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Thread: Beauty Pageants

  1. #76
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    Slightly OT

    ...or perhaps totally on T.

    Weibo user solicits pics for 'most beautiful bosom' contest
    Staff Reporter
    2013-07-23
    08:52 (GMT+8)


    Making Zhang Jiang happy. (Internet photo)

    Over 3,200 contestants have submitted pictures of their cleavage for the Happy Zhang Jiang "best breasts" competition on Sina Weibo, China's equivalent of Twitter. The only entry requirement is the words "Happy Zhang Jiang" written somewhere on the contestants' chest, reports our Chinese-language sister paper Want Daily.

    Any shots that get past the qualifying round, presided over by (presumably happy) Weibo user Zhang Jiang and a panel of expert judges, will be rewarded. There are special prizes for the biggest, smallest and most beautiful bust.

    Many were not afraid to show their faces and an ample portion of the rest of their body. Rather disturbingly, a three-year-old child is reportedly included in one of the shots.

    References:

    Zhang Jiang  張江
    Gene Ching
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  2. #77
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    Take that tiara...

    ...and run!

    Stripped of title, Miss Asia Pacific winner goes on the lam with expensive prize tiara 【Update】

    Mike 2 days ago



    May Miat Noe, a native of Myanmar and (brief) champion of the 2014 Miss Asia Pacific beauty pageant has apparently gone on the lam after contest authorities attempted to revoke both her winner status and her extremely pricey prize tiara, which the 18-year-old squirreled away with her before falling off the radar.

    The Korean contest organizers claim that Noe’s status was revoked after it was discovered she’d apparently lied on her profile about… something (the agency appears reluctant to specify), and that she’d “been rude” to staff and extended a 10 day visit for her mother – which the agency paid for – to Seoul, where the contest was held, into a three-month sojourn.

    Update: Reports now suggest that Ms. Noe is refusing to return the tiara, which is worth approximately US$100,000, until the contest’s organisers apologise for branding her a liar. The dethroned champion alleges that the contest’s director of media, Mr. David Kim, lied about her age and accused her of having undergone plastic surgery in order to give her career a boost. It was not her intention to take the tiara with her, Ms. Noe insists, but she now has no plans of returning it to the contest’s organizers without first receiving an apology.

    But, as with all disputes involving large sums of money, there appears to be more to the story than what the contest organizers are letting on. Although Noe obviously can’t be reached for comment at this time, David Kim, the director of media for the Miss Asia Pacific pageant, also told press that they’d offered her a recording contract to become a singer if she agreed to get plastic surgery and breast augmentation.



    Read between the lines and one could conceivably draw the conclusion that some back door deals with Noe fell through – possibly when she refused the surgery – and the organizers decided to get vindictive, strip Noe of her title, and blame it on her with some flimsy attacks on her character.

    The organizers did, after all, continue to pay for Noe’s mother’s visit for the entire three months when, if it was such a problem for them, they easily could have refused.

    There’s quite a bit of they-said-she-said going on right now, and we probably won’t be able to truly get to the bottom of this one until Noe goes back on the grid.

    (Note that some media outlets are reporting that Noe actually received breast augmentation surgery, while other outlets say she refused and indicate that that may have been the event that kicked all this off.)
    Gene Ching
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  3. #78
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    Why you can never trust Thailand...

    ...anyone who has ever been there knows...

    Queens of stage and screen: Thailand’s transgender beauty pageant kicks off for 10th year
    Fran Wrigley 17 hours ago



    In many ways, Miss International Queen is just like any other pageant: finalists parade in evening gowns, swimsuits and national dress, and the winner will perform twelve months of promotional and charity duties. There’s one major difference, though: all the contestants are transgender women, and the top prize includes cosmetic surgery for the winner – if she wants it.

    As the world’s largest transgender pageant hits the stage in Thailand (where else!) for its 10th anniversary year, we take a look at this unique contest.

    Miss International Queen began in 2004 with the aim of building international awareness of transgender rights. The event, now in its tenth year, kicked off with a press conference last week, and the final will be held on November 7 at Tiffany’s Show Theatre, Pattaya.

