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Thread: Shaolin Rasta - the 37th Chamber

  1. #91
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    Fist of Curry

    Asian AND Jamaican curries? This Kung Fu Restaurant is so Shaolin Rasta.

    First Taste: Fist of Curry brings irreverent kung-fu fun to old Huron Room space
    Mark Kurlyandchik, Detroit Free Press Published 7:01 a.m. ET April 5, 2018


    (Photo: Mark Kurlyandchik, Detroit Free Press)

    A Kurosawa film plays on the bar's lone TV hanging above the painting of a clenched fist ostensibly belonging to Bruce Lee as I sip a cold Slovakian lager.

    Dragonmead's Final Absolution is just $4 here, but I’m only waiting for carryout. There’s no need to go down that dark path, however good a deal it may be.

    The place is decked out in ‘70s regalia -- all tan and mustard yellow and brown. I don’t recall any shag carpet, but it certainly wouldn't be out of place at Fist of Curry, where the aesthetic is decidedly disco-stoner conversion van.

    It has been nearly two months since the folks who run Johnny Noodle King and Green Dot Stables — otherwise known as Inlaws Hospitality — quietly closed floundering seafood restaurant the Huron Room in southwest Detroit and revived it just three days later as a ‘70s-themed globetrotting curry slinger with a kung-fu kick.

    Fist of Curry — a pun on the title of the classic Bruce Lee film "Fist of Fury" — launched at the corner of Bagley and 18th on Valentine's Day. The place is still getting its proverbial fighting stance down and tweaking its offerings. It may be too early to conduct a full review, but between one dine-in visit and one expansive carryout order, I've sampled almost the entire menu and found a lot more to like than in visits to its predecessor.


    The interior of the new Fist of Curry restaurant in southwest Detroit, which suddenly replaced the Huron Room in February. (Photo: Mark Kurlyandchik, Detroit Free Press)

    For starters, there's the concept itself. Sure, you can get both Thai-style and Japanese curries down the street at Takoi and Ima respectively or trek up to Hamtramck for its panoply of Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi offerings. But Fist of Curry is perhaps the first restaurant of its kind in metro Detroit to build its identity on the broader concept of curry itself, which originated on the Indian subcontinent thousands of years ago but has been exported around the world and altered regionally in fundamental ways.

    The origins of chicken tikka masala, for example, are disputed, but the most widely accepted claim is that it was invented in Scotland, likely by a chef of Pakistani or Bangladeshi descent.

    Fist of Curry's cardamom-forward tikka masala with either chicken or smoked tofu ($13) is already its most popular item, but there are much better options on the brief menu, which is split into five snacks, six curries, one rotating special, a couple of sides and two varieties of soft-serve ice cream.

    Start with the cheese sticks ($6). This clever riff on mozzarella sticks employs melty halloumi cheese wrapped with fresh sage leaves in a crispy wonton roll. The result is lighter and less greasy than the traditional American bar variety and just might be the best thing on the menu. They come five to an order and are accompanied by a spicy tikka dipping sauce sans butter and cream, which allows the tomato and turmeric flavors to shine while being bolstered by a house-made ginger-garlic paste — a base for many of the curries here.

    If there's one challenger to the cheese sticks, it's the curry-fried cauliflower ($7), another of the snack options. The florets are battered in rice flour and soda water for an almost tempura-like coating that's also gluten-free. It lends the florets a satisfying crunch despite being drenched in a sweet-and-sour-and-spicy Manchurian sauce. The garnish of cilantro and scallions adds an herbal element that rounds out the dish.


    Jamaican jerk brisket curry ($16) from the new Fist of Curry restaurant in southwest Detroit. Mark Kurlyandchik, Detroit Free Press

    The meat version made with chicken drumsticks ($8) is just as satisfying, while the lion salad ($8) deceives you with fresh herbs and hunks of English cucumber before sneak attacking with spice from both Thai and Hungarian peppers and a guajillo chile-infused vinaigrette.

    Broadly speaking, the snacks are Fist of Curry's strongest offerings, while the curries themselves could use a little more coaxing in the depth department. (I'm going to make a controversial recommendation here and suggest a dash or two of MSG.) The long-grain basmati rice that accompanies each, on the other hand, is nicely cooked and worth noting.

