recovery
    Source: Xinhua| 2020-03-07 18:33:10|Editor: huaxia



    A medical worker from the military shows the nucleic acid test negative report of a 100-year-old man at the branch of Hubei's Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital at the Optics Valley in Wuhan, the capital city of Hubei Province, March 7, 2020. A 100-year-old man has recovered and been discharged from hospital Saturday after 13 days of treatment for the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), becoming the oldest recovered patient to date. (Photo by Zhao Jiaqing/Xinhua)

    WUHAN, March 7 (Xinhua) -- A 100-year-old man has recovered and been discharged from hospital Saturday after 13 days of treatment for the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), becoming the oldest recovered patient to date.

    He was among the group of more than 80 COVID-19 patients who were discharged from the branch of Hubei's Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital at the Optics Valley in Wuhan, the capital city of Hubei Province and the epicenter of the outbreak.

    Born in February 1920, the elderly man just marked his 100th birthday.

    He was admitted to the hospital on Feb. 24 due to a coronavirus infection, with underlying health problems such as Alzheimer's disease, hypertension and heart failure.

    Due to his complicated conditions, medical professionals from the military held multiple consultations, and a variety of methods including antiviral treatment through traditional Chinese medicine and convalescent plasma therapy were adopted in the treatment.



    A 100-year-old man is discharged from the branch of Hubei's Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital at the Optics Valley in Wuhan, the capital city of Hubei Province, March 7, 2020. A 100-year-old man has recovered and been discharged from hospital Saturday after 13 days of treatment for the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), becoming the oldest recovered patient to date. (Photo by Zhao Jiaqing/Xinhua)
    THREADS
    Give it up to the elderly!!!!!
    COVID-19
    Gene Ching
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  10. #85
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    Another centarian survives


    Coronavirus: 103-year-old woman becomes oldest person to beat disease

    Centenarian recovers after just six days of treatment at hospital in virus epicentre
    Chiara Giordano
    32 minutes ago

    A 103-year-old woman has become the oldest person to beat coronavirus and return home.

    Zhang Guangfen recovered from the disease after receiving treatment for just six days at a hospital in Wuhan – the Chinese city at the centre of the outbreak.

    The centenarian’s quick recovery was down to her having no underlying health conditions apart from mild chronic bronchitis, her doctor Dr Zeng Yulan told reporters.

    She was diagnosed at Liyuan Hospital, Tongji Medical College, in Wuhan on 1 March, Chutian Metropolis Daily reports.

    The newspaper published a video showing the woman being escorted out of the hospital to a waiting ambulance by a group of medical workers as she was discharged on Tuesday.

    Older people and those with pre-existing medical conditions are more at risk of developing severe coronavirus symptoms.

    The grandmother has become the oldest person to recover from the deadly disease so far – days after a 101-year-old man also beat the virus in Wuhan.

    A 100-year-old man with Alzheimer’s disease, hypertension and heart failure also recovered from the virus in Wuhan this week after being treated by military doctors.

    Wuhan’s 11 million residents have been in lockdown since late January.

    The disease has infected more than 80,700 people in China and killed more than 3,000.


    103-year-old Zhang Guangfen has been discharged from hospital in Wuhan, China, after recovering from coronavirus. (Chutian Metropolis Daily/screen grab)

    Latest figures from the National Health Commission on the spread of the virus showed 24 new cases across China, and 22 more deaths as of Tuesday.

    All of the latest deaths occurred in Wuhan.

    However new infections in the wider Hubei province continue to stabilise, with new cases declining for the sixth day. All 13 new cases in Hubei were recorded in Wuhan.

    Additional reporting by agencies.

    THREADS
    Give it up to the elderly!!!!!
    COVID-19
    Gene Ching
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  11. #86
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    This could use more details...

    ... perhaps the will emerge with some later report.

    Elderly Woman, 80, Uses Her Martial Arts Skills to Fend off Two 21-Year-Old Thieves
    BY REBECCA SPEARE-COLE ON 12/7/20 AT 10:18 AM EST

    An 80-year-old woman fended off two 21-year-old thieves who were trying to raid her home in France by using her martial arts skills.

    Two 21-year-old men appeared at the Béziers criminal court on Friday for assaulting and attempting to steal from her home in Agde in the southern region of Hérault on November 17, according to France Bleu.

    It emerged that the men, both from Frontignan, had thought the woman was wealthy so planned to target her house but it was in fact a modest home on the Hérault river, the broadcaster said.

    One of the men, a former legionnaire, was wearing a motorcycle helmet and was carrying a semi-automatic pistol, when he rang the doorbell. The gun has not been found, the court reportedly heard.

    The woman, who is Belgian and has been described as a "master" in martial arts by French media, opened the door and was confronted by one of the two men.

    Instead of retreating, she kicked him in the testicles before punching him several times, according to France Bleu.

    As the man tried to contain her, she reportedly struggled as much as she could before screaming loudly to alert neighbours.

    Three people came running to help and as they arrived to help, reports say the man attempted to grab the jewelry the elderly lady was wearing but to no avail.


    The Bezier Criminal Court in southern France.
    GOOGLE MAPS
    He then fled, joining the other man who was reportedly waiting on a stolen motorcycle in front of the house. They drove off without having stolen anything.

    The driver of the motorcycle, a former soldier, was arrested last week after the discovery of several of his fingerprints at the scene, France Blue said.

    The other man who confronted the woman has been sentenced five times in the past, including spending three years in prison for aggravated theft before being released last April, the media outlet added.

    He now reportedly faces up to 20 years in prison so asked for a trial postponement in court to prepare his defense. Both men have been remanded in custody as they await trial, reports say.