    It’s not the only transgender pageant in the world, but it is the biggest and the most international: this year’s 25 finalists hail from 21 different countries.

    ▼ Contestant Piyada Inthavong, from Laos, posted this selfie backstage with Poy, one of Thailand’s most famous ladyboys.


    Contestants in Miss International Queen can be pre- or post-operation transgender, but must have been born biologically male. Candidates are competing for a top prize that includes US$12,500, and any surgery they wish to have, be it gender reassignment, or other cosmetic surgery.

    Having surgery as the grand prize sounds a bit like those guys who get their wife a boob job for Christmas, but there’s no pretence that this contest is about inner beauty. And in its acceptance of that fact, Miss International Queen actually somehow comes off looking more honest than other, more conventional women’s beauty pageants.

    ▼ 2013 winner Marcelo Ohio, from Brazil, with some of the contestants at this year’s press launch.


    The participation of transgender women in mainstream pageants, meanwhile, remains a source of controversy. The Miss Universe Organisation faced criticism in 2012 when they disqualified candidate Jenna Talackova from Miss Universe Canada after learning that she was transgender. While the organisation later reversed the decision and allowed Talackova to compete, the winner of Miss Universe 2013 Gabriela Isler said transgender people should have their own pageants because the Miss Universe pageant was “made for women”.

    If the major objective of Miss International Queen is visibility of transgender women, the glitzy televised ceremonies seems to achieve that. That’s not to say that the contest is particularly politicised, though: in the Talent Quest event, the rules expressly forbid “any display of nudity, foul language, innuendo, political, and transgendered & gay statements.“

    So is Miss International Queen doing enough to increase awareness of transgender issues? It’s hard to say. But the glitzy ceremonies – and the contestants’ Instagram pages – are certainly gaining attention.

    You can watch some of the extravagant press conference in a video from MissLadyBoys below.

    Gene Ching
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  4. #79
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    This is great...

    Life as a Fake Beauty Queen in Small-Town China
    I came to Beijing to model. Then I found myself playing Miss America in Inner Mongolia.
    Meredith Hattam Nov 8 2014, 8:00 AM ET


    The author (second from left) and fellow models pose in flower-inspired national costumes. (Courtesy of Meredith Hattam)

    It was November 2011, and I was in a fluorescent-lit hotel room in the Chinese city of Ordos, on the outskirts of Inner Mongolia. Next to me, my 17-year-old Brazilian roommate, Anna, was tucking into bed. I set our alarm for 6 a.m., when singing, dancing, and talent contests awaited us. All would be broadcast on China Central Television.

    “Open your eyes and smile,” called Anna from her bed, using the phrase our choreographer had been shouting for the past two days. “Ugh. Goodnight.”

    Back home in Brazil, Anna was a high-fashion model, represented by agencies in Milan and New York. I was a 24-year-old recent college grad who, having difficulty finding a full-time job, took a year off to travel by unconventional means (modeling, though of the questionable variety that lands a person in a hotel room on the outskirts of Inner Mongolia).

    This wasn’t a reality show, nor was it one of the elite bookings Anna enjoyed back in New York or Milan. We were there for a fake beauty pageant, one our Beijing modeling agency had booked us for, telling us it was a “fashion show” and providing no further details. It was only after we boarded our early-morning flight to Ordos that the true nature of the event was revealed.

    “We’re on our way to another ‘Miss’ thing,” a Ukrainian girl said from her seat with a groan.

    I was hired as Miss America; Anna, despite being Brazilian, as Miss Chile. It would have been the strangest 36 hours of my life—if, over the previous two months, I hadn’t done it twice before.

    * * *

    My first stint as Miss America for hire had been that September, in the desert oasis of Dunhuang, for the city’s International Grape Festival. It was a surreal experience in which 40 models, including me, were paid to walk down a catwalk for about 2,000 locals. Later, we rode camels across the dunes of the Gobi Desert, crisscrossing the sand in single file. The photos of all 40 of us on camelback—some only in bras, to dodge tanlines—are wonderfully absurd.