    Of the five curries I sampled, the soft-shell crab rose above the rest thanks to its Thai-inspired coconut curry that's bright with lemongrass and a dusting of sumac. There's crab paste and oil in the curry itself, but while soft-shell is in season, the whole crab is served on the side, lightly breaded and fried to crispy perfection. At $16, this dish represents the top of Fist of Curry's modest price scale.

    The Japanese-inspired kare curry ($13) with pork katsu is another I'd recommend. The sauce starts with Japanese curry powder that's enriched with leftover pork juices from sister restaurant Johnny Noodle King and blended with sake, mirin, tamari and fresh Granny Smith apples. It's a silky and mild version of curry, perfect for heat-averse diners.

    Other offerings include a smoked tofu curry ($12) that's both vegan and gluten-free, a meaty Jamaican jerk brisket curry ($16), a vegetarian saag halloumi ($12) that I also enjoyed and a rotating weekly special.

    One of the biggest misses for me and evidently for a group of early online reviewers as well is the non-naan bread that's offered as a $2 side. The menu describes it as a house-made fry bread and the deep-fried gluten-free flatbreads that come out indeed have more in common with Navajo fry bread than soft, leavened naan -- a key component of so many good curries.

    Executive chef and co-owner Les Molnar said he'd never attempt to make naan without a tandoori oven and is instead experimenting with a pizza dough-based flatbread brushed with ginger-garlic butter that will likely make it to the menu next month. That's a smart move and will likely stanch some of the criticism.

    On the beverage side, Fist of Curry offers five house cocktails priced at $9 each that employ many of the ingredients you'd find in their curries, like a masala simple syrup. The beer list of nine drafts and 20 bottles and cans is well priced and includes a few surprises — like a nitro-draft Old Speckled Hen for $4 — among some usual suspects.

    “Part of our motivation here is to expose people to what's out there," Molnar said. "I’m not some artisan savant when it comes to making curry yet, but we know we can make good food at an affordable price.”

    Most important, though, is bringing new life to a concept that should've worked but never took off for a variety of reasons.

    "Doing a smaller restaurant like this — Fist of Curry is between 40 and 50 seats — I think you can get away with having some niche fun over here when it comes to cuisine," Molnar said. "We just want to have fun at work. If we can make it as fun as possible and pass that energy on to the guest, that’s something we get a kick out of.”

    If that's the goal, then this punny kung-fu curry shop may soon deliver a knockout roundhouse.


    A Jamaican bobsled cocktail ($9) from the new Fist of Curry restaurant in southwest Detroit features rum with strawberry and pineapple juice garnished with a whole baby banana. (Photo: Mark Kurlyandchik, Detroit Free Press)

    Fist of Curry
    2547 Bagley, Detroit.
    313-265-3325 and detroitcurry.com.

    Dinner daily.

    Irreverent '70s-themed curry joint with small bar and mostly booth seating.

    Full liquor license with limited selections.

    Reservations accepted.

    Contact Mark Kurlyandchik: 313-222-5026 or mkurlyandc@freepress.com. Follow him on Twitter @mkurlyandchik and Instagram: curlyhandshake.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  2. #92
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    Bruce Lee Rastaclat bracelet

    WANT!

    Although 'clat' isn't the right term to use here.



    INFINITE OPTIMISM RASTACLAT BRACELET

    $23.95

    477 items left

    SIZE 7" TO 9" WRIST CIRCUMFERENCE

    DESCRIPTION
    A Bruce Lee Family Store Exclusive!

    The Bruce Lee Family Company teams up with Rastaclat to celebrate Bruce's inspirational philosophy of Infinite Optimism with this iconic yellow and black release.

    * Complete with Collector's Edition bracelet box and card insert featuring Bruce's signature and quote, "As you think, so shall you become"
    * Custom barrel features the Flying Man and Rastaclat logos
    * Nunchuck aglets
    * One size fits most, 7" to 9" wrist circumference
    * 100% polyester
    When you read Bruce Lee: A Life by Matt Polly, there is much discussion of his pot use.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  3. #93
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    Check dis

    Here's the logo for the 2018 Universaide.



    Jiayo? nuh mon. JAH-yo!