    Meanwhile, the 80-year-old woman sustained wounds to her hands in the attack and has now been given 30 days of Incapacité Temporaire Totale de Travail (ITT), which means time off work due to her injuries.

    Newsweek has contacted the local police in Adge for comment.
    Threads
    Successful-Street-Applications
    Give-it-up-to-the-elderly!!!!!
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  12. #87
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    Xiao Zhen Xie

    Video behind the link

    Update: Elderly Asian Woman Who Clobbered Her Attacker Talks About Terrifying Assault In San Francisco
    March 18, 2021 at 6:31 am


    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — An elderly woman attacked on Market St. in San Francisco Wednesday – the latest victim in a wave of attacks on Asians in the Bay Area – spoke to KPIX 5 about turning the tables on her assailant, leaving him with injuries that required a trip to the hospital.

    From her senior retirement home in San Francisco, Xiao Zhen Xie candidly talked to KPIX 5 in an exclusive interview about the attack and her injuries, with her daughter Dong-Mei Li interpreting.

    “Very traumatized, very scared and this eye is still bleeding,” Li told KPIX 5. “The right eye still cannot see anything and still bleeding and we have something to absorb the bleeding.”

    For the latest, real-time San Francisco Bay Area news and alerts, click to download the KPIX 5 news app

    Surrounded by her family, the 76-year-old who has resided in San Francisco for 26 years said she was quite shaken up and that the attack was completely unprovoked. Her immediate instinct was to fight back.

    Xiao Zhen Xie says she was just waiting at the traffic light and then the suspect punched her by her left eye.

    Immediately, her instincts kicked in to defend herself. While she suffered injuries and required medical attention, it was her attacker that ended up on the stretcher. “She found the stick around the area and fought back,” said Li.

    Li said her mother cannot see at all out of her left eye and hasn’t been able to eat. The hope is that time will heal the physical and emotional wounds, but her family said the incident has left her scared for her life.

    “As you can see she is extremely terrified,” Xie’s grandson John Chen told KPIX 5. “She’s terrified to even step out.”

    Xie’s family has set up a GoFundMe account to help with her medical expenses.

    San Francisco police said they are investigating the aggravated assault. The incident happened at Market St. and Charles J. Brenham Place near McAllister St. at around 10:30 a.m.

    Coming upon the scene during his morning run was KPIX Sports Director Dennis O’Donnell.

    “There was a guy on a stretcher and a frustrated angry woman with a stick in her hand,” said O’Donnell.

    In a video he captured on his cellphone, Xie is seen with an injury to the side of her face and eye and holding an ice pack to her face. Police said both Xie and her assailant were taken to a hospital for treatment.

    Witnesses told KPIX 5 they saw Xie pummeling the assailant. In the video, the alleged assailant is handcuffed to a stretcher with his face bloodied. A sobbing Xie berates the man and waves what looks to be a wooden board at him as he’s being taken away.

    “You bum, why did you hit me?” she said to the man on the stretcher in Chinese.

    Xie then turned to the crowd of people who had gathered, saying, “This bum, he hit me,” as she raised the stick she held and sobbed. “He hit me, this bum,“ she repeated.

    The victim added that she had been leaning against a light pole and all of a sudden, the man punched her without provocation.

    “The woman said that she was hit,” O’Donnell says. “She attacked back. From what I could see, she wanted more of the guy on the stretcher and the police were holding her back.”

    Police did not disclose a motive for the attack and it was not clear whether the victim’s race had anything to do with the assault.

    Officers also say there was a second victim Wednesday morning, an 83-year-old Asian man. A 39-year-old man is now being investigated for both attacks, and police say they are working to determine if bias was a factor.

    “We have to do our job and we have to investigate these cases with all resources brought to bear and we need to make arrests, and we’ve done that,” San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott said Wednesday.

    Both the police chief and the mayor highlighted the arrests made in connection with previous attacks in the city, promising more targeted patrols.

    “We need to understand, not only what is going on, but why these attacks occur,” said Mayor London Breed. “Because in some cases they didn’t include any robbery or theft.”

    As for one case that did include robbery; police have announced three arrests in connection with the violent attack caught on camera in a San Francisco laundromat. Police say the suspects, arrested in Antioch, are also tied to eight car burglaries in the city.

    “Again, you have a small group of individuals,” Scott said. “All of those three that were arrested live outside the city.”

    Hate crimes against Asian Americans rose 150% in 2020, even as hate crimes overall declined. In January, a 91-year-old man was shoved to the ground in Oakland’s Chinatown. An assault in San Francisco killed 94-year-old Vichar Ratanapakdee, while another assault left 75-year-old Pak Ho dead in Oakland last week.

    Most recently, 59-year-old Danny Yu Chang was severely beaten on San Francisco’s Market St. on Monday, leaving him with serious injuries.

    And for every crime reported, state Assemblyman David Chui (D-San Francisco) says there are more that aren’t.

    “It’s not just the incredible violence in a number of incidents, but how racism has manifested itself in so many ways,” said Chiu.

    Chiu and other Asian American and Pacific Islanders are proposing a statewide hotline for reporting and dealing with hate crimes, as well as legislations for restorative justice programs. They also want Governor Gavin Newsom to appoint an attorney general from the community.

    The wave of incidents has sparked rallies throughout the Bay Area condemning anti-Asian violence and more than $1.4 million in state funding to track and stop the attacks.

    The group Stop AAPI Hate said over the past year there have been nearly 4,000 hate incidents against Asians across the U.S. Chiu says 1,600 of those attacks were in California.
    threads
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    Give-it-up-to-the-elderly!!!!!
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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