    Models on camels (Meredith Hattam)

    For the second pageant, in October, I was hired to cruise around Dalian in a fake gold Mercedes golf cart with five other girls for three days, in an effort to lure potential buyers into investing in a miniature replica of Versailles. A printed guide to the event offered fictitious backstories in Chinese about each contestant, and her purpose there. We wore dresses whose colors the organizers must have thought somehow corresponded to our countries of origin. As Miss America, I strangely, and perhaps unpatriotically, wore a teal-tinged baby blue.

    Pageants like these typically serve as glittery infomercials for the cities where they take place—“Visit Ordos, or Dunhuang, or Dalian, or Chengdu: wealthy enough to import foreign pageant queens!” The events are usually funded by investment-hungry real-estate developers, city tourism departments, or, in the case of my pageant in Ordos, China Central Television. Photos and film captured during the event can live on via promotional materials for months, even years. In Dunhuang, billboards advertised the pageant using images of models from the previous year’s event.

    Models booked for these pageants aren’t actual beauty queens—they’re aspiring runway models sent to Asia by their “mother agencies,” which are usually based in their home countries and serve as their main managers. In return for placing them abroad, mother agents take a cut of models’ pay (typically 10 percent). Once in China—popular cities for work include Beijing and Shanghai—models often build their portfolios with magazine spreads, runway shows, and catalogs. Most contracts stipulate that a model can’t reject jobs, however dubious, or her contract will be broken and she’ll be sent home.

    Less reputable agencies in China provide models with few details about the jobs they'll be doing, calling gigs “fashion shows” and sending them on their way. Of the nine “fashion shows” I booked while in Beijing, only two were on a runway. The rest were fake pageants, car shows, and trade shows—but I was not informed of their nature until I was en route to the events. Models flagged as having low earning potential will do fake pageants frequently, as they’re easy to book. I once met a Russian teenager who was stuck traveling on a bus for 10 days across rural China as “Miss Argentina.”

    When models are chosen as mock pageant queens, they head to their destinations (usually one of the smaller cities in China), where they're handed sashes, crowns, and heels, and instructed to be on their best behavior. At the pageant I attended in Dunhuang, the models were forbidden to smoke, swear, or wear clothing that fell above the knee—though, in my experience, no punishments were inflicted for slipping up.
    Continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  5. #80
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    continued from previous

    Life as a Fake Beauty Queen in Small-Town China
    Meredith Hattam Nov 8 2014, 8:00 AM ET


    Preparing for the International Grape Festival in Dunhuang (Maria Kompf)

    Most models in these pageants are from Eastern Europe or Latin America, and often everything in their biographies is fictionalized—from home countries, names, and national costumes to elaborate personal stories. In the case of the Ordos pageant, Anna from Brazil was “Annabella” from Chile, while I was “Mary Ann” from America. In another pageant, I had played “Mary, from New York.” I wish I knew my narrative (was I fresh from an upstate farm, or a hardened city girl?), but it was written in Chinese.

    “I’ve been Miss Brazil, Miss Poland, and Miss America, and I’m still ****ed I was never Miss Canada,” Lora, a model from Toronto whom I met in Beijing, told me recently. “Some Polish girl got it instead.”

    Lora once fell through the stage during dress rehearsal for a pageant in Guangzhou. The runway had been so flimsy that it couldn’t hold her weight in 5-inch heels. “They gave me three days paid vacation after that,” Lora told me. “But I still had to do the pageant.” (The pageant's organizers rebuilt the runway.)

    * * *

    These pageants echo China’s larger affair with Western knockoffs. In the city of Wuxi, an entire street is lined with stores like H&N, Sffcccks Coffee, and Zare, while fake Apple stores have been shut down in the city of Kunming. Attractive Caucasian men are paid generously (sometimes up to $1,000 a week) to lend validity to new businesses by posing for store openings and ribbon-cutting ceremonies. Nor is architecture immune: A replica of Paris lies empty in Tianducheng, while in Beijing, there’s an Amsterdam-like area where roommates of mine traipsed merrily down a cobblestone alley to shoot a Chinese beer commercial.