    Gene Ching
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  4. #94
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    Our newest exclusive web article

    Gene Ching
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  5. #95
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    Our newest exclusive web article

    Our intrepid reporter explores Wushu in the Land of Cush. READ The Rainbow Continent Kung Fu Friendship Tour Part 2: Ethiopia by Gregory Brundage



    THREADS
    The Silk Road
    African Martial Arts
    Shaolin Rasta - the 37th Chamber
    Gene Ching
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  6. #96
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    Kung Fu Vapes

    Oh man, srsly? If they sent a sample, I'm sure I could find some one to review it. Maybe a Shaolin Rasta or a Marijuana TCM proponent?

    MARKETING > EVERCANNABIS
    Kung Fu Vapes sees growth ahead
    Mon., Aug. 19, 2019


    Alexis Dawson and John Dawson Jr. of Kung Fu Vapes (Joe Butler / EVERCANNABIS)

    By Joe Butler
    EVERCANNABIS Writer

    Kung Fu Vapes
    4811 N. Market St., Spokane
    (818) 254-8861
    www.kungfuvapes.com

    John Dawson Jr. knows exactly when his “Aha!” moment happened.

    In a tattoo shop in San Diego, a friend asked him to try an early version of a vape pen loaded with hash, a cannabis concentrate.

    He’d smoked pot before growing up but never experienced the type of high as he did with that device. He instantly knew that plenty of people are going to love their cannabis this way, and he wanted to be part of it.

    “We went on a mission right then to all the stores around town and bought any kind of e-cigarette and vape pen we could find, so we could take them all apart, see how they were made, and see if we could figure out how to make them better,” said Dawson.

    Today, a decade later, Dawson is the owner of Kung Fu Vapes, which provides components for vaporizers, including batteries and cartridges, plus all sorts of pens and pocket rigs designed for heating cannabis concentrates or oil.

    “We love to help design, brand, and package products for different companies,” he said.

    Located on Market Street in the Hillyard area, he and co-owner/brand manager Alexis Dawson now work with producers and processors and retailers in 25 states.

    While Kung Fu Vapes must follow state rules governing the sale and use of vape products, the restrictions for 502 licensees don’t apply, allowing it sell and distribute outside of Washington.

    “This evolution is a trip – we have a small niche of the industry, but we’re doing huge numbers around the country and even internationally,” John Dawson said.

    Vape pens/e-cigs can deliver a more potent experience than smoking flower. They’re also more discreet than a traditional pipe or bong, can easily fit in a pocket or purse, and the vapor doesn’t fill the lungs or have a strong odor like pot smoke does.

    A client may have ideas of what they want or don’t want in their next vape product. Or Dawson’s manufacturing partners in China may suggest new products and materials. Mostly, the ideas for come from his own hands-on research.

    “We’re always trying to push the industry forward,” he said. “We never want to follow trends – we want to create them.”

    He also likes to visit different growers and social media/industry influencers, and is always attending cannabis events around the country, either as a vendor or an attendee to learn what new products are in the works. It’s also a chance to educate consumers and possible partners about everything Kung Fu Vapes can bring to the table.

    He and Alexis essentially do everything – it would easy to hire sales people around the country, but he likes being hands-on and involved in all discussions and decisions.

    Kung Fu Vapes recently released the Quasar pod system, a one-time use fillable pen that’s already receiving praise for its portability, stability, and ability to use different types of oil. It’s child-proof, and there’s no wicking or alloys involved.

    Later this year, it plans to release Kung Fu Vitals, a pre-filled device containing CBD oil sourced from high-quality hemp grown in New York.

    Dawson said this is a great time for the industry. Though there are a lot of vape products, producers/processors want to make sure their customers have safe, reliable and enjoyable products, and that’s where he thinks Kung Fu Vapes has established a great reputation.

    “What we’re seeing right now is this perfect blending of electronic materials and cannabis, and it’s all going to get bigger,” he said. “There are a lot of products out there, but your hardware is going to define you.”

    Joe Butler is a longtime marketing writer and editor at The Spokesman-Review. He’s an enthusiast of Star Wars, commemorative spoon collecting, and the Oxford comma.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  7. #97
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    Came to salute this thread just for the title, and say I'm all for the 37th Chamber.
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  8. #98
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    check dis 'ere

    Culture Desk
    Stephen Cheng Released One Single That Sounded Like Nothing Else. But Who Was He?
    The story behind an obscure and beloved rocksteady recording and a singer who tried to bring worlds together in his music.
    By Hua Hsu August 23, 2019


    Photograph by Friedman-Abeles / © The New York Public Library

    Pop-music history is filled with dreamers who came and went, leaving behind just enough to scramble a latter-day listener’s sense of what was once possible. In 1967, the Jamaican record label Sunshine released a seven-inch single by a man named Stephen Cheng, titled “Always Together (A Chinese Love Song).” The track begins in the loping, offbeat style of rocksteady: a guitar cranking through a skanking rhythm, the bass slinking up and down in the background. But things get odd when Cheng starts singing. Most Jamaican rocksteady singers of the time mimicked the cadences of American soul. Cheng sings in a bold, over-the-top style reminiscent of Chinese opera. The words he sings are in Mandarin: the lyrics for “Always Together” were adapted from “Girl from Ali Shan,” a folk song that originated in Taiwan, thousands of miles from Jamaica. “Always Together” was obscure even upon its release; eventually, it became a cherished novelty among hard-core Jamaican-music fans. But, for years, the few historians and collectors who knew about it wondered about its provenance. Chinese Jamaicans played a significant role in the island’s rocksteady and reggae scenes, as both performers and producers, but Cheng was an unknown. Where did he come from? And where did he go?

    Last year, I joined the curatorial team at New York’s Museum of Chinese in America for “The Moon Represents My Heart,” an exhibit focussed on the role that music has played in Chinese-American life. Our show didn’t have a central story, because there’s no single thing that might credibly be called “Chinese-American music.” Instead, we tried to explore how music brings meaning to our lives, whether we are singing in church or at a karaoke bar; freestyling with friends or dancing at a rave; learning enough chords to make a racket at a club or in the garage. Sometimes the meaning of such experiences doesn’t come into focus until later—the piano lessons you were forced to take as a child morph into a predisposition for synth-pop. Music shapes our identities in ways that, like a forgotten recording artist, can be difficult to trace. Our show’s title came from a 1977 hit by the Taiwanese pop singer Teresa Teng, whose songs about romance and reunion bound people throughout the Chinese diaspora, serving as a beacon for those who would never return home. Naturally, we were drawn to musical stories involving unlikely circuits of encounter. One day, while working on the exhibit, I mentioned Stephen Cheng to one of the museum’s curators, Andrew Rebatta. I played “Always Together” for him, and he was entranced. Within a week, he had tracked down Cheng’s family.

    Cheng, we were surprised to learn, was a New Yorker. He had died in 2012 and was survived by five children, who told us that music was a constant part of their upbringing. Their father was born into a well-to-do family in Shanghai, in 1921, and worked as a journalist there after college. In 1948, he moved to Hawaii, where he had family, and then to New York, where he attended Columbia, and later studied singing at Juilliard. He was cast in Broadway shows, including “The World of Suzie Wong” and “Flower Drum Song,” and he recorded an album of Chinese folk songs for New York’s Monitor Records. His summers were spent performing theatre and touring.

    Cheng’s children knew most of this growing up. But they had not learned about “Always Together” until recently. In November, 2017, Cheng’s son Pascal discovered it by chance on YouTube—he had listened to some of his father’s other recordings, and the site’s algorithm suggested it to him. The song had been uploaded to YouTube in 2010, around the time the single was reissued by a Japanese record label specializing in Jamaican obscurities. Pascal left comments below the YouTube video and on music blogs, touting his father’s long career and asking if anyone knew about the song’s origins.

    After Rebatta, the curator, contacted Cheng’s family, Cheng’s daughter Danielle came by the museum. She brought a collection of files that their father had kept about his musical exploits: news clippings and magazine articles, advertisements of shows in Jamaica and Trinidad, glossy photos of him performing on “The Steve Allen Show” and the Jack Paar show. (He also performed on “The Ed Sullivan Show.”) In some of the photos, Cheng is dressed in a silk robe, marking him as Chinese; in others, he sports the sharp suit or flowy shirt of a nineteen-sixties lounge singer. He wears a broad, blissful smile in nearly all of the pictures.