    A farmer near a replica of the Eiffel Tower in Hangzhou's Tianducheng development (Lang Lang/Reuters)

    For models, nationality-switching gigs aren’t limited to pageants. A photographer friend of mine relayed a tale of young foreign models hired to stroll up and down the street of a fake Italian villa, greeting potential investors with a cordial buon giorno. According to a model I met in Shanghai, fake Victoria’s Secret fashion shows are also common: The lingerie may be Chinese, but the choreography, wings, and footage are ripped straight from American television. “Sometimes they’re outside in zero degrees,” my friend said. “All it takes is fake wings and underwear.”

    Although models are often contractually bound to do these strange jobs, their employment papers are usually as fake as their pageant sashes, leaving them with little legal protection. A work visa is expensive and hard to obtain in China, so agencies often recommend models visit on a tourist visa and work illegally (though China has begun to crack down on the practice—around 60 models with nonwork visas were arrested in Beijing earlier this year). Eager to build a career, models consent to this, winding up in China and similar markets—such as Thailand, Singapore, and Japan—because cities like Milan, New York, and Paris are more competitive.

    Many models I met during my time in China were as young as 14, and working to send money home to countries like Russia and Ukraine. As captured in the documentary Girl Model, scouts scour these countries for the next big face, sometimes sending young girls abroad with big dreams and no legal protection.

    From a financial perspective, the allure is understandable: The fake pageant queens notwithstanding, models can make hundreds an hour posing for expensive catalogs and Taobao (the Chinese equivalent of Amazon). But even with jobs like that, modeling isn’t lucrative; agencies in China take around 40 percent of your pay, your mother agent back home takes 10 percent, and expenses, including a plane ticket and rent, can reach upwards of $10,000. With their cash flow intact thanks to their few high-earners, most agencies cover some of these expenses, but they also make it hard for models to turn a profit. Leaving with money in your pocket is rare. For more savory jobs, you need to have the right look, at the right time—otherwise you’re stuck paying rent as Miss America.

    The going rate for a fake pageant queen? Around 2,000 RMB ($325) a day, almost twice the average monthly salary of an entire Chinese family, which is currently around $175. This means that after a little over a week’s worth of work, a model will have earned what the average Chinese family makes in one year, though she herself will likely take home less than half of that income. The disparity is striking: Young girls being paid to woo wealthy locals and expats to invest in novelty real estate, the likes of which the average Chinese citizen will never, ever obtain. How much are these knockoffs—pageants, Sffcccks, et al—really worth?

    * * *

    My pageant in Ordos, with Anna, was my most elaborate by far, and its backdrop only made things more surreal. Chinese urban planners developed the city to accommodate China’s ever-growing population, and it’s designed to house 1 million people. But barely anyone has moved in. Instead, it’s a ghost town perched on the edge of the Inner Mongolian plains, its architecture a futuristic fever dream. Giant horse sculptures stand in the shadow of buildings that look like falling dominoes, while the Ordos Museum, an undulating copper orb designed by the architecture firm MAD, glints bizarrely over empty streets.


    A scene from a pageant in the desert oasis city of Dunhuang (Maria Kompf)

    Our pageant was hosted in the Ordos Grand Theater, which borders the Mongolian plains. We rehearsed for three days straight, struggling to perfect our dance moves in sequined miniskirts and Plexiglas stilettos. With three costume changes, a song and dance routine, and a talent competition, practice was essential.

    "Open your eyes and smile, girls!" our choreographer yelled dutifully from the front of the stage. Next to me, a young Ukrainian girl translated this command to her peers. At least half of the 40 or so models in attendance did not speak English.

    On the night of our pageant, the theater was nearly empty. A few Ordos residents who had been invited (it was free) clapped idly in the audience. Our pageant mirrored the trademarked international beauty contest, Miss Universe, precisely—complete with national costumes, a talent contest, and the announcement of the top 10 finalists.

    In reality, the top 10 had been chosen days before, when we’d piled off a dusty tour bus into the amphitheater where the pageant was held. We’d lined up in rows as a polished woman coordinating the event strolled by, inspecting us closely. Ten were asked to step forward, then five, Anna among them. The winner was kept a secret until the night of the pageant.