    Cheng saw music as a way of reaching people outside his predominantly Chinese-speaking world. His ability to sing in different languages allowed him to tour throughout the West Indies, catering to communities of Chinese immigrants, and, after a successful string of shows in Suriname, he secured a hotel-lounge gig in Trinidad and Tobago, where he performed a repertoire that included songs in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Chinese. He became a minor star. In the late sixties, he worked with the local government to stage a series of shows as a benefit for the National Stadium of Trinidad, bringing, as he would later write, “the Chinese out of the confines of the strictly Chinese community to work with the other racial groups for the benefit of their whole country.” His fame spread to Jamaica. On a visit sponsored by the Chinese Benevolent Association, he met Byron Lee, a renowned Chinese-Jamaican musician, and they recorded “Always Together.”

    Back in New York, in the early seventies, Cheng started a band called the Dragon Seeds. (Byron Lee had a band called the Dragonaires, though it’s likely the similarity is a coincidence.) Among the files that Cheng’s children brought was a draft of a press release that described the Dragon Seeds’ approach to blending Chinese traditional song with a softened version of American rock—“a new Chinese folk rock sound,” minus the “screaming.” Trying to imagine what the Dragon Seeds actually sounded like was dizzying. Reviews described Cheng’s singing as “attractive,” “sensitive,” and “attractively unassuming”; the Times praised his “superior way of reacting to the moods of each song.” The band’s lineup featured twelve musicians playing Chinese instruments, surrounding a four-piece jazz band. They played the Public Theatre and benefits for Chinatown churches. In 1971, they were invited to be part of Jazz in the Garden, a Museum of Modern Art concert series that also included legends of jazz, blues, and Latin music. The program included Elvin Jones, Odetta, Big Mama Thornton, and Mongo Santamaría among the performers. Cheng and the Dragon Seeds was the only act that I had not previously heard of, the only one that hadn’t left an obvious legacy.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  9. #99
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    Continued from previous post


    Stephen Cheng, August, 1971.
    Photograph by Leonardo Le Grand / MOMA

    Some time after Danielle dropped off the files, she provided a couple of reels of quarter-inch tape, one recorded in Jamaica, presumably with a local band, and the other a live Dragon Seeds set from Town Hall. It seemed possible that the second reel represented the entirety of the Dragon Seeds’ extant recordings.

    So much of what we know about immigrant life, even in the not very distant past, is thanks to hoarding and scavenging, rather than the sort of careful personal archiving one sometimes sees among the more powerful and well-to-do. When we were putting together “The Moon Represents My Heart,” we wanted things that could bring shape and texture to the role that music had played in Chinese-American life, and I thought it would be easy to find personal mementos and fan-club membership cards, mixtapes or photos of epic karaoke nights. But, when you don’t see yourself as part of a scene or a movement, you may not think such things need to be saved. Immigrants have not tended to regard their own lives as rising to the status of history. Sometimes they simply don’t have the room or the resources to keep records of their lives.

    We converted Cheng’s reels into audio files, but I was hesitant to listen. Lost artifacts are almost always better in the imagination, burnished by hope and yearning. When we pressed play, I was captivated by Cheng’s voice. He croons with a kind of desperate earnestness. There were standards, such as “The Shadow of Your Smile” or “Softly as I Leave You,” that I’d heard hundreds of times before, but never with his amateurish zeal, which soars above his band’s tasteful, jazzy pop. He sings with a slight accent and seems to compensate for it by singing louder, with more passion. There’s a groovy song inspired by the Chinese tale of the “Butterfly Lovers”; he races through English-language lyrics about lovers reuniting in heaven, accentuating his words with a series of delirious, scat-like trills and the Chinese expression “Ai-ya! Ai-ya!”

    The Dragon Seeds fizzled out after a few years, and Cheng redirected much of his energy from performance to teaching. He gave voice lessons at the New School, N.Y.U., the Stella Adler Conservatory, and Sarah Lawrence College. In 1991, he published “The Tao of Voice: A New East-West Approach to Transforming the Singing and Speaking Voice,” a book that tried to fuse ancient Chinese philosophy and breathing practices with Western vocal technique. It wasn’t intended only for aspiring performers: Cheng wanted to help all kinds of people feel confident using their voices, whether to sing or to give presentations at work.