    And there we were: in the final moments. The chosen five huddled onstage in anticipation, Anna grasping hands with the other finalists in mock excitement. For no discernible reason, footage from a real, American Victoria’s Secret fashion show streamed above us as our host, a tow-headed, middle-aged Westerner-for-hire, pulled an index card from his pocket. Miss Universe, he announced proudly, was Kristina, Miss Montenegro.

    I waved at Anna from backstage. Had she wanted to win? Was she disappointed? She laughed, shrugged, and gave me a tiny, pageant-style wave. Wrist left. Wrist right. Then she turned towards the audience, opened her eyes, and smiled wide.
    I suppose I could have posted this on the Chinese-Counterfeits thread.
    Gene Ching
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  6. #81
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    Slightly OT

    ...but a ttt 4 2015!
    See the gorgeous top-ranked Miss Campuses from universities across China

    Krista Rogers 2 days ago

    Meg Sawai, an editor for our Japanese sister site and all-around Chinese news liaison, was browsing the net last week when she stumbled upon the recently released Top 30 Face Ranking of all Miss Campuses across China. Intrigued, she opened the list to see who would take the top spot. Get ready to meet some of the lovely–and intellectual–ladies from universities across China!

    The definitive Top 30 Miss Campus Ranking was revealed on a special university page at Chinese web portal Weavi. Below, we’ve listed the university names and locations of the Top 10 Miss Campuses in English:

    1. Chongqing University (重慶大学), Chongqing

    2. Fudan University (復旦大学), Shanghai

    3. Renmin University of China (中国人民大学), Beijing

    4. Sichuan University (四川大学), Chengdu

    5. Peking University (北京大学), Beijing

    6. Shanghai Jiao Tong University (上海交通大学), Shanghai

    7. Xiamen University (厦门大学), Xiamen/Amoy

    8. Nanjing University (南京大学), Nanjing

    9. Zhejiang University (浙江大学), Hangzhou

    10. Tsinghua University (清華大学), Beijing

    ▼Here’s the complete Top 30 Ranking for our Chinese-reading visitors:



    And there you have it. According to Meg, Chinese people have traditionally said that women from Chongqing and the Sichuan region of China are famous for being especially pretty, so let’s keep our eyes peeled on Miss Campuses Numbers 1 and 4. Supposedly, the high humidity and spicy foods consumed in these regions lead to high metabolisms and smooth-looking skin (whether these general beliefs are scientifically accurate or not remains to be seen).

    Based on the chart, the No. 1 Miss Campus in all of China is Miss Li Yun Xi (李韻熙). The 23-year-old is actually from Gansu Province in the northwestern area of the country, but she is more than happy to be called “a girl of Chingqing.” She is also said to be an unassuming, intellectual woman who is currently enrolled in graduate school. When she was judged the Most Beautiful Miss Campus in all of China, her humble response was: “My tests are coming up so I would be really happy if everyone cheered for me!”

    ▼ The No. 1 Miss Campus in all of China, Miss Li Yun Xi





    ▼ Would you mind sitting next to her in class every day?



    Let’s take a look at the other top five winners as well!

    ▼Here are the second place winners (presumably tied), Miss Sun Yu Meng (孫雨朦) and her twin sister, Miss Sun Yu Tong (孫雨彤), from Fudan University in Shanghai.



    ▼In third place is Miss Kang Yi Kun (康逸琨) from Renmin University of China in Beijing.



    ▼Fourth place goes to Miss Fu Meng Ni (付夢妮), a student at Sichuan University in Chengdu.



    ▼And in fifth place, we have Peking University’s Miss Yuan Jia Yi (袁佳怡).



    ▼By the way, Miss Zhang Ze Tian (章澤天) aka “Milk Tea Girl” of Beijing’s Tsinghua University is in tenth place. She became a hot topic a few years back for showing her armpit hair during a cheerleading routine.



    Let’s hear it for all the ladies with beauty and brains! Good luck with your future studies.

    Original article by Meg Sawai
    Sources/Images: CQNews (1, 2), MSN Photo Eastday, Sina Weibo (all Chinese)
    Gene Ching
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  7. #82
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    Oh CANADA!

    Srsly? Wth?

    miss universe 2015: Contestants take part in national costume show, in pictures



    jolly hockey sticks: Miss canada, chanel beckenlehnerpicture: Splash news
    Gene Ching
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  8. #83
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    Nice pucks.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Srsly? Wth?
    I thought it was a photoshop when I first saw it.

  10. #85
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    That oufit made it to the final 5

    Miss Indonesia Wins Best National Costume At Miss Universe 2014
    Sun, January 25, 2015 11:46pm EST by Avery Thompson


    After 88 amazing and outrageous Miss Universe costumes, only one could be deemed the winner. Miss Indonesia took home the top prize for her stunning costume!

    Miss Indonesia Elvira Devinamira is the world’s pick for Best National Costume at the 2014 Miss Universe pageant. The gorgeous lady was awarded the honor for her breathtaking costume inspired by a Buddhist temple in her home country!
    Inspired by a Buddhist temple. Man, they should make one inspired by the Vatican, or maybe Mecca.

    Of course, Miss Colombia won.

    Paulina Vega: Miss Colombia Wins Miss Universe 2014
    Sun, January 25, 2015 11:50pm EST by Caitlin Beck


    Paulina Vega Wins Miss Universe
    Getty

    Congratulations, Paulina Vega! The Colombian beauty was crowned the 2014 winner of the Miss Universe pageant!

    So exciting! Miss Colombia Paulina Vega, 22, was named 2014’s Miss Universe! After a rigorous competition starting with 88 girls from around the world showing off their stunning beauty and talent at the FIU Arena in Miami, Florida, the stunner went home the ultimate winner over Miss USA Nia Sanchez!
    And just for the record here (FOR ALL YOU COSTUMED CANADIANS), our own Miss U.S.A. place second. And we luv her because she's a TKD black belt.

    Nevada's Sanchez a runner-up at Miss Universe
    Kelli Kennedy 8:45 a.m. PST January 26, 2015


    (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

    MIAMI – Miss Colombia Paulina Vega has been crowned Miss Universe in pageant in Miami, beating out contestants from 88 other countries.

    Miss USA Nia Sanchez of Las Vegas, Nevada, and Miss Ukraine Diana Harkusha were the runners-up during Sunday's competition in Miami.

    Vega is from Barranquilla, Colombia and is studying business administration. She said the contests leading to MIss Universe were the first she'd participated in and will be her last as she's eager to return to her studies in business administration.

    The 22-year-old is the granddaughter of a legendary tenor, Gastón Vega.

    Miss Colombia Paulina Vega has been crowned Miss Universe, beating out first runner-up Miss USA Nia Sanchez and contestants from more than 80 other countries. (Jan. 26)

    Earlier this week she said, "It will be a dream come true to represent the woman of today. A woman that not only care about being beautiful and being glamorous, but also cares about being a professional, intelligent, hard-working person."

    The other finalists chosen from among the 88 contestants were Miss Jamaica Kaci Fennell and Miss Netherlands Yasmin Verheijen.

    Sanchez, a 24-year-old contestant from Las Vegas, Nevada, said she was looking forward to the often-dreaded interview portion. She had been running practice questions all week with her roommate Miss Australia Tegan Martin, who made it to the top ten.

    Sanchez has a fourth-degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do and has traveled the country teaching others. She spoke earlier in the competition about equipping women to defend themselves against crime.

    "It's just something that's so prevalent in our society and why not empower women to take control of a dangerous situation into their own hand," she said.

    "Today Show" personality Natalie Morales was hosting the show. And before Miss Universe, Gabriela Isler of Venezuela, crowned the next winner, viewers were to hear performances from singers Nick Jonas and Prince Royce.

    Miss Jamaica Kaci Fennell has stood out during the competition with her short, spiky haircut.

    "I don't have long tresses like everyone else, I'm just representing myself and that's what beauty pageants are all about," said Fennell, who wore a long, red beaded evening gown. "You don't have to look a certain way … and I feel like I represent that."