    The reels that Cheng’s children brought didn’t contain other rocksteady gems like “Always Together,” though the Dragon Seeds did record a more traditional version of “Girl from Ali Shan.” There was also a funky version of another Chinese folk song, “Girls from Daban City.” On all of the tracks, Cheng sounds impossibly hopeful, as though his effervescence can’t be contained, and he can’t help but share it. His performance spans styles and eras: he affects a heavy vibrato croon here and lightly tiptoes through syllables there, occasionally flitting between English and Mandarin. The song I can’t stop listening to is his version of “Yesterday.” The recording begins with a dutiful polish, but soon Cheng breaks free of the cool economy of the Beatles’ original, and begins singing with a kind of operatic gusto. It’s a song about longing and memory, and he’s trying to sing it into tomorrow.

    “The Moon Represents My Heart: Music, Memory and Belonging” is on view at the Museum of Chinese in America, in New York, until September 29th.


    Hua Hsu is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of “A Floating Chinaman: Fantasy and Failure Across the Pacific.”


    Quote Originally Posted by Djuan View Post
    Came to salute this thread just for the title, and say I'm all for the 37th Chamber.
    Welcome 'ere mi bredren.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  10. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post



    Welcome 'ere mi bredren.
    Yes I !
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  11. #101
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    Some Lovin from the Mountains

    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  12. #102
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    Grandmaster Hugh Mcdonald

    Professsor Hugh Mcdonald, Grand Master World Martial Arts Champion
    by Hugh McDonald
    (California and Jamaica)

    I love Rasta People, I have been with some of the greatest.

    I have been around Bob Marley before he knew about Rasta. I was there when he appeared on Vere Johns opportunity Show In Kingston. He was in his teens. We were born Feb 6th. I am his senior who taught him and his Sons Martial Arts.

    I ate with, traveled with, and protected him on stage. He called me teach.

    I never smoke or drink, won over 100 awards, proud to be a Jamaican, the only person to receive perfect 10 in the 1973 & 1974 world weapons championship, performed at the Jamaica National Arena.

    In 1974 and 1975 I received the living legend, lifetime, hall of fame, mayor, city council, governor of Nevada and California, awards.

    Last month I received another lifetime acheivement award.

    See Youtube, Myspace, and Facebook for Grandmaster Hugh Mcdonald teacher to the stars, Jamaica's first 10 degree black belt.
    I stumbled across this while researching a review I'm working on at the moment.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  13. #103
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    Roots Rock and Kung Fu on stage, had to share

    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  14. #104
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    Nicolas Daley's SS21 collection

    Nicholas Daley Explores Martial Arts And Reggae Culture For SS21 Collection
    Blurring the lines between past and present.
    Fashion
    1 day ago
    By Tayler Willson



    Following his London Virtual Fashion appearance that saw him revisit his Fall/Winter 2020 collection, Nicholas Daley has unveiled the lookbook for his Spring/Summer 2021 collection entitled: ‘Stepping Razor’. Through the exploration of martial arts and reggae culture in the mid-1970s, Daley digs deep into the meeting of the two and the connections created.

    Reggae musician Peter Tosh appears in this season’s narrative with his 1977 song, “Stepping Razor,” lending the collection its name. Alongside his passion for reggae music, Tosh was a keen martial artist and a black belt in karate. These two talents would often be seen together when Tosh would incorporate combat moves into his live performances. His martial arts stage apparel became a signature look throughout his career and now represents a key reference point for Nicholas Daley’s latest collection.

    Blurring the lines between past and present, the Stepping Razors lookbook features karate professional Jordan Thomas, who’s also due to compete at next year’s olympics. This collection highlights the significance of black karateka athletes in British sport over three decades of elite level competition.

    Tapping into traditional martial arts attire, Daley has referenced utility silhouettes across more functional garments. A Karate Gi crafted with a sturdy sashiko fabric is one of the stand-out pieces of the collection, while matching trousers with reinforced panels are in-keeping with Daley’s typical style. Olive green and sky blue tie-dye colorways are used across long and short-sleeved waffle tees, as well as relaxed fit cotton beach shirts and military over shirts.

    The Stepping Razors SS21 collection is expected to launch early next year. Keep up-to-date with Nicholas Daley news via his website.
    I'd rock these, maybe not the gis, but the tees.
    Gene Ching
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  15. #105
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    Prince Fatty - Kung Fu Battle Ina Brixton Ft. Horseman

    Gene Ching
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