    Crowd favorite Miss Venezuela Migbelis Lynette Castellanos was cut after the top ten. She had tremendous support and pressure locally and back home. The Miami suburb of Doral, which is hosting the women during their stay, is also known as "Doralzuela" for its many Venezuelan residents. Three of the last six Miss Universe titles have gone to Venezuela, where beauty pageants are big business.
    Gene Ching
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  11. #86
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    This is so awesome

    Beauty pageant runner-up rips crown from winner's pretty head
    By Annie Colbert Feb 03, 2015



    Smile, turn and rip the tiara off any sequin-clad lady who stands in your way.

    The Miss Amazonas beauty pageant in Manaus, Brazil, looked more like a UFC fight on Friday when runner-up Sheislane Hayalla violently grabbed the crown off winner Carol Toledo's head and strutted off stage. Before sashaying behind the curtain, Hayalla blew a kiss to the crowd because, well, she still had a chance at Miss Congeniality. Or at least Miss Back the Eff Up.
    Gotta luv Brazilian beauty queens!
    Gene Ching
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  12. #87
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    I don't believe in this kind of beauty.. Which come from wrong places.. The beauty queens whatever it is miss India, Miss africa, Miss world and Miss Asia.. They always come from dump places or dirty places.They are not pure by their soul and work too..

  13. #88
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    wtf?

    wtf = world taekwondo federation.

    Vietnam Taekwondo player faces fine for entering beauty pageant in Thailand
    Thanh Nien News
    Friday, March 06, 2015 07:00


    Nguyen Van Son, 21, competes in the Mister Global contest in Thailand. Photo courtesy of Mister Global.

    Authorities on Friday said they have never granted any permission for Nguyen Van Son, a member of the national Taekwondo team, to compete in an ongoing male beauty contest in Thailand.
    The 21-year-old athlete will face a fine of up to VND30 million (US$1,500) for the violation, local media reported.
    Over the past two years, nearly a dozen of Vietnamese women have entered beauty pageants without any official endorsements and then faced penalties soon after their homecomings.


    Nguyen Van Son poses in an army uniform for the Mister Global contest.

    Under a rule, those who want to compete in a beauty contest abroad must have at least one national title before being selected by the culture ministry to represent the country.
    Son, who has won 15 medals at national and regional Taekwondo tournaments, did not have any beauty title.

    Mister Global
    Despite the pending fine, Son is still preparing for the final gala on Saturday of the Mister Global pageant, organized for the second time in Bangkok.
    He said he was invited by the contest’s organizers, asking for support from his fans from home.
    The man, who is 1.93 meters tall, has been considered one of the front runners.
    At the national costume competition, Son chose to wear a uniform of the Vietnamese army, which sparked controversy among many Vietnamese.
    There have also been rumors that he underwent plastic surgeries

    Quote Originally Posted by fimed View Post
    I don't believe in this kind of beauty.. Which come from wrong places.. The beauty queens whatever it is miss India, Miss africa, Miss world and Miss Asia.. They always come from dump places or dirty places.They are not pure by their soul and work too..
    Speaking of Indian beauty queens, I'm still in love with Ash. And let's not forget that Michelle Yeoh started as a beauty queen. A lotus arises from a muddy swamp.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #89
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
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    Posts
    44,265

    Miss USA Nia Sanchez

    There's a vid if you follow the link. The vid really makes this story.
    Miss USA Nia Sanchez shows off martial arts moves
    Posted: Apr 30, 2015 3:33 PM PST
    Updated: Apr 30, 2015 3:36 PM PST
    By BARUCH SHEMTOV, Fox 5 Reporter


    NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

    Miss USA Nia Sanchez is also a fourth-degree black belt in tae kwon do, so who better to teach us some self-defense?

    She learned martial arts when she was a child. And after being crowned Miss USA last year, Nia is spreading her message of empowerment by teaching self-defense classes like this one at Hunter College.

    Miss USA demonstrated her top three moves on the students and on me.

    As she prepares to pass her crown to the next Miss USA in July, Nia Sanchez hopes to pursue a career in television.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #90
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    SF Bay Area
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    2,111
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    There's a vid if you follow the link. The vid really makes this story.
    Lol. Those were some pretty poor body mechanics.

    Does she get sued by victims with false sense of confidence against real attackers?

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